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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 26, 1981

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Educ. faces $800.
—arnotd hadatrom photo
ill
cut
By VERNE McDONALD
Cuts affecting students keep
coming and UBC's education faculty is definitely feeling the axe's
blow.
An $800,000 slash in the faculty's
budget will affect essential student
services and endanger whole degree
programs, a faculty administrator
said Wednesday.
Special education courses and
other programs could face reductions, and "if this (cutbacks) continues next year some degree programs could disappear," said
William Bruneau, assistant director
of undergraduate programs in the
education faculty.
Education dean Daniel Birch said
the decisions have not been made
concerning where the cuts will be
made but admitted $800,000 is the
target the faculty was given by the
university administration for trimming expenses.
"It's premature to locate the programs to be cut — we've looked at
all of them — because we're in the
process of internal planning on a
long term basis," said Birch. He
said the cut might be less than
$800,000 but, considering a 6.8 per
cent rise in education faculty enrolment, will have a serious effect on
Staff sacked
The campus support staff union
is another victim of UBC's huge
funding deficit.
Six members of the Association
of University and College
Employees have lost their jobs, a
union spokesperson said yesterday.
"This week alone, we've had
more than six notices of jobs
discontinued," said union coordinator Wendy Bice.
Bice said no explanation was
given by the university, facing a
deficit of at least $7 million, for the
job cuts.
"They hadn't told us anything.
All we knew was what we had heard
in rumors," she said, and added no
reasons were given despite union inquiries to administration president
Doug Kenny.
A UBC spokesperson said the
deficit was actually a "shortfall,"
and blamed any budget problems
on the wage increase awarded the
faculty by an arbitrator in August.
"The university is not allowed to
have a deficit, it's a shortfall," said
UBC information director Jim
Banham. He said the shortfall is a
result of the university budgeting
$18 million for faculty salaries while
the arbitrator's decision increases
the salaries figure to $25 million,
leaving a $7 million shortfall.
But the arbitrator said the university could afford a wage increase
and awarded the faculty an 18 per
cent pay raise.
Faculty president Charles Culling
wrote in a letter to The Ubyssey
Nov. 13 that the faculty association
is "sick and tired" of being blamed
by the university for the deficit and
said the provincial government is
the cause for the cutbacks.
"It is not the arbitration award
that should be attacked but rather
the provincial government's failure
to provide adequate funds for the
entire university operation" Culling
said.
Davis to resign
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Controversial campus housing
director Mike Davis, who has been
called sneaky and suspicious in the
past, will resign Jan. 1, 1982.
Council Briefs
"Since Mike Davis came onto
this campus students have had poor
housing. I'd like to recite to you
about how Dene House in Totem
Park was without heat for a
month," Alma Mater Society president Marlea Haugen told council
Wednesday night.
Davis' resignation was announced at council, but no reason was
given for his stepping down.
"I hope the new director will
have  students  and their best  in
terests as his or her highest
priority," said student board of
governors member Chris Niwinski.
In early 1979 student council called for Davis' resignation for his
lack of student input on the housing
budget, trying to confuse students
on the decision and formulating an
irrational housing policy.
To cut costs, in 1980 Davis proposed that the Gage Towers low rise
be used for conventions. Students
protested that they would rather
face rent increases than lose the low
rise.
"He also suggested all students
leave the university who did not
report their friends for throwing
pieces of paper out of Gage
Towers," said Haugen.
See page 3: PROGRAMS
the faculty's policies and direction
no matter how deep the axe
penetrates.
"It would seriously hamper our
ability to respond to the demands of
those teachers in our province to get
upgrading in their specialty or
qualification in special education,"
said Birch.
But Bruneau was more urgently
worried about potential cuts in
special education. "The capability
of this university to produce
specially trained teachers that the
school boards and the public demand will be seriously in danger,"
he said.
Bruneau said programs for
teaching the handicapped and
other special pupils may be cut back
to the point where degrees in special
education will be impossible to attain.
Birch said universities minister
Pat McGeer could be accused of
placing less emphasis on accessibility to post-secondary education than
on "high quality and international
visibility" at the province's universities.
The education ministry, he said,
is not fulfilling its "responsibility to
young people in B.C. to be able to
enter the professions."
Murray Elliott, director of
undergraduate programs in the
education faculty, said if the cutbacks occurred it would "certainly
have repercussions on the programs
we can offer students."
And if a further cutback occurred
it would "certainly have repercussions on the programs we can offer
students."
And if a further cutback occurred
next year? "All's I can say right
now is that it would be disastrous,"
said Elliott.
Birch said long range planning
for the faculty could include more
efficient use of funds by integrating
specialized programs with traditional programs. To attempt providing a similar level of services
would mean "less specialization
and more of a common element,"
he said.
If the cuts reach the targeted
level, faculty of education programs will be "seriously endangered" and graduate level programs in particular may be "reduced or suspended," Birch said.
Enrolment in the faculty fell for
three years previous to 1981-82
before rebounding, which has
already caused reductions in funding that make the $800,000 cut
critical, Bruneau said.
"An $800,000 cut is about eight
per cent of the current core faculty
salary. It's got to have an effect,"
he said.
Birch agreed the funding cut will
make it tougher for the education
faculty to do its job.
"The universities supply only 50
per cent as many graduates as there
are openings each year in B.C. each
year. Twenty-five per cent of the
openings are filled by teachers from
out of province and the other 25 per
cent are trained teachers who reenter the profession," he said.
Cutbacks will make the faculty
even less able to cope with demand.
"According to figures I have from
B.C. research there will be an increasing number of openings from
now until 1990," said Birch
'Raise taxes'
By CRAIG BROOKS
Post-secondary students in B.C.
will not be hit with massive tuition
hikes as a result of recent federal
education budget cutbacks, universities minister Pat McGeer claimed
Tuesday.
"The burden (of recent federal
funding decreases) must be born by
all B.C. taxpayers," McGeer told a
dozen University of Victoria
students   outside   the   provincial
legislature. 	
Sf'U tuition jumps 22.7 per cent
See page 3   	
Provincial finance minister Hugh
Curtis said recently that a $2 billion
cut in federal funding of provincial
post-secondary and health programs over the next five years
would mean a $370 tuition fee hike
for all B.C. post-secondary
students.
But this was just "one way of
looking at it," McGeer said. The
other option would be to increase
provincial taxes to generate the
necessary revenue to make up for
the shortfall, he said.
"There's nobody who can't afford to go to university," McGeer
said. He added that the province
has an  "excellent"  student loan
program, and one of the best educational systems in the world.
McGeer slammed the federal
government for effectively pulling
out of the shared cost program for
education and for "going back" on
their agreement with the provinces.
"The provinces should never again
climb into bed with the federal
government on any joint
program," he said. "(The provinces) will be left with the baby,
but no means of support.
"The provincial government
won't be going into shared programs (with the federal government) again."
The federal government has been
"imprudent" in its spending over
the last few years, and has created
an emormous deficit, McGeer said.
He further implied the federal
government is shifting expenses to
the provinces to reduce the deficit.
McGeer denied that the provincial government has been cutting
back on post-secondary education
expenditures, as charged by government Senate leader Ray Perrault
Friday in a speech at UBC. "The
provinces have spent far more than
any federal allocation," McGeer
said.
Police 'confiscate' paper
EDMONTON (CUP) — The student union at the University of
Alberta is considering taking legal
action against the City of Edmonton and perhaps several individuals
following confiscation of the student newspaper Nov. 19 by police
and fire department officials.
The officials claimed the
newspaper, the Gateway, was seized
because it contained a story about a
Nov. 8 arson incident in the student
union building. They said the story
may have been detrimental to the
departments' investigation.
Although 12,000 copies of the
Gateway and about 21,000 copies
of Federation of Alberta Students
newspaper were taken, no court
orders justifying the seizure had
been issued.
City officials said later that they
had mistaken the FAS newspapers
for the Gateway and had taken
them all. Police and fire officials
told    Gateway    editor    Peter
Michalyshyn they wanted the paper
out of circulation only for one day
to thwart the possibility of a "copy
cat" fire. But the papers were not
returned to campus until Monday
morning by police. The FAS papers
were returned Friday evening.
A press release from the city
police department says, "proper
search and seizure procedures have
been reviewed with the police officer involved." And police chief
See page 3: GATEWAY
. -jnl* V -K*-*. » Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26,1981
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3bec H9P2R2 • 101 104-3860 Jacombs Road. Richmond British Columbia V6V1Y6 Thursday, November 26,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
SFU tuition jumps by the minute
Canadian University Press
Despite student and teaching
staff pleas, tuition fees rose 22.7 per
cent at Simon Fraser University
Tuesday.
