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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1983

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Five per cent cut in funds likely
By PATTI FLATHER
B.C.'s three universities should
expect a five per cent decrease in
provincial government funding next
year, a Universities Council of B.C.
spokesperson said Monday.
UCBC secretary Lee Southern
confirmed recent rumors that the
government is planning to
dramatically decrease 1984-85
operating grants to universities.
"A coupie of weeks ago the
universities ministry informed us of
a revision. Now our sights are on a
five per cent decrease," he said.
UBC administration president
George Pedersen has said a five per
cent decrease could mean disaster
for the university. He said UBC
would have to absorb a $10 million
shortfall and he has no idea how the
university would respond to that.
In July, the ministry told UCBC
a freeze in university funding was
"the best they could hope for,"
Southern said.
But UCBC, a mediating body
between B.C.'s three universities
and the provincial government
which is responsible for allocating
funds, will not know until March
"at the earliest" exactly how much
money will be available.
After 1985, the funding situation
iooks grim.
"The forward projections for the
government's revenues aren't that
good. We're not very optimistic,"
Southern said.
Southern criticised the government for placing a low priority on
post secondary education and said
universities have been receiving a
smaller share of funds than other
government run institutions, such
as hospitals.
"Schools have been getting a
smaller share and universities have
been getting a smaller share among
the schools. Education isn't retaining the same place with the government."
Grant Fisher, assistant deputy
education minister, said the
ministry has indicated that colleges
and  other post secondary institu-
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
B.C.'s two mainland universities
officially installed their new
presidents at a pomp and gala
ceremony Monday night.
UBC president Knud George
Pedersen and Simon Fraser University president William George
Sayweil were robed and fawned
upon at a "special installation
ceremony" at Vancouver's Queen
Elizabeth Theatre.
To the sounds of two bagpipes,
Pedersen and Sayweil were heralded
into the theatre with 2,000 well
dressed on lookers.
University of Victoria president
Howard Petch conducted the
ceremony, which acknowledged
Pedersen as UBC's eighth president. It was the first time a joint installation has been held in B.C.
"Tonight's initiative will herald a
new era of co-operation and support between our two institutions,"
said Pedersen in a 15 minute address.
Pedersen justified the existence
of education and it importance. He
recognized the current economic
situation may lead to cost cutting
measures in public universities but,
he warned such cuts would have
long-term implications.
"Ultimately they contain important implications that change the
nature of what a university is and
should be and that threatens then
fundamental purpose — namely,
the process of discovery."
Sayweil    discussed    university
autonomy, saying freedoms are best
maintained in a society where
universities are "free and strong".
Universities should decide teaching
and research questions — not the
government, he said.
"Universities (should) retain
strong humanities programs even
when student preference and external pressure are directed
elsewhere."
Pedersen, who was SFU president before accepting UBC's position, took over from Douglas Kenny July 1.
tions will have to increase "productivity" and accomodate more
students, but the former will receive
a flat level of funding.
UCBC is currently organizing a
project to examine ways of
streamlining B.C.'s university
system. The project, which involves
government members and university administrators, will examine "the
best compromises that we can make
with the resources available,"
Southern said.
The project should come up with
some conclusions by the spring, he
said.
THE UBYSSEY
Vancouver
. Tuesday, September 2
Bank moves loans
By FRANCIS LEW
Students attempting to get their federal loans processed will be sent
downtown because the campus branch of the Bank of Montreal refuses to
deal with them once again.
The campus branch, no longer responsible for the processing of UBC
students' loans, will direct students to the bank's Granville and Pender
location where its student loan department is now centralized.
Stuart Clark, manager of the Bank of Montreal's SUB branch, denied
the move was due to low profitability of student loan processing. He said it
was made in 1980 when the bank decided to consolidate its student loan
departments into a central location.
"Certainly there hasn't been any money made on loans in the last ten
years. And it used to be unprofitable, but by the time the move took place
we were at-a break even point. I think now we're making money on student
loans," Clark said, adding students have been complaining about the interest rates.
Clark and Audrey Henderson, the bank's downtown manager, also
denied the change in location inconvenienced UBC students.
"We prefer it this way," Henderson said. "We can be sure the
students are getting proper instructions."
Henderson said the move was also prompted by complaints from
Simon Fraser University and college students who had to travel to the UBC
branch for their loan processing.
The staff at UBC was moved downtown along with all the loan
records, said Clark. The need for greater expertise in the department and
the cramped physical space in the SUB branch were cited as reasons for the
move.
The Bank of Montreal once maintained two branches on the campus
to service students, but these merged, Clark said. The centralization of loan
departments at UBC increased pressure on the bank and the managers
realized they needed more space. The loan department had to go, Clark
said.
President lauded
— neil lucenta photo
CLUBS COMMISSIONER dressed as ancient Japanese baseball umpire tries to warn Ubyssey reporters away
from SUB building, where exotic brainwashing techniques were employed last week to stem the plague of
apathy currently affecting many students. Commissioner said he was wearing outfit to protect himself from fly
balls. "Usually 1 use Raid, but these flies carry a lot more weight."
Maranathas tried to get names
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
The Maranatha Christian club
made extensive attempts to obtain
the names and addresses of first
year and international students
from the UBC administration for
the purpose of sending out invitations to a "deliberately
misrepresented"   recruiting   event,
Work study thawed
Students eligible for UBC's work study program will not have to
fry cockroaches for February dinners after all.
Work study is the only program exempt from the university hiring
freeze announced Sept. 9, according to the student awards office.
Students who applied to the program before Sept. 15 will receive
their authorization-to-work forms soon, but those who applied after
this date may not get a chance at the jobs, said UBC's assistant
financial awards director Dan Worsley.
He could not say what will happen to the applications received
after Sept. 15.
"I don't know what we'll do about them."
"Che awards office had stopped mailing authorization forms last
week, but will now continue to mail out processed applications, said
Worsley.
