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The Ubyssey Jan 19, 1971

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Confusion at UVic:
meetings cancelled
as the plot thickens
VICTORIA (Staff) - Funny things are
happening at the University of Victoria.
The students are being co-opted and
administration president Bruce Partridge appears to
be at the root of it all.
At a meeting last Tuesday, called by Martlet
newspaper editor Bob Higinbotham, seven hundred
students unanimously passed three motions
demanding the immediate re-instatement of the
twelve faculty currently involved in the faculty
tenure-promotion dispute.
The resolutions were forwarded to board of
governors chairman Willard Ireland, for a decision
by this morning.
That decision was to have been made at the
regularly scheduled meeting of the board Monday
night and taken to the general student meeting for
consideration at noon today.
But last night's board meeting was cancelled in-
order that some members of the board could meet
with an inquiry commission being held here by the
Canadian Association of University Teachers.
The commission is investigating the cases of
three of the twelve profs involved in the
tenure-promotion dispute.
The CAUT had invited university
representatives to testify during the regular sessions
of the hearings last week.
However the invitation was sent to Partridge
who was absent from the university on his yacht
until last Tuesday.
Since the board did not meet last night there
was no decision made regarding the twelve faculty
members.
Consequently, a student meeting scheduled for
noon today, has been cancelled because there is no
'communication of substance' from the board.
Partridge said he and Ireland are inviting the
students to a meeting this afternoon where he will
"make a statement regarding the concern people
have expressed" and where he will be presenting
"some facts regarding erroneous reports that have
been made".
Partridge made the statement in an interview
with the Colonist, one of Victoria's daily papers.
The "erroneous reports" that Partridge referred
to seem to involve a letter from Alma Mater Society
president Robert McDougal to Ireland, which was
circulated Friday to the student body.
The letter said "the board has seen fit to
modify the position of the university, and to enter
formal negotiations with CAUT."
"That is completely incorrect and misleading,"
Partridge said. "In the first place the board never
had a position."
Partridge said the suggestion that the university
would be entering negotiations with the commission
was ridiculous, because the CAUT recommendations
are not binding on the university and because the
negotiations are not within the terms of reference of
the commission.
"The students invited me to attend a mass
meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 19. I accepted and they
cancelled the meeting," said Partridge.
Students have a different view of the situation.
"Partridge invited himself to the meeting and
we cancelled it," said Higinbotham.
"The committee recommended the cancellation
of the Tuesday meeting in order that nothing would
happen that would prejudice the legitimate
consideration of the cases now in disupte," said
former AMS president Norman Wright.
"It would seem therefore that the action of the
president in sponsoring a renewed public discussion
at this time cannot be in the interests of the
legitimate processes which are not yet complete."
Last Tuesday's student meeting jeered solutions
from extreme factions on both sides. Instead,
students applauded moderate proposals from
Wright.
"I think we should stick to the term 'teaching',
and 'teachers'," Wright said. "It goes way back to
the idea that teaching is thetsingle most important
thing that happens at this bloody place."
Break or no break?
UBC students may have to go without their
mid-term break this year because of the university
closure last week.
"It's too early to tell whether we are going to
make up for the lost time," said administration
president, Walter Gage, Monday.
There may be a curtailment of course content
or lectures could be speeded up, he said.
"In the end, the final decision will probably be
up to the department heads," Gage said.
He said the campus had to be closed down
because it was a dangerous situation.
"It was hard on the conscientious student who
couldn't make it," he added.
Printers censor
sexuality story
TORONTO (CUP-Staff) - The University of
Toronto's student paper, The Varsity was censored
Friday by its printers for the third time in three
months.
The Varsity said the censored story, entitled
Very Pleasurable Politics, was originally printed in
RAT, a New York women's newspaper, and
discussed the need to be able to experience pleasure
without feelings of shame or guilt.
The article, the third in a series of stories
dealing with various aspects of love and human
sexuality was refused by The Varsity's printers, Web
Offset Publications Ltd.
"Basically the theme of the article was that the
more you know about your body the easier it is to
give yourself pleasure and to show someone else
what gives you pleasure," The Varsity said in a
story.
In   addition   to   a biology   text  diagram  of
woman's genitals, the feature described how women
could   become   more   familiar   with   their   own
continued on page 5:    see CENSORING
—david bowerman photo
THE UBYSSEY lays some heavy symbolism and a great new
contest on its readers this week. Receive a groovy UBC
graduation diploma in any field by picking the best title for this
piece of art: "Trudeau", "Stanfield", "Edgar Benson", "Cece
Bennett", or "Tom Campbell". People answering "all of the
above" will receive doctorates.
U.S. investment
draining Canada
EDMONTON (CUP) — American corporations are taking more
than $ 1.6 billion a year in profits out of Canada, University of Toronto
economist Abraham Rotstein said here Saturday.
Rotstein told the Committee for an Independent Canada that
U.S. investment in our country has now reached the stage where there
is a financial drain on the economy — they are taking more money out
than they are putting in.
(Some left wing economists would argue that the U.S. has been
taking more money out of the country than it has been putting in for
many years now.)
Not only are the Americans taking all that profit out of the
country, but they are also using Canadian money, from Canadian
banks, to finance expansion of their corporations in this country,
Rotstein said.
In 1969, Rotstein estimates about 60 per cent of the expansion
of U.S. companies in Canada was paid for through Canadian money.
"In other words, we are financing our own take-over," he said.
Rotstein said Canada is the only industrialized country in the
non-communist world without a clear policy about foreign investment.
More than $40 billion in U.S. capital has been invested in our
country to buy 90 per cent control over such industries as automobiles,
rubber, petroleum and oil, Rotstein said.
Since 1969, he said, about 1,000 Canadian corporations have
been taken over by U.S. conglomerates which, within nine years, will
control two-thirds of world production of everything.
Quebecois speak out — p.6 & 7 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1971
Engineers snow council
A visit from several engineers was the high
point of the AMS council meeting Wednesday
afternoon.
In the middle of a weighty political discussion,
several engineering students appeared suddenly at
the doors of the SUB council chambers and yelled
"it's a snow job!"
Numerous snowballs were fired at council
members, and the engineers quickly disappeared.
The gears had interrupted a discussion on
whether the AMS should co-sponsor a "political
event."
Some council members were worried that the
good name of the AMS might be endangered if it is
associated with an energy resources symposium to
be held by the New Democratic Party's Waffle
Caucus in the SUB ballroom Jan. 23.
Waffle member Peter Dent appeared before the
council to ask the AMS to co-sponsor the event.
"We of the Waffle are very concerned with the
sell-out of our resources to foreign interests. For
foreign interests you can read American interests,"
Dent said.
The resources symposium, to be attended by'
Waffle energy expert Jim Laxer, will run from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, and despite council's
worries about being associated with a potentially
left-wing political event, the AMS has decided to
co-sponsor the symposium.
Arts Undergraduate Society president Don
Palmer supplied coke and donuts for council
members as his proposal for giving more money to
undergraduate societies came up for consideration.
Despite opposition from treasurer Stuart Bruce,
council approved Palmer's idea of a guaranteed
annual income for undergraduate societies.
The issue of requirements for holding AMS.
executive offices was the only proposed
constitutional change that received any attention.
Council finally decided to put three alternatives
before a General Meeting on Jan. 27. Students will
choose between requirements of one, two or no
years UBC attendance for aspiring AMS executive
members.
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UBC may acquire Expo pavilion
By JUDY McLEOD
The Asian studies department
will dismantle the Sanyo pavilion
of Expo 70 and reassemble it in
Nitobe Garden as an Asian studies
library if funds can be found for
shipping.
The Sanyo Pavilion, a building
with the capacity to house a
complete Asian studies centre,
has been donated to the campus.
But whether or not the university
can accept it is another matter.
The university will not be able
to accept the offer until it finds
the money to finance it," said
Basil Stuart-Stubbs, head
librarian, Monday.
"I am hopeful that the library
will come about," he said. "But
the substantial costs of tearing
down, transporting and rebuilding
the structure must be taken into
consideration."
He also said UBC has the tenth
largest Asian studies library in
North America.
"The more than 180,000
books are now being housed in
the sixth floor of the main library,
or are in storage in the basement."
Sanyo Hall is an impressive
sructure, with a sweeping 140foot
roof overhanging the almost
totally glass walls on each face,
said Arnie Myers of information
service.
Articles printed in local
newspapers regarding the
structure stated that Sanyo Hall
would definitely be moved to
Canada for use as a library.
"Those articles were received
through United Press from an
Osaka newspaper," said
Stuart-Stubbs.
"The university has made no
statement at all, which should
indicate the indefinite nature of
the undertaking."
"If it did become a reality, the
pavilion would be large enough to
handle    classrooms    and
administration offices as well as a
library," said Stuart-Stubbs.
"Government publications and
microfilms could then be taken
from sixth floor and moved to the
old Sedgewick library once the
underground extension is
completed in the summer of
1972," said Stuart-Stubbs.
DANCE
^ LIFE*
Wed., Jan. 20     12:30 Bu. 232
OOOOOQOQflOOaBOPBOOQOOWMW
THURSDAY, 9:30 P.M.
CHAPEL SERVICE
SUNDAY, 10:30 A.M.
Contemporary Worship
9:30 Films - Discussion
The University of British Columbia
READING & STUDY
SKILLS PROGRAM
SPRING J971
Reading Improvement Course for
Students and Adults
The U.B.C. Reading Improvement Course offers individualized
programs for adults, university and college students, senior high
school students and others who wish to improve their reading and
study skills for educational, business, professional and personal
reasons.
