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The Ubyssey Oct 27, 1966

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CHANGE NEEDED'-MAC
OTTAWA (UNS) — UBC President John
Macdonald said Wednesday his resignation
will be a good thing for the university.
"We have had a very heavy development
program over the past five years," he said.
"With the new institutions in B.C., the
university will be moving into a new phase."
He thought this was a good time for a
leadership change and a new look at problems coming up.
"I think universities do need a change in
leadership from time to time," he said.
Macdonald continued to deny that his resignation had anything to do with reports of
differences between himself and the provincial government.
He did voice disapproval of the federal
government's proposal to put university
financing in provincial hands through tax
transfer.
He said UBC needs increased capital funds,
but  pointed out that  all universities share
this problem.
Macdonald stated that he had been thinking of resigning for two or thrqe months.
He said there is no trouble between himself and the staff of the university.
He said there is nothing personal in his
decision.
When asked why he felt there is need for
a change, Macdonald pointed out that the
average tenure of a president in the U.S. is
less than three years.
Macdonald has held the UBC post for only
four years.
Previous president Norman MacKenzie
held the post for 18 years.
Macdonald  was  attending  a  meeting   of
Canadian universities and college heads in
(Continued on  Page  2)
See: CHANGE
Vol. XIVIII, No. 18   VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1966 «^=S*>48       224-3916
LAMENTED BY SOME and cheered by others, UBC president John B. Macdonald's decision to leave the president's
seat caused a sensation in academic and political circles
here. Why he is leaving is still to be answered.
be    continuing   his    education
work in Canada.
Macdonald will continue as
president until June tout will
be assisted by two deputies,
inter-faculty affairs dean Walter Gage, and applied science
dean  William  Armstrong.
Nemetz said a four or five
man board of governors committee will be named Nov. 3
to find a new president.
Leader of B.C. Liberals Ray
(Continued on  Page  2)
See:  RESIGNATION
NATHAN NEMETZ
. . . learned Friday
Leaders lament
Macs decision
By TOM MORRIS
Tragic. Disappointing. Unprecedented. Sorrowful.
Leaders on campus and around the province reacted this
way Wednesday when told UBC president John Macdonald
had quit.
"As premier of the province I regret it very much," said
premier W. A. C. Bennett in Ottawa. "It came as a surprise
to me."
Education minister Les
Peterson, also at an Ottawa
conference, said he concurred
with the premier's remarks.
He paid tribute to Macdonald's achievements.
"We are grateful for what
he has done for higher education in B.C.,"  Peterson said.
"I'm very disappointed," said
opposition leader Robert Strachan.
"He did an outstanding job
in the whole field of post-secondary education in the province," Strachan said. "Without his advice, we would be
in much worse shape than we
are now in post-secondary-education."
Strachan was asked why he
thought  Macdonald   resigned.
"There may be many reasons," he said.
"He was not given a fair
opportunity from the provin
cial government to do the job
at UBC that he wanted to do."
"It was a very progressive
presidency in view of his financial limits," Strachan said.
Macdonald, in his letter of
resignation dated Oct. 20, said
he was quitting to devote himself to other tasks.
His resignation is effective
June 30, 1967.
Board of Governor's chairman Nathan Nemetz said the
board received Macdonald's
resignation Friday.
He said the board had met
with Macdonald and asked
him to reconsider his decision.
"However, since he had determined to pursue other activities in the field of education we were unable to dissuade him."
Nemetz said that during discussions with Macdonald, the
president   indicated   he   would
Nobody expected
Mac's resignation
By BONI LEE
"It caught me by surprise.
It was the last thing in the
world I expected."
This was the reaction of one
student to the unexpected announcement Wednesday o f
UBC president John Macdonald's resignation.
It was typical.
Students greeted the announcement with shock and
disbelief when interviewed by
The Ubyssey.
"I don't believe you," said
Sara Gayman, Arts  1.
Many students expressed
sympathy   for   Macdonald.
One girl said, "It's too
much for one guy."
A first year commerce student said, "It's too bad the
whole board of governors
didn't resign and Macdonald
stayed."
"I think many of the things
Macdonald has done have
been  for the  university."
He blamed many of the
problems of the university on
the board.
Students frequently asked,
"Why?" and "What's going to
happen?"
A fourth-year science student suggested the real reason
for Macdonald's resignation
was heavy student criticism,
especially from the Ubyssey.
A second year arts student
said: "I feel guilty. I didn't go
to his big meeting this fall because it was so nice out."
Judy Varcoe, arts 1, said,
"Action is the best means of
getting results, but it's not going to change the situation."
BACK
TO MAC
SEE PAGES 5, 6, 7 Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October 27,   1966
GREAT PUMPKIN FILLED with cement and coated with
grease is engineers' contribution to Hallowe'en festivities
in the library. Difficult-to-dislodge pumpkin was one of
dozens left Wednesday.
Consultant studies
residence plans
The student residence committee formed by student
council had its first meeting
with architect Reno Negrin
Wednesday.
Negrin has been hired by
the administration to conduct
a feasibility survey for the
proposed  new  residences.
AMS first vice - president
Charlie Boylan said the meeting was fruitful.
"We exchanged views freely
and have agreed to meet
again. It proved that students
can make constructive contributions to the planning of our
university," Boylan said.
Ray Larsen, AMS housing
co-ordinator, and Judah Shu-
miatcher, a UBC architecture
graduate, also expressed optimism about the potential success   of   student   participation
Resignation
rally Friday
UBC student leaders have
called a student rally for Friday noon to discuss the sudden
resignation of President John
Macdonald.
The rally will take place in
the main lounge of Brock Hall.
AMS executive invited Dean
Walter Gage and a representative of the board of governors
to address the rally. But both
refused.
Other topics to be discussed
at the rally are faculty plans
for student representation in
the senate and board of governors and tuition fees.
in planning a major building
project.
"We plan to see this thing
through," said Larsen. "We
will want to involve other
students, especially resident
students, to make our efforts
successful."
CHANGE
(Continued from Page 1)
Ottawa when the announcement was made public in Vancouver.
He said he has no plans and
no job to go to.
He would like to stay in
Canada.
"There is a great future here
in the expanding field of edua-
tion," Macdonald said.
He expressed an interest in
the field of policy and the relationship of universities and
government.
Macdonald was asked if there
were close relations with Victoria and easy access to the
government.
"I haven't met Premier Bennett frequently, but of course
he isn't the education minister,"
he said.
"I saw Peterson (Education
Minister Leslie Peterson) from
time to time."
"It has been an exciting time,
and a great progress has been
made despite growth difficulties,'' Macdonald said.
He paid tribute to the support and help he received at
UBC from the Board of Governors, faculty, students, and
alumni.
"There is a better climate of
co-operation at UBC than experienced on many campuses in
Canada," he added.
RESIGNATION   SAD'
(Continued from Page 1)
Perrault said Macdonald's
move is  remarkable".
"His resignation is unprecedented in this time of the university  year,"   Perrault  said.
"I hope he hasn't resigned
in complete frustration." If the
lack of finances is the problem
then the board of governors
should give the public a clear
estimate of the facts," he said.
Former UBC president Norman MacKenzie said the sudden resignation is unfortunate
for UBC.
"I always had a high regard
for Dr. Macdonald's ability
and energy and I felt sure
that, given the time and support, he would be a great
president," he said.
UBC alumni association
president Kenneth Martin said
Macdonald's resignation a s
president  is   a  sad  situation.
"He has done a tremendous
job both for the university
and the province as a whole.