"It's our understanding that it (the work study progam) is back
on," he said.
if the hiring freeze had included the program as was originally
assumed, the number of work study positions would have been
frozen at 47, out of a possible 400.
Four hundred and sixty-six students have applied and are eligible
for the program.
The Ubyssey has learned.
The Maranatha club, whose
recruiting techniques have been
described as similar to those of cult
groups, wrote to the UBC
registrar's office in the summer requesting the computer print out of
names and addresses of first year
students who had been accepted into the university.
And it attempted to obtain the
mailing list of UBC's international
students from International House
director Rorri McBlane.
One Maranatha member, Mona
Abed, who is also the Alma Mater
Society clubs commissioner, successfully obtained official AMS approval of the request to the
registrar's office.
But both the office and the director of 1H refused to supply the information, citing the university's
policy "to deny requests for access
to student information to clubs
which have a sectarian or political
affiliation."
And AMS president Mitch Hetman, who signed the letter endorsing the Maranathas' request, now
regrets doing so.
"I didn't take a good look at the
letter when Mona brought it to me.
I shouldn't have signed it, but it was
mv fault,  it was me tripping over
my feet," Hetman said Wednesday.
He added he thinks Abed abused
her position of authority in the
AMS for the Maranatha club's
benefit.
"Mona knew me and when to approach me," Hetman said, adding
the fact that she is a student administrative commission member
- influenced him to sign the letter and
to attend the event, a welcome
reception for first year and international students.
The Maranathas invited Hetman
along with administration president
George Pedersen to speak at the
registration week reception. Hetman later said he felt he was used by
the club for its own gain.
And although Pedersen denied
being manipulated, Anglican and
United Church chaplain George
Hermanson said the president was
used as part of the Maranathas'
recruiting campaign and as the
"draw in card" for the event.
One student council member
warned the president in a special
memo that his name and attendance
were being used to "suck in"
students. Pedersen's and Hetman's
names were prominently featured in
a leaflet distributed during registration week which invited first year
See page 2: ABED Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,1983
Abed denies AMS — Maranatha conflict
From page 1
and international students to the
reception.
Hetman added he was misled by
the Maranathas because they claimed the event was sponsored by all of
UBC's various Christian clubs.
According to Hermanson and
Lutheran chaplain Ray Schultz,
several Christian groups were not
involved in sponsoring or organizing the event.
But Abed, who claimed that all
campus Christian clubs had been
invited by telephone and were
therefore "involved", denied that
she abused her authority in the
AMS for the Maranathas' benefit.
"It was not my intent to abuse
my position and it's an incorrect accusation. It's not like the
Maranatha club used me to make
sure Hetman was coming. We really
wanted him to be there," she said.
But she said as a SAC member
she operates from a Christian
perspective. "I'm a Christian first,
and then I'm a SAC member," she
said.
Abed, who personally invited
both Hetman and Pedersen to the
event, said the reception was intended to be more than just a
welcome — it was to serve also as
advertising for the clubs present..
And she said only certain clubs
were in\ ited to set up display tables
because of "space limitations".
The Maranathas did not use Hetman and Pedersen for recruiting
purposes, she said. "That was not
the intent at all.
"Hetman should have asked
more questions and discussed it
with me."
Hermanson said the Maranathas
try to recruit first year and international students because such
students   tend   to   be   vulnerable,
Awaited money arrives
MONTREAL (CUP) — The bureaucratic and political logjam has burst
and the 10 Ghanaian students at
Concordia University are now
receiving money from home.
The    federal    external    affairs
department has verified the money
— withheld for a year and a half
because the debt-ridden Ghanaian
government lacks foreign exchange
— is safe in the country's banks.
Elizabeth Morey, Concordia's in
ternational student advisor did not
know when the money would arrive, but said at least one Ghanaian
student had already received some
of it.
The students have been scraping
an existence in Montreal since the
fund withdrawal. Some have obtained work permits, but others
have had to rely on compassionate
landlords and aid from the Concordia dean of students' office.
disoriented and lonely at the beginning of the school year and are easily convinced to join.
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Bring your questions and concerns to a
workshop designed to help you understand
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All programs are free and voluntary.  Workshops
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the Employment Centre On Campus until October 3rd. Applications should be accompanied by recent course transcripts. Tuesday, September 27,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bill 32 blackmails student gov'ts
MONTREAL (CUP) — Recent
threats, coercions, blackmail and
administrative interference in student government affairs are the
result of provincial legislation passed last June, says Quebec's largest
student organization.
Bill 32 protects student associations that meet certain stiff criteria
from administrative interference,
but those who do not qualify are at
the mercy of their administrations.
And they are suffering for it, says
l'Association Nationale des Etudiantes et Etudiants du Quebec.
One CEGEP administration at
Abitibi-Temiskaming will no longer
collect student fees, leaving that
student association without funds.
And the Universite de Quebec, a
Montreal administration which has
never collected student fees,
threatens to kick the student
association out of its one-room office by Oct. 16, unless it can get
government accreditation.
"Bill 32 is being used as a tool, by
both administrations and the
government, to destabilize Quebec
student associations," said ANEQ
secretary-general Patrice Legendre.
Along with other student groups,
the association plans a general student strike Nov. 15 to protest the
law.
Under Bill 32, collection of student fees by administrations is
guaranteed to an accredited student
association. But the unincorporated
student groups at UQAM and the
CEGEP at Abitibi-Temiskaming
do not qualify for automatic accreditation, and must fulfill near-
impossible criteria to gain that
status.
Meanwhile, they are left wide
open to administration harassment.
To apply for accreditation, an
association must run a referendum
where 25 per cent of students vote
yes to incorporation.