Coursework emphasizes: increase in reading speed and
comprehension-previewing, skimming and scanning-study habits
and skills - critical reading skills - flexibility of reading rate -
reading skills in subject matter, professional, academic and special
interest areas.
Classes begin the week of January 25 and meet for 1%
hours - twice weekly for six weeks in East Mall Annex
(Rooms 116,118 and 119), U.B.C.
Fees:
Students   $30.00   (Senior   high   school   students,  college  and
university students)
Adults $60.00 (Part-time adult students and non-student adults)
Fee    includes    testing,    materials,   counselling,    use   of   reading
laboratory during current and future sessions.
Class Schedule: Early registration is recommended
SECTION
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
TIME
3:30-5:00
3:30-5:00
5:30-7:00
5:30-7:00
5:30-7:00
5:30-7:00
7:30-9:00
7:30-9:00
7:30-9:00
7:30-9:00
9:00-12:00
9:00-12:00
DAY
Mon.-Wed.
Tues.-Thurs.
Mon.-Wed.
Mon.-Wed.
Tues.-Thurs.
Tues.-Thurs.
Mon.-Wed.
Mon.-Wed.
Tues.-Thurs.
Tues.-Thurs.
Saturday
Saturday
ROOM
119
119
119
118
119
118
119
118
119
118
118
116
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Student
Adult
Student
Adult
Student
Adult
Grade 8-11
SPRING
1971
Writing Improvement Program -
Improve your essay writing . . . This course is designed for those
who wish to improve the quality of their essay writing. The
common core of content for all sections includes the principles of
composition and the study of essay organizations and structure.
The instructor helps identify and deal with individual student
needs and also focuses on problems common to all students in the
class. Meetings consist of brief lectures, writing practice and
seminars.
Classes begin the week of January 18 and meet for 3 hours
once a week for 7 weeks in Room 1221, Buchanan
Building, U.B.C. Campus.
FEES:
Students  $30.00   (senior   high   school,  college and  university
students taking 9 units or more)
Adults $60.00 (part-time adult students, non-student adults)
CLASS SCHEDULE:
Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Students
Adults &
Sr. Students
Adults
Students
Tuesdays
Thursdays
Thursdays
Tuesdays
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
7-10 p.m.
REGISTRATION FORM
Name of Course  Fee enclosed
Section	
Name (Mr., Mrs., Miss)	
Address Phone
Occupation    Employer Phone
Student    Institution    Year	
Please make cheques payable to the University of B.C. and forward with
this form to Education-Extension, Center for Continuing Education,
University of B.C., Vancouver, 8, B.C. (228-2181). Tuesday, January 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Constitution splits AMS executive
There appears to be a split within the Alma Mater
Society executive over the proposed constitutional
changes.
The composition of council is the biggest problem.
It's causing the most controversy with council this year,"
AMS president Tony Hodge said Monday.
At present there are 40 members of the AMS council
including seven executive members.
Hodge wants to drop the number of council members
down to 17 which would include five executive members.
"Most of the council doesn't like this proposed
change in the size," Hodge said.
"The new executive would consist of a vice-president
of academics, a vice-president of services, a vice-president
a community affairs, a vice-president of finance and a
president," he said.
"This new executive would put the responsibility on
individual people," Hodge said.
"If someone screws up, we can put the finger on him.
Internal affairs officer, Sue Kennedy, said at first she
agreed with the proposal to cut down on council's size.
"Council would have become a large executive but
discussion of the many facets of campus life would have
been sacrificed," she said.
"I don't want a reduction of council size that would
not be in the interest of general discussion of campus
affairs."
She said that a majority of council, in a straw vote,
rejected Hodge's proposal for a smaller council.
"The proposal is a minority presentation against the
wishes of the majority of council. It's perfectly legal,
however," Kennedy said.
Some people on council believe that Hodge shouldn't
go through with his proposal but Kennedy would not say
who these people are.
Ombudsman Hamish Earle, is incensed over the whole
New name but same old job
Despite the fact that his responsibilities have not
changed, UBC's radiation protection officer has been
renamed officer of pollution control.
"I'm wearing a new hat even though the control of
radiation hazards is my main job," said Bill Rachuk,
newly-appointed pollution control officer.
"I'm not qualified to suggest pollution controls," he
said.
Rachuk's appointment was a direct consequence of
recommendations by the president's committee on the
disposal of dangerous chemicals, headed by Dr. B. A.
Dunell.
The pollution control officer is intended to put into
.effect policies outlined by the committee.
"There are 128 locations on campus that use or store
radioactive materials, most are the biosciences, and my
responsibility is to ensure the disposal of these liquid and
solid materials in a safe and legal manner," said Rachuk,
radiation, protection officer since 1966.
The method of disposal will correspond to the
radioactive content of the waste.
"After being diluted to prescribed limits set for
drinking water, slightly radioactive materials will go down
drains and eventually flow in the Strait of Georgia,"
Rachuk said.
"Other materials will be incinerated and will go into
the atmosphere at prescribed levels for safe breathing.
This incinerator is one of the immediate expenditures of
this program.
"Other materials will be put in oil drums and shipped
to the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. at Chalk River,
Ontario for burial."
Rachuk outlines the dangers to humans of radioactive
materials:
"There are two types of radiation internal and
external, which ionize the body cells and either damage or
destroy them."
He also said a program will be initiated to recycle
dangerous chemicals.
"Science students will learn to recycle those
chemicals which they have used in the lab as part of their
regular studies," said Rachuk.
'   "We must not only obey the laws, we must set an
example because we are a teaching institution."
Library hours change
since transit strike
Some of the library hours have been changed because
of the transit strike.
Main library hours on Saturday are now 9 a.m. - 5
p.m. Sunday Sedgewick hours have changed to noon - 8
p.m. Woodward library hours run from 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Brock Hall hours are unchanged.
Animal resource, ecology; Crane library, curriculum
laboratory, MacMillan library; record library and social
work library are all following normal hours.
Monday to Friday, the law library is open from 8
a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday the hours are 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. and
on Sunday the hours are from noon-- 8 p.m.
The music library is open from* 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.,
Monday to Friday. Saturday the hours are 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
and on Sunday, noon - 6 p.m.
These hours have been in effect since Saturday, Jan.
17. Normal hours will resume as soon as possible.
general meeting of Jan. 27.
"Council has had the proposal for the general meeting
for five weeks. I doubt very much whether council has
bothered to relay the information to its constituencies,"
said Earle.
"Council has done nothing about communications
which our president seems so worried about. I personally
feel that they have shown a complete disregard for the
student body," he said.
"I want an informed council who could participate in
various committees along with many general students.
"If it is necessary to reduce the number of bodies on
council to achieve these results, then do it," he said.
"It's the technicalities of how to do it that I'm
uncertain of."
"Why and the hell don't we ask the students how
they want it done?"
Disputing UVic profs
fight separate cases
Professors involved in the University of Victoria
dispute are each fighting a separate battle due to the
complex terms of the statement of guidelines for the
hiring and firing of faculty at this island university.
The individual cases of the profs, according to a
document circulated by the Alma Mater Society, are as
follows:
William Goede was recommended for promotion and
tenure by the English department. The recommendation
was denied by the administration and he is required to
leave.
Sheila Hogg was recommended for promotion to
senior lecturer by the English department but was denied
by the administration and she is required to leave.
George Forbes was recommended for promotion to
senior lecturer by the English department. He was never
officially notified by the university on this matter until
his contract expired at which time he was offered a one
year contract which he accepted waiving all rights to
future employment at UVic.
The contracts of Robert Sward and Derk Wynand,
both poets, were not renewed by the English department.
Toby Graff was recommended for promotion to
assistant prof. He was denied promotion by the
administration, then recommended for promotion to
senior lecturer with tenure, but was then told the position
is not in existence.
The philosophy department then recommended him
for assistant prof with tenure, but it was denied by the
administration and he is required to leave.
Ronald Kirkby was recommended for renewal of
contract by the philosophy department but this was
denied by the administration and he is required to leave.
Neil Thompson was recommended twice for
promotion with tenure to senior lecturer by the French
department, but it was denied by the administration and
he is required to leave.
Dana Atchley and Peter Daglish were recommended
for renewal by the studio visual arts department but were
denied by the administration and they are required to
leave.
David McDougall has not been given reappointment
by the Hispanic and Italian department.
Tikim Jain was denied tenure by the math
department but then recommended for tenure by the
Dean's Advisory Committee. It was denied by the
administration and he is required to leave.
Unemployed to march
Unemployed workers will be demonstrating Thursday
in front of the provincial legislature in Victoria.
The demonstration is being sponsored by the
unemployed committee in the B.C. Federation of Labour
and is supported by the Vancouver District Labour
Council.
Colin Gableman, the public relations officer of the
B.C. Fed., described the demonstration as being against
unemployment in general.
"The government is not taking its responsibility to
run the economy to provide jobs," he said. "We must put
pressure on the government."
Charlie Boylan, chairman of the unemployed caucus
of the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway, Transport, and
General Workers local 400, stressed student and youth
support.
"The success of the demonstration depends on the
numbers of union and non-union unemployed who
demonstrate," he said. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1971
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THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer ?nd not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary.and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
.228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-397/.
JANUARY 19, 1971
Constitution games
If it's good enough for Ottawa, it's apparently
good enough for SUB.
While the federal government is sending something
called the constitution committee on a free junket
around the country to sample the opinion of people
who can afford to waste a day sitting in places like the
Hotel Vancouver, the AMS has called a Jan. 27 general
meeting for students to vote on its own constitutional
revisions.
