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The Ubyssey Nov 14, 1967

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Array Dow
THE UBYSSEY
/ol. XLIX, No. 23
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1967
W^
48
0.
224-3916
+$-
— norm daniel photo
AS A MOCK VIETNAMESE hut flares in the foreground, theatre student John Linton reads
from the play Macbird to some of the 500 students who watched  a  protest rally Monday
against Dow Chemical, whose employment reps are on campus today.
AMS acts on action program
An education action program beginning Nov.
2 with a student rally was approved Monday
ight by student council.
The program, submitted by Alma Mater
lociety executives Shaun Sullivan and Don Mun-
_n, is designed to make students and the public
ware of provincial government neglect of
igher education.
Most controversial of the program clauses
/as the last — a pledge for students to state
hey would vote only for those political parties
rhich support higher education.
Council debated its acceptance for 45 minutes
efore voting in favor.
"The B.C. government is the most unsympa-
letic government in Canada with regard to
igher education,"  Sullivan said.
"The government is run essentially on ex-
ediencies."
They get most of their support from the in-
.rior, Sullivan said, and most of the money is
pent in the interior.
"The best highways are the ones going into
rince George because Williston (Ray Williston,
mds and forests minister) comes from there,"
e said.
"We have to threaten Bennett's power base,
.are him with the threat that students will not
ote for his government."
Commerce president Peter Uitdenbosch, agriculture   president   Gene   Zabawa,   engineering
president Lynn Spraggs and law president Dave
Norton voted against approval of the   pledge
clause.
"It won't scare Bennett in the least. He won't
have an election for a long time anyway. It's
an absolutely ridiculous issue," said Uitdenbosch.
"It's an absolutely useless pledge," said
Norton.
"Dr. Hare is the first UBC president to get
an invitation to the opening of the B.C. parliament. Let's wait and see what's going to happen,"
said Uitdenbosch.
"Student council is going to have to realize
sooner or later that political action will be
necessary," said AMS treasurer Dave Hoye.
Zabawa said one issue, higher education, is
not enough to base a vote upon.
Spraggs said the B.C. labor force resented
higher education.
"If you're going to go out with the reputation
that university students have now you're not
going to succeed. Be responsible citizens; then
you'll be successful," he said.
"We've got to open the people's bloody eyes
in this province,"  Sullivan said.
Gage makes
Do
otest
peace plea
By MIKE FINLAY
UBC acting president Walter Gage called Monday for restraint in a protest demonstration starting today against the
Dow Chemical Company.
"If a group of students feel they have some right on their
side, they have the right to demonstrate, but they must not
interfere with the rights of others," Gage said in an interview.
"We must depend on the good judgement of students to
make this a peaceful demonstruction."
The protest, today until Thursday, is against the presence
of Dow interviewers seeking UBC graduating students.
A spokesman for the university RCMP said no instructions
for handling a possible violent protest had been received.
"University students are supposedly intelligent people, so
we do not anticipate any trouble," he said.
Organizers of the demonstration reaffirmed their non-violent
position at a rally held in front of the bookstore Monday noon.
At the rally, a replica of a Vietnamese hut containing a
dummy was set afire as a passage from the play Macbird was
read by John Linton, a member of the threatre department.
In the middle of the reading, an unidentified engineer
doused the flaming hut with a fire extinguisher.
Arts president Stan Persky, one of the leaders of the protest
said there would be no interference with the Dow interviews,
and that the action was to be informative.
Reports continued Monday that engineers plan to protest
the protest, but no confirmation was available from the engineers
undergraduate society.
"Any action taken will be by individuals, and not sponsored by the engineering council," said a spokesman.
It will be the policy of the demonstrators not to resist if
they are moved by engineers or police, Persky said.
The demonstration has also received support from students
at Simon Fraser University, many of whom will participate
today.
Other support has come from the university teachers' committee on Vietnam, chaired by anthropology professor Bill
Willmott. It has met twice to discuss policy.
Here is an open letter drafted by the committee and directed
to persons seeking employment:
"The University Teachers Committee of Vietnam urges every
person to consider carefully the uses which his employer may
make of his knowledge and technical skills.
"Hundreds of millions of people are poorly housed and
poorly educated. Diseases which are now readily preventable
still take a vast toll in terms of human suffering and premature
death, and scientific research could prevent and cure countless
others.
"The development of techniques of chemical and biological
warfare, the perfection of nuclear weapons, and the manufacture of napalm are all shameful examples of the misuse which is
sometimes made of skills and knowledge.
"We believe that people who contemplate working for
companies like the Canadian subsidiary of the American Dow
Chemical Corporation, which manufactures the napalm dropped
in huge quantities on defenceless Vietnamese women and children, should consider soberly the moral issues involved."
The faculty committee will hold a discussion of academic
responsibility and arms production Thursday noon in Bu. 106.
Strike looms over
city newspapers
Four unions have given strike notice to Pacific Press   %
Ltd., which publishes the Sun and the Province.
No strike date has been announced, but three of the   '
four union notices expire at 11:05 a.m. Wednesday.
The unions include the Vancouver-New Westminster
Newspaper Guild, the International Typographical Union,
the Mailers Union and the Stereotypers Union.
In the Guild are 600 editorial, circulation, advertising
and business office employees.
A Pacific Press spokesman Monday admitted the company is holding a strike-breakers school for management
personnel.
He called it, however, a mechanical training program.   .
A meeting for all Ubyssey staff will be held at noon
today to discuss the possibility of the newspaper expanding   \t
to a temporary city edition. 6
\. h-®,^. *■ "
v> »•■ Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 19<
— f red cowjey photo
DONT IGNORE that parking ticket. If your Volkswagen is missing, and you have failed to
pay your parking fines, you will  probably find  your car  in  a  fenced-in compound  in Sir
Ouvry's back yard not far from the traffic office out there behind Brock Hall.
GENETIC CONTROL
Mass destruction seen
By IRENE WASILEWSKI
Genetic control may be the ultimate in mass
destruction, says UBC physics professor K. L.
Erdman.
Erdman's prediction came during a speech
on atomic ethics in Bu. 106 Monday.
"The control of human genetics is around
the corner," he said. "If you could control the
development of the human being through gene
manipulation, and possessed a herd of female
incubators, what sort of 'people' would you
produce? Would you use them as weapons of
mass destruction in your society?"
Scientists are human, he said, and can ra-
Arts grad to direct
alumni association
Jack Struthers, a 1955 UBC arts graduate,
has been appointed director of the UBC Alumni
Association.
He replaces Tim Hollick-Kenyon, who resigned in April after six years in the position.
As director, he will be responsible for implementing programs that engender community
and alumni support of the university.
tionalize that the end justifies the means when
existance is threatened.
They have been pressured over the ages to
produce weapons by loyalty to their society,
loyalty to their race, and fear for their own
survival.
"It seems that in the art of waging war,
people are far more squeamish today in the
weapons which they choose to employ than our
ancestors were in the recent past."
"Is it really any worse to have a horde of half
a million screaming savages on horseback to
totally annihilate a city of a million people by
the use of swords and knives, than a similar
army of. men to construct a device, if when
operated by one man, destroys that same
million?"
Science, which increased the population by
improving living conditions at the same time,
controlled it by weapons such as projectiles,
fire, blast, disease — all of which have been
used for centuries.
A Christian ethic from which western moral
values are being made has been undermined by
science, he said.
"We may have our preferences, our likes
and dislikes, our personal opinions, but there is
no truth independent of these."
You Don't Have To Join A Monastery
To Become A Winemaker
Now you can have a private wine cellar in your own home, within your budget.
Wine-Art has everything for the amateur winemaker—equipment, ingredients,
recipes and advice. Superior quality wines, including champagne, can be made
for less than thirty cents a  bottle.
ine«__l»i«i
3417 West Broadway, Vancouver 1108 Lonsdale, North Vancouver
Stores in Victoria, Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto,
Winnipeg, Montreal
Airwave university
offered by CHQM
CHQM has offered free weekly broadcast time to UB
students.
Morris Foisie, CHQM program manager, said a similar off<
has been made to Simon Fraser University. Both universiti
will have half-hour time slots starting in January, he said.
Definite broadcast times have not yet been decided.
Any students interested in planning format, writing scri]
or broadcasting are invited to meet in the upper Brock committ<
rooms Thursday noon.
Ontario Water Resources Commission
Representatives
Will Be On Campus
November 20 and 21, 7967
To Meet
7968 GRADUATES
PAPA BEARS
MEDICINE SHOW
AND
FROM SEATTLE
BLUES INTERCHANGE 'uesday, November 14, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
TORN AND DISFIGURED, a young victim of the Vietnam war
stares  from   poster  behind   students on   library   mall.  The
poster was  erected  by  organizers  of a  campus  protest
against Dow Chemical, which manufacturers napalm.
UBC chessman pawns well
Duncan Suttles is pawning well in Tunis.
Suttles, a UBC grad student in mathematics, is currently
tied for thirteenth place in an interzonal chess competition in
Tunis.
In this tournament 22 players from several world zones
compete to eventually select the world champion.
The top six players from the Tunis tournament will move
to another tournament, where the world champion is picked.