Sixteen incorporated student
associations applied for automatic
— neil lucente photo
PRAISE THE LORD and all his children, says brainwashed Reagan disciple. Woman threatened bored pacifist
students with fiery annihilation if they did not join the army soon. But disciple was ill-prepared for hecklers and
wasn't sure if nuclear bombs were a gift from the Lord.
Chinese option is
control
By ROBBY ROBERTSON
China has no choice but to follow
a government run birth control program to avoid large scale famine
and disaster in the future, a noted
expert in Chinese affairs said Saturday.
William Sayweil, the new president of Simon Fraser University,
said current efforts in China to limit
population include the use of pro-
poganda campaigns, restrictions on
legal ages for marriage, and "the
best the west has to offer in modern
birth control devices."
To ensure the modernization succeeds in China, the problem of birth
control must be dealt with even
though these methods may seem
"Orwellian" in their loss of individual rights, Sayweil said before
a large audience in IRC 2.
But traditions of maintaining
large families and desiring male
children are significant obstacles to
birth control outside the cities, he
said. The birth rate is 50 per cent
higher in the country because of the
limited success of the birth control
program, he added.
Given current rates of increase,
"it will take the Chinese 70 years to
reach zero population growth,"
Sayweil said. Peking is aiming to
reach this point by year 2000, he
said.
Agriculture capacity will not be
able to keep pace with population
growth in the future, Sayweil said.
The three per cent yearly increase in
agricultural production achieved
during the 1979-1982 period will not
be maintained because agricultural
techniques are already so well
developed, he said.
He cited agriculture, as well as industry, science, and defense, as the
four divisions under which modernization has progressed in China.
In the area of defense, plans to
modernize the military by purchasing foreign weapons have been
abandoned because of the expense,
said Sayweil. China can achieve
"maximum security with minimal
cost," by maintaining it's strategic
alliance with the U.S., he said.
"Chinese security depends on
maintaining strong relations with
the U.S., " he said. But he
acknowledged the - Reagan administration is employing damaging
policies such as selling arms lo
Taiwan and controls on high
technology exportation.
The Chinese have "no time for
revolution in the area of internal
politics," Sayweil added.
The pursuit of policies is ' 'the only way they can win against the race
of time," Sayweil said.
accreditation by the Sept. 21
deadline, although six — all
members of ANEQ — applied
under protest.
Concordia University Students'
Association did not apply and co-
president Francois Longpre said it
already has protection from its administration. CUSA is acknowledged as one of the biggest and
strongest student associations in
Quebec. Yet Longpre fears accreditation would open CUSA up
to government prying.
"The problem with the law is that
we don't know how the government
will interpret it," Terry Fenwick,
the other co-president said.
Under the CUSA constitution,
students at Concordia can initiate
referendums through a 100
signature petition. Under accreditation 25 students could challenge the
right of the association to represent
them.
Other associations will follow
Concordia's lead and make private
agreements with their own administrations.
Students associations from across
Canada have sent telegrams of support to ANEQ, and to Quebec city
denouncing the Quebec government
for its "fascist and undemocratic"
law.
SFU to allocate
emergency funds
By ROBERT BEYNON
As part of a province wide student pirotest movement, the Simon
Fraser University student society
decided to allocate emergency funds
for students affected by the provincial government's new budget
legislation at a general meeting
Thursday.
Students requiring childcare,
food, housing, and transportation
will now be aided by SFU student
society funds. These may be used to
organize a food voucher system at
the student's pub, a child care coop, and temporary houssng arrangements.
The general meeting was called
after three groups affiliated with
the Solidarity coalition petitioned
SFU students, in an anti-budget
campaign similar to one at UBC.
The UBC's Alma Mater Society
will be holding a general meeting
about the budget in October, said
external affairs co-ordinator Lisa
Hebert.
UBC students will have an opportunity at the meeting to give Vic
toria their opinion of the new
budget legislation currently before
the house, said Hebert.
The AMS belongs to the Campus
Community Alliance, a group of
organizations opposed to the new
legislation. UBC unions, faculty
and graduate students are also
members of the alliance.
UBC's campus alliance belongs
to the larger Solidarity Coalition,
along with the student societies and
faculty associations from all three
B.C. universities.
"1 think the UBC movement will
be successful because it's such a
diverse movement composed of
people from various political
backgrounds," said Hebert.
Canadian federation of students
representative Donna Morgan said
Monday CFS is conducting an extensive campaign to make students
more aware of the potential effects
of the budget legislation.
The campaign will involve action
groups, a newsletter, and a
newspaper called The Student,
Morgan said.
Women for safety
By SUE McILROY
Women flooded downtown
streets on Friday night, chanting
and singing their way to a Main
street Red Hot Video store.
"The streets are ours, we have a
right to be safe," they shouted in
the country-wide annual take back
the night march.
The march, organized by Rape
Relief centres across* the country
drew more than 300 Vancouver
women in protest of rape and battering.
One Canadian woman is raped
every 17 minutes, and 54 per cent of
women who live with men are battered, a Rape Relief worker told the
crowd in front of Red Hot Video.
This chain of stores have been the
scene of protests by people opposed
to  the rape and violence toward
Students to strike
MONTREAL (CUP) — A common front student strike will
highlight the seventh anniversary of the Parti Quebecois' ascension
to power.
Quebec's largest student organization is urging students to boycott
classes and join the strike on Nov. 15.
Anger over Bill 32, which regulates student associations, sparked
associations actively lobbied against Bill 32 before it passed in June.
Quebec over unemployment, welfare conditions, and government
education policies.
The walkout follows months of preparation by the Association
Nationale des Etudiantes et Etudiants du Quebec, whose member
associations actively lobbied against law 32 before it passed in June.
Other groups include a new youth organization, composed of 40
associations of young unemployed and employed groups, non-
members of ANEQ and Quebec's student press association.
The strike culminates a summer of discontent, when the Parti
Quebecois government was widely denounced for its perceived ignorance of young people's needs.
women depicted in videos sold in
the store.