Thirty students watched SFU
board of governors members listen
silently to presentations and, after a
10 minute discussion, vote
unanimously to raise tuition fees
22.7 per cent with the same increase
to the university's financial aid
budget.
Both student board representatives voted for the increase.
Louise Miller, student society
public relations officer-elect, urged
the board to defer fee increases until it was informed about how the
increase would affect all potential
students' access to SFU.
"SFU does not gather the socioeconomic data needed to
demonstrate the increasing tendency for educational benefits to flow
to the children of the well-off," she
said.
The increase was considered at a
time when the quality of education
at SFU was deteriorating, she
charged, citing cuts in stipends for
graduate students and limited
enrolments in some programs.
Miller blasted the board for its
"meek acceptance" of provincial
funding cuts and asked the board to
work with other B.C. universities
against the B.C. government's
"axe-headed intentions" to shift
the costs of education to students.
"In    the    last    decade    the
Programs
on way out?
From page 1
In 1979, in response to an incident where Gage residents sang
Christmas carols and threw toilet
paper out of their windows, Davis
established investigation committees to find the culprits.
Every quad (six person unit of
housing in Gage) which had been
identified by housing staff as being
involved in the incident was
brought before the committee and
told that if the individuals involved
did not confess, the whole quad
would be evicted.
Davis was nominated for the student council annual Crumb Bowl
award for the individual or thing
which contributes the most to student oppression.
"This is the last time we'll be able
to take a shot at him and he's taken
many shots at us," said Haugen.
Finance minister Hugh Curtis
won the award and council
members decided to invite him to an
on campus ceremony to receive it.
» * *
Student council tabled a motion
which would have cut the AMS programs, virtually eliminating all on-
campus concerts next term.
"My philosophy is to openly
show where all these funds are and
divide them into services. There
isn't a great deal of slack but unfortunately a shortfall has occurred,"
said AMS finance director Jane
Loftus.
Loftus said the Pit revenue was
overestimated and the increases in
liquor prices were underestimated.
The society currently has a $12,000
projected budget deficit, she said.
* * *
Bill Maslechko, AMS director of
administration, resigned at the
council meeting because he is
withdrawing from the university.
Maslechko said he will continue to
work with the student administration commission until a new permanent director is found.
Council elected current SAC
member Terry Cox as the interim
director.
university's operating grant has
dropped from 6.4 per cent to 4.75
per cent of the provincial budget,"
she said. "At any less than five per
cent of the provincial budget, any
realistic reduction, or increase,
would have no significant effect on
the average taxpayer," she said.
Teaching support staff represen
tative Anne Burger read to board
members a statement from her
union opposing the tuition fee hike.
It condemned ' 'the attempt to pass
the university deficit on to
students."
Faculty board representative
Klaus Rieckhoff said while he
agreed    with    the    "general
philosophy of wide access to university," he supported the fee increase
because the university needed the
money. It would not become impossible for even the poorest student to attend SFU, he said.
"Those willing and able to go to
university, and those willing to
make the sacrifices, will be able to
do it," he said.
Student board member Ted
McNabb said he was forced to vote
for the fee hike.
"I'm really torn by this motion,"
he said. "It's a compromise motion, and like all compromises,
some parts you like the taste of and
some you don't."
TOWERING ENT bends down to scoop up branchful of students. Student
in center, worried that Ent will recognize book as former relative, hides it
— anc eggertson photo
under coat. Book turned out to be recycled combination of grandmother
and first cousin, both former copies of campus rag.
Young just following Kenny's orders
By CHRIS WONG
UBC's administration will not
appoint a full time vice provost of
student affairs, UBC information
officer Jim Banham said Monday.
Banham said the hiring freeze,
placed on UBC in August in response to the massive funding
shortfall, will prohibit appointment
of a new vice provost.
More than eight months ago Eric
Vogt, then vice president of faculty
and student affairs, resigned. An
administrative shuffle replaced
Vogt's position with that of vice
provost.
Since then the position has not
been filled by a full time administrator.
Alma   Mater   Society   president
Marlea Haugen said the administration is directing little effort towards
hiring a full time vice provost. "The
administration is ignoring it."
In addition to the hiring freeze,
the committee selecting a new vice
provost was unable to choose anybody from about 75 candidates,
vice president Michael Shaw said
Monday.
U.S. military influence harmful
By GLEN SANFORD
The United States is actively
fighting reconstruction efforts in
Nicaragua, a Nicaraguan labor
leader charged Wednesday.
In addition to cutting off all aid
to Nicaragua, the Reagan administration is helping train military opposition to the socialist government
and is using naval manoeuvres to
frighten the Nicaraguan people,
Julia Vargas said.
Speaking through an interpreter,
Vargas told 30 people in SUB 205
that the national guard of former
right wing dictator Anastasio Somoza has training camps in Florida.
Vargas said the Somoza national
guard also has training camps in
U.S. supported Honduras.
"The Somozan national guard is
making excursions into Nicaragua
from Honduras to try and destabilize the country. They kill whole
families and leave the country
again."
Vargas said the Honduras government denies the existence of Somozan camps.
She said another example of American military influence in Nicaragua took place when American
navy ships practised naval manoeuvres in Nicaraguan waters in October.
"They never explained the rea
sons for the manoeuvres," she said.
"But it was to increase tension at
the particular moment. Even if they
didn't invade, they showed they
could land at any time. It had a
great impact on the people."
She added the mobilization took
place in Fonseca Gulf at a point
equal in distance to Nicaragua and
the revolution torn countries of
Honduras and El Salvador.
Vargas said the reconstruction effort in Nicaragua, which follows
years of civil war between the socialist Sandinistas and the Somozan
regime, faces several obstacles.
The cancellation of U.S. economic aid, mass murders committed by the national guard and media
distortion of what is actually happening in Nicaragua are major
forces against reconstruction, she
said.
But she said reconstruction will
ultimately be successful. There will
be increased industrialization in
Nicaragua, and the benefits will be
shared by all the people, she said.
Vargas said she has spoken in
various B.C. cities for three weeks,
and has received positive reaction
from workers, church groups, and
communities at large.
"It's important not only to generate support for the reconstruction
in Nicaragua, but to also push for
the platform of non-intervention in
Central America."
She spoke at UBC as part of the
week of solidarity with Central America. Events continue today with
an information table in the SUB
foyer and a slide tape about Guatemala at noon.
The week concludes with Friday's
noon hour speech by El Salvador
student Raul Pineda in the SUB
auditorium. It will be preceded by a
slide presentation about El Salvador.
"It wasn't possible to make a
strong recommendation. No decisions have been made," Shaw said.
Shaw refused to comment on why
no recommendation was made, but
he stressed "you have to be very
careful" in discussing such matters.
The vice provost position has
been filled on a temporary basis by
registrar Ken Young.
Young said he enjoys his role as
vice provost. "It's been a rather interesting period. I don't think that
I'm getting tired of it."
Young added he is merely following UBC president Doug Kenny's
orders in occupying the position.
"I'm just a pawn."
Young said his hours in the registrar's office have been drastically
cut because of his dual role. He added not many students have approached him in his role as vice provost.
But Haugen said that it is difficult to reach Young because he is
rarely in his office. This has affected communication with the administration, she stressed.
Gateway kidnapped
From page 1
Robert Lunney contacted the
Gateway Monday and apologized
for any inconvenience the confiscation may have caused the paper or
its staff.
The papers were discovered missing Friday morning, the day they
were to have been distributed on
campus. The Gateway contacted
campus security and city police immediately, but it wasn't until 3 p.m.
before the police told Michalyshyn
the papers had been removed shortly after midnight Nov. 19.
Although campus security assisted
the police and fire department officials in removing the newspapers,
security said they had no knowledge
about the missing papers when contacted by the Gateway Friday morning.
Said senior security officer R.J.
Oliver: "It's their (police and fire
departments') investigation. They
can do what they want." Campus
security director Gordon Perry said
it was standard procedure to
"assist" police investigations on
campus.
After the papers were seized, they
were first stored in the garage of a
fire department official before being transferred by a police pad-
dywagon to a police compound. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26,1981
Pat lies
All bets are off guessing the tuition fee increase the
UBC board of governors will decide for students in
January, now that Simon Fraser University has taken
the 22.7 per cent challenge.
But the 22.7 per cent tuition increase at our eastern
neighbor reveals more than just a massive hike. First of
all, it means the SFU board knows either that the
government will pick up that university's $1 million
deficit or that SFU's cutbacks next year will be larger
than so far anticipated.