"Suttles is doing very well," said UBC math professor
Nathan Divinsky. "To place thirteenth in a tournament such
as this one is quite an achievement.
"Duncan has only one more game to play, so he won't be
in the top six."
Suttles has beaten Denmark's Bent Larsen, one of the top
contenders in international chess competition.
Realist trouble  brewing
Police  break  up        Toronto-the-good
McGill protests raps the Varsity
MONTREAL (CUP)—The McGill administration called in police Thursday night to disperse
a crowd of protesters who had taken over the
principal's office, continuing a protest which
began a week ago.
Lecturer Stan Gray, chairman of the Students
for a Democratic University, along with Joseph
Paul and Thomas Carrow, both students, were
taken away in a paddy wagon.
Gray and Paul were charged Friday with
assaulting a police officer. No charge was placed
against Carrow, who was released after a night
in jail.
Thirty students entered principal H. Rocke
Robertson's office at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday to
discuss the McGill Daily situation.
The McGill Daily editor, supplement editor,
and a columnist have been charged by the administration with obscene libel.
The article in question, reprinted from the
Realist, contained a fictional account of the
events following the assassination of John Kennedy.
Robertson refused to discuss the situation
and ordered the students out. When they refused,
he became furious.
Academic vice-principal Michael Oliver later
delivered summonses to the 30 students.
The summonses told them they must appear
before the student discipline committee to answer
to charges of refusing to leave the building when
asked to do so.
There was no date set for the appearance.
Students were forced to give their names and
ID numbers. Those who refused were photographed.
Some students refused to leave and police
were called in to carry them out of the building,
one by one.
As the demonstrators were carried down
stairs and dropped on the lawn, supporters outside hooted and jeered the police and administration action.
Some of the crowd contend that Stan Gray
was beaten by police prior to his arrest. Police
deny this, but Gray spoke Friday at a rally of
over 500 students with bandages around his
neck.
McGill students had been offered seats on
senate committees early in the year but council
turned these down as tokenistic.
TORONTO (CUP) — The controversy over
the McGill Daily reprint from last May's Realist
magazine has spread to the University of Toronto
campus.
The Varsity, U of T's campus paper, Wednesday carried a front-page banner news story on
the McGill controversy in which it quotes verbatim from the last few paragraphs — the contentious ones — of the Daily reprint.
Bob Parkin, Varsity general manager, told
Canadian University Press the story was handled
as straight news copy.
He said in order to explain the strong reaction to the story at the McGill campus, the
paper had to carry the sections which were
dubbed obscene libel by McGill principal H.
Rocke Robertson.
The Toronto Globe and Mail carried a frontpage story on the Varsity news story, as well
as an emotionally charged editorial entitled:
Freedom of Expression Demands also Responsibility.
The editorial termed the article by any
dictionary's standards, obscene, and by any
political standards, hateful.
The editorial concluded:
"The student bodies of Varsity (Toronto) and
McGill may very well be concerned about the
rights of their representatives to express themselves, but they may have a larger responsibility
to say whether or not that right has been judiciously used.
"Are they so hooked on their right to say
what they want that they have lost all interest
in what they are saying? If that is the case, the
movement toward student democracy is a hoax
and a sham. What the students are after is
license, power and privilege."
Student council president Tom Faulkner
said in a letter to acting president J. H. Sword
Thursday that Caput, the U of T disciplinary
body, should not act on the controversy.
"The matter with which we are concerned
is the charge of obscenity, not an academic
infraction," the letter said.
As yet, no non-student publication in either
Montreal or Toronto has reprinted the controversial  paragraphs of the Realist article, first
reprinted a week ago by the McGill Daily.
KRASSNER INTERVIEW
See Page 7
Name-a-house  contest
slated for Acadia Park
Horsefly House or Dollyvarden Villa.
These could be two student suggestions
for a name-a-house in Acadia Park contest
announced by housing administrator Les
Rohringer.
Postal authorities require names for each
of the five clusters of family dwellings now
under construction because they are placed
back from the street.
A high-rise tower in the project would
not require a name as it faces an existing
avenue and can use just a number, Rohringer
said.
"I first suggested using Nova Scotia place
names," he said. "But a committee of deans
rejected this idea because Acadia Road, from
which the project takes its name, refers not
to a geographical area but to Acadia University."
The deans have suggested using names of
B.C. towns or names of historical significance
to B.C.
"Residents have already suggested many
towns so I would now stress the historical
names. They could be of persons, mountains,
anything."
Ideas should be either submitted to The
Ubyssey or the housing administration office
located behind the education building before
Friday.
gd ^MKElPrMAr.J0ft£! lTC^g^y^aH.FRE5HAIRiAl0yELV C^V FpR THE m/1/mJ.GQOOeK. PEAR! IM OFF TO SUIT W() Ajyp jflEANUHII F THEWSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press'. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Pag.
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex  04-5224.
NOVEMBER 14, 1967
Bubbling flesh
"A napalm B fire reaches a temperature of almost
2,000 degrees Fahrenheit in a few seconds. The polystyrene component of napalm B acts like a glue at high
temperatures, holding the fire to a particular surface.
"The new napalm B is so sticky and burns so intensely that it cannot be removed from human skin without causing whole chunks of flesh to come off.
"Napalm B causes severe bubbling of the flesh, pus
formation, and terrible burns."
So Writes University of California biochemist Harold
Kasinsky in a study of napalm published in The Daily
CalifoTnian. The effects of napalm Kasinsky described
are part of the reason behind this week's protests
against recruiting at UBC by Dow Chemical of Canada.
There is a feeling that it is wrong to splatter human
beings with a chemical burning at 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit which causes flesh to bubble.
There is a feeling also that if it is wrong to use the
chemical in this way it is wrong to make it for this use.
And it is wrong for Dow Chemical of Canada to make
the polystyrene component of napalm — the part that
acts like glue as it holds the fire to a surface.
Dow, the prevalent feeling goes, is responsible for
what happens to the napalm it makes — just as any
human being is responsible for the effects of his actions.
It is wrong therefore to devote's one's talents to such a
firm and to accept a salary derived in part from profits
made through the sale of napalm.
Thus, there would appear to be justice in an attempt
to prevent today's Dow interviews from taking place.
But, says acting president Walter Gage, protesting
students must be sure not to interfere with the rights of
ethers.
In his role as head of the university, Gage is anxious
to pfotect the rights of all — even those of visiting war
suppliers and of students who wish to apply their talents
to the goal of bubblier bubbling of innocent human flesh.
In other times, one might have expected the university to take a stand about an issue like this. Even
today one might have hoped for some kind of awareness
of the issue at hand — perhaps a statement to the effect
that it is wrong to make napalm for use against human
beings.
Fond hopes indeed, in this age of the amoral university. UBC, it is evident, stands for nothing — except
good public relations.
Too, Gage is undoubtedly aware of another effect
of the war in Vietnam. As federal minister Paul Hellyer
pointed out in Toronto last week, part of Canadian university education is paid for by the sale of Canadian
goods, including arms, to the U.S. If Dow Canada stopped selling polystyrene to the Americans, the GNP
would suffer. And what's bad for the GNP, is bad for
UBC's budget.
There are many evil corporations and many evil
weapons. Perhaps Dow and napalm are — if such things
can be measured — more evil than most.
Nevertheless, violence on the part of protestors at
the student placement office today will serve no purpose.
The worst danger of such violence is that it will make
the Dow interviewers and their applicants appear peaceful.
The mindless zombies who will conduct and attend
today's interviews do not deserve to become martyrs.
Maple  Leaves
TT\eres got lobe
som+hinq srranoe
about aquu
aewned GfoBriel—
especicalautoenhe
y   svde. saddle
'I thought of something student council can do tonight—lefs fire the editor I'
Housing crisis means fun
for neurotic landlords
By BONILEE
Once upon a time about two
and a half months ago, four
female university students pooled their meagre resources and
took over half a duplex on
beautiful Point Grey Road.
The four enthusiastic girls lived happily during the month of
September in the spacious and
comfortable house, enthralled
with their good fortune, full of
good plans for the future and
warm thoughts for the nice landlord, who raised the rent $10
more a month, but assured them
a lease was not necessary, and
left them quite alone.
But one day, the friendly landlord moved his wife and son and
baby and furniture into the duplex next door. Wife of friendly
landlord was duly greeted one
morning by member and self-
appointed spokesman of the other
side of the house who Welcomed
friendly landlord's wife and suggested friendly landlord and wife
inform the other side if their
sounds of living were excessively
loud or disrupting.
Pleasant and amiable landlord's wife pleasantly thanked
self-apponted spokesman and retired into the depths of her quarters. Days passed.
The energetic, enthusiastic and
indeed, resourceful girls, because
they were young, energetic, enthusiastic and resourceful, were
often visited by friends and fellows.
They lived neither excessively
noisily, nor excessively immorally nor excessively amoursly.
And the friendly landlord
smiled in greeting and waved
when their paths did deem to
cross and did not speak but to
say hello. Never once did he
complain or give any indication
of displeasure or warn his tenants.