"This store makes a profit off
our bodies. They think it's entertaining to see women being
abused," one woman told the marchers.
"The films in this store lie to
men, they say that men have a right
to abuse and rape women and that
women enjoy it," she said.
One speaker called Red Hot
Video's owners "pimps who sell
women's sexuality fro profits."
In the 17 months that people have
protested against material sold in
Red Hot Video stores, the police,
government and courts have all
refused to take any action, the
speaker said.
"Red Hot Video, we're going to
stop you, Red Hot Video, close
them down," shouted the marchers.
They shook their fists at the store
and jeered at men entering and leaving the place.
Other speakers addressed curious
onlookers at various points in the
march.
"As a child 1 was taught to fear
strange men, to depend on men for
protection, to stay at home," said
one woman. "But I was assaulted in
my home by a male relative," she
said.
Another Rape Relief volunteer
said "women are left alone, battered, abused, frightened.
"They are not encouraged to talk
to each other," she said. "But we
must begin to share our pain, our
shame, and our isolation," she said
as the women clapped and cheered. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27, 1983
One more Bill?
In the interests of "eliminating confusion among the students of
Quebec's colleges," the Quebec government passed Bill 32 this summer.
Bill 32. A simple enough title. It's supposed to make Quebec's student
societies more efficient by ensuring only one society governs each campus
and giving guidelines on how to form a society.
That's the theory. The fact is. Bill 32 quite literally gives the Rene
Levesque government the power of life and death over Quebec's student
unions. And somewhere along the way when the Bill was proposed, someone must have realized it is the perfect weapon for destroying the
powerful student lobby.
By requiring student unions to be "accredited", the government can
pick and choose the society to represent students on a particular campus.
More than likely, it means students could wind up with a government
"puppet" for a student union.
And it that isn't bad enough, a student society now needs the approval of 25 per cent of the gross student population to get "accredited". If
you've ever experienced a campus-wide referendum before — as we had
last year on the $20 fee increase — you know that the student union would
be lucky to get even 10 per cent of the student population to vote.
And worst of all — should the Quebec government consider a student
society too controversial for any reason, it can be "disaccredited". That
means it has to undergo the accreditation process all over again.
And that sets a dangerous precedent. Because as long as Quebec's
students are not organized and can't contribute to provincial associations,
such as the Association Nationale des Etudiants Quebecois, the Quebec
government can control college student unions while squashing the tide of
protest.
This sounds suspiciously like something another well-known Bill
might cook up.
The minute, the very second any of our student unions become too
powerful or financially screw-up, he'll be ready with his own version of Bill
32 to drive through the legislature so fast we won't know what hit us until
it's too late.
Let's not give him that chance, shall we?
Breathe deep and
hold, hold, hold
I was in my first year of university before I ever smoked up. I was
working part-time in a library with
a group of six other girls. There was
always a lot of talk about parties,
being drunk, stoned, et cetera, and
I was always careful to add my own
experience, et cetera.
This particular night one girl asked,"Want to toke?"of course was
ready with my assent, praying none
of the others would guess I was a
rookie. I'd been to numerous parties where people toked up, but
because I didn't myself I never paid
any attention to the particular etiquette involved. Here was the
crunch.
Into the ladies' we went. I'm
sweating and hanging back. Out
come a couple of bags and rolling
papers. Much to my relief no one
asks me to roll. Much chatter. I'm
busy trying to concentrate on where
the joints are going to come from so
I won't be first or second.
I'm convinced I'll need time to
observe all the rules so I'm trying to
place myself far away from the initial toke. Much to my horror two
joints are coming from both sides.
Happily I had time to take
everything in before my first toke:
how to hold the joint, suck in and
hold the smoke in my lungs. I'm
terrified now. I'm going to blow my
cover for sure (woman of the world,
et cetera).
Here goes. Breathe deep and
hold, hold, hold, then pass it on.
Alright! I'm in! A pro! A real
doper. Now if someone would just
tell me what a roach clip is.
Actually, this time everything
went fine. It taught me that you can
pass yourself off in many different
social situations if you just stand
back and watch before stepping in.
found on a SUB
photocopy machine
The word
A letter to Michael Howlett:
I wish to acknowledge your letter
of August 17 regarding the student
aid program.
Please let me assure you that the
provincial government has a strong
commitment to supporting post-
secondary education. In fact, the
total amount «f aid available to an
eligible student has increased this
year. As the student aid program is
administered by my colleague, the
Honourable Jack Heinrich,
Minister of Education, I have taken
the liberty of passing your views
along to him.
Thank you for taking the time to
write.
Patrick L. McGeer
Universities Minister
THE UBYSSEY
September 27, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
We gotta get outta this place, whined Sarah Cox and Chris Wong from their messy desks.
Yeah, boomed the tree in the corner, Craig Brooks. Muriel Draaisma didn't care - she had
her nice flannel shirt. Victor Wong made it to the door first, quickly followed by Patti Rathe
who wanted her milkshake. Robby Robertson was lost in a Chinese daydream and Robert
Beynon had disappeared off into the sunset with his macho scooter. Neil Lucente and Charlie
Fidelman were in the darkroom making contact, ooops, I mean contacts, but Frances Lew
saw the light and left before it was too late. Poor Joel Pecchioli cowered under a typewriter.
In the end, Verne McDonald's drug-induced insanity prodded the weary sheep through the
door to who knows what.
WHO is THIS
0 a use mv srmw ojho's just ruuep am ALL-MHrea
i) A US. wwe. off tee* Mo's oaj teAi/e f/?oii tesmwAj
3) A    S0CH6V   MLA
Letters
A question of Victorian wording
Universities minister Pat McGeer
is aware and has stated publicly that
there has been a $9.7 million cut in
student funding contained in the
July 7 budget. This represents close
to 40 per cent of last year's budget
of $24.3 million allocated to student
aid. However, McGeer apparently
has chosen to ignore this cut for the
purpose of his letter.