His loss will be felt by all."
Stuarte Keate, members of
the board of governors, also
felt very sorry. He called the
president outstanding and dedicated.
"He may have been under
pressure from faculty and students.   There   was   also   diffi-
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culty from the provincial
government."
Malcolm MacGregor, head of
the classics department, said
he is sorry to see Macdonald
leave.
"He's an easy man to work
with. I found working with
him very satisfying.
"What we have accomplished under his leadership is
amazing," MacGregor said.
Liberal MLA Pat McGeer,
on leave from his UBC research post, claimed the resignation was a tragedy for UBC
and the province.
"Five years ago we were
in the dark ages in education.
Macdonald has spearheaded
five years of spectacular
achievement to bring us out of
this  darkness."
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TR 4-0207 Thursday, October 27, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  3
I'VE FOUND A HOT ASH, cries Fred Flamechazzar warmly,
groping through Yorkeen House fireplace. Firemen were
burned up after report of fire dt faculty mansion turned
out only fireplace. They sent truck, inhalator, eight men.
Chosen few receive
their just rewards
By SUE GRANSBY
The excellence of past and
present Ubyssey editors has
been officially recognized and
rewarded.
Richard Blair, arts 4, managing editor of The Ubyssey
and Keith Bradbury, law 2, a
past Ubyssey editor-in-chief,
are recipients of the second
annual award of excellence
presented by UBC's Demosthenes Society.
Blair was selected for excellence    in   managing   news
Leftist editor
leads talks
on liberalism
Realist editor Paul Krassner
joins UBC students and profs
Friday in an all-weekend dissection of liberalism at Fall
Symposium.
The Symposium, sponsored
by the Academic Activities
Committee, will be held Friday
night to Sunday at Rosario
Beach, Washington.
Included will be lectures and
panel discussions with considerable time allowed for free discussions.
There is still room for 30 students on the bus leaving Friday
at 5:30. Price for everything—
transportation, food, and accommodation — is $8.
Other speakers include Simon
Fraser sociology prof John
Leggatt.
Applications and information
are available at AMS offices in
Brock Hall.
arid   Bradbury   for  excellence
in political strategy.
The award is given, said
Michael Coleman, the Society's president, "in recognition of the pursuit of excellence in literary, artisic, cultural  and   governmental   arts.
Among others chosen to receive the award was Gabor
Mate, arts 4. He has achieved,
simply, excellence.
Geoff Flack, arts 3, stood
out for his part in organizational administration; Kathy
Gilliland, arts 3, for excellence
in the social arts.
Selection of summer housing put Maijk Holtby. grad
studies 2, on the list, and Dave
Hoye, arts 4, won excellence
in literary epistles.
Canine care was the sphere
of excellence for Shudell Webster, ed. 3.
Bruce Donald, law 2, was
named excellent in the study
of customs; and winding up
the distinguished list is Ron
Pearson who has reached the
"peak in bureaucracy" as an
AMS hireling for eleven years.
WILL  SOVREIGNTY  BUST?
Guard probes queen
Flunkers get fees,
but only this year
ST. JOHN'S (CUP)—Newfoundland students on probation or repeating a university
year are eligible for free tuition — ibut only for this year.
The provincial government
has agreed to postpone a decision to withhold free tuition from repeating students
for one year, following protests from the Memorial Uni
versity students' union.
By  KATHRYN   KEATE
A UBC club led by campus
Conservatives is investigating whether failure to anoint
Queen Victoria's, breast means
the late queen was not really a queen.
The club is the Blue Guard,
formed to counteract "radical" elements at UBC and
to rally the cause of monarchy, church, and constitution.
"A special committee of
the Guard is now investigating whether Queen Victoria
was the true monarch of the
British Empire," organizer
Geoff Flack said Wednesday.
"It seems all English mon-
archs from the time of Richard III were anointed on the
head and breast with oil.
Queen Victoria was not anointed on the breast, so there is
some doubt as to whether she
was the real monarch.
"If we find she was not,
we will search for the true
monarch — even if it is Mal-
com MacGregor," he said.
The club is organized, said
VICTORIA REGINA
.  .  .  breast  unanointed.
third year arts student Flack,
"on the family compact system. The members have complete voting freedom, but
the executive tells them what
issues they can vote on."
He added:   "It  is based on
the    system    of    monarchies.
Roll in the water with us,
foresters challenge council
It will be roll, sink, or swim for AMS executive
today.
Forestry Undergrad Society has challenged the
AMS executive to a log-rolling contest, to be held at
noon in the Buchanan courtyard pool.
Also featured will be a broomstick race between
representatives of the nursing and home ec undergrad
societies.
Both events are FUS sponsored.
A forestry sponsored log-carrying contest will be
held on main mall Frid&y at noon. Forestry, science,
engineering, agriculture and PE representatives will
participate.
The week of forestry activity will be climaxed by
the Undercut dance Friday night.
No pay for sex,
say UBC docs
By RON  SIMMER
Paying brainy people to breed is ridiculous, says UBC
geneticists, commenting on Tuesday's Ubyssey story in which
University of Ottawa Professor E. O. Dodson suggested that
marriages between intelligent people be subsidized.
Many other clubs are also
run by cliques, but ours is
the only one that admits it."
At the club's meeting
Tuesday, a constitution embodying these principles of
government was sung in a
Gregorian  chant.
The majority of the club's
39 members are Conservatives, including some Socreds.
There are also a few NDP
members.
The club has applied to
the club's committee for a
grant  and office space.
"If we don't get the grant,
we will get a 500-name petition asking for a seat on
AMS council," said Flack.
We have just as much right
to a grant as any other club.
The communists have a min-
iscule membership and we
have many more."
Blue Guard sweatshirts are
being designed, said Flack,
"which will probably have
Blue Guard written in old
english lettering on the back,
and will feature a sceptre or
mace or something similarly
suitable."
Mrs. Ma Murray, editor of
the weekly Bridge River-
Lillooct News, has been asked to be patroness of the
Blue Guard and to speak at
a meeting.
"It is fitting that a woman
of her stature should participate in this revelation," said
Flack.
Other honorary members
of the Blue Guard are all
reigning monarchs and all
leaders  of religious  sects.
According to Andrew
Gates, another Guard organizer, the color blue was chosen for the club because "blue
stands for loyalty to establishment authority and that
is the idea we wish to promote."
The Blue Guard constitution says the club is "to
strengthen the fibre of our
nation and to regenerate that
which is wholesome and to
eradicate that which is false
by supporting the monarchy,
the "true" church, and upholding the  constitution."
True to its code, the Blue
Guard's membership fee is a
conservative  25  cents.
Dr. Tom Perry, UBC pharmacologist, doubted that intelligent parents always have
intelligent   children.
"Genetically, Dodson's remarks are naive," he said. "I
am disturbed by the snobbery
this reeks of."
Barriers against marriage
are anti-human, Perry added,
and subsidies should be given
all students.
Referring to Nazi Germany,
genetecist David T. Suzuki
said: "There is a precedent for
this kind of talk. Any minority
can claim they are superior."
Dr. Denis Chitty, ecQlogist,
said Dodson's principle was
"all right for breeding cattle."
Geneticist Dr. Leone Piter-
nick questeioned the need for
more intelligent people.
"The average person uses
only 20% of his capacities,"
she said. "Environment is an
important factor in intelligence, whatever "intelligence"
means  precisely."
Students lose patients
because of medicare'
Medicare is causing a dilemma in the future of clinical
teaching units.
