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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1966

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Array New officer
fits right in
Practising for job she
won the easy way,
new AMS secretary
Gail Gaskelf relaxes
in office that will be
hers for 1966-67 academic year. She was
one of two candidates
acclaimed to executive positions as
nominations for AMS
elections closed
Thursday. (See story
page 3.)
-norm  betts  photo
^^»V*$V..#t'j^
Vol. XLVIII, No. 42        VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1966   <^&»48  CA 4-3916
Threat of expulsion
subdues Vic students
VICTORIA (UNS)—The protest over high fees at Victoria
College has faded into quiet
grumbing.
The last of the students withholding $56 of their second
term fees to protest the 1965
fee increase, gave in by the
Wednesday deadline set by the
board of governors.
The students had intended to
withhold the money until the
provincial legislature opened
Thursday, but were under a
threat of expulsion if they failed to meet the deadline.
A single student council
member, Gordon Pollard, refused to pay by the deadline.
His fees were paid by an
anonymous benefactor Wednesday.
Susan Pelland, editor of The
Martlett, said that the 689 students who had withheld their
fees would be assessed the $10
late fee fine.
An ad hoc committee formed
by members of the council will
try to raise the money for the
fines from other universities.
The committee of 66, as it is
called, cannot use council funds
because of a legal clause in the
Societies Act.
Paul    Williamson,    Victoria
council president and member
of the committee, will be at
Simon Fraser today to appeal
for funds.
Help is coming from other
sources.
"A chemistry professor from
UBC sent over a cheque for
$10," said Miss Pelland.
"We really appreciated it."
A motion of non-confidence
in the Victoria council was defeated Thursday.
The motion censured the
council for failing to provide
strong leadership and support
for fee withholders.
Four hundred students voted
overwhelmingly against the
motion at an open meeting.
$50 million
aid jump-
but where?
VICTORIA (UNS) — The goverment announced in
Thursday's throne speech there will be $50' million more for
education this year — but they didn't say where the extra
money will go.
The speech, read by Lt.-Gov.
George Pearkes, said spending
for the next fiscal year will
approach $200 million. Last
year's budget allotted $152 million for education.
The speech said enrolment in
universities, community colleges, and the Institute of Technology in Vancouver is continuing at a rate exceeding
normal growth.
"An even larger proportion
of the department of education's work will be directed toward the post-secondary field
of education," the speech said.
"Therefore you will be asked
NEW ONE
ON THE WAY
Engineers   monument  gone
By NORM BETTS
Ubyssey Cairn Editor
The Engineers' instant commemorative cairn is no more.
The rock-and-concrete cairn,
built at noon Wednesday by
the Engineering Undergraduate
Society, "in humble appreciation of the diversified and continuing contributions to campus life by the Engineers", has
disappeared from in front of
the Library.
Engineering president Art
Stevenson says the cairn wilf
reappear on the campus.
He said a new and bigger
cairn would be constructed.
"The engraved plaque needs
a resting place," he said.
I'm not too sure how big the
ENGINEERS' CAIRN
. disappeared suddenly
new cairn will be but no one
will be able to move it."
Don Allen, vice-president of
the EUS, said Wednesday's
cairn construction was only
symbolic.
"We don't want to say when
the new cairn will be on
campus but the one constructed Wednesday noon was built
only for ceremony and dismantled  later.
"There are several refinements we want to add to the
permanent cairn,"  Allen  said.
A usually reliable source revealed the engineers were
planning to cement a science-
man into the new cairn.
to approve an expansion of the
department."
The speech also announced
plans for expanding the Labor
department, but there has been
no word on whether Leslie
Peterson will keep both portfolios.
"It is apparent that with increasing automation and technological change, mass education has entered another
phase," said the speech.
B.C.'s public education system requires 17,000 instructors
and serves over 420,000 students, said the speech.
It said many part-time teachers and students occupy these
buildings in the late afternoon
and evening.
"The undivided attention of
our educational authorities will
be required to achieve optimum use of this massive growing facility, and at the same
time to keep consumption of
financial and human resources
within attainable limits."
The speech said there is a
need to clarify the functions of
the various types of education
institutions and the relations
between them.
UBC was not mentioned in
the speech.
UBC president John Macdonald was in New York Thursday and unavailable for comment.
In Vancouver UBC information officer Ralph Daly said
there would be little official
UBC reaction "until we know
where the money falls".
He said there was no way of
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: WHERE? Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1966
Dons the WISE choice
—simply "gives a damn
it
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Associate Editor
This is the first in a series of interviews with the three
candidates running for AMS president,
the
WISE
. gives a damn
Alberta
university
aid upped
EDMONTON — (UNS) —
Alberta Premier E. C. Manning announced Wednesday
that provincial government
grants to the University of
Alberta will be increased to
$1,6Q0 per student effective
April 1.
Present grant is $1,365 per
student, so the increase will
mean $235 more for each of
Alberta's 13,500 university
students.
The boost will cost the government nearly $22 million,
Manning said.
"We hope it will make a fee
raise next term unnecessary,
although this must be the decision of the board of governors of the University."
Manning said money for the
increase would come from the
province's general reserve
fund.
He said student fees must
now pay only 16 per cent of
the University's total operating expenses.