It is also true that the total
number of students receiving any
I would like
to thank . .
I would personally like to thank
all the students who helped to
organize the first year students'
retreat this year. It was an unmitigated success because of the
professional level of organization
and hard work of all involved.
For those attending the retreat
much was learnt about living within
the university community. Lectures
on all facets of student, administrative and alumni organizations were given. To add to the
knowledge gained, the new students
were able to meet and make new
friends before embarking on their
academic career.
I would like to thank both the
organizers, for having invited me to
speak, and new students for listening to me at this year's retreat. I
also hope that each of you succeed
in your endeavours at UBC and
hope that next year's new students'
retreat is as large a success.
Mitch Hetman
Alma Mater Society
president
form of student assistance will be
lower this year because of stricter
eligibility requirements implemented by the provincial government, including a grade average
cut-off of 60 per cent and the requirement that any student receiving aid must take an 80 per cent
course load. And because of the
criteria changes many students will
qualify for only one quarter of what
they need or will receive no funding
at all.
Even in the case made by Dr.
McGeer, that "the total amount of
aid available to an eligible student
has increased" (which ignores the
above mentioned facts that the total
amount of aid has decreased and
the number of eligible students has
decreased) this is true only because
of increased federal government
funding. A student may receive
more money this year, but as any
receiving student knows the increase
is in the federal loan portion and
not in the provincial grant portion
(the federal government by the way
requires only a 60 per cent course
load in order to qualify and has no
academic cut off limits).
Passing the buck to the minister
of education (who is technically in
charge of negotiating federal-provincial student loan programs and
administering provincial grants) is
unacceptable. Cuts in operating
budgets and other matters which
fall directly under the universities
portfolio held by McGeer also affects students, and as the minister
responsible on an overall basis for
universities and the state of higher
education in this province McGeer
has an obligation to fight within
government to ensure adequate
funding is given to universities and
students to ensure a properous
future for B.C.
Mike Howled
UBC Campus Community Alliance
secretan
V
Standing for standards
Your story laments the use of marks attained in a prerequisite as a
criterion for acceptance in a fourth year course. The story states that
a cut-off point of 65 per cent was used. In many universities that
score would be considered a D at best. A common standard in such
schools is a C for admission into the next course.
Why does your headline state high marks are needed? A more interesting question may be, why have half the students wishing to take
a fourth year computer science course done so badly in the prerequisite? A university without standards fails to remain a real university.
Kevin Caskey
grad studies Tuesday, September 27,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
A room for Christmas
Students on waiting lists for on-
campus housing may not be accommodated for several months, UBC
housing director Mary Flores said
Monday.
"The students on the waiting lists
should all be accommodated after
Christmas," Flores said. The wait
will be especially long for men, she
added.
There are 840 men waiting for
Gage Tower rooms, while 205
women are on the list. But the
overalMist for the three campus
residences is shorter than last year,
Flores said. The greater availability
of off-campus housing has contributed to the decrease, she said.
But the students haunting the
Ponderosa housing office have not
seen any evidence of increased
housing availability.
Caryl Penner, a former UBC student now at Vancouver Community
College, said she has still not found
affordable housing.
"I think the problem is there's no
rent controls and the prices have
skyrocketed," she said.
Penner said she has been looking
since the beginning of August and
has not been able to find a suite in
her price range of around $300.
Darcy Alexander, a commerce
graduate student, said this is the
worst year he has experienced in the
housing market. Alexander said he
recently found a suite, but only
after a long search and at a higher
price than expected.
"It was a hassle. I probably looked at around 50 or 60 places before
I found the right place," said Alexander, who still must find a roommate.
Of the 55 furnished suites listed
at Ponderosa, only seven are renting for $250 or less per month. The
average cost for a bachelor suite is
$365 per month.
NOMINATIONS
open for three (3) UBC delegates
to attend the University of Toronto Conference and the Canadian
Federation of Students National
General Meeting, November 4 to
14th.
Nominations close
October 5th.
Application forms available
in SUB 238.
MICA
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around. Mayba HI *mok* «om» gra* v»t*e f<n t»r». J=«tt AW* — bow 1M* 1* QttttnB-mvn totwubt*. Hah twh - 1 can
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ma aomawhara hara - ah ahooti t laft It on tha photocopier whan 1 maoa oiM|i«)«a^«f.lii^^racia.Ma»haa-aah,wlwearaa
about aH that? tt'a a rUea gray day, tha atranga druoa In tWa Joint Oro gMr« ma t0^v$aa*«ttttl|itat know that ths paopla who
ara raatUng (Ma ara going to laat mighty aWy whan avaryona ah)» mm trialratta(rtl<WBotr4haMt^aa^giayba« wtwnthay
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Applications are available from the Awards Office for the Rhodes
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Candidates must:
— be   Canadian   citizens   or   persons   domiciled   in
Canada.
— be unmarried.
— have been ordinarily resident in Canada for at least
five years immediately proceeding October 1st, 1983.
— have completed at least three years of University
training by October 1st, 1984.
Successful candidates will have demonstrated literary and
scholastic attainments; fondness of and success in outdoor sports;
qualities of truth, courage, devotion to duty; sympathy for and protection of the weak; kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, moral
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COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
BY OCTOBER 25. 1983.
INTERESTED IN
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in SUB
Apply before September 30
Mandatory Training. Fri., Sept. 30, 6-9 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 1, 9-4 p.m.
Tues., Oct. 11, 6-9 p.m.
STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS -
THE T.A. UNION PRESENTS
ALL T.A.'S AND MARKERS
DANCE
b/rf«jr $1.00       Live bands free admission
fri. sept. 30th        8 p.m.      Grad Centre Ballroom
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CHRISTMAS
CHARTERS
EDMONTON $ 1.29
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TORONTO $359
OTTAWA3 3 89
MONTREAL $399
Going   ** TRAVEL
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VA Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,1983
TODAY
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Immigration officers to meet students regarding
visas, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., International House
board room.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
General meeting, sign-up for effective cycling
and novice race clinic, noon, Biology 2449.