But one night in late October,
the girls had a card game and
the card game, as games do,
went merrily until early morning.
So much so, that the friendly
landlord, in an early morning
call, very amiably suggested the
game end. The game ended.
The next evening, self-appointed spokesman of the other side
of the house received a call from
the friendly landlord. Very
amiably, very pleasantly he evicted them.
Here begins the story.
The situation above is, in
fact, what the housing crisis
is all about.
I was one of those four girls
and I feel I have an insight
into the housing crisis because
I am part of it.
The housing crisis is now an
acknowledged fact. It is an
acknowledged fact that people
cannot find decent accommodation because there just is not
enough to go around.
But the real crisis exists not
in the lack of accommodation
but in the injustices that surround it.
And the injustice arises because not only are those who
look for accommodation
aware of the shortage but so
are those who offer it.
A landlord no longer needs
to sign a lease to protect his
monthly income because he is
assured of tenants while the
crisis exists.
He is thus free to kick out
at will his unprotected tenants,
who, for want of decent accommodation, must rent on his
terms.
INCOMPATIBILITY
In our case, the reason given
Was incompatibility. "We
would rather rent to someone
like our selves, with children,
whose routine conforms to that
of a normal family," we were
told.
Incompatibility. It is almost
incredible that a landlord
would evict his tenants not on
legal grounds of excessive
noise, non-payment of rent, illegal or immoral activities, but
incompatibility.
But our eviction is only one
example of the injustices of
the housing crisis.
Several male university students who lived in half a duplex had to contend with a
landlady who thought nothing
of running unannounced into
their bedrooms, accusing them,
in most explicit terms, of fornicating.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Oransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo    Kurt Hllg.r
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire  Charlotte Hair.
Pag. Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lm
At first, there didn't appear to
be any. Later, it was quite apparent that there weren't any. Much
later, almost all hope was lost, because there still weren't any. "Any
what?" asked Irving Fetish. But no
one answered there weren't any.
Finally, as midnight approached,
there   were.   Mike   Finlay   came   In
Two female students room
and boarding in Burnaby were
unjustly accused by a neurotic landlady of entertaining
men in their bedrooms.
"I ought to _lap your face
and kick your teeth in," she
screamed at them.
They didn't wait to be evicted; they left.
TELEVISION BLARES
There are countless students
right now who can't use a telephone without a landlord or
landlady hovering around
them.
There are others who must
try to study while five youngsters murder each other and
the television blares with tho
sounds of Tarzan.
These things, these great injustices and incredible inconveniences that students somehow manage to adjust to, are
the essence, the real meaning
of the housing crisis.
The most appalling fact of
all is that there is no immediate answer to the problem.
Government authorities, tangled in red tape, will probably
take years to ease the crisis.
And meanwhile, students
will find themselves trying to
live with a toaster and a kettle.
They'll find themselves travelling   precious   hours    every
day getting to  and from the
university.
PRIVACY
They'll find themselves with
the basic human right of privacy violated again and again.
To these people I offer my
sympathy.
To landlords like my former,
I offer this: If there is a heaven and hell for landlords,
you're slated for the latter.
This might not solve the
problem, but it sure eases
those   pent-up   frustrations.
wearing a nightcap, and Irene Wa-
silewski, Steve Jackson and Mark
DeCoursey all carried candlesticks,
which shed some light on the problem.    Ann   Arky   shed   some   weight.
Hew Gwynne left 187 pipe cleaners in his empty saki bottle, Laurie
Dunhar did push-ups, Paul Knox
curdled yogurt, and Alexandra Volkoff had a rugged time making
carpets. Judy Young worked some
more on her renuine .1unk in a corner, while Fred Cawsty became
quite bald and bawled. Jade Eden
shrank from a Pyfatalphynx and
left,  shortly.
Chris Blake snored in the darkroom., while Lawrence Woodd, Bob
Brown   and   George   Hollo  grimaced.
Frank Twigg twirled bolos in the
jock shop, as Mike Fitzgerald lept
over the tallest buildings, which
abounded, in a single bound. Jim
Maddin   ran  an  errand,   but lost. uesday, November 14, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Optimists
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The recent returns from the
American elections showed
that the Democrats lost some
ground to the GOP, but, according to the Vancouver Sun,
"The Johnson administration
received good news from San
Francisco where a referendum
on a proposed cease fire in
Vietnam, followed by withdrawal of U.S. troops was
soundly defeated.
"San Franciscans voted 132,-
406 to 76,632 against ending
the war."
The fact that 37 per cent of
the voters endorsed the most
radical position possible, i.e.
immediate withdrawal, didn't
seem to phase the men in
Washington.
This approach to statistics
has some interesting implications. Take the institution of
marriage for example. When it
was recently pointed out to
an official in he State Department that 40 per cent of American marriages end in divorce,
he replied enthusiastically:
"Excellent! A clear victory for
successful marriages. American family life has never been
stronger. Also, I am particularly heartened by the wonderful state of mental health in
this country. Do you realize
that nine out of 10 Americans
spend no part of their lives in
a mental hospital!"
Upon being informed that,
according to a recent clinical
survey, 65 per cent of Americans were in need of psysci-
atric help, our official ejaculated: "Marvelous, almost four
out of 10 getting along on their
own steam! Why, even Babe
Ruth didn't bat .400."
LARRY BECKMAN
arts 9
« I t
'Joy
Editor, The Ubyssey:
While your editorial page
undoubtably brings joy to the
hearts of the professional
"boulevardiers" of protest, the
rational elements of the student population must ques-
ion your rather absurd equation on Thursday's editorial
page that freedom equals communism in Asia and South
America.
If the undeniable brutality
of Asiatic communism is seen
by your editorial staff to mean
freedom and enlightenment,
perhaps The Ubyssey should
distribute pinlc-tinted glasses
to the rest of the campus so
we all might enjoy your amusing view of viet-cong imperialism.
DAVID BARNHILL
arts  4
Action, anyone?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Last week there was a notice placed in the paper asking
Eor anyone interested in work-
Log on the Education Action
Committee to come to first
vice-president Don Munton's
»ffice Wednesday noon. As is
lypical around this campus, no
ine showed up.
What I am unable to com
prehend is how the apathetic
student body of this institution can vote 70 per cent in
favor of retaining the Canadian Union of Students one
week and when volunteers are
called for implementing a program the next week, nobody
turns up. What's wrong? Do
we blame the leaders of the
flock? Surely Lynn Spraggs
and Stan Persky should, instead of always wanting to
know what someone is going
to do for them, ask what they
can do for someone. Both these
leaders should push their followers to participate a little
more than always howling because nothing is getting done.
On Wednesday, then, everyone interested turn out at Mun-
ton's office in Brock Hall at
noon and volunteer to work
on the Education Action Committee.
MIKE PEARCE
arts 3
'Not blatant'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In reply to Mr. Duncan Od-
ner's challenge in the Nov. 3rd
issue of The Ubyssey:
There are two types of foreign students registering at UBC
for the first time — those who
are sponsored by some government plan (i.e. Colombo Plan,
Malayan Exchange, World University Service), and those
who are privately sponsored.
The percentages quoted of
foreign students who wish to
live in residence.
Those on government plans
are registered with the university long before they arrive in
Canada and none are refused
residence. In fact, beds are
held for them in the event that
they arrive later than expected.
Privately sponsored students
who make application for residence are all accommodated.
The only students in this category who are refused residence are those who have not
informed the administration of
their need for accommodation
and who arrive after the residences are already full.
I would hardly call this "bla
tant  discrimination,"  Mr.  Od-
ner.
BLAIZE  HORNER
AMS   residence  representative
Graduate Scholarships
VALUE $6,000 PER ANNUM
A number of scholarships, each valued at $6,000 per annum
(tax free), are available to suitable graduates in any branch
of engineering—mech., elec, civil etc.—or applied science
who are interested in a career in the Mining Industry.
These are McGill University scholarships for an advanced
course leading to a master's degree in mining engineering.
Applications should be made, before February 5, 1968, to:
Chairman:
Dept. of Mining Engineering & Applied Geophysics,
McGill University, 510 Pine Avenue West,
Montreal, P.Q.
These scholarships are sponsored by a group of Canadian
Mining Companies.
a
yourJesus
is
contaminated!"
The angry cry of a young Negro rings out of this searing documentary of
the compromising fears, confusions and hopes of a white northern Lutheran
parish, faced with the challenge of "loving thy neighbor"... when "thy
neighbor" is black.
AYIME
FOR
See this documentary THURSDAY NOON
HA. 110   -   25c
Hear L. William YOUNGDAHL
Creator of this racial storm; now of Berkeley.
And commentary by Dr. John ROSS and Jack WASSERMAN
PRESENTED BY LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 196
Passion of St. Doris
By AL VAN MEER
The second major topic of the year for half the Arts I has
been the Bible.
A book of this stature, complexity, and sheer economic
potential (if we believe the best-seller bus ads) lends itself
perfectly to the discussion format of Arts I.
During the last month we have been forging ourselves
with debates on concepts of God, the metaphysics of original
sin, where Cain's wife came from, Noah's ark as a UFO, pros
and cons of immaculate conceptions, whether or not a Tower
of Babel would be a worthwhile unemployment project; and
countless other scholarly considerations.