Just as legalistic changes in the constitutional relic
known as the British North America act do nothing to
change any of the concrete problems facing Canada,
neither will the latest set of constitutional revisions add
to the usefulness of the AMS.
The AMS constitution has been revised and
altered to death over the past few years and nothing has;
ever changed.
Now we are asked to believe that the AMS will
. work better if the treasurer is called the vice-president
(finance) and that a council of 17 can sit around and do
nothing more efficiently than a council of 40.
The present council has wasted a large part of the
year on this newest set of revisions, but still hasn't
tackled the problem of why the AMS exists and what it
should be doing.
If the AMS doesn't come to terms with that
question, all of their playing with structures won't mean
a thing.
But, in a year that has lacked on-campus
entertainment, the general meeting should be good for a
few laughs.
Short memories
To many people in Canada, the events that took
place in Quebec three months ago have become an
isolated historical incident that is best forgotten.
But the nature of Quebec society hasn't changed,
the material conditions that created the FLQ still exist
and 25 people in Montreal are facing trial for their
political views.
This week, UBC students will have a chance to
hear about the Quebec crisis from people who lived
through it, the victims of repression who won't forget as
easily as some of us. The speakers will be in the SUB
ballroom Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. We
certainly can't think of a more valuable way to spend
those noon hours.
LETTERS
Third world
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to a recent
conversation which our
representative had with you, we
wish to state the following:
We feel that your rejection of
our request for a regular space in
your newspaper to present the
views and problems of the third
world is totally unreasonable and
irresponsible. Furthermore, your
suggestion that we submit
"feature" articles subject to your
approval is an insulting form of
tokenism.
The argument that your
newspaper covers third world
events from time to time is
unacceptable. Such coverage is
either merely a transcription of
reports circulated by the
monopolistic pro-western news
agencies or articles culled from
the pages of a Canadian daily.
Surely there must be a few
students at this large institution
capable of writing better articles.
And if not, why has no attempt
been made to solicit their stand
on current events?
We would have assumed that a
body of students at a major
Canadian university would be less
concerned with the petty
mundanities of everyday living
and would have some interest in
the problems, not only of their
fellow humans, but also those
created by the involvement of
their country in the third world.
But we of the third world have
gained the impression that not
only the students' parents,
teachers and professors keep them
ignorant of the unpleasant truths
concerning third world problems,
but that your newspaper is unable
to transcend this conditioned and
protected atmosphere to enlighten
its readers.
For these reasons we find it
totally inadequate to present our
views in "feature" articles which
may or may not be accepted by
your editorial staff. Your
avoidance and irresponsibility
make it necessary that we demand
a weekly two-page forum,
designated as a third world
section, compiled and edited by
us, within which we would
present our views and inform the
students of ths extent and nature
of Canadian involvement in the
third world.
We hope that you will have the
courage and integrity to publish
this letter in its entirety.
AFRICAN STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
ARAB S.A.
CARIBBEAN SA.
IRANIAN SA.
MALAYSIAN-SINGAPORE S.A.
PAKISTAN S.A.
First of all, we have never
relied on the commercial press for
coverage of third world events.
What material we have presented
on the third world has, in fact,
been a direct attempt to counter
the pro-western propaganda you
speak of.
Granted, there have been too
few such articles, but that is
because the people who know
most about the subject
(yourselves, for example) have
rarely bothered to submit them. ,
That is the kind of feature article
we told you we would welcome.
The "approval" involved would be
based primarily on the technical
merit (readability) of the articles
rather than a judgment on any
ideological viewpoint.
What you label tokenism is the
same criterion under which
everyone, including our staff,
submits articles.
As to your "demand", The
Ubyssey will not be an official
organ for any organization. The
Ubyssey has spent most of the
years of its existence fighting for
editorial independence and is not
prepared to give a carte blanche to
anyone.
Even if we were willing to
grant regular space to you or
anyone else, our limited space
would make it extremely difficult,
if not impossible (unless, of
course, you could find some way
to finance an additional two pages
each week).
Finally, may we remind you
that as important as the third
world is and as interested as we
would   be   in   articles   on   the
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire    '. .. .John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News     Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
We're back in business. Cheer us on
you seething masses of discontent.
Flaming your seethings on this fine day
were Bruce Curtis, Natalie Apouchtine
and Shane McCune. Whv? Whv? Whv?
screamed    mighty   Mike   Sasges.  Just
subject, we also have a
responsibility to devote as much
space and effort as possible to
some of the serious concrete
problems here in Canada, which
we hope don't fall into your
category of "petty mundanities of
everyday living."
-Ed.
Books
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The efficient management of
the UBC bookstore has apparently
seen fit to eliminate its' tiny
section of French and foreign
language paperbacks on the
grounds that these commodities
are not selling well, although some
titles will still be available in the
textbook sections.
This new policy seems
shortsighted, if only from the
crassest commercial perspective. It
can only undermine the
still-profitable textbook sales, for
what is the point of learning to
read a second language if you
can't later find something to read?
It is far more disturbing that a
university bookstore the size of
ours can't forego cashbook
thinking on even this small part of
its operation in the interest of
cultural universality and as a
trifling gesture in favor of
bilingualism at a time when
French and English speaking unity
in Canada is still under attack.
A bookstore, meant to serve the
needs of students should not be
allowed to fall behind purely
commercial stores like Duthie's or
Fraser's, which still find
themselves able to stock a few
French books.
D. B. BORLAND
Grad Studies
because, because, because answered
Jinny Ladner who was watching Leslie
Plommer, torn apart by great inner
maladies over Mike Finlay's new
tobacco pouch.
Sharon Boylan contemplated the
continuing charisma of Dick Betts, our
silliest syntaxer Kathy Carnie waffled
wistfully as Paul Knox worked out on
his favorite piece of felonious
feathering. Josephine Margolis
kaddished and Sandv Kass trimmed
Ken Lassesen down, down, down!
Keith Dunbar, Tony Gallagher and
Steve Millard kept the stiff upper lip of
our greatest super jocks.
In the dusky dungeons of
development, photogs Dave Enns and
David Bowerman tried unsuccessfully
to abort Darryl Tan. Tuesday, January 19, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
'Censoring shows sexism'
from page One
anatomy, especially by
stimulating the clitoris The
Varsity said.
Web Offset's general manager,
Bob Chittick said they were
refusing to print the feature on
the advice of their lawyer.
Chittick also said he doesn't
like "that kind of obscene
material."
Rudy said, "The article
(written by women working on
Black Cross
begins again
The Black Cross, a food
cooperative, will resume its
services by the end of January,
said Tom Wayman, a major
organizer of Black Cross last year.
"High prices and the low
standard of food offered by UBC
Food Services motivated
interested persons," said Wayman.
Working cooperatively, lunches
were prepared and sold cheaply,
added Mark Warrior who was
involved last year.
Wayman said approximately 50
people volunteered the use of
their homes, cars and time in the
project.
Sponsored by the Industrial
Workers of the World, Black Cross
operated between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m. Tuesday through Friday on a
suggested donation basis.
"Grateful students donated
generously to the cause," said
Warrior. "It was possible to get a
sandwich free if one had no
money at all."
Wayman said, "Black Cross will
be run on much the same basis
again this year."
Any individuals willing to
make sandwiches, drive, offer the
use of their homes or sell, please
contact Kathy Carney or Dick
Betts at 873-2153 or at The
Ubyssey office, 228-2305
anytime.
RAT) containing information
women and men ought to have."
On the two previous instances
of censorship, The Varsity said
the printers were acting on their
interpretation of the Public Order
Regulations of the War Measures
Act.
"Friday's material definitely
does not arouse sexually or appeal
to purient interest," The Varsity
said.
"The    usual    definitions    of
obscenity simply did not apply to
the story.
"The decision to censor this
article was taken by men, not by
women, and that is an important
indication of the sexist bias of
our society."
The Varsity felt that there
would not have been the same
objections if the story was written
by a man, dealing honestly and
forthrightly with problems of
male sexuality.
"In a male society, it seems, it
is usually the female body which
is regarded as obscene," said The
Varsity.
Web Offset also prints the U of
T's engineering society newspaper,
which treats sexuality in a sexist,
degrading, often anti-human and
offensive way, said The Varsity.
"We are trying to break the
rule which says sexuality and the
reality of masturbation are nasty
private acts that should not be
talked about.
"Those of us who believed that
freedom of speech and
information existed have been
faced with a glaring
contradiction," said The Varsity.
PAYMENT OF FEES
Second Installment Mow Dvo
Payment   should   be   made  at   Department  of   Finance,
General Services Administration Bldg. on or before
FRIDAY, JAN. 21, 1971
Stiff Time To Register For
The Engineer
andPHOTOGRAPHY
- Introduction to Creative Engineering
INSTRUCTOR: Mr. DENES DEVENYI, P.Eng., Special Lecturer
in Creative Photography, Assistant Director Department of
Physical Plant and Planning, Simon Fraser University.
TIME:  Postponed to Saturday, January 23,  1971, 9:30-11:30
a.m., 10 sessions.
PLACE: Room 308, Civil Eng., UBC. FEE: $40.00.
COURSE OUTLINE: The course is designed to help graduate
engineers and engineering students to improve their power to
communicate through the visual media. It will explore areas that
are normally beyond the engineering education and experience.
By doing this it will lead engineers to a more creative approach to
their profession as well as to teach a greater awareness of the
world around them.
Lectures, picture analysis and group discussions are part of the
program including a number of picture-taking assignments.
REGISTRATION: As enrolment is limited to 25 persons, advance
registration is advised. Please contact—
ENGINEERING PROGRAMS - 228-2181
Centre for Continuing Education U.B.C.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. - Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
m.