Manning said he foresees no
reduction in student fees.
British Columbia's universities, with 22,300 students, receive less than $800 per student in provincial grants.
WHERE?
(Continued from Page 1)
knowing how much UBC would
receive until after the budget
is announced next month.
Chairman of the UBC's board
of governors, Nathan Nemetz,
said the promise of increased
aid to education was good news.
"However, until I see how
much money is destined for
UBC, and until exact budgetary
requirements are known, I
don't think I can come to a
conclusion on the government's
position," he said.
Today the Ubyssey interviews Don Wise. Now in Arts
III Wise spent on year in engineering and was an EUS vice-
president.
He claims it's time for a new
type of president. "Most AMS
presidents and executives have
been syndicalists, they are in
it for the administrative experience and to make contacts
in the business world," says
Wise.
"I'm confident I'm the best
choice for president simply
because I give a damn about
the other students out here.
"I'm concerned with several
issues which must be talked
about during this election
campaign.
"I'm against the Student
Union building as it's presently proposed but I can't see
killing the project altogether
and costing the students several hundred thousand dollars
just to break a few contracts.
"SUB can be acceptable if
certain provisions are adopted.
As presently proposed SUB
will take up all of the time of
the AMS executive just to ad-
minster the building which
could turn into an AMS play
pen.
There is also too little space
provided for club's rooms and
common rooms.
"One way to ensure AMS
execs will have time to participate in total student activities and have time to investigate and do something about
issues which are constantly
coming up such as fees and
residences is to share the work
load.
"The AMS presidency is a
prime example of an organization's chief policy maker being forced by an overwhelming
administrative workload to
turn into a non-committal bureaucrat.
"As his position is currently defined the president just
doesn't have the time to participate in and take a stand on
key issues such as academic
planning and activities, athletics and particularly student
action which may be necessary
to force recognition of our concern and bring about necessary  changes.
"By creating the post of
ombudsman and hiring more
students on a part time" basis
to help with administration
we can take a closer look at
individual and common student problems.
"The residences are now
four isolated and distinct student communities. But how
much more effective their
pleas for better facilities, lower rents and better food if they
could speak as one group.
"Residence students must be
brought together by co-ordin
ated social, academic and athletic activities so they will be
willing to speak with one
voice knowing they share
many common and serious
problems.
"By expanding and co-ordinating activities and lessening
costs students will not be forced to live off campus, often in
small basement rooms.
"Another area with which
I'm concerned is our extramural athletic system. We pay
two-thirds of the athletic budget, $70,000, and should have
two-thirds of the say in running the program—but we allow faculty members on the
Men's Athletic Committee to
make all the key policy decisions.
"And at least two of the
priority sport's coaches should
be named to the comittee every
year. These people have often
spoken out sharply on such issues as athletic scholarships
but are ignored because they
have no influence in actually
making policy.
"With either of the AMS's
two representatives chairing
the athletic ibudget committee
and representation for the
coaches both radical and beneficial changes would swiftly
come in our athletic program.
If we don't do something in
this area quickly Simon Fraser
will obviously take the leadership in B.C. amateur sports
away from us.
"Student action can be good
thing if timed and! co-ordinated properly:
"For instance we can inform
and educate people in this province on the critical problem
of spiraling costs in higher education.
"If the voting public accepts
the financing of higher education as a priority election issue
then provincial and federal
governments will be forced to
make a greater and more realistic committment to this problem.
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
RAID  SEDGEWICK
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices. . .
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EYEGLASSES
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
ORANVWf  OPTICAL
Ml Granville MU S-tMl
■as-Money Back Quaranlii —
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
Commencing Monday
Jan. 31 to Feb. 5
Don Crawford
with Carol Hedin
*     *    *
HOOTENANNY
SUNDAY-EVENINGS
Coming the  Irish  Rovers
Mad red mora I men
burn 'pornography
By CAROL WILSON
The Sedgewick Library has been cleansed of all its
pornographic books to make room for more technical engineering literature,
The clean-up took place
Thursday when a group of
second year engineers marched
into the library, took out all
the dirty books and burned
them.
Greek freaks
clown it up
at pep rally
By VICKI SMITH
The Greeks went Mexican
Thursday afternoon in the War
Memorial Gym.
The girls were clever and
cute. The boys were corny and
crude.
Byron Hender was shot. The
Beta production . . . "Cuban
Revolution at UBC" saw the
end of our president . . . the
fatal result of a merciless firing squad.
Most sororities featured
Mexican dances by Mexican-
costumed girls. But penguins
and road-runners made appearances too.
Some 2,000 students sought
shelter from dripping skies by
purchasing  admission  tickets.
Peter Olson, leader of the
engineers, said he was concerned about the lack of technical literature for engineers
in the library.
"We found that there is no
room for it because all the
space is taken by pornographic
literature, so we decided to do
something about it," he said.
"We went in there this
morning and marked all the
dirty books. We don't know
if we got them all, but we
think we got most of them,"
Olson said.
Several students reported
seeing the engineers in the
library this morning putting
books  on  the  shelves.
The engineers encountered
no opposition from the librarians.
Slacks Narrowed
» .