"As soon as there are no
charity patients, the clinical
teaching unit situation changes
dramatically," said dean of
medicine Dr. J. F. McCreary,
speaking to the Vancouver Instate.
McCreary said an arrangement of separate teaching units
under private physicians will
not provide the appropriate
setting for increasing student
responsibility.
"Many doctors would be very
generous and give too much responsibility and others would
allocate little responsibility,'
he said.
McCreary said another pro
blem arises in the charging and
use of medical funds.
Medical schools charging no
fees will be accused of encouraging socialistic medicine.
School allowing university
teachers to collect fees will be
accused of subsidizing members
of the profession.
School putting a ceiling on
fund incomes and using the remainder of the funds to
strengthen other parts of the
medical school will ibe accused
of financing medical education
with professional fees.
"A medical school will be
damned if it does and damned
if it doesn't and I am double
damned if I see any easy way
out of this situation," said McCreary. ,t " * "*** '.■Vf,"v!mm
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions arm
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence  and  editorial writing.
OCTOBER 27,  1966
Bon voyage, Jack
John Macdonald said it, and we agree: "Universities
do need a change in leadership from time to time."
He said he thought quitting was a good thing for himself and for UBC, and again we agree ... but for
different   reasons.
His contributions to education in B.C. are undeniable.
In five short years, he had a large part in making
four universities where once there was one.
He urged eight junior colleges where none were,
and three are now a-building.
He gave a healthy and valuable boot to professional
schools like engineering, medicine, and dentistry . . . but
he did it a.t the expense of liberal arts.
Although he pushed fund raising, including the $28
million three universities capital fund, his self-admitted
distaste for the task was part of the reason for two
consecutive fee hikes totalling $100.
In his speeches—his main legacy—Macdonald instituted a drive for excellence, a war against the forces of
mediocrity.
But he allowed mediocrity to flourish in the university; mediocrity exemplified in some of the incompetent staff he hired or retained from the MacKenzie
era; mediocre facilities in the library, hut classrooms
and residences; mediocre thinking on university government and student participation in it.
He instituted a fight against bigness in the university,
but he himself was the very symbol of cold, unapproachable bigness.
Of la.te, his speeches trumpeted against the forces
of irresponsibility at work m the university, but what
Macdonald decried as irresponsibility was in fact student attempts to communicate, to force back the bigness
barriers.
Students did not succeed, and in the wake of his
own warnings of student unrest, educators at UBC and
across Canada, are predicting student upheaval while
offering enough tokens to keep just ahead of the flood.
And as Macdonald leaves, all eyes expect UBC to
be the first place to blow the token dike to hell.
Throughout Macdonald's five years, he took grave
exception to governmental thinking on university finance, and last week he forecast financial disaster when
next year's education budget comes down—a back-to
rags prediction corroborated by private statements from
several MLAs.
But it's all right, Jack . . . Macdonald's reputation is
secure and his credentials are still impeccable, and he
can name his job and price anywhere in North America.
He leaves at 48 years of age, after what educators
ten years from now 'will note as five years of calm.
He leaves before his credentials can be muddied by
the events he helped to create.
He leaves carrying a compendium of speeches about
excellence versus mediocrity, unrest versus responsibility
—speeches that read like a John F. Kennedy re-write
job, filled with catchy phrases that leave the listener
unsure of their meaning but very sure the speaker is a
Great Man.
The next man comes into the void of those speeches.
The right ma.n can leave as shiny as John Macdonald
leaves; a wrong choice will be buried under the flood
Macdonald, by resigning, so deftly avoids.
The next man must rise above the frustration of the
office that helped drive Macdonald out, and make UBC
a university without mediocrity, an excellent university
with no need for student turmoil.
He must sell education to the Socreds — no mean
task, that—a.nd to do it he'll need a political adroitness
and an idealistic pragmatism approaching genius^
And if that man can be found, Macdonald's quitting
will be the best thing that ever happened to UBC.
FLUSH
EDITOR:
John Kelsey
Managing
Richard Blair
News
Carol Wilson
City
Danny Stoffman
Photo
Powell Hargrave
Page Friday
.         Claudia Gwinn
Focus
Rosemary Hyman
Ass't News 	
.   -          Pat Hrushowy
CUP
Bert Hill
Ait't Photo    .     _
_       -    Dennis Gans
Rick Blair, Carol Wilson, Murray McMillan, Angelo Ottho,
Kris Emmott, and a bureau beard
played hero putting out an extra
nuit-ly. Reporters Norman Gidney
rioni Lee, Tom Morris, Kathryn
blue guard Keate, Sue Gransby,
Allan Neicl, Rod Wilczak, Mary
Ussner, David Cursons, and Lin
tsc-hsu   reported.
Kurt Hilger, Derrek Webb, Don
Kydd, John Tilley, Al Harvey,
Chris Blake and old Joe Varesi,
who   dropped   in,   took   pictures.
Nf VT GAME
BY GABOR  MATE
Let's play universopoly
A group of us have invented a new game. It's called
Universopoly, and it's based on
the familiar children's game.
Some of the rules:
The players (any numlber
from two to 17,000, but preferably about five) all sit
around a grey wooden board.
This is the Board of Governors. This name has nothing
to do with the actual game,
and each player has to figure
out why the Board of Governors really exists.
Players advance on the
(Board of Governors by tossing dice. The
dice have letters and numbers on them.
For example,
1 ■ ""%5^BpPP  you 'might get
JK|n£9^ fc combinations
__HNB       J like  En.   101,
Ph. 100, Geo. 101, and so on.
The more meaningless are
your combinations, the further
you advance. If your first toss
is successful, you get to pay
five   hundred ' dollars,   and
throw again. It you don't have
the money, you can't play the
game.
As you advance on the
Board good and bad things
can happen to you. For example:
"Go to the Buchanan building, and tell your English prof
that he talks irrelevant nonsense. If you pass the library,
collect two hundred dollars."
"Become AMS president,
and transform yourself into a
human tape recorder. Make
the same speech a thousand
times, no matter what the
topic. Do not collect two hundred dollars. You have already
collected sixteen hundred dollars during the summer."
"Go to Fort Camp, and eat
dinner there. Collect two hundred dollars. You will need it
for the doctor's Ibill."
"Become the library pond,
and get people thrown into
you. You may not like it.
Neither do the people who get
thrown in."
'^Become Ubyssey editor,
and lose your mind. Or better
still, lose your mind and become Ubyssey editor."
"Become an  engineer and
yell 'I am, I am!' People will
say you are crazy. Do not collect any money. Now become
a crowd of engineers and yell
'We are, We are!' People will
no longer say you are crazy.
They will be afraid of you.
Collect all the money you
want."
So as you see, the game is
very simple. The winner gets
a degree and a job collecting
garbage in high-class neighborhoods.
LETTERS
'Arrogance
Editor, The Ubyssey:
"But to provide sanctuary
in Canada tends to weaken an
already dangerously oppressed
group of dissenters in the
U.S.," says The Ubyssey's editorial of October 20.
If that is truly the case, then
there is only one logical course
of action for fellow dissenters
in Canada in response to this
alleged state of affairs: they
should press for closing the
border to dissenters, potential
draftees and draft-dogers,
rather than vice-versa.
What a classic example of
inauthenticity and phoney
radicalism! No risk of jail for
us Canadian dissenters — but
let's insist that our American
comrades get the full treatment, whether they choose it
or not.