■' How do we know this? Because before the board announced the final figure, it said increases would fall between 19 and 37 per cent, depending on whether the
government decided to make up the projected deficit.
But the SFU increase also reveals that UBC students
can expect a similar increase.
In public, the UBC board of governors has been bandying about 15 per cent as the increase it would eventually favor. But The Ubyssey has it from an informed
board source the board has delayed its customary
November decision only because it wanted to see what
SFU could get away with before inflicting UBC students
with a similar hike.
It will be interesting to see how the board juggles the
figures to make it appear that students will still be making up 10 per cent of the operating budget, despite a
possible eight per cent hike over earlier estimates.
It will be even more interesting to see what universities minister Pat McGeer will have to say about tuition
increases, after promising students will not face
massive fee increases the same day SFU hiked its tuition.
Letters
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CAUSE charges creation model unscientific
Andrew Labun's letter of Nov.
17, a criticism of Gary Marchant's
Oct. 30 article on creationism, was
a classic example of the muddled
thinking that CAUSE (Citizens
Against the Undermining of Science
Education) wishes to dispel. Labun
started with a legitimate complaint
over the inappropriate, misleading
title — "Christians 'want indoctrination schools' ". But then he
went on to claim that Marchant and
other science types are themselves
"bad-mouthing Christians" by saying that they deny the importance
of spiritual forces in the world.
Anyone who read and
understood Marchant's article
could see that this is not true, and
what is clearly the real point of the
creation/evolution problem: some
fundamental Christians with a large
bankroll and a fairly slick PR
machine are trying to lobby their
religious views into the public
schools. This vocal minority is
disturbed that science doesn't provide the answers to all their questions (especially spiritual questions)
and that some explanations that it
does provide are irreconcilable with
their extreme, literalist approach to
faith. For them, a six-day creation,
Adam and Eve, and Noah's Ark
and Flood were real people and
events; the findings of biologists,
geologists, and astronomers are
therefore not part of the Truth they
believe in. None of the other
mainline world religions have this
problem — everyone except the
fundamentalists realizes that good
science can never prove or deny
God's existence or role in the
world's unfolding.
One fundamentalist response has
been to invent the edifice of "scientific creationism," which is not to
be confused with the more general
belief in a divine Creator common
to the other religions. Creationism
is supposedly the alternative theory
to evolution and its supporters can
be counted on to list all the "scientific facts" which prop up their
theory — these "facts" usually just
criticize evolution. Mr. Labun did
not disappoint us. He dutifully trot
ted out the "gaps-and-other-
problems-with-the-fossil-record",
and the "second-law-of-
thermodynamics" arguments, both
of which are supplied pre-digested
in the many books and pamphlets
published in San Diego by the creationist headquarters. Well, Darwin
himself dismissed the fossil record
as a poor source of information
(conditions for fossilization are rare
and unusual), and any decent
physicist will tell you that the second law applies only to systems at
equilibrium, not to non-equilibrium
biological systems. Many other
creationist "facts" contain non se-
quiturs — "this animal is so perfect
that it must have been created" —
or consist of misquotes and fabrication, using the work of other, genuine scientists. The "creation
model" is not scientific except in
superficial appearance; it has been
carefully crafted to look enough
like science to fool the general
public. But how can you scientifically test a theory when its central mechanism, as Labun says, "of
course, cannot be defined"?
Evolutionary theories can be
tested, as can ideas in other
historical sciences, such as paleontology, astronomy, and geology,
and there is currently a lot of active
speculation in evolutionary biology.
Biologists don't need creationists'
"help" in finding the weaknesses in
their theories; real scientists try to
find answers.
The creationist lobby in B.C. is
still fairly small, although increasing in certain areas such as the
Fraser valley. We still have a chance
to avoid the mistakes made in some
American states, where educators,
clergymen, and civil rights groups
are now fighting rear-guard actions
against foolish legislation forcing
creationism into schools. Let's improve by all means, but not dilute,
the quality of public education.
Keith Lindsay
graduate studies
Support TA U strike vote
Kenny's behavior poor
To president Doug Kenny:
I do not hesitate to communicate
to you in this way; I found your letter to students dated Oct. 26 both
insulting and highly unnecessary.
Considering, Mr. President, that
there are approximately 25,000 students attending this institution,
eight incidents of misconduct is
hardly excessive. I was surprised
that there are so few incidents
brought before your committee.
Can you imagine any group where
the number of people involved in
unacceptable behaviors is so few?
The truth is, Mr. President, that
the university does not stand for
truth and honesty. Corruption exists here as it does in any institution.
It surprises me that in your position
you aren't more aware of that fact.
Frankly, Mr. President, I don't
think that your message to students
will improve the problems you have
addressed. It might be more helpful
if you tried to consider some of the
factors that lead students to cheat
or plagiarize. Neither of these behaviors is justifiable but financial
stress, parental expectations, social
oppression and mental illness do affect some people more than others.
In your position, Mr. President,
a hint of compassion could go a
long way. Rather, you send a
threatening directive that is an insult to the rest of us 24,992
students.
Your behavior is not befitting of
your position. It is analogous to the
minister of justice sending a letter
to all Canadian citizens stating that
rape and murder are on the increase
and that these behaviors will not be
tolerated. If you were to receive
such a letter, Mr. President, how
would you feel?
At some time you must have
demonstrated considerable skill and
ability in dealing with people in
order to have been appointed president. I ask you, Mr. President,
where is that skill now?
Grant Warrington
I am writing to recommend to all
members of the bargaining unit
associated with the Teaching
Assistants Union that they support
the position taken by the union
negotiating team in bargaining with
the university administration. An
impasse has now been reached
which can only be ended if the
university is convinced that there is
sufficient feeling of support for the
union's demands. As with all contract negotiations, the method of
communicating this support is
through a successful strike vote.
The university's negotiators are
aware that this is merely a tactic to
strengthen one's bargaining position, a means of bringing the issues
back to the table. A strike vote does
not imply that a strike is forthcoming, but merely that it is no longer
illegal to strike. The key issues are:
• a union security clause which
will remove the necessity for the
union to expend most of its
resources in signing up members
each year, thereby allowing the time'
to work in areas which are of concern to TAs, and indeed, the
university community as a whole.
The university refuses even to
recognize continuity of membership.
• a wage package commensurate
with the job which TAs are expected to do. One should bear in
mind that the TA is often the only
contact with teaching staff that the
student has, epecially at an individual level. Moreover the TA
often has the sole responsibility for
the assessment of students, albeit
that there is an appeal procedure
which is seldom invoked. The union
is asking for equal pay for equal
work; markers are particularly
poorly paid, at a rate comparable to
that given to candy sellers at the
information desk in SUB. The
university is determined to make the
weakest groups on campus pay for
the B.C. government's retrenchment policy.
• a recognition by the university
that TAs have a role to play in the
maintenance of high standards of
education at UBC. The university
administration refuses to cooperate
with the TAU in what should be our
mutual concern for the quality of
education at UBC.
If these seem reasonable positions for the union to hold, then, as
a member of the bargaining unit,
you have a duty to vote YES in the
strike vote, and as a concerned
member of the university community, you should express support for
the Teaching Assistants Union.
J. R. Boyle
economics grad student
THE UBYSSEY
November 26, 1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
It was resignation day at The Ubyssey. Resigned to doing city desk was Nancy Campbell. "Ill resign - is
that news?" enquired Glen Sanford. Eric Eggertson resigned himself to layouts, while Chris Wong resigned
himself to another day of having his story bumped. Julie Wheelwright was resigned to covering council,
Verne McDonald resigned from staff for the third time, just to beat the record of Pierre Trudeau, who said
he would resign "soon." Craig Brooks and Muriel Draaisma resigned from staff, only to ]oin again five
minutes later. "Maybe that makes a resignation record," asked Scott McDonald, who has yet to resign Arnold Hestrom resigned himself to being left out of another misthead, so we won't forget Arnold this time, or
be will resign, Mark lieren-Young was resigned to the telephone, waiting for his name to change, while a
hoard of exchange students joined the staff for an hour, then all resigned 7 nen all the staff resigned, effective Dec 5 Meanwhile, on the outside. Lumpy Maslechko, the infamous AMS DoA and housing director
Mike Davis resigned their positions to join The Ubyssey staff. Thursday, November 26,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
ipa-**********************-
■ M-
New student representative faces sedate senate
The room in the Old Administration building was very full. I wondered how it could hold the large
number of senators present. My
neighbors at the back of the room
were mainly student senators. We
kept each other informed of what
speakers were saying when their
voices failed to project their remarks clearly. It was especially important to hear the remarks of the
president of the university, who is
also chair of the senate, in order to know where he stood in relation to the opinions being expressed.