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS|
549 Granville St.
We invite UBC Students to
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
Sunday, January 30th, 1966
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship
Sermon — "WE NEVER
SAW ANYTHING LIKE
THIS!"—Rev. Harold L.
MacKay.
7:00 p.m. University Young
People's will attend Congregation Dessert Party
and see a film, "The Visitor".
THE CHURCH ON THE
CAMPUS WELCOMES YOU
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
KE*EP
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West  10th Avenue
For  an  interview
call RE 1-1131
GSA NEWS
CLUB NIGHTS AND BEERGARDEN:
Both activities will continue this Friday afternoon
and Saturday Evening.
TRIP TO CHINA:
Dr. H. L. Keenleyside will speak on his trip to China:
at 8:00 p.m., Friday, Feb. 4, in International House.
Tickets are now available at the G.S.C. Office. Admission free.
DEBATING: TEAM:
Graduate students interested in forming a Debating
team should leave their names with the Secretary,
in the GSC Office. TODAY at noon.
ELECTIONS:
G.S.A. Executive Elections will be held about March
1. A full slate of 11 candidates is needed. Some potential nominees have already made inquiries. Nomination forms are available at the GSC Office. Graduate
students in the Faculty of Arts Departments should
especially attempt to increase their representation
on the executive. Friday,  January 28,   1966
THE    U BYSSEY
Page 3
—dennls gans photo
DEFENDERS OF MORALITY won battle Thursday in the fight to restore decency to medium
of the printed word. Here first-year engineering students bask in heat from flames
destroying "filthy, disgusting books" they discovered in Sedgewick Library stunt.
Braund, Mate, Wise
chase AMS presidency
Three students are set to
begin the scramble for AMS
president.
In the race for president are
AMS second vice-president
Peter   Braund,   law   I,   Gabor
Playwrights
challenged
Students who can write an
original one-act play may enter
the UBC Alumni Association
Original One-Act Play Festival
1966.
Three or four plays will be
selected before April and presented to the public on the
campus in fall 1966.
Judges will select one play
to represent UBC at the Canadian Drama Festival in February 1967.
Rules and official entry
blanks may foe obtained from
Brock 252, Buchanan 171 or
the Department of Theatre
office in the Frederic Wood
Theatre.
Deadline for submitting entries is March 15.
Mate, arts IV, and Don Wise,
arts III.
Two executive positions
went by acclamation as nominations closed at 4 p.m.
Thursday.
New second vice president
is Ian McDougall, arts II. Gail
Gaskell, education IV, is secretary for 1966-67.
McDougall said Thursday he
noticed the second vice-president's position went by acclamation last year and at the time
he decided to run this year.
He said he thought students
should have a more definite
voice in the community.
"The student volunteer service is a good example of what
1 mean by this," he said.
McDougall also wants to see
the Student Union Building
brought out into the open.
"I'd like to see it debated
by students outside the council," he said.
Miss Gaskell said there
should be an AMS bulletin to
present council issues to students.
"I think The Ubyssey is
presenting  a warped  view  of
Healy hunts opinions
on new arts program
Arts dean Dennis Healy wants to meet the students.
Healy said Thursday he wants to search out student
opinions on the new arts curriculum.
He has held one meeting already with students in
Totem park residence and will be discussing the new program Thursday at 4 p.m. in Bu. 203.
Healy said he plans 10 to 15 meetings with students
this spring.
Spring Formal Specials
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E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
Tuxedos
$6.50
student   council   issues,"    she
said.
The three-way presidential
campaign will be focussed on
the issues of SUB and student
involvement in university affairs.
Braund feels students should
have another chance to vote
on the building before construction begins this fall.
He introduced a motion into
student council Monday asking
for a referendum on the issue.
The referendum was defeated with only two councillors
backing Braund.
Mate thinks students should
have a voice in the administration of the university.
"We are the ones who' are
most concerned with the education we are getting. The
board of governors isn't concerned."
Mate was a member of th»
ad hoc committee which backed the student march for universal accessibility Oct. 27,
1965.
Wise wants students to take
a "new look" at SUB.
If the SUB project is scrapped or curtailed he would like
to see the money saved used
to leave the president free to
involve himself more in leading the AMS than in fulfilling
a purely bureaucratic function.
POSTGRADUATE
OPPORTUNITIES
Pathological Chemistry
BANTING INSTITUTE,
UNIVERSITY  OF   TORONTO
Three Postgraduate Fellowships, initial stipends ranging from $2,400-$4,000 per
annum depending upon
qualifications, will become
available during 1966 in the
Department of Pathological
Chemistry, Banting Institute,
University o3 Toronto, Toronto 5. Applications are
invited, from students with
a sound undergrad uate
training in the Chemical or
Biological Sciences or in
Medicine. Interested students may write to the Head
of the Department for further details.
'RUN IT OURSELVES'
Students seek
outside housing
By PAT HRUSHOWY
Student co-operative off-campus housing at UBC may
become a reality because of the shortage of student accommodation.
A survey is now being conducted by Jim Slater, grad
studies, into the feasibility of
establishing university-owned
but student-run residences for
married students.
"We want to cooperate with
the administration in obtaining
accommodation for married
students with the policies set
by students on the committee,"
said Slater.