CITR RADIO
Orientation meeting for new members,
refreshments included, 7:30 p.m., SUB 211.
HILLEL HOUSE
Shefa home-cooked hot meal, noon, Hillel
House.
FREE LEGAL ADVICE
Law students' legal advice program, noon, SUB
111.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre conference room.
ISMAIL, STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
J.K. meeting, 6:30 p.m., SUB 212.
JAZZ BALLET UBC
Registration for fall classes, noon to 1:30 p.m.,
SUB216e.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Discussion on grad involvement in the AMS: extra cost or an opportunity? Resource people to
atiend, 8 p.m., Grad Centre fireside lounge
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Evangelist Greg Anthony from the University of
Washington in Seattle, 7:30 p.m., Angus 104
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE
Film: China, A Land Transformed, noon, Buch
A204.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting   noon, Buch. A203 or A205.
WEDNESDAY
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Vancouver  first  division  match  vs.  Vancouver
Rowing Club, 5:30 p.m., Thunderbird Park
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Introductory meeting, everyone welcome, noon,
SUB 212.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Seminar   with   lunch   available,   noon,   Hillel
House.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
SUB 211.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem. 150.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Celebration: singing, sharing and short teaching,
noon, Buch. A100.
AMS EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Meeting to organize the Oct.  13 AMS special
general meeting on the provincial budget and
legislation, 4:30 p.m., SUB 224.
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Career Days, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., wine and cheese
party, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., SUB.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 207/209.
JAZZ BALLET UBC
General    meeting   and    executive   elections,
registration   for   fall   classes,    new   members
welcome, noon, SUB 206.
LECTURES COMMITTEE
Robert   Maxwell   of   Dartmouth   College,   New
Hampshire speaks on  Cult Books and Sexual
Cultures, noon, Buch. A102.
THURSDAY
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
General   meeting   and   summary   of   summer
recycling work, noon, Angus 223.
POINT GREY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Thrift sale of household articles,  clothing,  etc
fur students only, card required, 7pm. 4397 W
12th Ave
UBC GAYS AND LESBIANS
Women's pub night, 7.30 p m , go to SUB 239
for location
JAZZ BALLET UBC
Registration for fall classes, noon to 1 30 p m ,
SUB 216e.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Introductory    general    meeting,     everyone
welcome, 7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
HIL'.EL HOUSE
Simchat Torah celebration, 7 p.m., Hillel House.
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Career days, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., wine and cheese
party. 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., SUB.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Wen-do,   women's  self-defence,   noon,   Brock
Hall annex 351.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Introductory meeting,  1:30 p.m.,  International
House lounge.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Introductory meeting with Dr. Johnston speaking on prosthodentics, new members welcome,
noon, IRC 1.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, everyone welcome,
noon, SUB 212a.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Introductory meeting, those interested in debate
welcome, noon, SUB 211.
UBC ORIENTEERING
Introductory  clinic  and  event,   noon,  meet  at
Aquatic Centre.
FRIDAY
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL
UBC invitational tournament, alumni invited, all
day, War Memorial gym and Osborne Centre.
HIGH SCHOOL FIELD HOCKEY
UBC invitational women's tournament, all afternoon, Warren and MacGregor fields.
TEACHING ASSISTANTS UNION
Dance,    8    p.m..    Graduate    Student    Centre
ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
First general meeting, noon, International House
lounge
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Dance and fashion show, 8:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.,
Harbourside Holiday Inn.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Beer    garden    with     music,     new    members
welcome, 7 to 10 p.m., SUB 211
JAZZ BALLET UBC
Registration for fail classes, noon to 1 30 p.m.,
SUB 216e
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada West Universities  Athletic  Association
league game vs. University of Victoria Vikings, 2
p.m., 0. J. Todd field.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
Women's Early Bird Invitational Tournament, all
HAIRCARE SERVICES
For Men & Women
Two Locations in U.B.C. Village       •
Open 6 Days A Week
Bernard Labrosse Hair Studio Inc.,
5784 University Blvd. ph. 224-1922 or 224-9116
OR
Ken Hippert Hair Co. Ltd.,
5736 University Blvd., ph. 228-1471 or 228-1472
We sell Joico products
Ten professional Hairstylists to Serve You
49&THUNDERBIRD
*np SHOP
Make Mine PenmQHS
Sweatshirts - 50/50 Poly/Cotton, Crew Neck, Long Sleeved. 10
Crest Designs. Red, Navy, White, Grey, Wine, Royal, Gold,    WITH
Powder. S-M-L-XL. Reg. Price $14.98 COUPON
THIS COUPON IS WORTH
$3.00
ON THE PURCHASE OF ANY PenmQHS
CREW NECK SWEATSHIRT.
REG. VALUE $14.98
OFFER EXPIRES SAT. OCT. 8
1 COUPON PER SHIRT NO CASH VALUE
NOW OPEN AT 8:00 A.M.
.
LOWER LEVEL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TELEPHONE: 224-1911
HOURS:
MON. TO FRI. 8 AM - 7 PM
SATURDAY 10 AM - 5 PM
VISA & MASTERCARD
ACCEPTED
day, Warren and McGregor fields and Thunderbird Park.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
UBC vs. UBC Old Boys for the Moore Cup, 2:30
p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL
UBC invitational tourney, ail day with final at 9
p.m., War Memorial gym.
OXFAM
Kin Lalat performs in benefit concert for
Nicaraguan boat project, tickets $5 at Octopus
East, 8 p.m., Ukrainian Hall at 805 E. Pender.
SUNDAY
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
Women's eady bird tourney, all day, Warren and
McGregor fields and Thunderbird Park.
MONDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
Andrew Spence of Science for Peace speaks on
the cruise missile, noon, SUB 205.
JAZ2 BALLET UBC
Registration for fall classes, noon to 1:30 p.m.,
SUB 216e, and modern dance class, 6:30 to 8
p.m., SUB party room.
Active
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^        Present your student I.D.
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"l all purchases of books
from Active's Data and
Reference library.
Open Mon. to Thurs.   9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday 9:00 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
3070 KINGSWAY — VANCOUVER
TEL.: 438-3321
AMPLE FREE PARKING
VISA AND MASTERCARD WELCOME
Book Discount valid until Oct 15.1963. '     ■
i-THE CLASSIFIEDS*
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
islHiir
M9SS
HI
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
MODERN DANCE CLASSES
by Janice LeBlond
director ot Pacific Motion Dance C o.
* UBC GRAD CENTRE
$60/10 classes
Mon. & Wed. 5-7 p.m.
Thurs. 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Register at first class
Info: 263-1287
TIRED    OF    COMMUTING    ALREADY?
Come and live on campus. Vacancies
available now in the student residences.
Room and board for Ladies. Come to the
Ponderosa Housing Office or call 228-2811.
FULL ROOM AND BOARD on campus at
Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity house. TV
room, lounge with stereo, and many other
extras. $1,300 per term double occupancy
or $1,500 per term single occupancy.
Spaces available now and on October 1.
Contact John Robertson or Mark Senner,
224-9930 or drop by 5766 Agronomy Road.
30 - JOBS
7 - LEGAL
EARN EXTRA MONEY in your spare time!
Recruiting sub-agents to sell Canada Savings Bonds. Commission on $5.00 per
$1,000 sold. Contact Jose Carmona at
Levesque, Beaubien Inc.: tel. 687-0456.
JUDITH ALEXANDER
Lawyer
731-8323 or 261-8514
Family Law
— Change of name
— Custody
— Divorce
— Family Property
— Separation
Personal Injury Law
40 - MESSAGES
ANYONE OBSERVING a hit and run involv
ing a black and silver 1981 Datsun pickup in
the South East corner of A lot on Fri., Sept.
16 please leave a message at 943-1068.
WITNESSES of the accident between a bike
and a tandem cycle Wednesday, Sept. 21 at
8:20 a.m. on Main Mall, just south of Scarfe
Bldg. call Bruce 734-8809 after 6 p.m.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
FINEST QUALITY hand-knit Cowichan
sweaters only $100. 324-6212 (leave
message for Susan).
75 VEGA HATCHBACK, standard, good
cond., 78,200 mi. Must sell — leaving coun-
try. $800 obo. 327-7800.	
'81 YAMAHA 250. Incl. back-rest, luggage
rack, & alarm. 10,000 km., good cond.
Peter. 228-0649.	
WOODGRAIN arborite kitchen table with
4chairs, good cond., $75. Chuck. 738-2790
between 10 and 11 p.m.
FINEST QUALITY hand-knit Cowichan
sweaters, only $1. 324-6212 (leave
message) or 736-2785.	
78 HONDA CB400 motorcycle. Only 18,000
km, good cond., runs well. Asking $850.
Bob at 261-8677 eves.
20 - HOUSING
FREE ROOM 6 BOARD in exchange
for 15 to 20 hours house sitting. 25th. 6- Arbutus. 738-8685.
65 - SCANDALS
DO  YOU  WANT to get rid of your baby
food religion? (To be continued).
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING A D
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
85 - TYPING
FAST,    ACCURATE.    PROFESSIONAL
typing.    Double-spaced    page,    $1.50.
Audrey. 228-0378.	
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Bite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers, fac-
tums, tetters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857* Tuesday, September 27,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Bangladesh refugees: must they go back?
MONTREAL (CUP) — Takukdar
Rezaul Karim lives with seven
others in a small one-room apartment. Karim and his room-mates
sometimes can't afford to eat. After
a year and a half of this, six of these
people, including Karim, will probably be deported.
Karim is one of hundreds of nonstatus refugees who arrived in Montreal this summer to escape imprisonment, torture and execution
in their homeland, Bangladesh.
"They come here for something
better and just don't find it," said
Marie-Celie Loumal of La
Maissonee, a community center
that helps refugees adjust to life
here.
According to Loumal, Canada
has little to offer "non-status"
refugees who have fled their countries because of racial or political
oppression and request asylum once
they arrive in Canada.
About 800 refugees are currently
awaiting status in Montreal.
"These people are not coming
here   because   they   are   hungry,"
Loumal said, "but because guns are
constantly pointed at their heads.
They had no choice but to flee."
Political oppression has increased
since Bangladesh imposed martial
law 14 months ago.
Last October, the federal and
provincial governments cut off all
financial aid to non-status refugees
and, according to Loumal, "never
gave any reason" for doing so.
Non-status refugees arrive here
with little or no money, and most
with no knowledge of either official
language. They are unable to obtain
"work permits" until they have a
job offer; they can't accept the job
until Canada Employment has
proof the "offer" is valid.
"By the time they get their work
permit, the job they were offered is
probably taken," said Loumal.
Even those, like Karim, who have
work permits, can't find jobs.
Most non-status refugees rely on
non-government organizations for
support, like the Service d'accueil
aux voyageurs et aux immigrants.
This centre is helping 640 refugees
from Bangladesh but can only give
most of them $140 a month.
Non-status refugees usually wait
a least a year before they receive
status. Many are refused and then
appeal the decision.
Each request for asylum is reviewed individually by the refugee
Status Advisory Committee, which
must "assess the credibility of these
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BRITTON T.V.
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Service • Sales • Rentals
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2346 W. 4th Ave.,
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claimants" and to advise the Canadian Ministry of Immigration
whether to accept them.