How arrogant for anyone to
decide for American war objectors, in the -real relative
safety of Canada, how best
they can serve their cause. As
if each individual dissenter
is not capable of deciding for
himself which of several possible roads to take in face of
the draft — jail, guile, exile,
hiding, Good-Soldier-Schweik-
ism ("Beg to report, sir, but I
can't tell the difference between a VC and an SV"), and
a myriad of others.
To distribute information on
one of these alternatives is
simply to help optimize the
rationality of the choice —
but does not determine the
choice, which in each case is
and should be an individual
matter.
NORMAN EPSTEIN
'Damn  foresters'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Condemnations to the forestry club! Horrors upon horrors! They refused to send an
invitation to their log rolling
contest to the new dynamic
force on campus — phys. ed.
This is understandable when
one considers the humiliation
the entrenched powers would
suffer if beaten .by a tiny
group of young up-starts.
Therefore, for the sake of
competition, I have graciously
offered to enter our "B" team.
The big green at UBC is no
longer forestry but phys. ed.
Jocks rule the world!
ED YOUNGIBERG
President, PEUS FOCUS
ANTI-EDITORIAL
Mac: the great success
By LORRAINE SHORE
You could almost call John
B. Macdonald a reverse Ann
Landers.
Into the mailbag in the office of the president came all
the answers.
But only one man — President Macdonald — had the
problem.
The problem, when he
came from Harvard University five years ago, was to
lead the University of British
Columbia out of the education boondock and to create
a true institution of higher
learning.
To give UBC a vision of
greatness — and to provide
the practical means of getting there.
He succeeded.
Certainly UBC has not realized the dream, but under
Macdonald the tools for
building were provided.
His leaving should not be
viewed with regret, for he attained what he came to do.
In his five years as president, the student body had
one of its greatest periods of
growth — from 13,000 students in 1962 to 17,300 today.
In the 1964 report of the
president's academic goals
committee, Guideposts to Innovation, he advocated a
greater emphasis on graduate
education, reform in the curriculum, and the creation of
a more intellectually stimulating environment for students.
Earlier, in 1962, he outlined a visionary plan for higher   education   in B.C.
The latter is no longer simply a vision.
The existence of Simon
Fraser University, and the
commencement of numerous
regional colleges can all be
attributed to his program.
His success here has been
limited not toy his own capabilities but by the lack of
co-operation from the provincial government.
It was not John Macdonald
who lacked the foresight to
see the need for more and
better professors, and increase facilities, especially for
graduate studies, but simply
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a lack of money which hampered the implementation of
these goals.
The president was criticized for remaining aloof — for
being too much the administrator and too little a warm
human  being.
Perhaps in his early years
this criticism was justified,
but Macdonald learned and
acted.
He turned up at symposiums,, he crowned home-coming queens .... and this
year he took the largest
steps of all to become acquainted  with  his  students.
He initiated his open-door
program whereby students
can walk in and talk about
their problems one day a
month.
And he should be lauded
for his proposals to put students on committees ranging
from housing to food services.
Certainly    he    did    things
INTERESTED
IN AN
OVERSEAS
CAREER?
Dr. Robert L. Gulick, Jr.
will be on the campus
NOV. 4, 1966
to discuss the training offered at
A.I.F.T. (an intensive nine months
program of post graduate study) and
the job opportunities open to
graduates in the field of
INTERNATIONAL TRADE and
GOVERNMENT SERVICE.
Interviews may be scheduled at
Office of Student Services
The American Institute
For Foreign Trade
Thunderbird Campus
PHOENIX, ARIZONA
An Affiliate Of
The American Management Association
wrong — or perhaps he did
things in a way which people
didn't like — but he worked
well in one of the most difficult times that this university
has  encountered.
He provided a goal of
greatness for UBC and initiated changes as circumstances  would  allow.
John Macdonald had the
problem, and not all the answers — but he provided a
dream  for the future.
The realization of this
dream  will be his tribute.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5 FOCUS'
From UBC. where?
Macdonald and past AMS president shared an umbrella.
THE PRESIDENT:
The president at convocation.
Page 6
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
"The man in a hurry," the
quotes called him, "the man
with a desire for excellence."
But in the five years since
John Barfoot Macdonald became ..president of UBC students became convinced the
path to excellence he led
them down was only the garden path.
And in those five years,
Macdonald saw his student
support dwindle from the
5,000 who roared approval of
his drive for more funds in
1963 to the mere 300 who
attended his welcoming address this fall.
The man in a hurry found
that his students were running down a different road.
Macdonald was a professor
of microbiology, director of
the Forsyth Infirmary and
director of post-doctoral studies in dental medicine at
Harvard University when he
was asked to come to UBC.
Shortly after his arrival, he
produced the Macdonald Report, which observers see as
the blueprint in education
used by the Bennett government over the last five years.
"Macdonald, through his
report, is the one man responsible above all others for
the direction B.C. higher education is now taking," reads
one  assessment.
"The most significant result of his report was the development in B.C. of a totally
new form of higher education, the regional or community college."
His report called for:
An immediate start on a
university in  Burnaby.
By 1965, establishment of
regional colleges- in Kelowna,
Castlegar and Vancouver.
By 1971, establishment of
regional colleges in central
Vancouver Island, Kamloops,
Prince George and the lower
eastern Fraser Valley.
By 1971, elevation of the
Kelowna regional college to
a university.
Macdonald also urged establishment of a university
grants commission and a provincial academic board for
higher  education.
Only the grants commission
remains outside the B.C. government's present plans for
higher education.
Three months after the re-
p o r t appeared, Macdonald
launched   his   campaign   for
THE    UBYSSEY
more funds for universities.
Students    collected    219,000
signatures to back Mm,  and
marched  2,000-strong   to   the
courthouse in another display
of support.
Forced, he said, unwillingly into the job of fund-raiser,
he was to spend much of the
next three years in a battle
with the provincial government for more money.
The summer of 1963, he
switched his attention to the
academic field.
He said UBC had a mediocre pass record for first-year
students,  a mediocre studies
program, mediocre financial
support and a shortage of
staff.
And that same summer, he
was named British Columbian of the Year by news-
apper, radio and television
editors.
Then, apart from speeches
to service clubs and other organizations, Macdonald seemed disappear.
Newspaper interviews and
reports of speeches showed
him holding to his views on
finance and the need for excellence at UBC. UBC would
place  high  standards  before
Queens  must  be   kissed.
Coming: FEL|X GREENpS
CHINA
Thursday, November 3 — Auditorium
A Film Society Presentation
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Thursday, October 27,   1966 FOCUS'
In his office, he talks to a Ubyssey photographer.
A FIVE-YEAR PLAN
physical expansion, he said in
1963. In 1964 and 1965, he
repeated   these ideas.
He often criticized the refusal of the provincial government to recognize that
university costs were rising
and that grants should rise
to meet them.
The B.C. government lent
its ear elsewhere.
While Macdonald was
caught up with these worries,
a new student movement was
being shaped.
Its leaders demanded a student voice in university government; its aims included a
more personal contact with
administration   personnel.
Macdonald recognized the
unrest.
"The university of old had
many of the attributes of the
church," he told a University
of Toronto conference.
"It was an asylum for the
persecuted, a political and
intellectual sanctuary; there
was respect for learning.
"But those days are gone.
"As every observer of today's campus will recognize,
equanimity and tranquility
are not characteristic attributes.
". .   .  The  paradox  is  that
while the universities are
making maginificent efforts
to meet the enormous demands being placed upon
them, they are facing deep-
seated unrest in their constituencies—faculty, students,
alumni and others.
"The attitudes and conflicts
represent a growing danger.