The stocking of the libraries is a
question guaranteed to cause anxiety and concern among faculty, and
the library committee report on this
occasion was no exception. The
amount of funds to be made available for serials (journals) was
warmly debated but assurances
were given that although the quantity of journals would be decreased,
the quality would be maintained.
The president's committee on retrenchment was  challenged  by a
WUSC away
to Grenada
World University Service of Canada is conducting a book drive on
campus during the next two weeks.
We are asking students and faculty
for their help by donating a book or
two or maybe some paper or a
binder. These materials are to be
sent to Grenada, a small Caribbean
country.
Their only library burned down
last year and as money is a problem
they are having difficulty replacing
those books that were lost. Any
help that you can give by your donations will be most appreciated by
the people of Grenada.
Books can be left in most department offices where boxes have been
left. Some suggestions: anything on
the West Indies, blacks, health, nutrition, drawing, art, crafts, Spanish books, religious material, comparative religions, English, education, reference books, media and
mass communications. These are
just some suggestions and material
on most subjects areas is most welcome.
As well as books any paper, second hand binders, essay folders and
other supplies are needed. Things
are expensive in Grenada; a little
desk stapler costs $14 Canadian and
they don't make the amount of
money that even we as students do.
Thanks.
Bert van der Sande
WUSC
courageous lady, a faculty member,
and a few very pointed questions
raised. It was quite evident that
many senators were deeply concerned that nothing should be done to
change the academic scene — which
senate has not only a right but a
duty to safeguard — without its
consent. It was also obvious that
senators were not convinced that
enough time would be allowed for
priorities to be set in connection
with budget cuts. Why were priorities not being established months
ago? Why are we not working on
them now?
A notice of motion was given by
a student senator from law school
asking that the subject of retrenchment be discussed again at the next
meeting which will be just after the
president's committee on retrenchment has submitted its report to
him. We should then be better informed on the subject, unless, of
course, everything is TOP
SECRET.
Attention was drawn to more
awards and scholarships available
to students. I had been shocked to
hear earlier that many of the awards
are not applied for each year. Is it
sheer student apathy or unaware-
ness of what is available to them?
The director of the continuing education department presented an
impressive report, which still left me
wondering whether the university is
prepared to face the consequences
of the difference between continuing education (implicitly or explicitly mandatory) and adult education
(voluntary participation), and. how
it is going to deal with those differences.
The ad hoc committee on eligibility to serve on senate had done an
extremely good job, no doubt because Doris Wong was one of its
members, although I felt that to allow a senator to miss five meetings
before the seat was declared vacant
did not encourage responsible representation. After all, a senator
may be excused from attendance
for good reason merely by making
the request to the senate.
Routine business included the approval of next year's calendar, so
that many examinations, despite
student protests, occur on a Saturday.
Since   I   have  been  an  elected
H-ewi  look* THirSax %£&»>*<*■ re*
our  op   Ttt*-rA<*fJ*~>!         ,
Have a SAE on cutbacks and fees
Students: there is no escape from
the events of this past year. The
university's $7.2 million deficit endangers quality of education and
forces UBC to decide its academic
priorities. After the Federal budget
was announced, provincial finance
minister Hugh Curtis said that
students may have to pay an increase of $370 in tuition next year.
Faculty, staff and students are facing serious cutbacks. If students are
made to bear the burden to financial problems, the fees could rise as
much as 60 per cent.
It is not true that students can
have no influence or involvement in
the decision-making. There is still
time — the exact effects of the cutbacks or increases are not yet certain. What is being done?
The Students for an Accessible
Education (SAE) is a group with
primary objective: student
awareness. SAE is no fringe group:
we have no political affiliations and
are only known by the name SAE.
SAE is holding a forum on the
issues of cutbacks and tuition. The
speakers will be: Bruce Grenberg,
English professor; Hugh Greenwood, member of the board of
governors; James Foulks, president
of the Canadian Association of
University Teachers; and Mike
Miller, spokesperson for the Canadian Federation of Students. The
Forum will be in Buch. 104, Thursday at noon.
What else can students do? A letter writing campaign is underway.
Board   of   Governors   member,
Hugh Greenwood (speaker at
Thursday's Forum) noted that "a
thousand letters would be hard to
ignore." The BoG must decide
UBC's financial picture on January
26th. Letter writing is one method
of student action that can not be
dismissed as student radicalism, but
must be interpreted as student concern. Write the BoG members, c/o
The Old Administration Building,
UBC, before the Xmas break.
Do not hesitate to contact any of
the SAE members, through the Arts
Undergraduate Society Office
(-4403), for information or to express concerns. Remember, we will
have no effect unless we act
together.
the SAE steering committee
member of a municipal council and
of a county school board and have
had the opportunity to run for the
English parliament, I must acknowledge that I find the UBC
senate a more sedate institution,
mainly due no doubt to its more
limited mandate of authority.
Elizabeth Thomson
senator-at-large
Hyphen
review
rationalizes
subjugation
Mark Leiren-Young displays
several misconceptions in his review
of Athol Fuggard's play Boseman
and Lena (Friday, Nov. 20). Men
beating their wives or sexual partners because the women somehow
brought it upon themselves or
"deserved" it is the first of these.
According to Leiren-Young,
"even Lena reminds him of bad
times and in his frustration he beats
her." This sentiment is based on the
idea that Boseman is justified in
beating Lena because she
"reminds" him of his
powerlessness. This is a very
destructive myth.
Oppression is no excuse for further oppression and Leiren-Young
rationalizes women's subjugation in
the context of apartheid. This situation is also rationalized in North
American culture. For example, a
Canadian man will beat his wife
because she reminds him of
"pressures at the office." No
woman deserves to be beaten, no
matter what her actions are or what
her husband's "frustrations" may
be.
Men's brutality against women,
whether shown in a fictionalised account in South Africa or the common experience of many Canadian
women, has no justification. It is
only when women are considered
less than human that racial
discrimination or "frustrations at
the office" can be considered an excuse for violence.
Currently 54 per cent of women
in long term relationships with men
in Canada are battered. This suggests the gravity of the situation and
that racial and sexual oppression
should be considered equally.
These common misconceptions
about the oppression of women
Leiren-Young reflects in his review
nullify his analysis of racial oppression in South Africa.
Diana Banks
arts 4
No ambiguity on abortion choice
Well finally, the impossible has happened. The issue of a female
control of her body is equated with capital punishment, nuclear
weapons, racial discrimination and income tax.
Talk about semantic gymnastics (often known as word games), R.
Marchak (The Ubyssey, Nov. 5) has fallen onto the parallel bars
himself. Basically, his problem is perspective, and it deserves some
clearing up. The "pro-choice" label of the abortion issue is not to
signify the choice of Joe, Harry, Richard or Mary to agree or
disagree with abortion. The "choice" is completely subjective to the
lone, pregnant female.
This label does not appear in any way ambiguous to us. We three
females, and we believe for a great number of women, there is little
doubt in our minds that abortion is a difficult choice for the lone,
pregnant female, so also is the choice to bear an unwanted child. But
it is a choice she must make. It would be wonderful if all the children
were welcomed by society, but this is not the case, and until it is, options for the lone, pregnant female must be offered.
That's the "choice" in "pro-choice" and to those who understand
it there is no ambiguity.
Flora Hillier arts 4
Deidra McDevitt arts 4
D'Arcy Davis-Case arts 4
Cram
with usa
Not exams -food. Great
food. 15 classic burgers,
inexpensive steaks, fabulous
starters, yummy desserts.
Open your mouth and say
'ahh! 11:30 on - 7 days a
week. 2966 W. 4th Ave. and
Bayswater.
WipjOfM
AMS PRESENTS A FREE LECTURE BY
RAUL PINEDA
ELSAWADOB    "0*<" "-^     ,
^a^        ^^™*****w'                NICARAGUA
El Salvador
Student
"'    '
Leader
EL SALVADORE LIBRE
Friday, Nov. 27, 1981 12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM, UBC Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26,1981
rn
rween Classes
l
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
Organizational maating, noon, SUB 115.
BCPIRO
B.C. Ombudaman Karl Friedman spaaks on tha
role of tha ombudaman in tha public interest,
noon, Buchanan 206.
BSU
Group diacuaaion on Afraid to tove and ba loved,
noon, Angua 215.
CAMPUS CRU8AOE FOR CHRI8T
Panal diacuaaion on Sharing Chriat with your
family, noon, SUB 111.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Bible study and prayer meeting, noon, SUB 113.