Seventy-five per cent of all such
applications are rejected sometimes
T<°-2
from
3 to4
Vn-.'   ',,v„;;; $2.50
'/'■•' /"■'•■•'■il
'.!!'/■/ l\ .V i ! •! / / ! $ \.2F>
after a waiting period of a year and
a half.
In the spring of 1985, after harsh
living in Canada, Karim may be
back in Bangladesh.
DR. GLENN G. CHU
(222-1336)
is pleased to announce thai he is opening his
practice ot General Dentistry
with the
Locarno Dental Group
4337 West 10th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2H6
Office Hours:
Mon. to Thurs. - 4:30 p.m. to 9 P.M.
FRI. & SAT. — 8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
For appointments phone 222-1336
Emergency Service 682-0511
Pager No. 2582
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THIS WEEK
IN INTRAMURALS
SPECIAL EVENTS
<oeSlogan cycle 200
• special appearance by Alex Steida
MEN'S FINAL. THURS., SEPT. 29.
WEEKEND EVENTS
— UBC Open Golf Tourn. (Indiv.l
Prelinary: Fri., Sept. 30, 3:30-5 p.m.
Championship: Sat., Oct. 1, 11:013-12
at UBC Golf Course. Reg. Sept. 26-28.
— Cohoe Swim Meet (Men's Teaml.
Tues., Wed., Oct. 4-5. 12:30-2:00.
— Novelty Swim Meet (Women's Team).
Thurs., Oct. 6, 12:30-2:00.
at UBC Aquatic Center.
Reg. Sept  26-30.
LEAGUE SPORTS
— Cross Volleyball
— Nitobe Basketball
* (New Open Unit Competition
— Fort Camp Hockey
Reg. for all these
league sports by
- Peripheral Road Run
3, 8 km., Fri., Sept. 30th.
at Race Centre, 12:30 p.m
cxJicys) Keep Happy!
.STYLING.
Come to Corky's for
styling the way you
like it, a price you
can afford.    ™
Cutting, styling, perms
for Gals and Guys
CALL
731-4191 3644 W- 4th Ave.
(At Alma)
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 50% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
with your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon. - Fri. 8:30 - 5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,1983
'Birds show new as good as old in UoA tromp
By MONTE STEWART
The Thunderbird football team
made the Alberta Golden Bears roll
over and play dead Friday.
The traditional rivalry between
the two teams was not apparent as
the 'Birds slaughtered the Bears
33-1 before 1,897 fans at Thunderbird Stadium. It was a case of out
with the old and in with the new as
the Thunderbirds showed their
critics they can utilize players
besides running back Glenn Steele.
Quarterback Jay Gard was not in
the starting lineup for the first time
in his three year career at UBC. In
fact, Gard only played to hold on
convert and field goal attempts.
Jordan Leith, a first year student
from Ottawa's J. S. Woodsworth
High School, was the 'Bird pivot
and his performance may prove instrumental in ' the Thunderbirds'
quest for a second consecutive
league championship. Leith ran for
two touchdowns and completed a
pass to wide receiver Chris Grdina
SPORTS
as the 'Birds gained sole possession
of second place in the Western Intercollegiate Football League.
Grdina did a superb job as he
kept one foot in bounds in the end
zone. Defensive hack Laurent
Deslauriers scored the 'Birds' other
major on a 58 yard interception of a
Darren Brezden pass. Alberta place
kicker Glen Goufrev >coreu the
Bears' only point on a wide field
goal attempt.
Glenn Steele carried the ball only
six times for 16 yards. It was one of
the easiest games of his three years
as a 'Bird. Kicker Tom Dixon was
very impressive, booting four converts, a 47 yard field «)ai and two
punt singles.
Leith   was   not   the   onlv   new
starter. Rookie Hilton Hartwell
started as a wide receiver while Kent
Bowling was a surprise starter at
slotback.
Sources indicated Leith would
start at quarterback but nobody expected Hartwell, who made a great
catch on a pass that was deflected
by an Alberta defender, or Bowling
to itart. Trent Edwaras also started
as iineoacker in place of Sandro
Romano.
Leith, who missed the previous
game against Calgary, completed 16
of 33 pass attempts for 181 yards.
The 181 yard passing total was
significantly better than tiie 78
yards which Gard initiated the
previous weekend against Calgary.
Frank Cusati, another first year
Notice for AMS Special General Meeting
On the Provincial Budget and Legislation.
YOUR VOTE COUNTS
Thursday, October 13th at 12:30
Outside Sedgewick Library
Registration and Entertainment 11:45 - 12:30
t
University of British Columbia Alma Mater Society
(Your Student Association) — Member of the UBC Campus Community Alliance
quarterback, replaced Leith late in
the game and completed one pass to
Bowling. The ex-Notre Dame
signal-caller hesitantly started but
later displayed enough talent and
poise to suggest that the starting
quarterback competition is now a
three-way battle.
Before the game, coach Frank
Smith did not hesitate to express his
concerns anout the 'Birds' inconsistent passing attack. Although Smith
did not come right out and say it, it
was easy to see that Gard was his
main concern.
The aetence piayed its usual
•~;rong game. The pass rush improved dramatically after its unimpressive performance against
Calgary. End Carey Lapa and the
rest of the lineup put constant
pressure on  Brezden.  Linebackers
V<4CK,
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Greg Kitchen and K.C. Steele also
played well.
Frankie Moores, a scout with the
Edmonton Eskimos, admitted his
club is also interested in Laurent
Deslauriers. B.C. Lion player
development co-ordinator Bill
Quinter stated earlier that his team
is seriously considering holding on
to Deslauriers.
WIFL Standings
Sask.
UBC
Alberta
Calgary
Manitoba
GPW
3   3
A
31
32
79
0 76  54
0 54 109
F
63
64
46
For complete coverage of all
Thunderbird's sports see Friday s
Ubyssey.
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