"In our study we have also
found there is a definite need
for more housing for single
students and the co-operative
plan would help."
Complete independent student-owned housing is a reality
at the University of Toronto.
There, large houses near the
campus were bought and redecorated to suit the aims of
student housing .
The co-operative officials in
Toronto claim they can provide
housing comparable to other
off-campus facilities for $200
less a year.
Director of Residences, Malcolm McGregor, was asked
Thursday about the possibility
of a student co-op.
"If they can arrange it, more
luck to them. But I doubt they
could provide the service for
less than we do in the residences," he said.
The advocates of student cooperative housing claim such a
plan will help alleviate the present housing shortage.
"If there was more accommodation near the gates it
would be our gain," said McGregor.
"There is no argument the
co-op  would  help  the  housing
JUST ARRIVED
The New
Suzuki Hustler
250 cc. 6 Speeds
SEE IT AT
Varsity  Cycles
4357 W. 10th      CA 4-1034
malcolm McGregor
. . . wishes luck
shortage problem if they were
practical," said AMS president
Byron Hender.
"As an alternative to campus
residences I'm not too enthusiastic," said McGregor.
Hender again stressed the un-
feasibility of the plan here but
said, "If they can provide
reasonable accommodation and
there is ademand for it, why
not."
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-   3005 W. Broadway   -:-    RE 6 9012 mnnsft
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
rear by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
L.oc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects ot Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
They're off!
Well, the candidates are named, the posters are
going up, and the dust is set to fly on the 1966 AMS
presidential election campaign.
And frankly, we're pretty pleased.
It's as if all the shouting and stomping around in
October has come home to roost. All three candidates
are student activists and that means a go-go year next
year regardless of who tops the polls.
On the fee front, things are looking better than ever.
Student agitation — plus the reports of the later-invalidated Bladen commission and the findings of the
Economic Council of Canada — have led to announcements of more federal and provincial aid to higher education this year.
The hint of more to follow means student leaders
like our new president will have to keep the pressure
up next year.
On campus, there is the reasonable alternative to the
SUB disaster to decide on. And the residence situation
to take fast and concrete action on.
Not least, there is the problem of where the university, and UBC, is going. The AMS must be made relevant
to academics, to the faculty, and to the running of this
institution.
All of the three 1966 action candidates seem to be
more than able to tackle these problems in a forthright,
positive manner.
Peter Braund is the "organization man" with a difference. AMS second vice-president this year, with a
history of service in the AMS, he spearheaded the Education Action Program along with spark-plug first vice-
president Bob Cruise.
Gabor Mate was a leader of the ad hoc group which
put the pressure on student council to turn the EAP-
planned Oct. 27 march into a reality.
And recently he has distinguished himself in writing
to President John Macdonald to spark the promised Feb.
8 open forum on the university.
Don Wise is the student who is out to prove that any
student should have a right to be an officer in the student
society.
A long-time believer that the AMS needs to become
more meaningful to more students, Don hit the limelight
earlier this year with his Men's Athletic Committee-
shaking suggestion that bronco riding be made part of
the athletic program.
There they are—three students committed to action
for a better deal. It should be a great campaign, and for
once the one group with nothing to lose by the outcome
is the students.
Clothes
We went downtown the other day and returned alive
to harbinge a warning for any other students contemplating such a hazardous adventure.
If you can hack soot and smoke, buses and parking
meters, you may meet some citizens.
A stranger, more anti-social breed there never was,
but they're harmless.
Fear not their naked faces — really, they could be
bearded, but somehow think it rebellious or fitting to
scrape daily with sharp metal blades.
Anthropologists tell us the strips of cloth dangling
about their necks are ritual garrots rarely functional
today, except to replace missing shirt buttons.
Being mostly fat, they wear light shoes to make
walking easier — it's hard to breathe through the neckpieces anyway — and they get wet when it rains.
Their sages say clothes make the man, and they're
certainly all made the same.
We guess it's just rebellion against comfort and
fuzzy thinking.
:^x\jQ&4--s
"Mardi Gras or no Mardi Gras, you can't park here!"
IN  THE EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
Awwwright, crab!  Go!
CAMERON
The other day I met a fellow who was in the Army with
me, way back when.
"Do you re-
j member?" he
! asked.
Do I remem-
i ber ?       Do     I
ever!     Neither
. I  nor  the  Army   will   ever
forget.
I joined in
order to play in the band. The
newspaper ad spoke of the advantages in glowing terms.
Trying to ignore the fact
that the same terms (and almost the same wording) were
used by the British Navy two
hundred years ago, I joined.
The first night at the armory, I was given a brown
sandpaper uniform; and told to
change in an empty room.
After being kicked out of
the gunners', sergeants', and
officers' messes, I found a room
and changed.
The braces they had given
me had seemingly been last
worn by a homunculus, and I
had no time to adjust them.
This meant that the pants
tops reached my armpits and
the crotch was somewhere in
the place that my navel once
occupied.
I went out onto the floor and
got fell in, and the Regimental
Sergeant Major came over to
say hello.
He did this at the top of his
lungs, while we all marvelled
at the power and feeling behind it.
Finally, after a series of incomprehensible orders, he got
us moving, more or less in
one direction.