CITR
Croat Currents, a look at consumer and environmental iaaues, 3 p.m., cable 100 fm.
Thunderbird sports report, with a look at the upcoming  T-bird   baaketball  teams  (men's and
women's), 5 p.m.
CLASSICS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 2566.
CSA
Chinese film series showing of "From Slave to
General," noon, SUB audrtorium.
Roller skating party, 6 p.m., Richmond Stardust
rink. Funds raised for United Way.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
EISA
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 211.
GAYS/LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 207/208. Linda Er-
vin, commissioned minister of First United
Church, speaks on Welfare cutbacks: the attack
from the right.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec volleyball drop-in, 7:30 p.m., War
Memorial gym.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Dr. Kassis speaks on contemporary Islam, noon.
SUB 119. Badha Acheejal
IVCF
Panel discussion on stewardship, noon, Cham
250.
LAW UNION
Charan G* spaaks on tha B.C. Organization to
Fight Racism and tha anti-racist movement in
B.C., noon. Law 178.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
French conversation, noon, Intamational House
Gate 4.
NDP CLUB
Executive meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 237A. All interested persons welcome.
NEWMAN CATHOUC CENTRE
Another exciting general meeting, noon, St.
Mark's (north of Gaga towers). Everyone
welcome.
AIESEC
General meeting, noon, Angus 226.
SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting, 1:30 p.m., Angus 426.
PC CLUB
General meeting regarding model Parliament,
noon. SUB 206.
PEOPLE'S LAW SCHOOL
An introduction to housing co-ops, 7:30 p.m.,
SPEC energy information centre, 2150 Maple
Street. Learn alt about co-ops for free, interpreter available for hearing impaired. Call
734-1126 for pre-registration.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Dr. C. Suedfeld speaks on grad school requirements, noon, Buch. 100.
STUDENTS FOR AN ACCESSIBLE
EDUCATION
Forum with four guest speakers contributing
views on recent budget cutbacks, noon, Buch.
104.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Marxist literature and discussion, noon, SUB
plaza.
FRIDAY
BSU
Bible study on doctinres of man, noon, Angus
215.
Hot Flashes
Fight cuts
on education
Those waskalwy, wambunctious
students for an accessible education are at it again. They're holding
a forum on cutback issues and student accessibility though they had
to cancel the warmup fashion show
where Doug Kenny wears Emperor
Pat McGeer's new clothes.
There will be people from the
board of governors, the Canadian
Association of University Teachers,
the English department, the
Chinese Students' Association and
the waskalwy SAE itself. Time will
be alloted for people to express
their opinions on the cutback question.
Considering the $800,000 cut
coming on line in the faculty of
education, maybe some future
teachers should be at Buch. 104 today at noon, too.
Not psychics
What do you do when a club
wants a Hot Flash and the only information on the form is the usual
laconic 'general meeting'? We gave
Andrea Lazosky, UBC science
psychology club president, a call.
Lazosky told us the club is for
students who study the
physiological nature of psychology
— a group of students smaller and
less well known than that which
gets emotionally involved with what
goes wrong with the mind.
For actually being available at the
telephone number she listed on the
form, Andrea Lazosky wins the Hot
Flash of the Month award. By the
way, the general meeting is at 1:30
p.m. today in Henry Angus 426.
Solidarity
It's the week of solidarity with
Latin America. Check out the information booth in the SUB foyer
and take in today's noon hour
slide/tape on Guatemala. The
week's highlight takes place noon
Friday in the SUB auditorium with a
speech by El Salvadorean student
Raul Pineda.
Investigate Bill
Lou Grant, Billy Newman and
Joe Rossi are coming to work on
The Ubyssey.
Actually, we are kidding, but
while you are reading this, we
would like to draw your attention to
an important journalism seminar.
Bill Tieleman, former Canadian
Press (oops, Canadian University
Press) national bureau chief and
Ubyssey news editor (plus a number
of attributes we can't mention in
print), will be giving a seminar on
investigative journalism Friday at
4:30 p.m. in SUB 241k. (That's the
Ubyssey newsroom.)
CCCM
Pick up your Free Namibia, atl day, Lutheran
Campus centre.
CITR
Dateline International, examines trends in
Japanese business, 3 p.m., cable 100 fm. Produced by Rob Simms, written by Dan Tidball.
CVC
Gym night, 7:30 p.m., gym A Winter Sports centre.
GSA
Punch drunk party, 8:30 p.m., Grad Centre.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
French conversation and general meeting, noon.
International Houae main lounge.
MUSLIM STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Muslim Jumal (Friday prayer), noon. International House lower lounge. All Muslims are requested to attend.
NEWMAN CATHOUC CENTRE
Skating party, 7:30 p.m., UBC skating rink. Meet
at St. Mark's at 7:30 p.m., yummy hot drinks
afterwards. Call 224-3311 for more info.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Discussion of federal education cuts with MP
Chuck Cook, noon, SUB 206.
THE UBYSSEY
Seminar on Investigative Journalism with former
Ubyssey news editor and professional writer Bill
Tieleman, 4:30 p.m., SUB 241k (Ubyssey
newsroom). All newshounds and interested parties welcome.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
New members welcome, we presume this is a
general meeting, noon, SUB 215.
WING CHUN KUNG FU
Event not specified, 5:30 p.m., SUB partyroom.
For this Friday only.
SATURDAY
ATHLETICS AND FOOTBALL FANS
Shrum Bowl, 8 p.m.. Empire Stadium. Thrill to
the sight of UBC triumphing over SFU.
CITR
Behind Four Walls, a look at the rental housing
market in Vancouver with an emphasis on student issues, 3 p.m., cable 100 fm. Produced by
lan Timberlake.
Making Waves: Paul Kahlia talks to Barbara
Frum and Peter Newman about the media in
Canada, 4:30 p.m.
EISA
Pre-Christmas dance, 8 p.m., SUB 200.
SUNDAY
CITR
Laughing matters: Jerry Eberts and Joe March
take a lighter look at war, 4:30 p.m., cable 100
fm. Features Bob Newhart, Jonathan Winters,
W.C. Fields and Eddie Cantor.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Clinic, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
MONDAY
BC PIRG
New members only, we presume it's a meeting
of some sort, noon, SUB 113.
CITR
Melting Pot: Joe March talks to UBC poultry
science head Dr. Darrell Bragg about egg
cholesterol and the fallacies associated with it, 3
p.m., cable IM fm.
Off Beat: a comic roundup of the week's offbeat
news, 7.p.m.
FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Management science seminar, 3:30 p.m.,
Buchanan penthouse. B. Raghavendra speaks
on a bound and bound algorithym for the
plywood design problem (that's the truthl).
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Register for fun-filled activities, especially sports,
noon, SUB 213. Good for people who feel overworked, lonely or frustrated.
TUESDAY
AVENTIST CHRISTIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Discussion on I Corinthians (basic Christian principles applied to daily lives), noon, SUB 213.
Everyone is welcome.
LAW UNION
Doug Sanders speaks on Nicaragua, noon, Law,
(no room given).
NDP CLUB
Last general meeting of the term, noon, SUB
215. All members and interested persons please
attend.
ONGOING
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION
PROGRAMS
The co-operative education programs in
engineering and forestry are accepting applications from all interested students in science 1,
transfer Ap. Sc. I and forestry 1 until Dec. 15,
Brock Hall 213.
LESBIAN INFORMATION LINE
Want to talk? Need information? Call 734-1016
Thursday and Sunday, 7 to 10 p.m.
Frunch
lessons*
Frunch-as in Friday
lunch. 15 classic burgers,
tons of other great stuff.
Intriguing starts, fabulous
desserts. 11:30 on-7 days a
week. Yum. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
and Bayswater.
BOWL WAVE
in THE PIT on
SATURDAY, MOV. 28
FROM 4:30-6:30 p.m.
SPECIAL ATTRACTIONS:
ENGINEER'S KAZOO BAND
U.B.C. CHEERLEADING BAND
No Door Charge
DANCING AT 8.
MUSIC BY CITR - Door $1
UNIVERSITY OF PUGET SOUND
SCHOOL OF LAW
Get the facts on:
• Admissions
• Curriculum
• Placement
Day: Friday Place: Brock Hall
Date: November 27 Room 200
Time: 2:30 p.m.
We welcome candidates who intend to practice either in Canada or the U.S.
SUBFILMS presents
A DOUBLE BILL!!
A RALPH BAKSHI FILM
WIZARDS
An epic fantasy
ofpeace and magic.