But most provocative of all was a recent two-hour session
on the very crux of the Bible: the song of Solomon.
After we observed that all the metaphors for love in the
song are ones of fertility and abundance, someone suggested
Doris Day as a modern counterpart of the Rose of Sharon. This
notion was promptly squelched by all with mutterings about
a sterile, cow-like image.
However, convinced that this question is of vital concern
to the outside as well as Arts I, and having long had an intensive
(almost prurient) interest in Doris Day movies, I must answer
this deluded consensus of opinion.
My research for this small treatise began a year or so ago,
when, by some uncanny coincidence, I was subjected to two
Doris Day movies in the space of one week.
Apart from Doris' eternal I'11-bet-it's-the-Crest sincerity,
there was something unnervingly similar about the two movies,
although I could not prove it was intentional.
The confirmation I needed came a few weeks later at a
third of her movies, which I had unwittingly walked into on
sneak preview night.
The thread I had suspected appeared again, allowing me
to make the following empirical statement: All Doris Day's
erotic scenes occur in the kitchen.
The ramifications of this law are obvious: what better
twentieth century setting for myrrh and spices, honeycomb and
honey, wine and milk, round goblet navels, etc., than in the
kitchen?
The somewhat crude folk sayings referring to having one
in the oven, need hardly be mentioned. Doris Day's image is
unquestionably fertile and abundant.
And what is more, she is inextricably bound up with the
Old Testament. Personally, I never open a Bible to the song of
songs without seeing her there, like a pressed flower, slipped
between the pages.
The general result is that an Arts I person, in attempting
to grasp any idea, finds that he has actually put his hand on a
whole sticky gob of knowledge, and so gained invaluable experience for the great taffy-pull of intellectual life.
Dow—a cog in the war machine—
an assembly line without morality
Br DAVID MARSHALL
Dow is coming to campus today. Dow Chemical, the people
who make jelly for napalm, the people who profit from napalm,
but are not responsible for its use. (They only make it.)
Dow Chemical only produces the jelly—not even the complete bombs. It doesn't drop the bombs or make the policy that
allows them to be dropped. It only does its little job. It merely
does its own part to make the whole blood-and-burning-flesh
thing possible.
But how can they be held accountable? They do a job
which is small. A job which, if refused by them, would be
performed by somebody else. And surely they are not responsible for the use of such a weapon.
And so we all cop out. And the machine runs unhindered.
And people are ground up.
We live in an assembly line era. It's time we developed
an assembly line morality. Killing is spread around, so must
be responsibility.
The war machine cannot function unless its parts function.
To say that one company's refusal will be met by simple replacement is both irrelevant to the moral question and an uncertainty—especially if even a few companies faced the issue.
Let Dow come out in support of American policy in Vietnam or stop producing polystyrene for the bombs. Don't let
them cop out. Go down to the student employment centre and
talk to them.
They're here from Tuesday till Thursday. If you are opposed
to the killing in Vietnam, talk to Dow Chemical. Ask them why.
tSHELU
Cold Weather Ahead!
it Free Antifreeze Check
it Free Battery Check
it Goodyear Winter Tires
it Imported V.W. Chains
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
This page, introduced today, is to provide a forum
for Arts I writers on aspects
of their new program and
questions of interest to those
outside its small group.
What's it all about?
guinea pigs give reply
By NATE SMITH
What the hell is this Arts I garbage?
Every one of tthe 240 guinea pigs in UBC's "bold ne^
experiment in education" has to answer that question severs
times a day.
Those who ask the question don't bother to hear the answe
because of their own preconceived notions. Some dismiss i
as a glorified English course or just another artsy-fartsy tinu
waster.
On the other hand, certain types go into ecstasy, offerin
Arts I as the answer to everything rotten in Denmark.
There are also Arts 2, 3 and 4 students who wish th-
someone had thought of it sooner, and the arts council, whic
sees it as fertile land for the cultivation of Perskyism.
Most of these people know very little about how the pr<
gram actually work. Therefore a brief explanation may be i
order.
First of all, the whole thing happens in what is euphemii
tically referred to as the new Arts I building, otherwise know
as the old music building.
The program itself is divided into two groups of 120 student
each. These two groups are subdivided into seminar groups C
20 to 25 persons, each led by a faculty member. The semina
sections meet twice a week for two hours at a stretch and eacl
full group meets once a week for two hours.
Discussion in these meetings centres on the content and/o
significance of whatever item on that group's required readm
list is currently under discussion.
And Arts I reading list is something that must be seen t
be believed.
Group one's list, for example, ranges from Plato and th
Bible to Camus and McLuhan with so much crammed in betweei
that it must be covered in very little time.
Arts I students write no exams, but are responsible fo
frequent essays and individual research projects. All must tak
two normal courses, however.
CENSORED!
RESTRICTED  TO  THE  UBC  AUDIENCE!
ANDY WARHOL'S
THE CHELSEA GIRLS
TOUR DE FORCE
OF TECHNICAL
_   AND SEXUAL
INGENUITY'
-NATIONAL OBSERVER
"ONE OF THE MOST
k POWERFUL, OUTRAGEOUS,
RELEVANT AND
NOTICEABLE MOVIES
ANYONE ANYWHERE
HAS MADE!'
-NEWSWEEK
I
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTATION
TONIGHT, NOV. 14 - 7:30 - UBC AUDITORIUM
Students $1.50 — Adults $2.00
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON ALL SPECIAL EVENTS
LISTEN TO TERRY DAVID MULLIGAN ON CKLG—RADIO 73
SUNDAY 12-4        MONDAY - f RIDAY 9-12 Tuesday, November 14, 1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 7
CUP CROSS-CONTINENT  NEWS ROUNDUP
Krassner  discusses  fuss
Special to Canadian University Press
An article by Paul Krassner, editor of the
satirical magazine, the Realist, is causing protests, sit-ins, and public hysteria in Montreal.
The McGill University newspaper, the McGill Daily, reprinted the article Nov. 3, resulting
in administration charges of obscene libel for
three Daily- editors. Revised charges contain the
possibility of expulsion for the three.
The article claimed to be excerpts of William Manchester's manuscript of The Death of
a President — excerpts which do not appear
in any complete version of the book.
The article describes scenes on the presidential jet just prior to the swearing in of president
Johnson in 1963.
In an interview with the Georgian, the student newspaper of Sir George Williams University, Krassner said the article was entirely
satirical and that no legal action has been taken
against him.
Krassner said he was not surprised at the
McGill reaction.
"When John Fekete (Daily columnist) called
me to ask permission to run the piece, I told
Pass-fail system
started at Yale
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (CUP-CPS) — The Yale
University faculty has voted to replace numerical grading with a system of four designations—
fail, pass, high pass or honors.
The new system will begin next year and
continue on an experimental basis for at least
five years.
Yale's present system is grading scale from
40 to 100, with 60 as the lowest passing grade.
The university at present compiles cumulative
averages for each student, but it will no longer
do so when the new system goes into effect.
him he'd have to expect this kind of reaction.
"He told me he realized the risks involved
and so I told him to go ahead and print it. He
called me over the weekend and filled me in on
what was happening and I wrote a letter saying
the article was entirely fictional."
In a statement released Friday, Daily editor
Peter Allnutt said the article should not have
appeared in the McGill Daily.
Krassner said he felt it was hard to determine
whether Allnutt's decision was influenced by
external pressures.
"As editor, publisher, and ring-leader of the
Realist," said Krassner, "I have no one to
answer to but myself. Allnutt's in a different
position.
"College newspapers don't have that type
of independence. It all comes down to he who
pays the piper calls the tune. There are no objective standards to decide whether or not they
were wise or unwise in printing the piece. It
depends on a number of things."
Krassner said that disciplinary action planned by students' council and the senate is
absurd.
"The Realist isn't trash ... it is assigned as
reading on some English courses in different
colleges in the states. To take disciplinary action
means to punish people for committing crimes
without victims."
Krassner said he felt it was valid to use real
people in satirical comment.
"One of America's most respected satirist,
Art Buchwald, wrote an article about the death
of J. Edgar Hoover . . . The use of real persons
in satire often determines the impact the piece
will have upon readers.
"The cries for censorship and suppression
of such material is a dangerous symptom of the
sick society we live in.
"It is, in part, this sick society which I was
trying to satirize in that now famous piece of
mine . . . censorship can only take place when
there is a clear and present danger such as preventing manufacture of firecrackers resembling
popcorn balls."
Report hits reduction
TORONTO (CUP)—A student report has called for abolition
of 10 per cent reductions given faculty by the University of
Toronto bookstore.
This was the major recommendation of a report commissioned by Toronto student council.
The report had general praise for the bookstore.
It also criticized the connection between the bookstore and
the U of T press, which it termed an unhealthy relation.
The report revealed that the bookstore has an annual net
loss of one per cent on a volume of $1.8 million. The deficit is
paid for by the university.
Senators, students
seek rector post
KINGSTON (CUP) — A prominent Ottawa senator
and two campus personalities have been nominated as
candidates for the position of part-time rector at Queen's
University.