Unfortunately, my pants
caused me to move in a somewhat irregular fashion. Just as
the men around me were catching on to the Cameron shuffle,
we were halted by another
series of Brobdingnagian
belches.
We stopped, still more or
less together, and he started
screaming.
"You bloody awful shaar!
Yes, you! Come here"
I looked around to see who
the  unfortunate  was.
"Don't look around," he
yelled. "You, you dozy little
man!"
In a panic, I shouldered my
way through the ranks, just in
time to see him turn an interesting shade of puce. I tried
to go back.
"Stop, You bloody horrible
little man!"
By this time his face was
bright red, and his eyes were
bugging out.
"Jesus wept," he screamed,
"and all because he looked at
you. Half man, half ruptured
crab, that's what you are!"
"You terrible little man!
You lump of putrified excrement!"
Fascinated, I watched his
tonsils   bobbing,   and   opened
my mouth to warn him of his
blood  pressure.
"Keep your mouth shut! If
you don't, I'll reach in and
pull out your entrails and
strangle  you  with  them!"
MJy intestines swiftly curled
themselves up into a little knot
and tried to hide in my chest
cavity.
I finally recovered, of
course, but I was on a liquid
diet for three weeks, until my
stomach came out of hiding
again.
Do I remember?
HA!
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News Ron Riter
Associate    .  _. George Reamsbottom
City Al Donald
Photo   Norm Betts
Sports    Ed Clark
Ass't News     _  —Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City Danny StofFman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing _ Ian Cameron
Features Mike Bolton
CUP Don Hull
Peppy Vicki Smith covered another pep meet, Dick Taylor played parliament, Anne Balf wrote" a
story, and another and another,
Paul Terry came back, Kris Em-
mott wrote more stories, so did
Bert Hill, but Marilyn went home
early, Elaine Briere and Dolores
Roberts came for the first time,
and Dave Nicholson, Jim Good,
and Carol Wilson wrote all manner of things. Val Zuker was here
too. Even the Lebanese camel
drivr   went   out  on   a   story.
FOR
LETTERS
see page 13
AH, POLITICS! THE GOOD FI6HT IN THE GLORIOUS ARENA! To SERVE THE FEOPlESMEEDS /
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IN JOKE: The long-suffering science ("Take it off,
baby!" undergraduate society is about to be marked
in, again.
INCENSED: Arts under-
graddie pres Charlie (snake pit) Campbell, the boy
who opens his mouth only
to change feet, has established some sort of pre-
:edent in Canadian jurisprudence.
He claims the arts rag
Consensus, in a snide art-
ticle about Einar (Grey
Eminence) Gunderson, has
committed the crime of
"borderline libel".
Last time we talked to a
lawyer, something was
libelous or it wasn't. At
that time, "borderline"
hadn't entered the legal
picture.
INEPT: The Vancouver
Times Memorial Award for
outstanding gullibility in
journalism goes twice this
week to the Vancouver
Province, once to the Sun.
Both downtown rags
thought it was so awful
very nice to see UBC kids
wearing academic gowns
— especially after earlier
contrived yarns based on
prof H. V. Warren's mouth-
ings about sloppy, slovenly
students here.
Call off the crack photographer-reporter teams,
fellas, the whole bit was
part of special events'
Camp Week on campus.
And that means you've
been had.
IN CROWD: It took two
tries for first-veep Bob
(Boy Scout) Cruise to get
into the AMS election playpen this year.
He appiled to be Gabor
(Quixote) Mate's campaign
manager. Mate turned: him
down.
So Cruise then looked up
the other presidential aspirant, Pete (The Establishment) Braund, and endorsed his nomination papers.
INDUBITABLY: Some
disgruntled students are
getting the idea that the
proposed student union
building (SUB) is becoming RUB — a personal
monument t o chairman
Roger McAfee's years of
high - pressure wheeling-
dealing.
Watch for that political
fable, the old grassroots
groundswell, to become
reality in a collective howl
about the $4.5 million
white elephant.
IN GREATNESS: Several Canadian campus
newspapers have written
very nice letters to that
brash western paragon of
excellence, The Ubyssey.
They want copies of the
thrice - weekly wonder's
Style Books, which they
think might be the key to
greatness.
Now, the University of
Western Washington (pop.
28.000) Daily, a product of
a high-powered journalism
class, says it too could use
the style sheet.
Glad to oblige, we said,
humbly but proudly.
INDIGNANT: AMS president Byron Hender was a
mite worried about rumors
that Consesus could be
sued for the alleged Gunderson libel.
Hence the quote of the
week, expressed to Ubyssey
boy-wonder editor Thomas
E. Wayman:
"I'd fire you, Wayman,
but I've got other things
on my mind right now."
IN-ELIGIBLE: The biggest upset in the Whose-
For-Prexy race came when
Aussie co-ordinator Graeme Vance was declared ineligible. It seems Graeme
was intending to run, and
his six-course work load
average was A-OK toy the
eligibility committee.
The Registration's office
didn't see it that way, however. It was about this
seventh course. Asked if
he wanted a re-run at the
eligibility committee: Graeme said: "Nope".
And that's the way it
happens, in the big city.