AND
THE WORLD NUMBER ONE
BEST SELLER
IS NOW A MAGNIFICENT FILM
Worship
MfDowns
Thurs.-Sun. 7:00 & 9:30
Both Films for $2.00-SUB AUD.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus — 3 tinea, 1 day $2.00; additional Unas. 66c.
Commercial — 3 Unas, 1 day $3.83; additional Unas
SBc. Additional days $3.30 and 10c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Vim.. B.C. V6T2AS
5 — Coming Events
35 - -Lost
ATTENTION PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS!
Need information regarding grad school requirements? Come to Buch. 100 Thursday,
Nov. 26 at 12:30 p.m.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
BAG TAKEN in error from games room.
Please return books and notes. Need for exams. Lost & found or ph. Rich, 420-5797.
GOLD LINK BRACELET of extreme sentimental value, on Nov. 20. Ph. 266-7376.
(Laurel). Reward.
50 — Rentals
11
For Sale — Private
60 — Rides
TYPEWRITER: Olympia, portable, manual,
pica, wide carriage, case. $140 or
reasonable offer. 738-5467.
FOR SALE — Pop machine and hot dog
machine and lots of supplies e.g. napkins,
plates, cups and straws. Call 986-6389 eves.
MUST SELL 4 tickets to Hawaii, Air Canada,
Dec. 13 till Dec. 27 charter. Call 683-1633
eves.
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of bartering and hairstyl-
ing. Student hairstyle, $8. Body wave, $15
to $25. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
80 — Tutoring
15 — Found
20 — Housing
85 — Typing
MAKE $$$ over Christmas. Quiet nonsmoking couple want apt. /house after Dec.
5 until New Year, $50/week. Call after 6
p.m. 682-2052.
ROOM AND BOARD available immediately.
Psi Upsilon Fraternity House, 2260
Wesbrook Mall. Ask for Rick Grey or
Steve, 224-1421, 228-8943.
M/F ROOMATE to share North Van apt.,
Woodcroft. Avail. Jan. 1, $270. Pool, spa,
sauna. 925-1892.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
NEED OCCASIONAL DRIVER - $8 PER
HOUR — Usually late afternoon and sometimes evening to drive woman with slight
injury to appointments and some shopping.
I live in U.B.C. area and prefer a non
smoker who is a very good driver. Could
use my car or yours. Please write giving
return evening phone number and mention
references if any to Box 30, Rm. 241 SUB.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032 (after 10 a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
FAST. EFFICIENT TYPING. Close to
campus. 266-5053.
ESSAYS, Theses, Manuscripts, Resumes.
Fast, professional typing. Phone Lisa,
873-2823 and request our student rate.
SPECIALIZING in academic typing. Fast,
dependable, top refs. North Vancouver.
Iona Brown, 985-4929.
ESSAYS, THESES, MANUSCRIPTS, including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
90 — Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous Thursday, November 26,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Get your rum and have some Shrum
By SCOTT McDONALD
How many Simon Fraser University football players does it take to
open a bottle of pop? Nine.
This may seem like a cheap joke,
but it is true. At a United Way luncheon to promote Saturday night's
Shrum Bowl, eight SFU players had
a try at opening a stuck twist-top
bottle before a ninth managed to
wrench it off. These players were
seniors, too.
The Shrum Bowl is the annual
slugfest between the UBC Thunder-
C'   "'""    " """   ' »^
Intrasports ]
Volleyball
In the division II women's final
the Council for Exceptional
Children were not that exceptional
as Forestry defeated them three
games to one.
Basketball
Final games for both division I
and II will be played Tuesday Dec.
1 at noon. In division I, Forestry
will tangle with blank while in division II the Aggies will attempt to
prove that physical education types
are really not that physical.
The finals of the Yuletide tournament will be played on Dec. 4.
Badminton
Round two of the Buchanan badminton  tournament  saw  Gordon
Kidd of Kayotes defeat Stan Kita.
Kita had won the first round.
Soccer
The division I semi-finals will be
played Friday at noon. Arts will
face Forestry, while the considerate
gentlemen from the Beta and Fiji
houses will be squaring off in the
other semi-final. In division III,
Mining will be playing VST and the
Chemical gears take on Geology.
Same Bat-time Robin.
Badminton
The UBC badminton team competed in the Kamloops Open on the
weekend and won almost
everything.
Kathy Thompson won the A
flight women's singles. Vivian Lee
and Abby Guanzon took the B
women's doubles. Gilles Bernier
was first in the C men's singles and
Lee and Larry Arnett won the mixed doubles C flight.
Gord Hayman & Jack
McDonald present
BLUEBIRD
An original musical play and
record album
Performances. Nov. 27, 28 & 29
Canadian Memorial
Community Centre
16th and Burrard
8:30 p.m.
Tickets: $5.00
RESERVATIONS: Call 731-0665
Peruvian
midgets*
Yes, these fidgety little
rascals are terrified when
they see the size of our
monstrous burgers. 15 classic
burgers. And other great
stuff. 2966 W 4th Ave. by
IJayswater. Open daily
from 11:30 a.m. Opening soon
in Lima. (Una mcntira
muy GRANDE).
SPORTS
birds and the SFU Clansmen. It was
started in 1967 by former B.C. Hydro chairman Gordon Shrum to
promote local football. The rivalry
was abandoned in 1971 because
SFU continually slaughtered UBC,
outscoring the 'Birds 168-32 over
five years.
The Bowl began again in 1978 as
fund raiser for the United Way. In
the three Shrum Bowls since 1978,
two of which were won by UBC,
$65,000 has been raised.
This year there is no clear cut favorite. If you could compare the
records of the teams, you would
have to give the nod to UBC, but
this is not possible.
UBC and SFU compete in different leagues. When SFU opened in
1965, it opted to give athletic scholarships based solely on athletic ability. Because of this.SFU has competed in District I of the American-
based National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, while UBC
plays in the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union.
In the NAIA the Clan was 2-6
this year while UBC was 7-1 in the
CIAU. UBC also played Eastern
Washington who are in SFU's
league and were trounced 29-6.
SFU also played a regular UBC
competitor, Calgary, and Clan
coach Rod Woodward said it was
the worst team his squad played all
year. SFU would be undefeated if it
competed in the CIAU, he claimed.
Eastern Washington had an even
easier time with SFU than when it
played UBC, and the 'Birds also did
a job on Calgary, so it is difficult to
compare them by looking at these
two common components.
UBC have lived all year on the
running game. Or, more accurately,
on the running of Glen Steele. In
the Eastern Washington game and
the playoff loss to the University of
Alberta, Steele was injured and only saw limited playing time.
Steele led the country in rushing
and has been nominated for both
the most valuable player and rookie
of the year awards in Canadian col-
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
Yukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
lege football. UBC's Mike Emery
and Jason Riley have also been
nominated for national awards,
Emery for outstanding defensive
player and Riley for outstanding
lineman.
Although UBC's offense is based
on the run it does have a. good receiver in Rob Ros. The quarter-
backing has been handled by Jay
Gard and Shelton Petri and they
have only enjoyed marginal success
this season. Gard is a first year
player while this is Petri's second.
The strongest part of UBC's
game has been its defense. Led by
Emery and Dave Singh, UBC went
three games in the season where it
did not allow a touchdown.
SFU is the opposite of UBC; its
experience is on its offense. The defense, especially secondary, has
been suspect all year. In the games
the Clan lost this year, the opposition averaged 40 points.
SFU's offense is centred around
the arm of quarterback Jay Prepchuk and the receiving of Dave Pur-
ves and Dave Amur.
The majority of the rushing is
handled by Robert Reid and Joel
Johnston. But SFU is a throwing
team and Reid and Johnston only
have three majors between them.
While UBC coach Frank Smith is
keeping quiet about the game,
Woodward readily admits a win
would salvage an otherwise dismal
season.
Since this is UBC's home game, it
will be played under Canadian
rules. The kickoff is at 8 p.m. in
Empire stadium Saturday and the
Pit opens at 4 p.m. for those of you
who need an emotional crutch for
the game.
Coopers
& Lybrand
chartered accountants providing
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ROYAL THEATRE
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AN   EVENING   WITH i
STEVE
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Exam Blues? Essays Due?
You've Heard of
Spood Reading?
CLEAR COMMUNICATION Introduces:
The Speedwriting method does for your writing of exams and essays
what speedreadirig does for your reading — it slashes the time you
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You can learn to save enough time in one day to triple the quantity
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This is not a shorthand method. It is a technique for organizing and
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THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 26,1961
THE WORLD'S GREATEST CLASSICAL RECORDINGS
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FRANCOIS DOMPIERRE: Piano Concerto.