Queen's students last week held a plebiscite which
endorsed a part-time rector. Alternatives were a full-time
man, or abolishing the post altogether.
Senator Gratton O'Leary, student council president
George Carson, and grad philosophy student Butch Nelson
were nominated at a council meeting Tuesday.
A student has never before been nominated.
O'Leary, ,a senator since 1962, was chairman of the
* 1961 royal commission on publications which recommended
'A tax penalties for firms which advertise in U.S. magazines
g printed in Canada — particularly, Time, Life and Readers'
\  Digest.
- Carson is in final year medicine. Nelson was one of
~  the main organizers of the campaign to have the rector-
" ship declared a fulltime post.
Elections are set for Dec. 6.
York joins the pill set
TORONTO (CUP) — University of Toronto has it. Western
has it. Waterloo has it. And now York has the pill.
Dr. H. J. Wheeler, director of the York University health
services, said: "In my own private general practice, I give out
birth control information and tablets to those desiring it, but
this is based on my discretion, having an interview with the
patient and conducting an examination.
"In my office at the health services, which is a form of
general practice, I will follow the same procedure, unless advised
to the alternative by the university."
President Murray Ross, questioned about the official university policy on the dissemination of birth control information
and devices, said: "The issue is entirely in the hands of the
medical profession. It depends on the doctor and the patient."
Dr. Joan Stewart, of psychological services, said the main
problem with distribution of birth-control information is the
lack of an official university policy.
ENGINEERING   GRADS
Engineering graduates in civil, electrical, mechanical and
other engineering fields are invited to consider these employment opportunities with the Public Service of Canada:
National Development
Programs
Water Resources Studies
Design and Construction
Laboratory Research
Maintenance and Operations
Instrument Development
Systems Design
Telecommunications
Patent Examination
Administration
Surveys
Trade Promotion
A career with the Federal Government, the major employer
of professional engineers in Canada, features broad scope
for professional development, competitive salaries, technically trained support staff, modern equipment, three
weeks' annual vacation and promotion based on merit.
INTERVIEWS: November 14, 15, 16 and 17
Mr. G. Laatunen will be on campus to discuss engineering
careers with you on the above dates. Arrange your appointment through the Placement Office today.
/
w
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
SHAKESPEARE'S
^
a dark comedy of innocence and corruption
with
Derek Ralston Peter Brockington
Barney O'Sullivan Shirley Broderick
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
Noverpber 17-25
STubENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for most performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, Nov. 20th, 7:30 p.m. - Thursday, Nov. 23rd, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 or 228-2678
Don't Miss This Opportunity To See One Ot Shakespeare's
Rarely-Performed Masterpieces
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
ws
.FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 1967
KLA-HOW-YA tillicum or as August Jack used to say, how
are ya. This cross-eyed Thunderbird, only one on campus
who hasn't dropped six games straight, appears perturbed
at the strange beastie crawling up his snout. Local legend
has it when our beastie reigns supreme peace will reign over
the land.
Church picks chaplain
The new chaplain for UBC Anglicans will be chosen by a
campus Anglican committee.
"Bishop G. P. Gower, in whose diocese UBC is situated, has
agreed to allow two members of the UBC committee to collect
information on possible chaplain candidates," said Dr. C. P.
Taylor, committee chairman.
The committee was formed after the resignation in May,
1966 by Rev. Allan Jackson.
"A chaplain should not be sent to the campus in the manner
of a nineteenth-century missionary," Taylor said. "He should
be invited to come by the Anglicans already there."
Bookstore
suggestions
disregarded
Only three of seven recommendations in a 1965 report to
improve UBC bookstore facilities have been implemented.
Confirmation that four had
not been acted upon came
in ah interview with UBC
bookstore manager John
Hunter.
The four are: the separation
o f bookstore administration
ancilliary services, a bookstore
subsidized by the university,
implementation of a decentralization program, and a suggested request to the Canadian
Association of University Teachers enquiring about publishers' policies for book prices
and distribution to universities.
Recommendations that departments and faculties review
their ordering procedures and
that the bookstore clearly label counters and list all personnel on an open list, have
been followed through, Hunter said.
The present expansion program, a third committee recommendation, is almost complete, Hunter said.
The report was released at
the second meeting of a student committee to establish a
cooperative bookstore in the
new Student Union Building.
Chairman Blaine Kennedy
said 50 copies of the faculty
report are available for persons interested in bookstore
administration.
Meanwhile, Alma Mater Society president Shaun Sullivan
said the committee's estimate
of $75,000 to cover operating
costs for a co-op over the first
two years is more than the
AMS could supply.
COLIN WILSON
- ANTI-FREUDIAN
EXISTENTIALIST
BRITISH WRITER & CRITIC
(1) NOV. 17 - FRI. - NOON - BROCK LOUNGE
'Nature ot Sexual Impulse
(2) NOV. 17 - FRI. - 8 P.M. - HEBB THEATRE
LECTURE  DISCUSSION
"BEYOND THE OUTSIDER"
(The Philosophy of the Future)
(3) NOV. 18 - SAT. - 9:30 A.M. - BU. 106
DIALOGUE BETWEEN COLIN WILSON AND
CRITIC KINGSLEY WIDMER ON
"The Critic Against Culture"
Moderator Dr. Stephen Black, Dept. of Eng., S.F.U.
SPECIAL EVENTS
ADMISSION:
fl).   35 cents
(2).   Students $1.25 — Others $2.50
(3).  Students $2.00 — Others $4.00
Admission which includes (2) and (3)
Students $2.50 — Others $5.00.
THE    FRIAR
Open from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m.
(3  a.m.  Friday & Saturday)
•
STUDENT DINNERS
Monday thru Thursday
5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
•
Delivery Drivers
Needed Evenings,
224-0833 after 7 p.m.
4423   W.    10th
fashion at
your door!
Leather and  wool  jackets,
coats,   vests,   shirts,   slacks.
Suede  suifs>  ties, purses.
Cow,  sheep,  wolf  skin  vests.
Wedding    dresses,   dresses.
Blou.es,   bathing   suits   and
jumping   suits.
All  garments tailored for
self  measurements.
MEKMET'S TAILORS
540 Granville St. - 684-0811
In Arnold & Quigley's Shop
WateAcolowa
ffiaming
4430
W lOtlx
GRACEM'S
&
PEC0R WflflWARE LTD
1636 Fnanklln St
255-2033 9AM - 9PM
exhilarating
elegance
for MEN
JAQH
EA5T
COLOGNE
4oz.
$4.75
AFTER
SHAVE
4oz.
$3.75
Discerning men find luxurious
pleasure in the subtle masculine scent of Jade East...worlds
apart from the ordinary.
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the University to discuss Summer Employment
at Thompson, Manitoba with 1st, 2nd and 3rd year
students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
COMMERCE
On November 22, 23 and 24
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
THOMPSON, MANITOBA Tuesday, November 14, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Adoption  procedures  criticized
No  one  is neutral concerning Children's Aid Society
By NORMAN GIDNEY
(First in a series on
child adoption)
The Children's Aid Society
is like communism, the John
Birch society and the God is
dead theory — no one has a
neutral position on. any of
them.
The most criticized section
of the CAS is its adoption
agency.
Praise from persons other
than employees is hard to find.
Among the agency's critics
are a B.C. MLA, a Catholic
priest, parents who tried to
adopt, and a spokesman for
Freedom for Adoptive Children, a new adoption group.
"The Children's Aid Societey
no longer has any reason to
remain in existence as a valid
organization. That farce should
should be terminated," says
Dave Barrett, NDP member
of the B.C. legislature and a
former CAS employee (master
of social work degree).
INFANTS BAPTIZED
Father Michael Ryan, chaplain at Simon Fraser University, complains that the Catholic CAS baptizes every infant
trusted to their care so that
it can only be adopted by
Catholic parents.
"Up to a month ago they
were baptizing every infant
that came into their care. I
don't think there are enough
Catholic parents in the area to
adopt that many."
A UBC professor and his
wife criticized the CAS for
stringing them along about
their qualifications to adopt.
Dr. Job Kuijt, assistant professor of botany, said he had
considerable difficulty with
the agency.
"We applied in the summer
of 1965, went through the usual interviews and after four
months the social worker said
we could adopt a baby soon.
In one way and another the
social worker kept putting us
off.
INTER-RACIAL BABY
"I contacted the director and
he told us the agency had decided against us. We-had been
strung along for six months."
He and Mrs. Kuijt both wanted to adopt an interracial baby.
In June, 1966 the Kuijts
moved to Berkeley, California
where they had no trouble
adopting a Negro - Caucasian
boy. They have since moved
back to Vancouver.
"Their attitude in Berkeley
seemed to be: we've got children you want one so let's get
together," said Mrs. Kuijt.
"The impression we got
from the CAS here was: prove
to us why we should allow you
to have one of our precious
children."
Children's Aid Society officials deny these conditions exist, saying almost anyone who
applies can adopt.
They attribute the excess of
orphans and scarcity of adoptive parents to increased promiscuity and a greater illegitimacy rate, not to restrictive and
unnecessarily harsh adoption
standards.