P.S. Another Registrar
choppee was cheerful Kim
Campbell, last year's frosh
prexy who aimed at
second-vice.
Friday, January 28,   1966
I      f':
THE        UBYSSEY
O'J'j  '■';\'/j'/i[  '.».'',■* I     '1 j''
Page 5 pf
ON THE COVER - Jeff Wall's
view of the upcoming festival
of the contemporary arts, feb
2  to  11.
Editor: John Kelsey
Current  affairs-
Steve  Brown
Science, the arts—
Al  Francis
Assistant-
Claudia Gwinn
arts
thesixthannualfestivalof
thecontemporaryartsmustl
ooklikethistotheunitiated.
But it doesn't take long
to unscramble it all and
realize, that next to
awarding bits of paper at
convocation, it's one of
the more significant
things happening around
here.
It's one of the few vestiges of life left on this
campus.
The most advanced
thinkers in contemporary
arts come to spread the
word and compare wild
ideas with students and
each other.
Note the contemporary.
That means relevant,
baby, with which your
studies usually aren't.
Nearly all studies in
the arts and fine arts departments are what's
gone before.
Which is necessary for
development of the artist
and scholar, we'll admit,
but isn't the freshest
thing  going.
The festival is a chance
to find out what artists
who have been through
the history business are
doing — where their
thought has led them, and
where they're going now.
It adds a new perspective on the old, and broadens the mind for more
new directions.
God knows we're spouting cliches now, exhorting the obvious, but that's
what happens when you
get enthused, which we
are.
And we're plugging
hell out of festival because  it's worth it.
Quasars limit
finite universe
recession, the giant red shift
W^/f y    mon    COO of the quasars indicated they
•*'U»     IIICll    jCC are   travelling   at   fantastic
final     anSWer Present   calculations   place
quasi-stellars   on   the   fringe
By AL  FRANCIS 0f the known universe, and flHEUHaJHa^BBoHi-                    .iiH
Until this decade the limits double  the  size  of the  uni-
of the visible universe were verse hitherto known. —■—                                      ^^..^^
about   two   to   four   billion If one were to travel from ■■■■^■^■^■ra^raaS* *                     ™     ^^■fe...
light-years. earth   at   186,000   miles  per ■■ri^^H^BKr^
Now     quasi-stellar     radio second, the speed of light, it pWy^^P?^ip^''' j/
sources,   quasars   for   short, would take five minutes to KjaJJi^^^Sit               * .■JhjMf^t
have been observed eight to reach the sun, five hours to ■■-^■■■■■ha^Ht.. ■ •               *CMmm$
ten billion light-years away reach Pluto, the last planet ■mumwp.         ^.
—close    to    where,    Eistein of our solar system. ^HH^H*!-'"       ■ -'> -'                             _.
hypothesized,  space may be Four year  of open  space ^^^^V^^HgF" .   - .--"■-"£S™"*s™Ka™te,f
seen to curve in on itself. would bring us to the near- ■^■^■H;    ^MBB=.-. ' ifti
One quasar appears to be est star in our galaxy, Alpha ^^^^^■■HyS J&*Wy	
travelling    away   from   the Centauri.   It   would   be   at ^^^HB^ JfiSfe'''*^-— -,--
earth  at   149,000  miles  per ■^■^■^■^■^■H^HhEK"* "   /%'^~
second—about 80 per cent of ■■^■^■^■^■^■RlPilBWHHlf &
the velocity  of light. CfJUAIE^A
The most baffling aspect of MiHillljt/ ■^■■^■^■^■^■MHataalSB .    S
quasars is their energy out- %      fcJV*V     W
put.    They    are    apparently ■f^Bf^Bf^Bf^fgp;,^    <gg
shining   with    10,000    times	
the   brightness   of a   billion least 20.°l&0 years before we Wm^^m^^^^^H
suns, energies that cannot be lef* our 100 billion star gal-
accounted for by any known axy   and   some   two   million
physical    process    including years before we reached An-
thermo-nuclear. dromeda, a nearby galaxy.
Many   physicists   and   as- Quasars  are  another  two
tronomers  think  there  may to   ten   billion   years   travel
be an entirely new and  in- yet, a long way to Tipperary.
credibly   powerful   form   of By   the   same   token,   the
energy   involved,   one   that light and radio waves astron-
will     make     thermonuclear omers  detect,   the  processes
reactions — like    those    at which    cause    quasars    one
work in ordinary stars—ap- hundredth to one third the
pear as damp firecrackers. size of a galaxy to give off
Quasars appear in optical up to  a hundred times the .
telescopes  as   faint   starlike light of a galaxy, happened • ' * Reeedln9 ,nto ">e red • • •
objects   and   escaped   notice two to ten billion years ago. More widely held theories      backs, such as the fact that
until  1960 when they were They    are    fossils    of    a revolve around the possible       no    excessive    gravitational
positively identified by Cam- young uniVerse, for the pro- escalation  of  more  familiar      disturbances have ever been
bridge University's immense cesses at work in them and nuclear      or      gravitational      seen  in   nearby   space,   this
Jodrell    Bank    radio    tele- tneir    appearances    are,    if forces, but.conditions which       theory supports the idea that
scope   and   a   200-inch   tele- ^     ^^ ^^ distance away might cause this have never      quasars   are   nearby  objects
scope at Palomar  Observat- M tenths of the way hac^ been   observed   in   the   uni-      and not at the galactic dis-
ory as strong radio sources, to creation verse and there are theoret-       tances   first   deduced   from
the first which had not been _         .                     .      _ ical  objections  to   their  oc-      their red shifts,
identified as entire galaxies. There  is some controversy .„____..