NOTICE
Re-Late Payment of Fees
A late payment fee of $25 additional to all other fees will be
assessed after JANUARY 22, 1971. Refund of this fee will be
considered only on the basis of a medical certificate covering
illness or on evidence of domestic affliction. Students who are
unable to pay their fees on time owing to new Canada Loan or
Bursary arrangements not having been finalized should see the
Finance Department prior to January 22,1971.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for
non-payment of fees applies for reinstatement and his application
is approved by the Registrar, he will be required to pay a
reinstatement fee of $25, the late fee of $25, and all other
outstanding fees before he is permitted to resume classes.
GREAT SHOUJS+CKLG PRESEMT
UJBTIS 103RoSI.RHVTHm BRI1D
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GARDENS AUD. *3.50ACV-4.25'«*
TICKETS: AT BAY L0U6HEED MALL+ RICHMOND
SOUND BY: KELLY/DEYOUNG
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N.U.S.
Fee Referendum
Results
Voting on the referendum was
held on Jan. 11/71 from 10:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 33% of the
students voted and 86% of
those voting approved the
$3.00 fee levy.
HONG KONG
CHrNESE FOODS
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in the Village
WE S"feRVE AUTHENTIC
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COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare or Straight Pants.
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1971
to build. • •
JOHN HUOT discusses the economic
background and repressive characteristics
of la crise au Quebec,
Quebec is part of the political and economic system
of Canada, and so Quebecois are grappling with many of
the same problems as Canadians in other regions —
economic stagnation, inflation and a large-scale lack of
jobs.
At the same time, the large majority of the people
in Quebec are French-speaking and part of a distinctive
culture and historical experience as a people since their
ancestors first settled the St. Lawrence valley in the
1600'sandl700's.
As part of the present political and economic
system of Canada, Quebec's economic and social
development runs head on into many of the same
problems that are hitting working people and students
all over Canada. With the second largest population and
the second most industrialized economy among the
regions of Canada, Quebec has been faced for a long
time with the same social and economic conflicts that
other regions in Canada are just beginning to experience
acutely.
Quebecois refer bitterly to the fact that Quebec has
held the championship in unemployment in Canada far
too long. From 1958-1968, average unemployment in
Quebec was 7.3 per cent, compared with 3.9 per cent in
Ontario. In the last fifteen years, the number of
unemployed workers in Quebec has ranged from 20
per cent to 40 per cent more than Canada as a whole,
and from 50 to 100 per cent more than Ontario.
Today, with unemployment rising rapidly
everywhere in Canada, Quebec still leads with 8.9 per
cent unemployed as compared to 4.4 per cent in
Ontario. One in eleven people in the Quebec work force
is out of a job.
Although Quebec has just a little more than
one-quarter the total work force in Canada, it has 41 per
cent of the unemployed. Young people are especially
hard hit — 42 per cent of Quebec's unemployed are
under 25.
As a people with a distinctive culture, language and
historical experience, the situation of Quebecois within
their own territory is characterized by the fact that
although Anglophones make up only about 13 per cent
of the population, they hold most of the
decision-making positions in the economy, and
consequently most of the high-income and status
positions.
This dominance of Anglophones in the economy is
the result of the fact that English-Canadian and
American interests control all the important sectors of
the economy: banking and finance, manufacturing, and
the resource industries.
It is estimated that 50 large industrial corporations
control 75 per cent of industrial (including mining)
production in Quebec; only three of these are controlled
by local Quebecois capital.
So, despite the fact that 62 per cent of the work
force in Montreal is Francophone, only 37 per cent of
salaried personnel in large manufacturing corporations
earning more than $5,000 is Francophone. And most of
those were not far above the $5,000 level - just 17 of
every 100 jobs paying more than $15,000 were held by
Francophones.
Conclusion: The average income of male
Anglophone wage and salary earners in Quebec is 41 per
cent higher than that of Francophones.
The social and economic conflicts generated by the
present political and economic system in Canada are
beginning to shake loose all kinds of movements and
groups among the people in all parts of Canada.
The effects of that same system on Quebec, with
growing intensity over a longer period of time, have
given birth to a whole range of political and social
responses.
These movements in Quebec have developed over
the last ten years in almost every sector of Quebec
society: in the slums of Montreal and Quebec City,
among trade unionists, students, teachers, and most
recently among the people in the outlying regions such
as the Gaspe and Abitibi where annual incomes average
less than 1,000 dollars.
Part of this development of political and social
movements of people grappling with day-to-day
problems of work, language, welfare and schooling has
been a tremendous cultural flowering — in literature, the
arts, theatre and film.
T
these various movements have grown out of the
concrete social and economic problems caused by the
economic system of Canada. The programs and activities
of these movements have changed over time as they have
increased their understanding of what needs to be
changed through experience with the present system.
MOOS WONS
MAIMTENANT
DESUSTES
D£ SUSPECTS!
#&
THE QUEBEC
The speakers
SIMOME CHARY RAND
Journalist and commentator with the CBC. Helped organize a protest of women to challenge the
anti-democratic ban on all demonstrations introduced last November by Jean Drapeau's Montreal
administration. Her husband, Michel Chartrand is president of the Montreal council of the Confederation of
National Trade Unions and has been imprisoned without bail since Oct. 16.
!
THEO CACNE
Organizer for the United Steelworkers of America in Noranda, Quebec. Arrested without charge under
the War Measures Act and then released. Fought in 1957 for the right of workers to unionize Noranda Mines'
Murdochville operation. Police and courts were used to smash the strike and several workers were killed.
STANLEY RYERSON
Historian of Canada and Quebec. Author of two major books. The Founding of Canada and Unequal
Union, which outlines and analyzes the origins of the intense conflicts of today - conflicts that won't
disappear tomorrow even if they don't make the headlines.
Presented by the Free Quebec, Free Canada committee and UBC Left Caucus. Thanks to Simon Fraser Student So Tuesday, January 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
drawing courtesy Le Magazine Maclean
•.. hundreds
of jails
>*v
The trade union movement, traditionally exclusively
concerned with wages, has increasingly carried the
struggle for social change to the roots of the present
political and economic system by challenging the power
of corporations and businessmen to make the important
political and economic decisions that affect economic
development, wages, schooling and hospital and health
care.
Similarly, community organizations that originally
sprung up in working class districts in Quebec's cities to
fight urban redevelopment schemes that deprived them
of housing have formed an alliance with the trade union
movement to win political power in city hall, so they
can make their own decisions about their own
communities instead of fighting city hall decisions.
People in the outlying regions, such as Cabano in
the Gaspe, who started by participating in government
redevelopment programs arid still found it impossible to
stop the government's give-away programs of natural
resources to corporations, found that the only way to
make the government move was by physically stopping
companies from cutting wood or building plants until
problems of jobs and wages had been settled.
People such as students and intellectuals who
started by demanding bilingualism to ensure that French
would be spoken in Quebec discovered that bilingualism
in Quebec meant that Francophones learn to speak
English.
T
■ his convergence has broadened the support for the
independence movement and pushed it towards
programs of radical change, thus posing a serious
challenge to the Montreal and Toronto big business elite
and the federal government.
The seriousness of this democratic challenge and the
broadly-based popular support for radical change first
exploded into the English-Canadian consciousness during
the spectacular rise of the Parti Quebecois last April.
The Montreal and Toronto business elite and the
federal government blew their cool by staging the Royal
Trust withdrawal of funds from Montreal to Toronto a
CONFERENCE
The meetings
TRIALS OF THE PRISONERS: UBC, Wednesday Jan. 20, noon, SUB Ballroom.
WOMEN AND THE STRUGGLE IN QUEBEC: Public meeting, Wednesday Jan. 20, 8 p.m., 1895 Venables (at
Victoria Drive.)
THE LABOR MOVEMENT IN QUEBEC: UBC, Thursday, Jan. 21, noon, SUB ballroom.
QUEBEC: THE COLONY WITHIN CANADA: UBC, Friday, Jan. 22, noon, SUB ballroom.
PUBLIC MEETING ON QUEBEC: Simone Chartrand on Political Prisoners, Theo Gagne on Quebec Labor,
Stanley Ryerson on Quebec as a Colony, Friday Jan. 22, 8 p.m., Fishermen's Hall, 138 East Cordova.
jty. Community Education and Research Centre, UBC Arts Undergrad Society and Graduate Students Association.
few days before the election, and by circulating falsified
figures of taxes collected in Quebec and federal spending
in Quebec.
This campaign of terrorizing the Quebec people
might have scared off some of the more affluent PQ
sympathizers, but it couldn't stop the PQ from winning
more than 30 per cent of the Francophone vote and six
seats in solid working-class districts of Montreal.
The fact that the Quebec Bourassa Liberal party
formed the government with just 24 per cent of the
Francophone vote and the remaining 20 per cent of the
Liberal vote from Anglophones after a campaign of
terror and manipulation of public opinion, caused
countless Quebecois to question the possibility of
effecting serious change — even with the support of the
people - within the present electoral system.
It is this movement as a whole — the increasing
militancy of workers who refuse government
rationalizations for unemployment and wage
restrictions, the expansion of the trade union movement
to include struggle for political power for the majority
of the people, the transformation of very localized
community organizations into disciplined mass
organizations capable of posing a serious challenge to the
rule of Drapeau in Montreal, and the politicization of
large numbers of students and teachers - which is the
target of the massive crack-down in Quebec by federal
and provincial authorities.