KIDS SHIPPED OUT
"We're placing about 80-100
children a month," said Mrs.
Denise Drew, assistant director of the provincial child welfare adoption service in Vancouver. "But last year at the
end   of  each  month   we  had
about 130-150 children in a
flexible pool."
One result, Mrs. Drew said,
is that children are being shipped out of Canada. Last year
her agency placed 12 children
in Minnesota.
Several agency requirements
for adoption had been relaxed
in the last five years, she said.
"Before, we never placed
with parents who had natural
children. Now a third of our
children are placed in this
manner."
No rigid financial requirements exist, but prospective
parents should be married for
at least two years.
The average time for placement is four to six months,
she said. There is no limit to
the number of children parents may adopt.
Miss Betty Kennedy, head of
the Catholic CAS adoption
agency, said their most important requirement was that parents should have love and security to offer a child.
MUST BE CATHOLIC
Other requirements are
that parents have a reasonable-
standard of living, a good mar-
rage, and a reference from a
Catholic priest, she said. One
parent must be a Catholic.
Robert Marcus, assistant director of services for the CAS,
said one important condition
for adoption is that both parents have the desire to adopt.
Marcus agreed that surplus
of applications and scarcity of
children five years ago has
been reversed.
Reasons he gave for the present situation were illegitimate
births, a shortage of housing,
and that people just don't want
to adopt children.
"A lot of this is dictated by
Talk over your future
with the Bell employment
reps when they visit your
campus on
NOVEMBER
16, 17
20. 21
GRADS-TO-BE-IN:
CIVIL &  ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING
MATHS  &  PHYSICS
HONOURS ARTS
Ask at your Placement Office
for informative booklets and
arrange for an interview now!
Bell Canada
the law of supply and demand," he said. "If we can
place for adoption we do."
ONE BECOMES GOD
CAS critic Tony Calaman
says he opposes the social
worker interview system because it places the power of
God in the hands of one person.
Calaman, a former boxer
and now Berkeley  apartment
owner who grosses $18,000 a
year, formed Freedom for
Adoptive Children to make
the adoption procedure easier
for parents.
His plan would connect
adoptive children with prospective parents. Parents would
appear before a supreme court
judge, and the courts would be
the sole determining factor in
allowing parents to adopt.
LES CHANSONNIERS
—Claude Gauthier — Composer, Lyricist &
Performer
—Louise Forestier — Recording Artist
—Les Alexandrins — Luc & Lise Cousineau
—A French Variety Package of Outstanding
Singers
SPECIAL EVENTS - TUES., NOV. 14
BROCK LOUNGE - NOON
DOCTORATE
MASTERS BACHELOR
1968
Physical Sciences Graduates
The Public Service of Canada offers excellent
career opportunities in
RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT
INSTRUMENTATION
for graduates in the following disciplines:
— Astronomy
— Chemistry
— Geochemistry
— Geology
— Geophysics
— Glaciology
— Oceanography
— Mathematics
— Mining
— Mineralogy
— Metallurgy
— Mineral Economics
Plan now to discuss these opportunities with representatives
of the Public Service of Canada when they visit your campus
on
NOVEMBER 20, 21 and 22
Interviews may be arranged through your University
Placement Officer. Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 1967
AS SEASON   ENDS
**% ' .-»•« '^
Birds' wings clipped again
By MIKE FITZGERALD
The UBC football Thunderbirds ended their season with
a sigh as they were dumped
29-0 toy the University of Alberta Golden Bears at the stadium on Saturday.
It was actually a nothing
game for both teams, but Alberta poured it on when they
found the Thunderbirds weakness, which was playing football.
Len Sorenson scored the
Bear's first touchdown as he
bulled his way through a porous UBC defensive line.
In the second half Hart Can-
telon sprinted around end for
their second major. Shortly
thereafter John Violini scampered across to make it 22-0.
The final points came on a
short blast by quarterback
Terry Lampert. Ludwig Dauber kicked all four converts
and also a single in the first
half.
Only the talents of four players kept this match from becoming a bloody bore.
For UBC, Bob Fitzpatrick
was brilliant on defense as he
did everything
but eat the
ball. Dave Corcoran, as usual,
put his head
down and
bashed a few
oncoming
tacklers, and
proved once FITZPATRICK
again that when you want to
move the ball, give it to the
fullback.
For Alberta, the quarterback
Terry Lampert was the distinguished star of an undistinguished   team,   better   per
haps than Danny Miles, All-
American from Southern Oregon whom the Birds faced
earlier this year.
His long beautiful passes hit
their mark every time and his
short bullets were so fast you'd
miss them if you blinked. The
star of the game, at any rate.
Halfback John Violini complemented Lampert in the
backfield and slithered around
all afternoon, taking little
passes and long breakaways.
For the statistically minded,
here are a few samples of
UBC's awesome power, season-
wise.
The average points-per-game
scored against them was 27.3,
which speaks very well for
the defense. This includes a
61-0 pasting at the hands of
Portland State.
The average of points for is
a fantastic six. Two field goals
a game. Which speaks very
poorly for the offense.
And that is why everybody
sighed.
Let's face it. Coach Frank
Gnup didn't have much when
the season rolled around, but
he did a great job with the
material he had.
Perhaps the problem can be
summed up by the answer
Gnup gave this fledging reporter who asked him why his
team wasn't doing so well.
"You must be new here,
son," he said. "We have a participation policy at our school."
As for Alberta, the score certainly does not represent any
ability on their part. As leaders of the Western Intercollegiate conference, they have absolutely nothing to show for
this position except their quar
terback and one halfback.
And as for the College Bowl
to be held in the near future,
forget it. This seems to be very
off-year for the WCIAA.
Rugby Braves
at teepee top
The UBC rugby Braves remained undefeated when they
clobbered SFU's first team 29-
11   on  Saturday.
The Braves have five wins
and one tie which puts them
solidly in first place.
Rod  Holloway   scored   two
gn   tries in a good
team effort.
The  Braves
won   going
away  as  they
were    at    one
point  tied   11-
11  with  the
Simon    Fraser
HOLLOWAY      squad   but   18
unanswered   points   clearly
established their superiority.
The Thunderbirds, UBC's
first string, beat North Shore
All-Blacks 14-6, for their second win in a row.
Chuck Plester scored three
tries, Tony Hodge added
another and Don Crompton
kicked a convert to account
for UBC's  14 points.
The Totems lost a close game
to North Shore All-Blacks seconds 11-6, the only loss a
UBC rugby team has suffered
in two weekends of play.
Coach Donn Spence gave his
inevitable quote, the one he
says every week.
"I was very pleased with the
results this weekend."
And pleased he should be,
for all the UBC rugby teams
are playing good, winning
rugby.
MARDI GRAS
The greatest fun and
frolicing event of the year I
DON'T   MISS
the FLOORSHOW TRYOUTS
Wednesday & Friday - Girls
Tuesday & Thursday - Boys
NORTH BROCK TV ROOM -12:30-2:30
r,
h
'*
Sports Shorts
Ski film heads for QE Theatre
World famous ski photographer John Jay will bring
his new ski-epic "Head for the Hills" to the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
One of the film's highlights is the coverage of Nancy
Greene of Rossland in last winter's Vail Races—the top
North American race.
Most of the skiers who will compete in this winter's
Olympic Games are to be seen skiing in Jay's picture.
Of special local interest is a coverage of the Slush
Cup race and its attendant amusements at Mt. Baker.
A number of UBC students are likely to be seen in
this portion of the film.
Birds wrestle to second meet win
The Thunderbird wrestling team won its second consecutive meet on Friday, defeating Notre Dame University
50-0.
The UBC team, stronger, better conditioned and more
experienced than the Notre Dame wrestlers, won all its
bouts by falls, most of them in the first round.
The two teams have a return match scheduled for
Feb. 24 in Nelson.
". . . there is no career that can match business in diversity of
intellectual interest . . . A vigorous, free society calls
for the highest type of business leadership . . ."
THE STANFORD UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
invites you to meet its Admissions Representative
Mr. Paul Johnson on
November 27, 1967
to discuss the Stanford M.B.A. and Ph.D. Programs in Business Administration. Appointments to meet with Mr.
Johnson may be made through
Student Services
The M.B.A. Program is a two-year general management
course particularly designed for students who have majored
in liberal arts, humanities, science, and engineering. The
purpose of the Doctoral Program is to train scholars for the
stimulating challenge open to business educators, researchers, and innovators.
THE CANADIAN
METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE
offers
professional careers to bachelor graduates in
PHYSICS & MATHEMATICS or PHYSICS
(GENERAL, MAJORS, AND HONOURS COURSES)
as
METEOROLOGISTS-(about 15 graduates required)
Successful candidates are enrolled, at full salary, in a 2 year
Master's degree course in Meteorology at McGill University,
the University of Toronto, or the University of Alberta (Edmonton).
and
METEOROLOGICAL OFFICERS
— (about 50 graduates required) —
Successful candidates are given a 9 month in-service training
program and then posted to the various civilian and National
Defence weather offices across Canada.