Astronomers immediately over the apparent distance ^ CI1V-C- This idea was summed up
turned to their standard of quasars as opposed to One theory suggested by by George Gamow, noted
tool, the spectograph, only to their brilliance and appar- Fred Hoyle and William theoretical physicist and
have the mystery deepen. ent mass. At stake is the Fowler claims quasars are popularizer, "What are we
The spectral lines of quasars foundation mathematical huge superstars on a galac- looking at here anyway?
turned out to be unlike any law in astronomy, the one tic scale which, by a series An elephant a mile away,
star or galaxy and defied in- °y which distance and vel- of explosions and implosions, or a mouse two feet away?"
terpretation until work in ocity of celestial bodies is have collapsed to a density Presently, most astron-
.1963 by Caltech's Maarten determined—Hubble's law. of about a billion tons per omerg support the Hoyie's
Schmidt. fThe task of explaining CUD1C tacn. idea the huge sizes and en-
Schmidt cracked the quas- quasars has resulted in a de- Sucn a titanic collapse ormous energies of quasars
ar spectographs toy discover- iuge of theories. would release ample energy can oniy be accounted for if
ing their unprecedented in the form of gravitational they are thought of "con-
large red shifts. Une suggf.sts they are waves to account for quas- densation knots" a massive
The concept of the red Pyrotechnic displays ot anti- ars> but caiculations showed primordial body, flung out
shift is a crucial one in as- matter, the counterpart oi it would be difficuit to pre. by the original explosion,
tronomy, and is based on the ordinary meters, witn part- vent such a process f rom fQr what we gee wag actually
long known phenomena of lc . of <;qual m™? °?~ swiftly reaching a runaway happening long before the
the lengthening of wave- pos"e cnarSe- ™nen ""J" state with gravitational earth was formed,
lengths   of  the   light   given mattf+meets ordmary mat- fields    of    such    magnitude
off   by   an   object   moving er   both are annihilated re- they would force the space          Thw c~cef* U .^^
away from an observer. The leasing  at  least /nough  en" around the star to curve in       ance    ^V"6   . blg*ang
same   phenomena   causes   a ergy t0 account for quasars" on itself, bottling up nearly      ?heory of ** universes or-
train whistle to change pitch all the radiation,  and  caus-       lgln—as  a  nuge   dense  pri-
as it approaches or recedes. •                          ,           ~ ing the whole mass literally      mordxai body winch explod-
Astronomers   analyse   the *      ' #1 to disappear from view.             ed' cai*mg 0«J giant f™**
,. . .    .          ,    .. ,  /;   ,    , "***-«* J#A „    ,           ,    „                          of matter  which  condensed
light of a celestial body by ;      llKlflA Hoyle    and    Fowler    say      intQ      laxieg of gtarg  „
using a spectograph to break Xll|£EtlV were this superstar to stab-      tulates a  life   oscillation  as
the  light  up   into   its   spec- ilize at this fantastic density,      thege bodieg loge to
trum. Elements in the light and not runaway, its radius       gravitation and decelerate to
source,    such   as   hydrogen, argument pf 2 would shrink to such a small       the        int   where   the     faU
show   up    as   characteristic eamoui   p, 3 size   it   would   have   to   be      ^^     ^     a     contracting
bars at certain wavelengths ...                                      . , fairly close to the solar sys-      nhase
on the spectrum. es,iva   "*                                p tern to be seen at all. More-
If the object is travelling interview pf 7 over, whatever light escaped          Thus, the universe is seen
away   from   the   earth,   the |etfar       __                      . 3 from  its   enormous  gravita-       as finite.
wavelength is lengthened by tional field would lose so Scientists now believe
the above phenomena and mu,,c ■* 4 much energy in the effort within a few years or a gen-
normal bars occur closer to science gf a that  it  would  be  stretched      eration they will know with
the red end of the spectrum. into a large gravitational red       certainty   whether   the   uni-
This is the red shift. shift rather than one based      vere is finite or infinite, and
Since the red shift is pro- war   P» • on velocity.                                     will be able to comprehend
portional to the velocity of whimsy   pf 8 Despite some grave draw-      it in its entirety.
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1966 Sexless judge
junks quandry
Who's who in the washroom
The Editor,
Page Friday:
In hopes of ending the
frivolous discussion of a
topic as old as man, which
of late has excluded many
more |worthy topics Sfrom
your paper, I have assumed
the role of arbitrator between the outspoken Mr.
Kelsey and the young maidens who have countered
him with such verbal intrep-
iidty as to hint of a well ingrained and perhaps well
founded fear of the opposite sex.
This battle of the sexes
seems to have begun most
unfortunately, because in
fact the defilers of each
group do not qualify to
carry on such argument as
they have been attempting
to  do.
Each is of the wrong sex.