• Active members of every one of the democratic
opposition movements in Quebec have been thrown in
jail for an indefinite period, including:
• members and candidates of the Front d'Action
Politique, the coalition of trade union political action
committees and community organizations in Montreal
who contested the Montreal civic elections;
• staff of community projects, including the
medical director of the St. Jacques community health
clinic in Montreal, the director of the Montreal family
planning centre, and members of a family budgeting
service;
• university faculty, students and staff,
including the secretary of the union of professors at the
university of Montreal;
• trade unionists active in building political
action committees in cities and towns throughout
Quebec;
• newspapermen, CBC reporters and producers;
• Pauline Julien, chanteuse known around the
world for her singing songs of Quebec's new spirit of
freedom.
T
■his extremist response by the federal government,
opposed in vain by a united front of all the significant
democratic opposition forces in Quebec cannot achieve
its goal of eliminating this popular challenge to the
present system in the short or long run.
In the short run, it would have to build hundreds of
jails to hold thousands of people who are part of this
democratic opposition which is challenging the
Drapeaus, Bourassas, Trudeaus and Royal Trusts, which
now control Quebec.
In the long run, they would have to make the
radical changes in the political and economic system
these movements are working towards if they were to
permanently remove the social and economic conflicts
that have generated these popular movements.
The lesson of history is that it will be the
movements rooted among the people that will carry
through these changes.
John Huot is a University of Waterloo MA student in
Canadian history who spent four years analysing the
literature of the radical left in Quebec. This article was
reprinted from the Chevron, Waterloo.
*•%•»!
S?S& Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1971
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART ELEVEN
One hour after I was dumped off at the Second
Battalion, Seventh Marines, I was assigned to the
flamethrower section of Headquarters Company and the
war started to get boring.
It might be hard to understand why being in a
flamethrower section would be boring.
To start off with, flamethrowers are about as much
use in Viet Nam as the official Navy department mailing
envelopes that glue themselves shut somewhere between
i>       Hawaii and Okinawa.
They used to use flamethrowers in Korea or
somewhere and so it was written down in triplicate
somewhere in the pentagon that each Marine Battalion
should have its own squad of pyromaniacs.
Since they have them, most units use the
flamethrowers to burn the brush away from the perimeter
of the camp. Even though it's hot, sweaty work and
somehow the thrill goes out of it after a couple of burns,
it keeps you from having to hide around your tent area in
constant feat of being picked for what is euphemistically
called the "shit detail."
Besides, burning brush does have one advantage. You
can take turns striking dramatic poses as you bum away
the grass around an American foxhole and have someone
get the whole thing on film. Then when you get the prints
back you can write to all the Lonely Hearts Club girls and
show them how you courageously wiped out an enemy
bunker.
But as it was, we couldn't even do that. It seems our
battalion had lent the air compressor and all our
flamethrowers but two to some other battalion.
That left us just sitting around waiting for five
o'clock when the club would open. That wouldn't have
been so bad, except that about once an hour one or
another of the grouchy staff sergeants would wander
through and assign anybody he could find to guard duty,
filling sandbags, or cleaning outhouses.
When ever we could get out of guard duty in the
evening we would go down to the club. The club was a
huge barn roof with a stage at one end and a room off to
one side where they could lock up the soda and beer.
There was supposed to be a movie five nights a week,
and that's what it usually was, one movie five times, and
then a new one for the next week. The projectionists were
always drunk or otherwise intoxicated, and could be
counted on to take eight minutes to change a reel.
The main entertainment down at the club was
watching people lose a month's pay in one night of cards.
Poker was fairly common, but by far the most popular
game was back alley.
Back alley is bridge simplified so a Marine can
understand it. It takes forever and requires little thought,
which makes it very appropriate for Viet Nam. In fact,
back alley is probably the surest indication that a Marine
is a genuine Viet Nam "returnee."
After the club closed at about eight there was nothing
to do but go back to the tent and read a book or write to
the Lonely Hearts Club girls.
The Lonely Hearts girls were the second biggest
time-wasters in Viet Nam, right after back alley.
The Sea Tiger, a weekly paper put out by the Marine
forces in Viet Nam, had a regular section called the Mail
Bag. It contained names and addresses of girls all over the
States, and even some from Canada and Europe.
If you ever found yourself in a mood for writing, all
you had to do was pull out a copy of the Sea Tiger, find a
name or address that was so obscure you figure no one
else would write her and start shovelling it on.
If you got an answer back you had a Lonely Hearts
Club girl.
If you wanted to try for something a little more
exclusive, all you had to do was find someone who was
willing to give you the address of his ex-wife or ex-fiancee.
There were plenty of them.
The most boring thing of all was guard duty. Up until
ten in the evening it wasn't too bad. All day there were
friends dropping by, people to talk to on the guard phone
and all sorts of things going on out in the paddies. In the
early evening two more people would arrive to share the
night watch and everyone would sit and talk until about
ten.
After ten all but one would find some comfortable
spot, if there was one, and go to sleep. All the one man
left standing watch could do was practice keeping awake
and hope he could remember to phone in every half hour.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Sportily attired in a
stunning new all-purpose sporting wardrobe, Prime
Minister Trudeau took a day off from the Commonwealth
conference to visit this enchanted island kingdom on the
weekend.
"There was nothing happening at the conference,"
said Trudeau, on whose athletic shoulders the fate of the
Commonwealth rests. "Besides, Ted Heath is such a silly I
just couldn't stand it for another minute."
While making the Pango-Pango scene ( and what a
scene it was) the dashing Canadian leader was mobbed by
puce child blorgs, all eager to shake or even kiss the hands
of the man they had heard so much about.
Trudeau also visited Pango-Pango's first hydro dam,
built by Canadian foreign aid. "If there was only a river
on this island you'd be set," Trudeau told the multitude.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL STUDENTS
ENTERING LAW
AM students who intend to apply for entrance into the U.B.C.
Faculty of Law must submit with their application a score from
the Law School Admission Test. The only dates for this Test are
February 13th (at U.B.C. and U. Vic.) and April 17th (at U.B.C.
only). You must register for the Test at least three weeks prior to
the date you wish to write. For further information, write or
phone the Law Faculty, U.B.C.
a SUB Film SOC presentation-
the
President's
Analyst
JAMES
COBURN
Your kind of shrink!
—Great Satiric Comedy-
Friday 22 & Saturday 23
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 24-7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c
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for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
• EAT IN • TAKE OUT • DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
GRADUATION (Class Gift)
SAVE UP TO 50%
over    1000   New   and
Used
Standard Portable and Electric
TYPEWRITERS
Adders, Calculators, etc. at the
World's 1st Office
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Absolutely the largest selection
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Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
STUDENT RENTALS
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WE DELIVERS PICK-UP
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
458 W Broadway - 879-0631
Open Daily inc. Saturday—9-6
Friday 9-9
Lots of Free Parking
This year we have * 19,591 of your MONEY as 1971 graduates, so what do you think we
should spend it on? Your Grad Class Executive needs ideas from anyone & everyone. It may involve
initiating a new project or supporting an established one. Please let us have a brief, clear account of
proposed projects including the dollar commitment & the rationale for such selection. Suggestions must be
received before Thurs., January 28, 1971. Address all ideas to Box 41, Student Union Building, U.B.C.
Include name, address, telephone & best time to contact during the day.
Remember, it's *19,591 of your MONEY!
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING
THURS., FEB. 4. 1971 at 12:30 noon in SUB AUDITORIUM -
PROPOSED AGENDA:    1) Approve budget & social activities;
2) Elect honorary positions;
3) Allocate class gift.
This will be your last chance to have your say in
your grad class activities!
REMINDERS:
1) Questionnaires should be in by Fri., Jan. 22, 1971
2) Have you had your picture taken yet? — Candid Photo by appt. Tuesday, January 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Tobacco firms eye
dope
Marijuana is now as American
as Spiro Agnew's daughter.
Forward-thinking executives of
U.S. tobacco firms have been
overtly eyeing the underground
market in "grass" and estimate its
value is at least $1.25 billion a
year.
The real figure, say western
entrepreneurs, is nearer three times
that sum, and now that the
possibilities of legal manufacture
are being discussed in the
boardrooms, bootleg suppliers are
organizing to safeguard their
interests.
Long before New Years Day,
when the government shut down a
$250 million advertising industry
by banning cigarette commercials
on television, the tobacco men
had been busy on contingency
planning.
One firm is allegedly running a
furtive sale test scheme in Hawaii.
At the start the big
manufacturers would market their
joints at about 25 cents each, well
under current black market price.
Business sources predict the
end of the marijuana ban will
follow the close of the Nixon era,
for the soundly ail-American
reason that the swollen costs of
the "new prohibition" exceed any
good it may do.
Enforcement costs in
California alone are now running
at $32 million a year and courts
are clogged with untried cases.
Already 23 states have eased
penalties, with more to follow.
Former U.S. attorney John
Kaplan, a Stanford University law
professor and authority on the
subject, said this week marijuana
"could and should" be legalized.
He favours a government
monopoly which would rule out
advertising. Packets of the weed,
graded by strength and heavily
taxed, might be sold in
government-licensed shops, he
said.
from The London Observer
However, the underground
does not plan to yield its rich,
sacred grass market to the big
money men.
"It's the economic basis of the
counter-culture," says Blair
Newman,    a    prominent    San
Francisco pot advocate.
"We have to keep it out of the
hands of the tobacco tycoons."
Believing legislation will come
"within three years" Newman
and his friends have formed a
"philanthropic, non profit
organization" called Amorphia to
stake their claim.
More confident still is a San
Francisco consortium of pot
dealers known collectively, as
Felix the Cat.