Harmonica Flash  Boivln-Beluse Garden
RAVEL Bolero
MUSSORGSKY  Pictures at an Exhibition
VIVALDI  The Four Seasons
Karajan Berlin Philharmonic
MOZART: Piano Concertos Nos  17 and 21
Elvira Madigan"
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No 5
Karajan. Berlin Philharmonic
PACHELBEL: The Famous Canon
ALBINONI Adagio for Organ & Strings
RESPIGHI Ancient Airs & Dances (3rd Suite)
BOCCHERINI  Little Quintet
Karajan Berlin Philharmonic
VIVALDI: The Complete Mandolin & Lute
Concertos Yepes T & S Ochl Keuntz
Chamber Orchestra
TCHAIKOVSKY: 1812 Overture  Romeo * Juliet
March* Slave Don Cossacks
Berlin Philharmonic. Karajan.
BEETHOVEN: Sonatas Nos 8   Pathetlque'.
No. 14 "Moonlight" A 23   Appasslonata"
Kempff (Piano).
ROSSINI OVERTURES — William Tell. Thieving
Magpie Barber ot Seville Silken Ladder
Italian Girl In Algiers. Semlramlde
Karajan Berlin Philharmonic
CHOPIN The Polonaises (Complete)
Fantasia In F minor Op 49  Poltlnl.
J.S BACH Toccata & Fugue In D minor,
and other famous organ works. K Richter
RODRIGO: Concierto de Aranjuez. Fantasia
para un gentllhombre for Guitar & Orchestra
Yepes  Spanish Radio and TV Orchestra Alonso
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No  5
Carlos Kleiber Vienna Philharmonic.
MOZART Elne klelne Nachtmuslk.
Divertimento No  15. K 287
Karajan Berlin Philharmonic
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No 6   Pastoral
Karajan. Berlin Philharmonic
TCHAIKOVSKY  Nutcracker Suite. Serenade for
Strings Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic
BEETHOVEN: Concerto No 5 "Emperor"
Pollini Vienna Philharmonic Boehm
TCHAIKOVSKY  Swan Lake & Sleeping Beauty.
Highlights. Karajan, Berlin Philharmonic
RIMSKY-KORSAKOV Scheherazade
Karajan  Berlin Philharmonic
OS 26560 0S0LEMI0
nS5 26560 LUCIANO PAVAROTTI
sings favorite Neapolitan Songs..
OS 26577 HITS FROM LINCOLN CENTRE
0S5 26577 LUCIANO PAVAROTTI-Anas and songs.
CS6360 TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1
CS56360 Ashkenazy. London Symphony. Maazel.
CS6422 CHOPIN: The 4 Ballades. 3 Nouvelles etudes.
CS56422 Ashkenazy.
OS 26437 SUTHERLAND & PAVAROTTI SING DUETS
Famous duets.
LONDON „
UlUI IML      CASSETTES
LDR 10004 MAHLER: Symphony No. 4
LDR510004 Hendricks. Israel Philharmonic. Merita
LDR 10008 TCHAIKOVSKY: Swan Lake Suite.
LDR510008 Nutcracker Suite.
Mehta. Israel Philharmonic.
LDR 10012 STRAVINSKY: The Firebird (Complete Ballet •
LDR510012 1910 Version).
Dohnanyi. Vienna Philharmonic.
LDR 10013 BERLIOZ: Symphonic tantastjque
LDR510013 Mehta. New York Philharmonic.
LDR 10020 PAVAROTTI: 15 arias from 9 Verismo Operas
LDR510020
LDR 10040 MUSSORGSKY: Pictures at an Exhibition
LDR510040 (orchestrated by Ravel).
Solrj. Chicago Symphony.
LDR 71019 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 4
LDR5 71019 Finlandia. Luonnotar.'
Ashkenazy Philharmonia Orchestra.
Soderstrom.'
PHILIPS
C99
RECORDS.   U
7.49
CASSETTES../
6558 001 FANSHAWE: African Sanctus. Hill. Clarke. Lester Butler
Ambrosian Singers. Owaln Arwel Hughes.
9500 563 RODRIGO: Concierto de Aranjuez. Concierto
7300 705 Andaluz tor 4 Guitars and Orchestra.
The Romeros. Academy of St. Martln-ln-the-FlekJs. Marriner.
9500 651 JESSYE NORMAN SINGS SPIRITUALS
7300 752 Ambrosian Singers. Baldwin.
9500 691 HANDEL: Water Music (Complete).
7300 779 Marriner. Academy of St. Martin-I n-the-Fields
6588 011 LAST NIGHT AT THE PROMS.
7304 002 Norman. Balnbridge. BBC Choral Society and
Symphony Orchestra. Davis.
6500 017 VIVALDI: The Four Seasons.
7300 312 IMusld.
9500 585 J.S. BACH: The Musical Offering
7300 708 (Orchestrated by Neville Marriner).
Marriner. Academy of St. Martin-1 n-the-Fields
9500 717 VIVALDI: The Four Seasons.
7300 809 Brown. Academy of St. Martln-ln-the-Flekls.
6500 017 VIVALDI: The Four Seasons.
7300 312 I MusiCi
6500 255 CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 1.
7300  109 Arrau. London Philharmonic. Inbal.
6500 265 SCHUBERT: "Wanderer" Fantasia.
7300 396 Sonata D.960. Brendel.
6500 309 CHOPIN: Piano Concerto No. 2.
7300 110 Arrau. London Philharmonic. Inbal.
6500 342 MAHLER: Symphony No. 1.
7300 397 Haltlnk. Concertgebouw Orchestra.
6500 374 LISZT: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2.
7300 229 Totentanz.
Brendel. London Philharmonic. Haitink.
9500 055 BEETHOVEN: Sonatas for Vlotln & Piano
7300 473 Nos. 1 & 5 "Spring" Grumlaux. Arrau.
9500 069 PAGANINI: Violin Concertos Nos. 1 & 4.
7300 477 Szeryng. London Symphony. Gibson.
9500 071 SCHUBERT: Quintet No  1 "Trout".
7300 481 Rhodes. Hortnagel Beaux Arts Trio
9500 097 SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 9 "The Great?
7300 510 Haltlnk. Concertgebouw Orchestra.
9500  105 TCHAIKOVSKY/DVORAK: Serenade for Strings.
7300 531 Leppard. English Chamber Orchestra
9500  140 SIBELIUS: Symphony No. 1  ■Finlandia"
7300 517 Davis. Boston Symphony Orchestra.
THIS IS ONL Y A SAMPLE OF THE 1000's OF RECORDINGS A VAILABLE
SPECIAL-2 LP Sets
I RECORDS
RESONANCE
449        M
^     CASSETTES™
FESTiyof viva!
2721 073  2 LP   THE SUPER CONCERT (100 Minutes of the World's
Greatest Melodies) Boehm. Karaian. Oistrakh. Rozh-
destvensky. Kubelik. Kempff.
2721 084  2 LP   THE SUPER CONCERT VOL. 2 (100 Minutes of the
Worlds Greatest Melodies). Fischer-Dieskau  Anda.
Kempft. Fournier. Boehm. Kleiber. Jochum.
| 2721 183  2 LP   GALA CONCERT   Popular selections by Suppe.
Grieg. Gounod, Offenbach. Weber. Smetana, Thai-   '
kovsky, Bizet. Ponchielli, Rossini and others. Karajan.
Berlin Philharmonic
| 2721   116   2 LP    THE SUPER CONCERT VOL 3 (100 Minutes of the
World's Greatest Melodies)   Beethoven. Wagner.
Tchaikovsky. Berlin Philharmonic Karajan.
2721   1 79   2 LP   THE TRUMPET CONCERTOS by J. & M. Haydn, L.  I
Mozart, Delabande, ToreAi. Vivaldi. Telemann and
other composers  Scherbaum  Vanous ensembles &
conductors
| 2721  083  2 LP   SPECIAL FESTIVAL OF HITS RELEASE (26 Super
Hits)   Karaian  Eschenbach. Maazel. Kubelik. Rozh-
destvensky Jochum Serafin
2721  180   2 LP   THE BAROQUE CONCERT   Music by Charpentoer,  |
Albinoni, Bach. Handel & Vivaldi. Vanous orchestras A ■
conductors
2721 181   2 LP    FESTIVE OVERTURES - 13 lamous Overtures. Vanous Orchestras and Conductors
l^rottfe Greatest!