"I note in particular a
growing tendency toward irresponsibility and a growing
incidence of lawlessness
among students."
The unrest Macdonald
noted soon broke upon him.
Macdonald spoke at a conference in January, 1966,
then left, saying he had another engagement.
His listeners claimed he
never had time to answer
questions; Macdonald said he
had a standing offer to answer any written questions.
Macdonald then offered to
hold a coffee party for students where he would talk
with them.
Some 600 students came to
the Brock party where Macdonald pledged tuition fees
would not rise and accused
The Ubyssey of distorting the
news.
But   Macdonald   still   came
St. Anselm's W. A. Annual
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Saturday, Oct. 29th
11:30 a.m. — 3:30 p.m.
at
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CHURCH
5375  University Blvd.
NO PRE SALE
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SEMI-FORMAL
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Tuxedo, tails, white dinner
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Formal and informal business wear — complete
sixe range.
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under fire from the student
left.
This fall, he offered Open
Door Days, when students
could come and discuss their
problems.
Seven students arrived, all
but one student government
representatives.
And it was suggested that
the university president really didn't have anything to offer the average student with
his average problem.
Macdonald had recognized
that the year before.
"Somehow in our modern
complex universities, we are
failing to get the message
across that the university
does exist for the individual
and for individual values,"
he said in his Toronto address.
"Momentous changes have
been compressed into a relatively short interval to a degree which is new in the experience of this university,"
he concluded in his letter of
resignation.
"I wish to express my conviction that a change in
leadership at not too infrequent intervals is healthy
and in the best interests of
the university."
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POLITICAL INSIGHT
as soon as he learned
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he knew for sure they were
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Thursday, October 27
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Thursday, October 27, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7 Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, October  27,   1966
•   ,, i Toronto. Ontario
o.he^ooos.u^d —^
EXECUTIVE OFFICES
J. W. ANDREWS
PRESIDENT   8. GENERAL MANAGER
To the Graduating Classes:
Gentlemen -
For many of you the time of decision is at hand.   Recruitment teams from
major Canadian companies are arriving on your campus to bid for your
talents.
It is also an important time for us at General Foods.   The future success
of our Company is in the hands of our newest staff members and it is
from Canadian universities that we recruit this staff.
That's why the General Foods team will soon be visiting your campus.
This year, we seek 80 graduates - competent young people ready to
expand with us and eager to meet the challenges of the days ahead.
What do we have to offer you?   We offer career opportunities in almost
every field of business and professional endeavour - in marketing, in
finance, in engineering, in chemistry, and in other specialized services.
Because of the scope of opportunity, graduates will be interviewed not
only for specific jobs, but for careers with General Foods.
No matter what your specialty, if you're ambitious, if you're perceptive
enough not to limit your horizons, if you can grow with a company whose
sales have increased two and a half times in the past ten years, then don't
let anything stop you from seeing the men from GF.
No matter what your decision, may 1 wish you a very successful future.
Yours sincerely,
iPi*^~"
jWA/mr
A General Foods Recruiting Team
will visit your university on
Nov. 2,3 and 4. See your Placement Office.
BIRD CALLS —Available next week
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE AND   BOOKSTORE - ONLY 75 CENTS
Be sure of your copy — buy early — limited quantity Thursday, October 27,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
TRIVIA  RULES
Mighty wrath stirreth
By KRIS EMMOTT
Now in the days when King
Peter the Gavel ruled, there
were murmurings among the
peasantry concerning the
workings of the King's Council.
"Lo, the King's Council
hath no workings, except for
a few noble princes, and they
spend all their time on
trivia," said the rumor.
Then wrath stirred in the
heart of one of the princes,
a stalwart Viking named
Bjorn Hudson, and he quoth:
"Trivia are our contact
with our subjects. We dare
not give some of the work to
hirelings, for then we would
no longer rule in our own
kingdom."
Then it happened that King
Peter called a meeting, and
left early, saying:
"I must give a speech, and
greet a visiting prince, and
at dawn tomorrow the prince
and I will rise and ride over
the countryside. Alack, but
I am busy! Would that we
could give some of the work
to hirelings, for one cannot
council and study both."
Thus it came about that
Bonnie Prince Charlie, who
sat at the king's right hand,
presented a plan to change
the King's Council.
"Please give me permission
now to draw up the plans,
and when they are done we
will not bicker about
whether to accept them," said
Bonnie  Prince  Charlie.
Whereupon the council
bickered for twenty-five minutes about whether to approve the policies.
"I will have no bickering,"
quoth King Peter. "I will
pound my gavel. Where did it
go?"
Woe to King Peter the
Gavel! Someone had stolen
his gavel. The Council bickered on.
"This program will be of
incalculable benefit to the
peasants," said Bonnie Prince
Charlie.
"The group of hirelings
will take care of all the
trivia, and another group
will do nothing but bicker."
"How, then will the King's
Council be any improvement?" inquired an innocent.
"Lo, the bickering will not
be about trivia, but about important things," quoth Bonnie Prince Charlie.
"You  will   never  convince
BRAUND
. . . gavel Peter
me," said one of the princes
of the Council.
"Yea, I will," said Bonnie
Prince Charlie. "I will spare
no effort to convince every-
b o d y — lecturing, explaining, issuing bumf, and kissing babes-in-arms."
But the Council bickered
on and King Peter the Gavel
was grieved for the loss of
his gavel.
And behold, a tree-worshipper clad in Lincoln green
stood in their midst, bearing
a huge club.
"Hurrah!" cried King
Peter. "Now I can command
order among my princes."
And the bickering stopped.
Then an agitator came
forth and asked the King
and his council to  agitate.
"Let us bestir ourselves
from our lethargy and agitate," quoth a redheaded
prince,  excited.
"Silence, varlet," commanded the King.
"Good," insisted he of the
red shirt.
"Bad," insisted Bonnie
Prince Charlie.
"Never mind that," said
King Peter, smiting about
him with the club. "Are we
going to agitate, or not?"
"No," said Hubert the
Physician.
"Yes," said Bonnie Prince
Charlie.
"But we are already in
support of the agitators,"
said an innocent.
"For behold, did we not
say so many months ago?"
"True," said Bonnie Prince
Charlie. "Now let us agitate
beside them."
The   princes   bickered   and
WANTED
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October 29th - 8:30 p.m.
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the night wore on, and at
length Bjorn Hudson sighed
mightily and said: "Let us
agitate, but not beside the
others."
"Verily, that is a good compromise," cried all the
princes.
And indeed it was not, but
the princes were tired of
arguing and wanted to go
home to bed, which none
would admit if put on the
rack — so the problem was
dealt with.
And if any do frown on
the decision of the King's
Council, let him be comforted by the thought of Bonnie
Prince Charlie toiling late at
night to change the system—
and for the passing of that
system none will be found to
shed a single tear, though
tears and diamonds should
stand at the same price in
the  marketplace.
CIRCUIT TRAINING
Any hour, any day: M - F. 8:30 a.m., 5 p.m.
BALLROOM  DANCING ,
Room for more — see Mr. Vincent any morning in
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No Charges — Instruction Free
Faculty   Welcome  —  Grads,   too
School of PE & REC,
Voluntary Rec. Program — Phone 228-2401
The Marriage bed isn't
always filled with roses . . .
THE PUMPKIN
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Starring - Anne Bancroft,
Peter Finch and James Mason
Today - 330 & 730
AUDITORIUM   50c
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ARLBERG
THE ORIGINAL SKI HUT
Cordially invites you to attend their Eighth Anniversary
OPEN HOUSE, between the hours of 9 a.m. and 9 p.m.,
Nov. 2, 3, 4. Meet ski experts Art Furrer (Nov. 2) and
Toni Sailer (Nov. 3) — 2 - 4 p.m.