"Marijuana is legal," they say
publicly of their bold new
venture, "a packaged, filter-tipped
brand of pot cigarette named
Grassmasters."
One "Mr. Felix" spokesman
told an inteviewer that 320
dealers in the Bay area are
handling their first consignment
of 5,000 cartons. A packet of 18
joints now sells at $7.50, but he
hopes to pass on savings to the
smoker as business grows.
UBC MUSSOC PRESENTS
Live On Stage
SPECIAL
STUDENT SHOWS
February 3-8:30 P.M.
February 8-7:30 P.M.
February 9 & 10-8:30 P.M.
February 11-12:30 P.M.
UBC AUDITORIUM
TICKETS $1.00
AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
228-4300 - 228-3073
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO
ENGLISH LANGUAGE
SUMMER SCHOOL
ORAL FRENCH SUMMER
SCHOOL-SAINT PIERRE
A programme in communication
for those whose native tongue is
not English.
Improve your spoken French and
enjoy a holiday in a native French
setting.
4 week programme-
July 2-July 30, 1971
Beginners,     Intermediate    and
Advanced Levels. 4 weeks —
6 week programme-
July 2-August 13, 1971
July 5-July 30, 1971
or August 2-August 27, 1971
For information write:
Division of Univer
UNIVERSITY OF
sity Extension
TORONTO
84 Queen's Park, 1
foronto 181, Ontario
(416)928-2400
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
POSTGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
to GRADUATES in any branch of
ENGINEERING or APPLIED SCIENCE
$4500 — 9 months
PLUS Planned Summer Employment
For information contact:
The Chairman,
Dept. Of Mining Eng. & Applied Geophysics,
McGill University, Montreal 110, P.Q.
CLOSING DATE 12 FEBRUARY, 1971
THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
ENDGAME
by SAMUEL BECKETT
January 29th to February 6th
directed by Stanley Weese
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES)
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Monday, Feb. 1st, 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 4 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre - Rm. 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE!
•EAT IN •TAKEOUT* DELIVERY.
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
VARSITY GRILL
SPECIALIZING IN
Chinese & Western Cuisine
FREE DELIVERY
ON ORDERS 2.50 & UP
Phone 224-1822 - 224-3944
4381 W. 1 Oth next to Varsity Theatre
WHERE ALL
THE ACTION IS
3
Sensational
Clubs in
1
HARRY'S
ENTERTAINMENT
COMPLEX
* OILCAN'S
DANCE to the sounds of
SWEET BEAVER
* THE BACK ROOM
The atmosphere of the
Roaring 20's
DANCE to the heavy sound
of NIGHT TRAIN
* DIRTY SAL'S
Listen to the unique voice
of JUDY GINN
 OPEN	
MON. THRU SAT.
752 THURL0W ST. 683-7306
Special Events Presents:
TODAY at 12:30
PHILLIP DE FREMERY
Classical Guitarist
SUB Art Gallery
THURSDAY, JANUARY 21
MIGUEL ANGEL ESTRELLA
Argentine Classical Pianist,
SUB AUDITORIUM
12:30       25c
PAT PAULSEN
IS
COMING
FRIDAY
JAN. 22
7:30 P.M.
SUB Ballroom
r
-.-?jiSf»
Pat Paulsen talks on the timely topic:
"THE WORLD IS ALL SCREWED UP"
and
founds the frankly funny philosophy:
"FOR DECADES TO COME CENTURIES
WILL PASS"
Tickets $2 °° at AMS Office & SUB Info Desk Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1971
TUESDAY
BLACK CROSS
Organizational  meeting in Bu. 204 at
noon.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting in Bu.  104 at noon.
PRE-MED SOC
Meeting   in   Wesbrook   201   at   noon.
Buy tickets at meeting for med careers
conference.
UBC   KARATE   CLUB
Important   meeting   and   workout   in
new gym at 7:30 p.m. Tsuruoka-sensei
will be here Mon. Grading and clinic
from Mton. on.
UBC   SCIENCE   FICTION   SOC
General meeting and elections in SUB
215 at noon.
NEWMAN   CENTRE
General meeting in SUB 213 at noon.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB '71
General meeting in Angus 24 at noon.
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   ALLIANCE
All   welcome   at   general   meeting   at
1776 Alberni St.   at 7:30 p.m.
HILLEL
Prof.  Louis  Shub  will  discuss  future
in   Middle   Eastern   affairs   at   Hillel
House, noon.
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Information  evening  on   Mexico   with
slides,  movies   and a  report  by  UBC
students working in Urnapan  in I.H.
402  at  7:30 p.m.
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Classical guitarist Phillip Be Fremery
in  SUB art gallery  at noon.
A-.m-i
'tween
classes
WEDNESDAY
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE  ORGANIZATION
Meeting in Bu. 3201 at noon.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS CLUB
Film   Marat/Sade  in Bu.   104  at 3:30.
p.m.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
"The   Dance   of  Life"  in   Bu.   232   at
noon.
cvc
Two color films on Taiman in I.H. at
8 p.m.
EDUCATION   STAGE   BAND
Meeting   in   Ed.   1317   at   noon.   New
members needed. Any experience, any
instrument.
OUEBEC   TEACH-IN
Simone Chartrand to speak on Quebec
trials in SUB  baUrooom, noon.
PRE-DENTAL   SOC
Dr.   Jinks   speaks   on   Pedodontics   in
SUB 213 at noon.
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting.  SUB  105A at  noon.
THURSDAY
QUEBEC TEACH-IN
Theo Gagne talks on labor in Quebec
in SUB ballroom  at noon.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Meeting   in   SUB   111   from   12:30-2:30
p.m.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS CLUB
Film Marat/Sade in Bu. 106 at  12:30,
7 and 9 p.m.
T-BIRD WARGAMERS
Meeting in SUB  119 at noon.
CAMPUS CRUSADE  FOR CHRIST
"The Holy Spirit" in SUB 215 at noon.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
OFFICIAL NOTICE
GENERAL MEETING
Wed. —Jan. 27- 12:30
MEMORIAL GYM
MEETING OF WHOLE STUDENT BODY TO VOTE
ON THE FOLLOWING CONSTITUTION CHANGES:
NB. The changes cannot go into effect unless 10% of the student
body is present at the meeting.
MAJOR CHANGES
1. The Executive
The Executive is established as a legal entity with certain
functions   which   coincide   with   the   priorities   of   interest   of
students at UBC.
Composition:
President - to co-ordinate efforts of the whole council
Four Vice-Presidents - responsible for
Academics Services
Community Affairs Finances
— each heading a commission to look after the above areas of
interest
Ombudsman — position to remain unchanged, at this time.
Ex-Officio members - Secretary and Communications Officer
- non-elected, non-voting members of the Executive
The new Executive are named as Managing Directors. Their
functions are defined, but with flexibility to the changing trends.
2. The Students' Council
Council will-retain its ultimate authority over activities of the
society. Rather than simply meet once a week and disappear,
council members will be required to participate in one of the
commissions (each headed by a vice-president). The result will be
more informed and more rapid decision-making.
Composition:
Majority Recommendation:
That the composition of council remain as it presently is,
ie. the duly elected representatives from all degree granting
faculties, colleges, and schools.
Minority Recommendation:
That the size of council be reduced from its present 40 to
17. Council would then be composed of 5 executive, 10
councillors elected . on a rep-by-pop basis from six
constituencies, and two councillors elected at large.
3. Eligibility — The following choices have been proposed:
(a) (i) The   President   shall   have   successfully   completed   his
second year or its equivalent .and shall have attended
U.B.C. for at least two years and shall not previously have
held the position of President of the Society.
(ii)
The Vice-Presidents shall have successfully completed second
year or its equivalent.
(b) All members of the Executive shall have successfully
completed one year or its equivalent and shall have attended
U.B.C. for at least one year.
(c) No residency requirement at all.
MINOR CHANGES
1. Meetings
Two general meetings a year are proposed so that programs
can be presented for evaluation by students.
2. Elections
To co-ordinate with the changes to the Executive and possibly
to the council, the election clause is to be ammended.
3. Renumbering, Deletions
To put the constitution into organized fashion a number of
minor changes (bureaucratic details) are necessary.
AND:
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEETING -
Thurs., Feb. 4,1971 -12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
SIMS
Lecture on transcendental meditation
in Bu. 204 at noon.
PHOTO SOC
General meeting and elections in SUB
245 at noon.
WOMEN'S  LIBERATION ALLIANCE
Abortion march workshop at 1776 Alberni St. at 7 p.m. All welcome.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Argentine classical guitarist Miguel
Angel Estrella in SUB aud. at noon.
Admission 25(.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Fencing workout, excellent instruction
every Thurs., 6:30-8:30 p.m. in Gym
A of phys ed bldg. New members
welcome.
cvs
Transportation option:  find out  what
the option is all about in Angus 407
at noon.
PRE-MED SOC
Tour   of   UBC's   psychiatric   hospital.
Mfeet at Wesb. 100 at noon.
FRIDAY
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
General meeting in SUB 105B at noon.
All members please attend.
EAST ASIA SOCIETY
Informal meeting to discuss this year's
plans   at  2756  W.   10th   at   8:30   p.m.
Bring own food and refreshments.
VCF
Carl Amerding in SUB 207-209 at noon.
FOLK DANCE CLUB
Learn   international   folk   dancing   in
SUB party room at noon.
CVS
Commerce-law  option:   opportunity  to
find out  about combined program In
Angus 407 at noon.
QUEBEC  TEACH-IN
Stanley  Ryerson  talks  on   Quebec  as
a colony in SUB ballroom at noon.