LONDON i
PAV
SERIES
2 LPs-
149
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PAV 2003/4 2 LP PAVAROHIS GREATEST HITS
PAV5 2003/4 2MC Famous Anas
PAV 2001 2 2 LP BRAVO PAVAROTTI
PAV5 2O0V2 2MC His Great American Operatic Triumphs.
PAV 2007 o 2 LP PAVAROTTI: My Own Story
PAV52007'8 2MC (Highlights of his spectacular career).
2535 105 VIVALDI: Four Seasons
3335 105 ALBINONI Adagio
PACHELBEL: Canon
Luoeme Festival Strings.
2S35 203 BEETHOVEN. Symphony No 9 "Song ol
3335 203 Joy   Fricsay Berlin Philharmonic.
2535 126 J.S. BACH: Toccata 4 Fugue in D minor
3335 126 and other organ works Walcha.
2535 134 JOHANN   STRAUSS:   Blue   Danube
3335 134 Emperor Waltz. Tales trom the Vienna
Woods & more. Fricsay. Berlin Radio Symphony.
2535 170 RODRIGO: Concierto de Aranjuez.
3335 170 Concerto Serenade
Behrend. Zabaleta. Berlin Philharmonic.
2535 137 HANDEL: Water Music (Complete)
3335 137 Kubelik. Berlin Philharmonic.
2535 143 J.S. BACH: Brandenburg Concertos Nos
3335 143 2, 3 4 5. Lucerne Festival Strings.
2535 304 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No 5
3335 304 Karajan. Benin Philharmonic.
2535 249 VIRTUOSO MANDOLINS: Mandolin Music
3335 249 by Vivaldi Scariatti and others. Behrend
Saarland Mandolin Orchestra.
2535 103 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 5.
3335 103 SCHUBERT: Symphony No. 8 "Unfinished".   Maazel. Berlin Philharmonic.
2535 295 TCHAIKOVSKY Piano Concerto No 1.
3335 295 Argerich. Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.
Dutoit.
2535 125 BEETHOVEN: Wellingtons Victory
3335 125 TCHAIKOVSKY 1812 Overture.
Karajan. Benin Philharmonic.
2535 138 J S BACH Suites lor Orchestra Nos. 2 &
3335 138 3 Karajan, Berlin Philarmonic.
2535 209 R STRAUSS: Also sprach Zarathustra
3335 209   2001 - A Space Odyssey"
Steinberg. Boston Symphony Orchestra.
2535 141 DVORAK: Synphony No. 9 "New World"
3335 141 Fricsay. Berlin Philharmonic.
2535 117 SCHUMANN: Synqjhony No. 2. "Genove- |
3335 117 va" Overture. Kubelik. Berlin Philharmonic.
2535 359 SIBELIUS: Symphony No 4 Valse Triste
3335 359 Berlin Philharmonic. Karajan.
2S35 238 BIZET: Symphony No. 1. Suite trom
3335 238 "The Fair Maid of Perth"   Children's
Gamee.
Martinon. French National Radio Orchestra
2535 293 BRAHMS Symphony No 3 Variations on |
3335 293 a theme by Haydn. Abbado. Dresden State
Orchestra.
2535 173 BRUCKNER: Symphony No   9 (Original
3335 173 Version). Jochum. Berlin Philharmonic
Orchestra
SERIES
RECORDS    ■     CASSETTES
[99
49
6570 092 RAVEL: Bolero La Valse. Ma Mere I'Oye/
7310 092 Mother Goose.
Monteux. London Symphony Orchestra.
6570 061  VIVALDI: The Four Seasons.
7310 061 Szeryng. English Chamber Orchestra.
6570 154 GREGORIAN CHANTS.
7310 154 Benedictine Monks
6570 065 ALBINONI: The famous Adagio. Oboe j
7310 085 Concertos. Violin Concertos. Hollinger I
Musici.
6570 146 MOZART: Concerto tor Flute. Harp and
7310 146 Orchestra Clarinet Concerto
Barwahser. Ellis. Brymer. London Sympho- I
ny Orchestra. Davis.
6570 016 HANDEL: Water Music (Complete). !
7310 016 Leppard. English Chamber Orchestra.
6570 027 TCHAIKOVSKY: Nutcracker Suite. Sere- i
7310 027 nade for Strings. Stokowski. London Symphony/London Philarmonic Orchestras.
London Philharmonic Orchestras.
6570 118 J.S. BACH: Toccata & Fugue in D minor |
7310 116 and other famous works. Rubsam.
6570 166 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 5. RdeNo
7310 166 Overture. Jochum. Concertgebouw Orchestra. !
6570 115 SCHUBERT: "Trout" Quintet.
7310 115 Haebier. Gmmiaux. Janzer. Czako. Cazau-
ran.
6570 072 TRUMPET CONCERTOS by Mozart, Tele-
7310 072 mann. Albinoni, Vivaldi. Maurice Andre.
6570 070 BEETHOVEN: Triple Concerto.
7310 070 Szeryng. Starker. Arrau. New Philharmonia
Orchestra. Inbal.
6570 022 MOZART: Symphonies Nob. 35 "Haffner"
7310 022 & 40. Marriner. Academy of St. Marbn-in-
the-fieWs.
6570 046 RACHMANINOV: Piano Concerto No. 2.
7310 046 Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini Oroz-
co. Royal Philharmonic, de Waart.
6570 052 BRAHMS: Piano Concerto No. 2.
7310 052 Arrau. Concertgebouw Orchestra. Hatttnk.
6570 028 TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. 1
7310 028 Violin Concert. Orozco. Fujkawa.
Rotterdam Philharmonic, de Waart.
6570 091 MOZART: The 2 Flute Concertos.
7310 091 Barwahaer. London Symphony. Davis, j
6570 077 MOZART: Piano Concertos Nos. 19421       I
7310 077 "EMraMadigan". |
HaeWer. London Symphony. RowkU.
6570 056 LISZT: Les Preludes. Orpheus. Tasso.
7310 056 Haitink. London Philharmonic Orchestra.
6570 066 BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 5
7310 086 "Emperor". Arrau. Concertgebouw Orchestra. Haitink.
Q99 A
RECORDS   V        CASSETTES     1
vrv   1 BEETHOVEN: Symphony No 9 "Ode To Joy"
KVIC 1 Harper. Watts. Young. Mclntyre.
London Symphony Stokowski.
VIV   3 VIVALDI: The Four Seasons
KVIC 3 Stokowski
VIV   6 MOZART: Symphonies Nos 40 S 41 "Jupiter"
KVIC 6 Karajan Vienna Philharmonic.
VIV   8 JS BACHSuitestorOrchestraNos 2»3
KVIC 8 "AirOnTheGStnng".
Ansermet Suisse Romande Orchestra
VIV   11 LISTZ: Piano Concertos Nos 1 » 2.
KVIC 11 Davis. Royal Philharmonic Dowries
VIV   14 BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 5 Emperor1.
KVIC 14 Katchen. London Symphony Gamba.
VIV   16 TCHAIKOVSKY: Piano Concerto No. t
KVIC 16 RACHMANINOV Piano Concerto No 2
Vered. New Philharmonia Orchestra Oavts
VIV   18 BRAHMS. Hungarian Dances
KVIC 18 DVORAK Slavonic Dances
Reiner. Vienna Philharmonic
RECORDS
CASSETTES
ZRG 654
KZRC654
ZRG 679
KZRC679
ZRG 697
KZRC697
ZRG 820
KZRC820
ZRG 821
KZRC821
ZRG 879
KZRC879
ZRG 880
KZRC8B0
ZRG 900
KZHC900
VIVALDI: The Four Seasons
Loveday. Academy of St. Martin-in-the-r Ms. Marriner.
MOZART: Eine Maine Nachtmuslk.
Symphony No. 32. Sinfonia Concertante.
Soloists. Academy of St.
Martin-in-the-Fields. Marriner.
HANDEL: Music for the Royal Fireworks.
(Complete). Water Music Suite.
Marriner. Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
J.S. BACH: Concertos in Transcription.
Marriner. Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
J S. BACH: Concertos in Transcription Vol. 2
Marhner. Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
HANDEL: Messiah Highlights.
Langridge. Reynolds. AmeJing. Howell.
Academy of St. Martirvin-the-Fiekls. Marriner.
MOZART: Violin Concertos Nos 3*4
I. Brown. Academy of St. Marlin-in-the-Fietds.
THE PLAY OF DANIEL
Pro Cantione Antiqua. The Landint Consort. M. Bruwn.
More than a record store . . .
your entertainment gift center -m
sound
Records & Tapes: 556 Seymour St.
Tapes: 2696 E. Hastings St.

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