These opportunities offer competitive salaries, challenging
work and numerous employee benefits.
Interviews On Campus
November 15 & 16
Full details, applications and interview appointments
available at your Placement Office. Tuesday, November 14, 1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 11
■      ■ i r
. . »' j •.->Ma'f,t
IN  HOCKEY
Daytime win goes to Knights
— fred cawtey photo
FUNNY YOU SHOULD ASK. You see, three days ago I got
up here on my two arms on these bloody bars when I heard
a crack, and Clarence, if I move a muscle I'm a goner. Tell
the coach I've gone to those Big Parallel Bars in the Sky.
Thunderettes take two
The UBC Thunderettes edged Victoria Rawlings 39-38 Sunday in Senior A women's basketball at John Oliver Gym.
The Thunderettes were down 38-23 with less than five
minutes to play but rebounded with 16 points to grab the victory.
Angie Radanovich led UBC with 11 points and Terry McGavin added nine.
Saturday the Thunderettes also nipped the Rawlings, this
time by a 51-49 score.
In this contest, Janet Douglas was UBC's top scorer with
24 points.
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds have a two win—one
loss record after their weekend
contests with the Notre Dame
University Knights.
The Birds defeated the
Knights 5-3 on Friday night
and lost by the same score on
Saturday afternoon.
Previously  the  Birds  had
beaten the Co-
quitlam   Lum-
berkings by a
10-6 score.
All games
were played
in the Winter
Sports Center.
"It was tremendous   hoc-
key," said       HUNTER
coach Bob Hindmarch,  speaking of Friday's  game in  particular.
"On Saturday we were leading 3-0 but lost our poise," added the jubilant hockey coach.
Friday's contest was filled
with hard, solid body-checking
as the UBC played great fundamental hockey. The Birds out-
shot the Knights 43-25.
A goal by Tom Kortechuck
gave the Birds a 1-0 first period lead. Kortechuck is sporting a beard this year and Hindmarch describes him as looking like the "wrath of God."
After the Kootenay team had
tied the score, Jack Littler
gave the UBC squad a 2-1 lead
only to see the Knights knot
the score again.
Les Johannesen's goal near
the end of the frame gave UBC
a 3-2 second period lead.
The Knights fought back
early in the third and again
tied the score before goals by
North-Rite "195" passes 23 strict quality and endurance tests before it is finally
packaged and shipped5 to your dealer... that is why we have no hesitation in giving
you a written guarantee for life. Even the ink cartridge is guaranteed to write for
one full year or we send you a replacement free. The new stainless steel ball and
socket eliminate ink leaks on hands, clothing and paper.
MjRth-TiLtE
THE COMPANY THAT MAKES A POINT OF QUALITY.
AT YOUR
UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE
Mickey McDowell and Glen
Richards assured victory for
the Birds.
In Saturday's contest, Don
Fiddler and Wayne Hunter
gave UBC a 2-0 first period
lead.
Jack James made the score
3-0 before Ron Chwacka netted the first of his three goals
to lead the Knights to the
come-from-behind  victory.
Each team had 34 shots on
goal. Rick Bardal in the UBC
nets played steadily in both
games.
Referring to this year's squad,
Hindmarch said that his team
has more balance despite the
loss of last year's scoring leader Al McLean.
Nine of last year's players
have come back. These include
McDowell,   Johannesen,   Jack
Moores, Kortechuck Miles Desharnais, Richards, Hunter and
goalies Bardal and Russ Kirk.
Besides McLean, Hindmarch
lost defensemen Doug Purdy,
Dave Chambers, Shelly Atwell
and Lenny Bousquette, along
with forward Kevin McGland-
ery.
Newcomers include James,
Tommy Thompson, Littler,
Pollock, Terry Elliott, Morris
Lambert, Barry Wilcox, Rob
Tambellini, Bob Cherry, Pat
Crandall, Lawrence Vanzella
and Fiddler.
"We got guys who like to
thump," concluded Hindmarch,
"so we're not going to be out-
muscled this year."
A young, fast-skating club,
the Birds are sure to provide
exciting hockey for fans this
year.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Public Relations Committee
Students interested in working with on-campus and off-
campus publicity and higher education promotion are
invited to join the Public Relations Committee. People
are needed for the following projects:
—radio and newspaper liason
—poster painting
—content research for radio and television
programmes
—speakers bureau
—compilation of a weekly activities bulletin
for newspapers
—office organization and  secretarial duties
Interested persons should contact Kim Campbell. 2nd
Vice-President in the Public Relations office, upstairs,
South Brock, or by leaving their names in AMS mailbox number 53.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON fDRUGS
f
Limited
GLASSES from 9.95 Complete
CONTACT LENSES one price only$69.50
Includes any color, insurance for one year,
lifetime prescription change, all fittings.
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
Vancouver      dMMMiHMipM ** }4ffs*
677 Granvillo   ||T|TTTIlB§|TfT|Tl       *& Columbia
Opp. THE BAY I 11 I A 1 f k I I 11 1 I k I    Now  Wostminstwr
681-6174      ■_____-__U_-___a__-________-l____l___Opp. Army I Navy Page 12
'TWEEN CLASSES .
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 14, 1967
. . . WHAT CLASSES?
Jan Solecki reveals Russian changes
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Prof.   Jan   Solecki   discusses
change in Russia, today, noon,
Bu. 106.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Les Chansonniers, today,
noon, Brock lounge. General
meeting and film Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 102. Payment of outstanding fees will be appreciated.
HILLEL HOUSE
Folk singer Luis Romero appears today, noon, Hillel House
(behind   Brock.)  Bring   guitars,
non-members welcome.
MUSSOC
Publicity meeting today, noon,
clubroom.
GRAD  STUDENTS
Special expansion week beer
gardens  Thursday  and   Friday,
3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., GSC.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General   meeting   Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 214.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Dr. Les Pulus discusses group
therapy   and   emotionally   disturbed adolescents, today,  3:30
p.m., Brock lounge.
WUS
General meeting today, noon,
Ang. 413.
ECONOMICS SOC
Dr.   Young   discusses   wage-
price   guidelines,   today,   noon,
Ang. 213.
AQUA SOC
Exam for both courses Thursday, noon, Bu. 202. More information in clubroom.
GERMAN  CLUB
Kommen Sie und lernen Sie
das   Polka,   heute,   mittag,   IH
402.
IM CLUB
General meeting today, noon,
Ang. 413.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
EL CIRCULO
CIASP
Miss Molina from CPA will
speak and show films, Thursday, noon, IH upper lounge.
DEBATING UNION
Debate: Resolved Nationalism
is a Necessity. Noon, today, Bu.
217.
DANCE CLUB
Today,  rhumba;   tonight,  pin
classes;   Wednesday,   fox   trot;
Thursday, pin classes; and Friday, cha-cha.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. D. C. Graham, faculty of
medicine's associate dean,
speaks on admissions procedure
to medical school, Wednesday,
noon, Wes. 201.
ONTOLOGY
Protest — Then What discussed Wednesday noon in Bu. 223.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP
Public librarian speaks  Wednesday noon, Bu. 225.
KARATE CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
at 7 p.m., Education Gym. New
members welcome.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Co-op bookstore investigation
committee meets noon Wednesday, Brock Ext. 362.
CUSO
CUSO national secretary Les
Johnson speaks on Overseas
Challenge Thursday noon, Bu.
100.
FORESTRY FACULTY lypts at noon Wednesday, Mac. Camerouns  and  elsewhere will
Dr. W. E. Hillis, of Melbourne, 166. describe their experiences with
Australia,   lectures   on   the OPERATION CROSSROADS Operations Crossroads in Africa,
Chemo-taxonomy   of  the   Euca- Returned volunteers from The Wednesday, noon, Bu. 102.
GUITAR
—Best   instruments   at   city's
lowest prices.
—Teachers  for   classic,   folk,
flamenco, popular, banjo.
BILL LEWIS MUSIC
3645  W. Broadway  738-0033
THE HOYSTER
Active...Slim...Sporty
WHAT A DIFFERENCE
A DAY'S MAKES Cg>
CANADAY'S APPAREL LTD., MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN
CORD HOYSTERS in the latest shades $9.95
Available at these Canaday Dealers:
FINNS
Clothing   Stores   Ltd.
3031 W . Broadway
2159 W. 41st Ave.
6495   Fraser   Street
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 dart $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
— GREAT   DOUBLE  BILL!   —
at   Retinal  Circus.   Papa  Bears  Medicine   Show   and   from   Seattle:   Blues
Interchange. Fri. & Sat. 9-2 a.m. $2.00.
DANCE: JASON HOOVER AND THE
Epics, Sat., Nov. 18th, 9:30-1:00.
Place   Vanier  Ball  Room.
POLKA PARTY, FRIDAY, NOV. 17,
International House, 8:30-1:00. German Band, $1 per person. Everyone
welcome. Sponsored by I.H. & German  Club.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
FOUND: ANDY WARHOL'S ''CHEL-
sea Girls" in the Auditorium, Nov.
10 at 1:30 and 7:30 and Nov. 14 at
7:30.   Students  $1.50.   Adults  $2.00.