(Refreshments and Gifts)
ARLBERG
Sport Haus
Downtown at
816   Pender   at  Howe
and   at  Whistler  Mtn.
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
founded in 1959, now boasts over 250,003 graduates reading at an average
of 1500 words per minute with good comp-ehension. Reading Dynamics is
an 8-week effective reading program, designed to teach you to vary your
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Although the majority of our Winter Classes are filled to capacity, we still have a few openings on the following starting date:
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READING DYNAMICS \3H9u. WM
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SUITE 210    549 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1 BC    685-2374 Page   10
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October  27,   1966
Canada still a colony
Red organizer charges
By   MARY   USSNER
Forget confederation celebrations — Canada is still a
colony.
"An economic colony,"
charged Communist Party national organiser Nelson Clarke
Tuesday.
In a sharp reply to policies
of Liberal finance minister
Mitchell Sharpe, Clarke announced his 'American investment' policies as bad for Canada.
"The U.S. doesn't want us,
it wants the right to pump
our   resources,"    he   said,   as
Vancouver Communist Party
secretary William Stuart stood
by "to see that Clarke is not
bombarded   with   tomatoes."
The Canadian economy
should not depend on American   capital,   Clarke   said.
"Inflation is setting in no
matter how long economists
burn the midnight oil. This is
primarily because LBJ promis-
the people they could have
the Great Society and beat
going as Johnson expected.
"Socialists want to stamp
hell out of the Vietnamese at
the same time," said Clarke.
But the nice little war isn't
IN PARLIAMENT
Complications
cause confusion
OTTAWA (CUP) — Provincial premiers here were confused, rather than elated, when the federal government
announced its complicated offer of new financial aid to
higher education.
Announcing the offer Sunday, Prime Minister Pearson
indicated there would be
about $90 million more federal money available for universities and higher technical
education next year.
But, few of the provinces
could figure out how much
they would   be   getting.
The confusipn in most provincial delegations was illustrated by Ontario experts who
at first figured Ontario might
net about $20 million. They
later  changed  their minds  to
Researchers
grab grants
The Medical Research Council of Canada has granted
awards to five UBC research
workers.
Dr. P. E. Reid, a chemist researching plant sugars, received
a scholarship for study on carbohydrates in humans.
Drs. Morley C. Sutter and K.
L. MacCannell will research
clinical pharmacology on a dual
scholarship.
Dr. J. A. Wada received a renewed three-year associateship
for neurological research.
Dr. Michael Smith, formerly
a biochemist in the fisheries
laboratory, was given a three-
year associateship.
estimate a net loss between
$7 million and $13 million.
The arithmetic, which Ontario officials admit is still uncertain, shows Ontario will get
a total of $151 million under
terms of the federal proposal.
Compared to this, the province maintains, under the present series of federal grants,
Ontario could expect to get
either $158 million or $165
million next year.
The difference depends on
whether the average $5 per
capita grant for higher education last January by the federal government is increased
to $6 by next year — a step
recommended by the Bladen
Commission report on university financing.
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eoutft
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out what they see as exploitation of the public. We want
to inject a Marxist point of
view. Capitalist 'big-business'
is not satisfying the demands
of the people.
"Between 1949 and 1966
there has been a 251 per cent
increase on investment returns while the wage increase
has only been 40 per cent. We
must curb corporation gains,"
hq   said.
Canada is subservient to the
U.S.,  Clarke said.
"The liberals have been
promising free medicare since
1919. They are paying no attention to the demand for abolition of university fees, they
are merely enforcing more
taxes,"
nun
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACES
"War on the Agrodome Floor"
FOREIGN STOCKS
A  cross  between   stock  car
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AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00,  Student $1.25
Children  under  12  FREE with  Adults
wiwvr
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER  SPORTS  CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE -  1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS   —
SATURDAYS   -
SUNDAYS   —
^Special Student Session
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.**
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.**
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons  —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —    Students .50      Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
The House of Seagram
Interviews
will be conducted
NOVEMBER 7th
for students graduating  in
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service
for Information and Interview Appointment
ENGINEERING
SCIENCE
COMMERCE
Shell Canada Limited
will be on Campus
to interview Students for
Geology (Regular & Summer) Nov. 7, 1966
HONORS SCIENCE,  ENGINEERING & COMMERCE
(Regular) NOV. 7, 8 & 9, 1966
HONORS SCIENCE,  ENGINEERING & COMMERCE
(Summer) NOV. 10, 1966
DEPARTMENTS WITH OPENINGS
Regular Summers
Exploration Exploration
Gas Gas
Producing Producing
Manufacturing Manufacturing
Marketing Administration
Administration
Specific information can be obtained from our posters and your
Placement Office. Thursday, October 27,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Indians dance for fair
BIG CHIEF FEATHERHEAD stomps out a timely sun dance
for Friday's International Fall Fair. The Chief will be one
of the major participants in the two-day Fair this year
featuring the Canadian Indian.
Morals cops clear
Gazette's bad word
LONDON (CUP) — A morality squad probe into alleged
profanity appearing in the
University of Western Ontario's student paper won't result in criminal charges, a
city police spokesman has revealed.
London morality detective
Larry Campbell made the announcement after completing
an investigation of The Gazette.
Police and the UWO president had received an anonymous note complaining of profanity in the student paper.
The note, accompanied by
the paper's Sept. 30 issue, said
in part:
"It is a disgrace that such
dirt is allowed to be printed
by and for our youth. Something should be done about
it ... "
The complaints were apparently directed at a headline
which included the word 'buggered' and at material appearing in Page Five, The Gazette's satire page.
UWO's dean of men has
criticized The Gazette for reflecting badly on the image of
students. Commenting on Page
Five, he said: "I think it's
vulgar."
The newspaper's editor, Jim
Schaeffer, said the controversy is a tribute to his newspaper.   "It   sure  proves   one
thing — they're reading it,"
he  said.
John Caplan, Gazette managing editor said the paper
seeks "to inform, entertain
and persuade" and contains
nothing which should have an
adverse effect on students.
"Being a university newspaper in a fairly closed society,
we have much more leeway
in our style and content than
a general circulation newspaper has.
"We can't accept the criticism from people other than
students who read the paper.
This paper is put out for the
students and if anyone else
wants to read it, that's their
business, not ours."
PEEKAJEWOi
Our famous perm-_.nt rnmtt
are on Sale! If we told you
li0w tittle th«y cost right aew,
ir*d simply curl yosr bair!
m\iso\ ummm
__l» Salon       Sfnmt _*»       turrsr- Silo.
685-6-.1        m-nn
Canadian Indians take
over part of UBC this Friday
and Saturday.
The occasion is the ninth
International Fall Fair at International House and Pan-
Hellenic House.
The Indians will present
native dances and floor shows
in line with the fair's far
west theme.
They will have a booth
where visitors may view Indian artifacts worth thousands of dollars.
Visitors will also have the
opportunity to participate in
making Indian handicrafts.
Fall Fair takes place Friday from 7 to 12 p.m. and
Saturday from 2 to 12 p.m.
There will be three floor
shows each day.
Foreign students will present fashion shows in their
native dress. Booths and food
will give the visitors a chance
to get souvenirs and sample
the delicacies of other countries.
The fair will conclude with
a dance Saturday from 9 to
12 p.m. featuring the Moonlighters Trinidad Steel Band.