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL  AID
Every Mon., Wed. and Fri. in SUB 228
and 232 at noon.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Skiing,   skating   and   snowballing  this
weekend.   If   interested   call   Don   at
266-4675.
WUSC
Senminar   in   Colombia,   summer   '71.
Application deadline Mon., Jan. 25 at
5  p.m.   Turn  in  applications  to   AMS
exec, office, SUB 236.
■■;*tt »_S >'T^'-^ iK;T/;x ■"     ■'   '      ■•    -'
. «-._> ^
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
WILD! TWO BANDS FUN! FULL,
facilities: I.H. 8:30-1:30 Fri., 22nd.
Come to the Walk-Walk-Bat
Dance.
FORGET DANCING! ENJOY "THE
President's Analyst" starring
James Coburn in the SUB Auditorium, Friday and Saturday, 7:00
& 9:30, Sunday 7:00. AMS card
holders  50£.	
DANCE AT PLACE VANIER
"Sunshyne" 9-1 Res. $1.00. Non-
res. $1.25. Beer Garden also. Fri.,
Jan.  22.
12
Greetings
THANX FROM A CARELESS
hitch-hiker to the Arch, student
from N. Van. who returned my
purse.
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
THE TAURUS SPA, 1233 HORNBY
St. 687-1915. Guys only. Special
student rates. Best facilities.
TAXI LICENCE FOR SALE.
North Shore Business expanding.
$10,500. Accept. 1/3 down. Mr. Day
874-8667   or   926-3223.
DON'T MISS THE FUN. EVERY-
one's going to the AMS General
Meeting. Wed. Jan. 27. Memorial
Gym,   12:30.
FUNNY MAN PAT PAULSEN
comes to UBC to speak on the
sexual revolution and other things.
Friday,   Jan.   22   at  7:30   in   Ball-
 room.  Tickets $2.00.
SPIRITUAL HAPPENING WITH
Father John Morris, S.J. Jan. 22-
24, $15. Cenacle Retreat House,
3689 Selkirk, 738-3121.
DANCE AT PLACE VANIER
"Sunshyne", 9-1. Res. $1.00, Non-
res. $1.25. Beer Garden also. Fri.,
Jan.   22.
Travel Opportunities
16
EUROPE FROM $185 ROUND TRIP.
Employment opportunities (U.K.)
Discounts, travel service, low car
hire rentals for members. Anglo
America Assn. 60A Pyle St., Newport,  I.W.,  England.
TRAVELLING   OVERSEAS   ON   A
BUDGET?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Yiuth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway
Vancouver 9, B.C. Tel. 738-3128
HONG KONG RETURN — $345
687-2855: 224-0087: 687-1244.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
Automobiles—Parts
23
1967 - 71 HARD - TOP FOR A MG
Midget or Sprite. $100. Call Al,
731-8036.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care & Baby Sitting    32A
Photography
34
DURST J-66 ENLARGER WITH 50
mm. f/4 Componon lens, developing trays — $65 or best offer —
phone Dave at 224-6746 after 6
p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
GENERAL ARTISTS SECRETARY.
She must know what she is doing. Must be versatile. All appreciable inquiries appreciated. Benefits $250.00 per month and travel
to all parts of the world. Please
send letter with qualifications to
P.O. Box 136, North Vancouver,
B.C.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Scandals
37
AQUA SOC SCUBA SCHOOL:
Starts 7:30 p.m. Jan. 14, Room 211.
War Memorial Gym. Heated Indoor Pool. All equipment provided.
Sign up in Outdoors Club Lounge
any  noon  hour.
CAN YOU IMAGINE THOUSANDS
of excited bodies all in one room?
Don't miss the AMS General
Meeting. Wed. Jan. 27. Memorial
Gym,   12.30.
DANCE AT PLACE VANIER
"Sunshyne" 9-1. Res. $1.00, Non-
res. $1.25. Beeer Garden also. Fri.,
Jan.   22.
TWO BANDS IN THE WALK-
Walk-Eat dance Full facilities.
I.H.   8:30-1:30,  Fri.,   22nd.  Wild!
FIND OUT ALL ABOUT A PRESI-
dent's hang-ups in "The President's Analyst", a comedy starring James Coburn. SUB Auditorium, Friday and Saturday, 7:00
& 9:30. Sunday, 7:00. AMS card
holders,   50#.
GET OFF YOUR ROCKER WITH
Paulsen. Really get off!! Friday,
Jan. 22 at 7:30 in Ballroom. Pat
Paulsen takes you for a look at
the 70's. Tickets $2.00. SUB Information Desk.
Typing
40
FAST ACCURATE TYPING. ELEC-
tric typewriter. Shorthand. Phone
325-2934.
FAST ACCURATE ELECTRIC
typing. Theses, essays, etc. 35#
per  page.   Mrs.   Duncan,   228-9597.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Ph.   263-5317.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SERVICE. Theses, essays, etc. Neat
accurate work, reasonable rates.
Mrs.   Troche,   437-1355.
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 * 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3   p.m.	
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & grammar, by qualified
ex-university teacher — native
speaker, group & quantity discounts.  Eves.   731-0156.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the  Bookstore,  Thunderbird  Shop
and AMS Publications Office
GOOD DEALS — FUR COATS,
jackets, capes, etc., $5 and up.
Pappas Bros. Sell, 459 Hamilton
Street at Victory Square. 681-6840.
Note: We are open only Friday
nights 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays 10 a.m.  to 6 p.m.
QUALITY TRIO STEREO EQUIP-
ment. Powerful 80 watt amplifier
and AM/FM tuner. $125.00. Phone
228-9871.	
PUREBRED GERMAN SHEPHERD
pups. 2 females, black & tan, 8
weeks old, good temperament, $50.
261-8366.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Wanted—Information
17
ANYONE SEEING ACCIDENT IN
B-Lot Monday, J'an. 11 please call
Wayne,  261-8290.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
BARGAIN — 1966 V.W. RADIO,
Low mileage, needs some body
work,   offers!   254-2258.   Must   Sell.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
HOME TYPING, ELECTRIC. Experienced. Reas. rates. 738-7881.
TEDIOUS TASKS, PROFESSIONAL
typing service. IBM Selectric —
days, evenings, weekends. Phone
228-9304. 30c per page.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van.  985-0154.
ESSAY & THESIS TYPING. IBM
electric. 35c page. Call after noon;
733-4708.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TY'PIST
—experienced in all types of technical thesis. Reasonable rates.
Call  Mrs.  Ellis,  321-3838.
SLEEPING    ROOM.    GIRL.    PRIV-
ate entrance and bath. Near gates >
and beach. $45.00 month. 224-4165.
ROOM FOR RENT, MALE, PRIV.
ent., priv. bath, 1% blocks from
campus. Prefer third or fourth
year.   $40.00.  224-6389.
Room & Board
82
LARGE CLEAN ROOMS — BEST
food on campus. Deke House, 5765
Agronomy,  224-9691.
MEN ONLY. LARGE CARPETED
rooms. Good food. Color TV. Large
social areas. 5725 Agronomy Rd.
Manager, 224-9620.	
PVT. RM. & 3 MLS. FOR GIRL.
TV, free laundry, close to UBC.
Home privil. (incl color TV), $95.
731-0018.
Furnished Apts.
83
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED
neatlv, accurately, 25<* per page.
Carol   Tourgis,   733-3197.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86 Tuesday, January 19, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
z   	
Hockey Birds put on
Jekyll and Hyde act
.  i Kii   / mm- \
The Thunderbirds pulled their
Jekyll-Hyde act this weekend in
two Western Collegiate hockey
games at Thunderbird Arena.
Friday the 'Birds skated for
two periods to take a 7-6 overtime
win from the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs.
Saturday the 'Birds decided
not to skate at all and the
resulting 7-3 defeat was indicative
of the play.
Duane Biagoni was the hero
Friday as he beat Calgary goalie
Gord Konowalyk with a shot
from the blue line three minutes
# into the overtime to give UBC the
win.
Three goals by Bob MacAneely
and one by Tom Williamson had
staked the 'Birds to an early 4-0
- lead, but Calgary came back to
lead 6-5 with about 10 minutes
left in the game.
"We lost our poise for a
while,"   said   UBC   coach   Bob
Hindmarch, "We stopped skating
and when we don't skate, we get
in trouble every time."
But the 'Birds started skating
again and Barry Wilcox tied the
score with three minutes
remaining in regulation time to set
the stage for Biagoni. Doug
Buchanan scored UBC's other
goal.
The next night was according
to Hindmarch, "Our worst game
of the season."
Calgary was on the
Thunderbirds right from the
opening faceoff. They led 2-0
after the first period and 6-1 after
the second. Only Bob MacAneely
could solve the Dinosaurs close
checking with his second hat-trick
of the weekend.
UBC just didn't skate ... or
check... or think. In short, they
did nothing right.
Both Calgary and UBC are tied
for second place with 7-3 records.
Birds' basketball team
avenged by Portland
PORTLAND - University of
B.C. Thunderbirds basketball
team was defeated Saturday night
in a non-conference game by the
Portland State Vikings, 120-71.
The superior Vikings avenged two
previous losses suffered in
Vancouver at the hands of UBC.
"Well, we finally put it all
together," was Bird coach Peter
Mullins' assessment of his team's
season play, which was climaxed
by the defeat in Portland. Not
playing consistently well all year,
the Birds did everything wrong
while the Vikings played much
better than they showed while at
UBC.