LOST AT WOLFSON FIELD ON
Sun. Nov. 5: 1 Bulova Stainless
steel self-wind watch and 1 gold
ring with family crest, phone Chris,
224-9900.
FOUND: LADIES' WRIST WATCH
front of Hennings Nov. 6 Phone
521-8967. 	
LOST NOV. 2 IN HA 407, COM-
merce 362 notes. Phone Tricia AM
3-3162.
LOST RED & GREEN PTOMALIN
ring on wide sliver band Nov. 8.
Contact 266-6865 after 5:30 p.m.
Reward.
FOUND: 1 PAIR OF WOMEN'S
brown-rimmed glasses by Buchanan
Wed. evening. Pick up at Pub.
Office.
FOUND: UMBRELLA FROM HITCH-
hiker Tues., Nov. 8. Male, 5th year
chemistry grad student. Phone 733-
5847.
FOUND:    SORORITY    PIN,    SILVER
ring.   Claim   Pub.   Office.	
LOST: BLUE SKI JACKET. IF ANY-
one found this jacket left in gym
on Saturday could, you turn it In to
Publications Office.
FOUND: PURSE BELONGING TO
Colleen Smallenberg. Please claim
at Ubyssey Publications Office.
Brock Hall.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WANTED — RIDE FOR 8:30's MON-
day-Friday from Moscrop and Patterson Street, Burnaby. Phone 433-
5628. Brian.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a 'good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone  Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.	
NOV.   21   ERIC   KIERANS   SPEAKS
to you  about  Canada.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE VIL-
lage — 3 barbers. Open weekdays
8:30-6 p.m. Saturday 'til 5:30.	
SEATTLE BAND AT ARTS DANCE
Thurs. 16th, 12:30 in Brock. By
donation, Blues Interchange, just
great.	
FREE TEA, COFFEE AND SOFT
chairs every Tuesday at 3:00 p.m.,
upper lounge at I. House. Come
today,   bring  your  silver  spoon.
THE KNACK AND HOW TO GET
it. Aud., Nov. 16, 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30.  50  cents.	
DOW ART GOD & SO ARE WE ALL
— at  Retinal  Circus — great   fun!
TICKETS FOR COUNTRY JOE,
Loyalists, and Papa Bears Dance,
Dec. 8th & 9th go on sale this week
at Psych Shop, Record Gallery &
Tartini's,   $2.50. 	
BALL AND CHAINS MADE TO
order. Ideal for stags, frats. Doug
Anderson, Law II or phone 263-8372
after 10 p.m.	
JASON HOOVER AND THE EPICS!
Jason Hoover and The Epics! Place
Vanier,  Sat., Nov.  18th,   9:30-1:00.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
59 PORSCHE GOOD CONDITION
2250 Westbrook. $1395, best offer.
224-9662.
'66 HONDA S600, GOOD SHAPE,
radio, must sell, no bull, will sacrifice,   leave   message.   325-7782.     	
1960 TR3, LIGHT BLUE, GOOD
condition, never been raced, $750.
Phone  Mike,   RE  8-4967.
'66      B.S.A.      650-C.C.      LIGHTNING.
Many  extras,  only  2,100  miles.  682-
3478.	
'56 V.W. GOOD MECH.  CONDITION,
radio, $250 or offers. FA 5-7861 after
six.
'55 BUICK 4-DR. HTP. SEDAN.
Running condition, new retreads,
$125. 228-8170. Phone Jamie after 6
p.m.	
1965 VOLKSWAGEN, 18,000 MILES.
Red.  Radio.   Phone  263-8949.
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and Used
SPORT CARS
N T
O      Motors     S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Copying & Duplicating
31
Miscellaneous
32
SETTING ENGAGED: SAVE BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings. For appointment call 261-
fi671  anytime.	
WANTED: HOMES FOR FOUR KIT-
tens. Suitable for catching mice,
mystic rites, etc. Will deliver. 732-
6719.
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
ANDY WARHOL'S "CHELSEA
Girls" Shocking! Unusual! Censored! Auditorium, Nov. 10, 1:30 & 7:30
and Nov. 14, 7:30. Students $1.50.
Others $2.00.   Special events!	
FROM SEATTLE: BLUES INTER-
change Arts tribal gathering in
Brock Thurs., 16th, 12:30. Dance.
By   donation.	
ROMANOFF AND JULIET, NOV. 16,
17, 18. Phone 433-5327 for tickets.
UBC students $1.00.	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
81
Help Wanted—Male
52
Male or Female
53
I CAN HELP YOU TO HIGH PART-
time  earnings.  688-3379.
Work Wanted
54
Music
62
BEGINNERS     IN     FOLK
lessons.   Flexible   schedule
able rates.  Call anythime
GUITAR
reason-
224-3975.
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
83
Tutoring
84
FRENCH. ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,  B.L.S.   736-6923.
WANTED —EDUCATION   STUDENT
to tutor second grader.   224-444S.	
TUTOR NEEDED FOR CHEMISTRY
110. Phone 298-1069. Leave name
and particulars.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
WURLITZER ELECTRIC PIANO
with preamp. Perfect working order.
Offers—Call Bob,  738-4241. _
TAPE RECORDER. — PHILLIPS.
Fully portable, excellent condition.
Remote control, new batteries, tapes.
Phone   Murray,   224-9662. 	
FOR SALE 1 PAIR ARLBERG 205
skis $20; Henkl ski boots, size 9, $10;
hand-made muckalucks, size 9. $20;
Sim Gar bongo drums; crash helmet.
261-1714.
KEUFFEL AND ESSER LOG. LOG
duplex decitrig slide rule. New con-
dition.  Phone  266-5002.	
ATTENTION E.U.S! FOR SALE:
ball and chain, professionally forged.
Phone 876-5462.
GEOLOGY STUDENTS — MEXICAN
mineral specimens. $1.50 — $2.50 —
$3.50.   Phone   Murray   —   nites   AL
5-7986.
THE KNACK & SKATER DATER.
Nov. 16, 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30. Aud.
50 cents.
PAPA BEARS MEDICINE SHOW
and Seattle's Great Blues Interchange turn everybody on this
weekend at Retinal Circus. Only
$2.00. 	
DKE ACTIVES: BRIAN WENT TO
court; John went short. You blew
yours.   Sloppy   Actives   beware?
BIGGEST DANCE TO HIT RESI-
dences: Jason Hoover and The
Epics, Sat., Nov. 18th, 9:30-1:00.
Place Vanier.
DAVID BARRETT. N.D.P. MLA,
Port Coauitlam. "Regionalism Politics or Progress", Thursday, Nov.
16, 12:30, Buchanan 203. UBC New
Democrats.	
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays
8:30-6  p.m.  Saturdays 'till   5:30.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
MEN TO FILL THE PREDATORY
shirts at 3510 West Fourth. End the
deadly days forever.
SAT., NOV. 18, 8:30 TO 12:30. OP-PHI
with The Shockers. Phrateres-
sponsored mixer. $1.00 each, $1.75
couple. 	
SLOT MACHINE FOR SALE. COST
$2,500 plus new, sell: $400. Phone
Dave FA 1-2544.
Typewriter Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELEC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384  or 224-6129.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  & Granville).   263-4530.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
oage! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison Rd. at University Blvd. Mon. to
Fri.   9  to  5.   Phone:   228-8414.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced eassay and thesis typist
Reasonable  Rates.  TR. 4-9253.
"GOOD EXPERIENCED T Y P I S T
available for home typing. Please
call 277-5640".
B.B. CLANDESTINE IMPORT SER-
vice brings you a classic slot machine at a low price. Ideal for club,
frat, small scale racketeer. Buy
mom  one for Xmas.  FA 1-2544.
ROCK AND MINERAL COLLEC-
tion, Ruger .22 automatic pistol, 5-
string banjo.   321-8436.	
PRE-XMAS SPEC: SIAMESE KIT.
pure bred, 3 mos. 736-4901.	
FOR SALE TWO PAIR OF MARKER
turntables, like new. Phone Dianne,
261-3753.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMS ON CAMPUS FOR RENT.
Close to meals. 224-9662 (male) @
$40  mo.;  2250 Wesbrook.	
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE,
2280  Wesbrook.   Phone  224-9986.
LARGE STUDIO WITH SKYLIGHT,
not for residence, $20 month, heat,
light, electricity included. RE 8-4857
after 6 p.m. First Ave. &^ Larch.
QUIET ROOM FOR RENT, NON-
smoker, non-drinker. Phone 224-
3096.  Near university.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
GIRL   WANTED   TO   SHARE   FUR-
nished apartment near 4th & Alma.
Phone Judy,  733-6994.	
GIRL   WANTED   TO   SHARE   FUR-
nished apt. with third year student.
Phona Pam 732-5751.	
FURNISHED ONE BEDROOM SUITE
kitchen   for   two   serious   students,
very   central,    $90    monthly.    Phone
736-4697.
BUY - SELL - RENT
TYPING AT HOME — 25c SINGLE
sheet, double spacing. Legible handwriting. Call after 10:00 a.m. Mondays to Thursdays, and Sundays,
738-6829.
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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