Although the theme for this
year's fair is Far West, some
of the participants come from
so far west that it is east.
Admission for students is
75 cents, for adults one dollar and children 50 cents.
Coming:
Felix Green's
CHINA
Thursday, November 3
Auditorium
A Film Society Presentation
GAVEL   GOES  BYE-BYE
Student council almost ground to a. halt Monday
night.
At the beginning of the meeting ARTS president
Peter Braund lost his all-important gavel.
Braund gavels with a free hand to bring order
among bickering councillors.
"I can't function well without my gavel," he complained several times.
Forester Mike Sywulych came to the rescue with
a huge sledgehammer.
It made a satisfying thump, but it wasn't the old
gavel.
SUITS!!    40on.y
40 to 50<?o OFF!!
Regularly 59.50 to  125.00 - Sale 39.50 to 68.50
SALE ENDS NOVEMBER 5
/tffr*8-
MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 10th
IMPORTANT
NOTICE
to students  awarded
Government of British Columbia
SCHOLARSHIPS
if the award notice mailed to you in triplicate from the Minister of Education, Victoria, has not been handed in to the
accounting office, this is to be done immediately
Don't miss the FABULOUS ACCENTS
Featuring
Derek Cave
and the Motown Sound of
The Soul Sisters
This Friday and Saturday at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024 Davie
Dancing from 10:00 until  1:00 a.m.
"The Place With the Dancing Lights"
Admission only $1.50
SCIENCE and ENGINEERING GRADUATES
For:
Marketing
Production
Engineering
Research
MacMILLAN  BLOEDEL LIMITED
"Canada's largest integrated Forest Products Company"
Invites you to discuss Career Opportunities in our Wood
Products,  Logging,  Pulp and  Paper and  Research
Groups
Interview, will be held on campus October 31,
November 1, 2, 3, 4
For information and appointments please see your
Stur'ent   Placement   Office Page  12
THE.      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  October  27,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Is truth silly putty?
SPECIAL EVENTS
Special Events presents Confessions from a Self Styled
Egotist or The return of Paul
Krassner who speaks on The
truth is Silly Putty today at
noon in the auditorium. Admission 35 cents.
GEOPHYSICS SEMINAR
Gary Boyd will speak on
Ionosphere and Magnetic Micro-
pulsations, Wednesday at noon
in Henn. 301.
POETRY READING
American poet Robert Huff
will read poetry at noon Friday
in Ang. 104.
NDP
Ernie Hall, a newly elected
MLA, speaks on NDP — The
Next Three; Years, Monday at
noon in Bu. 204. Everyone welcome.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
There wil Ibe a general meeting Monday at noon in Bu. 203.
AH are welcome.
OPERATION CROSSROADS
There will be a recruitment
meeting Friday at noon in Bu.
100. Slides by crossroaders returning from Africa will be
shown.
NEWMAN CENTRE
There will be a leg auction
today at noon in Newman
Lounge, St. Marks.
DEBATING UNION
There will be a forum debate
Friday at noon in Bu. 217.
Topic: Resolved that Student
Protest is no Protest.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
The last chance for beginners
to learn to Square Dance is today at noon in hut L-5. (Near
the field house.)
ONTOLOGY
Ron Polack will speak on
Inspiring Creativity Friday at
noon in Ed. 206.
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE
All undergraduate engineers
are invited to the professional
counselling service at noon to
day in Eng. 201.
VCF
Jack Shaver will speak on
The student: himself and God
Friday  at noon   in  Ang.   104.
Everyone welcome.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
There will be a meeting today at noon in the clubhouse
(Brock hut 11) to discuss Oct.
30 duck hunt.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Noon hour rally today starts
from top of C-lot at 12:30. Maps
are not needed.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
The field trip to New Haven
leaves from the north end of
east Buchanan today at 1 p.m.
DEBATING UNION
A Challenge debate between
the UBC team, and the British
National team will take place
at noon, Monday in Ang. 110.
Topic: Resolved that the welfare state has soped individual
interest.
HAMSOC
There will toe a general meeting of Hamsoc today at noon
in Bu. 212. All members and
prospective members please
attend.
SKI TEAM
The team will present movies,
including Ski Colorado, Friday
at noon in the Auditorium. Admission 50 cents.
ANGLICAN CHAPLAINCY
Meeting  at noon Friday in
Bu.  205   to  continue  the  discussion  on the future  of the
Anglican Chaplaincy.
LIBERAL CLUB
There will be a panel discussion on What free trade will
mean to Canada, today at noon
in Bu. 104. Speakers will be
Dr. Pat McGeer, MLA; Dr. D.
Smiley (political science); Dr.
R.   Shearer   (economics);   and
Alan Paine Pullovers...
of   fine  quality   IOOCp   pure
English lambs wool
Saddle shoulders
11 new Fall shades
14.95
759 Granville
and
Oakridge
Shopping Centre
"INSURE" Your Career
Serve with your COTC Contingent
The Canadian Officers Training Corp enables
you — as an undrgraduate — to obtain an Army
commission by training during your spare time
and summer holidays. Moreover, COTO service
also offers you a unique form of "career"
insurance.
■ You are paid at regular Army rates for all
time  spent in  actual training.
■ You   are   guaranteed   full-time   summer   em-
y ployment.
■ On graduation and appointment as a Lieut-
enant you may undertake either full-time
service in the Canadian Army (Regular) or
spare time service in the Canadian Army
(Militia). You are free to choose between a
civilian career or an assured position as a
Commissioned Officer.
SERVE
WITH A
PURPOSE
For full details consult Capt. D. L. WILLIAMS, Army Resident Staff Officer,
UBC Armoury.
Tex Enemark (outspoken communist).
SAILING CLUB
There will he a general meeting in Hut B-3.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR
CHRIST
College Life will meet tonight at 9:01 in the lounge of
Lower Mall Common block.
The speaker will be Robert
Andrews, western regional
director. Everyone invited.
A marketing career in Industrial Sales with
CROWN ZELLERBACH CANADA LIMITED
Continued growth of the company in new markets, products
andterritoriesfiascreatedtheneedformatureyoungmento
handle marketing of paper and building material products.
Interested persons should have some summer business
background or business education. A complete sales training and product knowledge program will be developed to
suit each man's needs.
Please contact the Placement Office for a personal interview with a company representative.
Interviews NOVEMBER 3
University Of British Columbia
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST—ONE MAN'S BLACK RAIN-
coat with girl's purse in pocket
at Amouries' Homecoming Dance
Sat. nite.  Please call 733-1020.
LADY'S WRISTWATCH LOST
Thursday.  Please  phone  278-1594.
LOST BLACK WALLET FINDER
please   contact   277-3861.	
BLACK PURSE LEFT IN C LOT
Monday night. RevSard call TU 7-
0066.
REWARD — FOR WALLET LOST
in Brock Lounge last Wednesday.
Must have I.D. and papers. Phone
Bill 224-1961.
LOST IN GYM AFTER THURS-
day's rally, lady's gold watch
with back inscribed. Reward
phone 738-8915 after 6.	
SECOND YEAR LAW NOTES
lost. They were in a black tour-
ring binder. Finder please call
Dave  at  YU  7-4746.   Reward.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE—1 BLACK
Attache Case from N. Brock Monday noon. Contains very important notes. Please return. Contact Vince RE 8-0493.
LOST: MAN'S WATCH WITH
black leather band at Homecoming    game.    Finder   please    phone
684-1751.
WOULD    PERSON    WHO    FOUND
drafting equip,   in Hen.  202  Friday   afternoon   please   return   733-
6461.