Using an aggressive, pressing
man-to-man defence, Portland
forced UBC into 33 turnovers
compared to only 16 by the
Vikings. Portland's wide open fast
break offence permitted the
Vikings to make 49 of 92 shots
from the field (53 per cent), while
the defence limited the Birds to
66 shots and a 42 per cent
average.
Portland's Willie Stoudamire
scored 39 points for the Vikings,
with 31 coming in the first half.
His brother, Charley, scored 25
points and collected 11 rebounds,
while Leo Franz scored 21 points
and eight rebounds.
Ron Thorsen managed 19
points for the losers while Derek
Sankey added 17. Sankey and
MacKay led the Birds rebounding
with six each, while Sankey also
led the team in assists with four.
'OH MY GAWD . .
120-71'
Asked who played well for the
Birds, Mullins noted, "the team
looked good entering the gym,
nobody fell down — they even
looked good in the first half of
warmup."
This makes one feel he has
accepted the loss as a climax to a
bad first half season with hope the
team will improve if they intend
to successfully defend their
Canadian championship.
Jayvees beat Clan frosh
Men's basketball at UBC
managed to win over the
weekend, even at the expense of
Simon Fraser University.
Dave Baker scored 25 points to
lead the UBC Jayvees to a 90-83
victory over the SFU freshman
team Saturday night at UBC.
Baker,   an   aggressive   6'   2"
forward, also pulled down 11
rebounds, high for the winners.
Forward Tom Allison had 16
points and 6' 3" centre Shep
Alexander added 10 more.
UBC trailed 18-9 early in the
game but pulled ahead to make it
46-40 at the half.
Manitoba, who visits Thunderbird
Arena next weekend, leads with a
10-0 mark.
SNOOKER, SKING, BOWLING—deadline for these activities has been extended to January 19 or 20.
ICE HOCKEY — is being rescheduled
this Thursday due to a closure of the
ice rink. Check with the office to find
out when your rescheduled games will
be.
BASKETBALL,   ICE   HOCKEY—games
snowed out will be rescheduled at the
end of the regular season.
WRESTLING—the sign-up deadline is
on January 21. This year the meet will
be in Memorial Gym at noon on a Monday or Wednesday.
CO REC VOLLEYBALL—will continue
again this Tuesday at 12:30. The nets
will be set up and ready to go.
AWARDS NIGHT—don't forget it on
March 15. Individual and team awards
will be presented. To receive an award
you must be in attendance.
azzzzsz
ITS SKI TIME AGAIN!
1
DON'T RENT SKIS WHEN YOU
CAN TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THIS SPECIAL OFFER!
* FISCHER SKIS WITH P-TEX BASE
* TYROLIA 1-2-3 STEP-IN HARNESS
* ALUMINUM TAPERED POLES
* SALOMON RUN AWAY STRAPS
.95
ALL THIS FOR-J64
IVOR WILLIAMS   SKI DEN
SPORTING GOODS
2120 W.41st -Open Daily 9-6 -Thurs., Fri. 9-9    261-6011 |
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
SURANCECOMPANY
C\
□
a
a
a
Fill in
r1
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
and return this coupon or phone today. No obligation. No salesman wil
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
call.
Residence
Address ...
(Please Print)
City Prov.
Phone: Home  Office	
Occupation  	
Age Married o
Single e
Date first licensed to drive	
Male a
Female □
Give number and dates of all accidents in last 5 years,
(circle dates of those accidents which were not your
fault).
In the last five years has your
licence been suspended? .—
Are you now insured ?	
Date current policy expires   	
This coupon is designed solely to enable non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile	
No. of cylinders 	
Horsepower	
Model (Impala, Dart, etc ) .
2/4dr-sdn,s/w;h/t,conv. .
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area —
One way driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
Days
Yes □ No a
Car No. 2
Davs
Yes d No a
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last five years
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
to you
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
%ofuse
Car #2
FPR UBC 24 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1971
Sartre now supports a free Quebec
OTTAWA (CUP) - The French philosopher Jean Paul
Sartre has, for a long time, doubted the fact that the
Quebecois were a colonized people.
Until recently, Sartre openly dissassociated himself
from Quebecois "nationalism "and bluntly refused to give
his support to the independence movement.
He now supports the struggle of the Quebecois for
independence and socialism, a struggle which, according
to him, will inevitably take on a violent character.
Sartre was invited to come to Quebec in the spring to
participate in a mammoth rally in support of trie political
prisoners and Quebec independence.
He has said it will be impossible for him to come at
that time, but he gave an interview that was distributed as
a working paper during a teach-in held by the Quebec
Committee for the Defense of Liberties.
Here are some extracts:
"You have your new law, the War Measures Act,
which seems to indicate quite clearly that you, the
Quebecois are not a part of Canada, because you are
considered to be insurgents and warriors and then
prisoners of war.
"It is absolutely admirable to think that Canada has
declared that a man arrested in Quebec is a prisoner of
war. He is then a fighter: he does not belong to the same
nation, he does not belong then to the same society. It is a
way of clearly stating that the Quebecois are colonized,
that is one of the things that appear to be to be most
striking.
"Of course it is evident that the soldiers who are in
Quebec (Sartre was interviewed before troop withdrawals
began) are not there to defend the workers. It is clear i
that the army is only protecting a very small minority of
Anglo-Saxons or French "Quebeckers" who are linked to
that English by their common interests. No one thinks —
despite what Trudeau or whoever else has written or
thinks — that someone is going to kidnap a worker leaving
his factory. That makes absolutely no sense."
Ecologists to screen Skagit scheme
A seven-member Washington state ecology
commission has been appointed to hear the pros and
cons of Seattle City Light Company's proposed
hydro site in Skagit Valley.
In a series of hearings, scheduled to take place
within 60 to 90 days in Olympia, Washington, the
commission will review the findings of certified
conservationists and "anyone with a direct interest
in the project."
However, according to commission chairman
Gordon Tongue, it has not yet been determined just
who will be given a chance to speak.
The hearings will be open to the public and
anyone may come and listen.
The state ecology department is presently
undergoing a review of the proposed development,
which will determine the stand it takes at the
commission's hearings.
Seattle Light previously applied for department
and federal permits to raise the level of Ross Dam,
which would result in the flooding of nine miles of
B.C.'s Skagit Valley.
The   department  announced  Tuesday  it  has
suspended Seattle Light's permits for reservoir
operation and water diversion which are required if
Ross Dam is to be raised.
Both permits are suspended without prejudice
pending the outcome of a Federal Power
Commission hearing, scheduled for sometime next
summer.
Should be federal commission back the project,
it still needs approval from the state ecology
department before work can begin.
Federal fisheries minister Jack Davis said last
week he would do everything in his power to stop
the project, should the findings of a study he is
presently undergoing prove the development
detrimental to the natural ecology of the area.
Davis is presently in Washington, D.C., at an
international ecological conference, talking with
American officials about the project.
Alma Mater Society president Tony Hodge said
Monday no plans have been made to have the AMS
represented at the hearings, but he will recommend
to the new executive that representation be made.
THE CANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDERGRADUATE
SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING ENGINEERING
$1,500-9 months
Educational Summer Employment Arranged
To students wishing to enter the first or
subsequent professional year of a degree
course in Mining Engineering
For applications contact:
The Secretary
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation
1600 - 44 King Street West, Toronto
or
The Dean of Engineering/Applied Science
CLOSING DATE 12 FEBRUARY, 1971
SCUBA DIVE!
N.A.U.I.
classes   start
Jan. 21st.
Thursday,
$35 includes membership in
Aqua Sod
Last chance this year! Register at
equipment cages in S.U.B.
basement (by -Outdoors Club
Lounge) any noon. Hurry!!!
PROVINCIAL
Bursary
Cheques
Available Now   at Cashiers Dept.
I—3rd Floor New Administrative Bldg.
"The physiological changes that have been recorded during
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION distinguish this state from all other
states of consciousness and establish that in TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION we are dealing with a specific and unique state that
ordinarily we do not experience" — Or. Anthony Campbell, LRCPI,
LRCSI, Medical Editor, 'Hospital Times'.
Transcendental Meditation
i
i
i
i
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE j
Thurs., Jan. 21st - 12:30 p.m. - Bu. 204   {
Further info.: Sims, 2549 W. 41st - Phone 266-0862 |
This Coupon is Worth
5
Off an International Hot Lunch any day from Jan.
19-22 at International House. Limit of one per
customer.
APPLICATION FOR
GRADUATION
. "Application for Graduation" cards are now being mailed to
all students in Fourth Year Arts, Music, Science, Commerce
and Fourth Year Elementary and Fifth Year Secondary
Education, and will be available in departmental offices for
students in the graduating years of all other faculties. All
Students who expect to graduate this spring are requested to
complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs.
Kent) as soon as possible, but no later than February 15,
1971.
"Application for Graduation" cards are available in the
Registrar's Office and students in these graduating years who
do not receive cards in the mail should check their addresses in
the Registrar's Office.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to make
application for his degree. If the student does not make
application, his name will not be put forward to his Faculty or
the Senate for approval.
No Application - No Degree
a SUB Film SOC presentation-
the
President's
Analyst
JAMES
COBURN
Your kind of shrink!
-Great Satiric Comedy-
Friday 22 & Saturday 23
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday 24-7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c
mm
Help Us To
Across
2. deep   feeling   of   love  or
desire
5. opposite of dirty
6. tight
7. below average
9. foul, disgusting dirt
Down
1. major   dirty   issue  of the
decade
3. military term for kitchen
and eating utensils
4. truck
5. game played with dice    ,
8. what A.M.S. hacks do all
the time
Hanson Lau

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