LOST YELLOW "NURSING1
notebook in Freddy Wood or College Library. Reward. Phone 733-
1835.
Greetings
12
HAPPY    BIRTHDAY!     CAROLE
save some goodies from Chico.	
GAYLE DARLING: MUST SEE
vou on the 22nd. Love will be
greatest   that   night. E.G.K.
Coming Dances
12A
PUSSY GALORE AT THE BLACK
Cat Ball, October 29th in The
Armory. Dance to the novel sound
of the Brave New World from
8:30 to 12:30. Admission $1.25 per
person.  Costume optional.
Transportation
14   Typing
RIDE NEEDED. THREE GIRLS.
Kingsway from Slocan, Welwyn,
Knight. Wendy, 434-5911; Louise,
879-2392;   Helen   876-9817.
WANTED RIDER FOR NORTH
Van. (Delbrook or Highlands) car
pool  YU   8-4418.	
RIDE WANTED. NEED A RIDER?
from West End (Harwood) Mon.
to Fri. Call Bob 684-0748.
Travel Opportunities
16
VISIT CHINA .FOR 50 CENTS
Auditorium, Thursday, November
3.
AUTOMOTIVE   8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE: 1964 TRIUMPH, RADIO,
rebuilt engine, 1 year guarantee.
Only 11,050.  224-6857.
HONDA DRIVERS
COLD?
WET?
xtlDE WARM AND DRY ALL
WINTER!
I will trade my 1954 Olds Rocket for
any 50cc late model motorcycle
complete with accessories. This is
a one owner car in excellent running condition. Only 65,000 well
cared for miles since new. Some
of the features include: power
brakes, automatic trans., custom
radio, backup lights, seat belts,
undercoat, tinted glass. Tires and
battery   almost   new.
Will trade, or sell for $225.00. Phone
733-1078 or drive by and see at
rear of 2171 W. 1st Ave after 5:00
p.m.
1958 HILLMAN, GOOD CONDI-
tion, new brakes. Must sell immediately. $450. Call Sandy, 731-
4344.
FOR SALE '57 FORD, EXCELLENT
cond., w.w., radio, etc., $450 or
best offer.  988-9354.
'58 JAGUAR XK-150 Coupe $1,035.
Phone Bob, Room 213, Sherwood
Lett,   224-9752.
43
TYPING   SERVICE
Mrs. Gail Symons
3885  W.  12th Ave. CA  4-6435
ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED
70th & Granville
263-4530
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
COMMERCE GRADS '67: ATTEND
briefing sessions and job interviews being held on campus —
Government of Canada.
Briefing: Oct. 26, 12:30 to 1:30,
Rm. 214 Angus Bldg. (Refreshments will be served.)
Interviews: Oct. 27 & 28, Student
Placement Offices, West Mall.
DELIVERY BOYS WHO KNOW
UBC and have own cars. Late
evening work. Modest salary plus
car allowance. CA 4-0833 — 4423
W.  10th.
FEMALE ASSISTANT FOR
downtown dental office. No experience required. Apply in writing to Dr. G. A. Folkins 907-925
W.  Georgia.
Music
63
FOLK   GROUP    REQUIRES    MEM-
bers.   Phone   929-2769   Steve.
INSTRUCTION  — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
11)65 CHEV. IMPALA V8, 2 DR.
hardtop, loaded, undercoated,
9,600   miles,   Evenings   733-9050.
Special Notices
13
CHEM 101—Another small shipment
of "Guides to Chem 101 labs" has
arrived today. Only $1.95 at the
College Shop, Brock Ext.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F&G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome.
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week Is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further Information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
POETRY CONTEST: UBC's LITER-
ary Guild announces a contest open
to all UBC students. Entry fee:
25c per poem, limit 25 lines maximum. Payment: one contributor's
copy, and prize of $5 for best poem
published. All rights reserved. Address entries to 'Literary Guild
Contest', c/o BE 259, Brock Hall.
DEADLINE:  Dec. 1, 1966.
BLABNIGHT at the Advance Mattress Coffeehouse (10th & Alma).
Make your own harangue or
comedy on stage tonight and
every  Thursday.	
HAIR CUTS WHILE YOU WAIT!
Campus Barber Shop. 153 Brock
Hall.
(WP) TREASURE VAN RESO-
lutely repelled pygmy raids en-
route Zambezi tn IH. Turkish
wedding rings and wife leaders
safe.   Arrive   Monday.
1950 PLYMOUTH, GOOD CONDI-
tion. Recent engine overhaul. Of-
fers  738-8180 after 6 p.m.	
MUST SELL OR QUIT SCHOOL!
'61 Corvette, excellent condition.
Two  tops  call  Jim   LA   2-0467.
1954 ZEPHYR IN GOOD RUNNING
order and body. A-l, phone Ber-
nie 224-9064 $145.
1958   AUSTIN   A55   GOOD   TRANS-
portation.   best   offer   922-6419.
1960 RENAULT DAUPHINE, GOOD
cond. Radio and heater, phone
Keary   224-7967  after   6:00  p.m.
Accessories & Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them all at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &   Alma 736-9804
(10%   Student   Discount)
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
HAND CARVED
Teakwood chairs and lamps from
the orient.
Unpainted single pedestal desks
$14.95 and up. Unpainted double
pedestal desks $24.50 and up. Unpainted chests of drawers $11.95
and up. We now have over 5,000
sq. feet of floor space to serve you
better.
KLASSEN'S  FURNITURE MART
3207  W.  Broadway   -  RE  6-0712
Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store.
Scandals 39A
SPUD,     ORIGINALLY     U-STUD,
guts loose  at  Fort  Camp.	
HAVE A PEEK UNDER THE
bamboo curtain, Thursday, No-
vember   3.   Auditorium.   50   cents.
FORT CAMP GIRLS TAKE NOTE:
Alvin Pulls, the voice of the
people,   is  pulling for you.        	
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available next Week.
Limited Number. Order now, only
75 cents from Phrateres or publications  office,  Brock Hall.	
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.	
SONY 102 TAPE RECORDER AND
5000 ft. tape, new condition. Phone
224-9029.  Dick, room 9.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
SKIS FOR SALE: 210 CM. HEAD
competition and Kneissi G. S.
with   bindings.   Phone  738-3208.
RENTALS  8c REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
DOUBLE SLEEPING ROOM. Private bath, entrance, Seven min.
walking dist. from Brock. Mrs.
Boyce,   224-5700.	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR MALE
student. Private entrance. Share
shower, toilet. Phone 224-5883 —
3917  W.   11th.
BEDROOM - KITCHEN PRIVI-
leges, female student. Warm,
clean, on bus. Larch at Broadway
$55.   Phone  738-9173  at  6  p.m.
DISSATISFIED WITH YOUR Accommodation ? Room available
November 1, Southlands area —
off Dunbar, $45 per month —
Bathroom and shower adjacent,
use of kitchen, washer/dryer —
10 minutes to University along
Marine Drive — 15 minutes Dunbar bus — Phone before 10:30
a.m. or after 5:30 p.m. — 266-
2696.
Room St Board
82
>?AZARGOBBLES      AT.     FORT
I     Camp.
ROOM AND BOARD, CLOSE TO
UBC gates. Share. Phone 228-8380.
RM. AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
rhone  224-9665.  PSI  Upsilon.
Halls  for  Rent
85
FURNISHED AUDITORIUM FOR
rent. 50 cents per day. November
only. Sharing with 800,000,000
Chinese.

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