If woman will denigrate
woman, and man, man; let
them blacken your pages,
sir. For then they know of
what   they   speafc.   But   if
woman, and man, man, let
man, and of woman, let that
presumption condemn them
to Hell.
That man will admire
openly the anatomy of the
sex from which he emerged,
is universal, for who cannot
but desire to regain paradise?
That woman is a physiognomist who declines to
enumerate the respective anatomical attributes of man
seems only her nature.
But for one to condemn
the other for her prudery
is as foolish as for the other
to condemn the first for his
wantonness. It is for man to
condemn woman as feminine, and for woman to condemn man as masculine.
Each is; they are — and
ever will be — different.
I should not presume to
make such arbitration were
I not to state my qualification, which is simply that
of belonging to neither yet
to both of those sexes.
GOD
A quasi-anthropological treatment of the
North American university, from a speech
by Prof. Richard Pope, of Toronto's York
University.
Washrooms are segregated at my university, not only by sex, which is common
practice throughout jNorth America, but
also by the position held within the university social structure.
Thus, there are facilities labeled '"men-
staff", "men-students", "women-staff", and
"women-students." Sometimes these facilities are immediately adjacent to each other
and sometimes not.
Further investigation on my part has led
me to hypothesize that, as in the southern
United States, where at least until recently,
similar non-sexual separation of washroom
facilities existed in public places, there exists a difference in rank among the persons
invited to use the different facilities.
As mine is a new university, and the
buildings where these facilities exist are
recently designed and constructed, I am led
to further hypothesize that these differences in rank symbolized by washroom
privacy from persons of differing status are
not ancient practices, but have current
meaning to the people.
There are approximately 450 telephone
listings in the university directory, of this
total, about 150 listings are of the teaching
faculty of the university and about 300 listings are of administrative personnel including the president, various janitors, groundsmen and watchmen, librarians, deans, executive assistants, and so on.
Judged by this  yardstick,  the faculty is
outnumbered 2 to 1 by the administration.
NO TOMORROW
PF  PLUGS
Contemporary arts festival pours over world
There  is  no tomorrow.
The world ends last week.
Everybody's dressed in
plastic bags, waiting for the
milkman.
Fizzies and marshmallows
—soup du jour.
Dance   activity   made   of
sunlight o yes.  It's festival,
man.
Feb. 2 to 11.
•       •       •
In the gallery happens an
environment made to live
without by Iain Baxter —
four room self-contained ste.,
dbl. bed, sterilized, aD
wrapped in plastic bags,
ready for misuse, no children's   pets,   smokers   or
JON   HENDRICKS
Thursday, January 27,  1966
Merce Cunningham and dancers
drinkers.   Starts   Tuesday
night.
It's with the Edge of Pop,
miscellany related to the
pop movement.
•        •        •
Jon Hendricks, oft rated
the best jazz singer in the
world, swangs in with evolution of the blues song,
presented at Monterey jazz
festival first in 1960.
5,000 people eavesdropped
as Hendricks sang the story
of the blues to a group of
children.
Sun art critic David Wat-
mough puts his chubby neck
in a dramatic knot as he
braves those who hate him
at UBC with the premiere
of his first play. Friedhof,
Feb.   3.
•        • •
Adam's Way is another
play — Robert Duncan's—
which volleys off with Ur-
men, irreal and allegory
through   phantasmagoria   to
theosophism dragons and
angels. Feb. 4.
Films by Ed Emshwiller,
Sam Perry, Kenneth Anger,
Storm de Hirsch, Jonas
Mekas — at vital times.
csMvai
ROBIN BLASER
THE      UBYSSEY
Jazz by Byron Pope, Les
Puces at more times.
Poetry readings by Robert
Duncan, Pierre C o u p e y ,
Jamie Ried, Robin Blaser.
Merce Cunningham's dancers are rated with the three
best of the avant garde in
the world. He's on Feb. 9.
Musicians go n o t e y as
Vladimir Ussachevsky talks
of electronics and contemporary music, the San Francisco Tape Music Center,
which has gone video, happens a happening in the
auditorium, Harry Adaskin
fills various classrooms with
everybody's music and the
music department goes to
the outer fringes in the
Angus building. Buy a program for the whens.
Sit on the edges of your
chairs for more details about
where and when.
Festival. Feb. 2 to 11.
There  is  no  tomorrow.
USSACHEVSKY
IplShree
Page 7 TRAVEL
SEMINAR
If you are. thinking of a trip
to Great Britain or Continental Europe, you are invited to attend a
free Travel Seminar, to be held in
the Regal Ballroom of the Georgia
Hotel, on  February 2,  1966.
Sponsored by AUTO-EUROPE, the
largest overseas car rental-leasing-
and purchasing organization, this
seminar has attracted an overflow
audience last year, and also in
previous  years  in  other cities.
Officials of CANADIAN PACIFIC
AIRLINES and P. LAWS ON
TRAVEL Ltd. will be on hand to
take part—they will give you a
brief and colourful summary on
"how" and "what" to see, and how
much money is needed.
A special discussion period will
form part of the evening's program
and all questions will be welcome.
There is no cost to you for this
seminar; it is staged without obligation to anyone, and attractive
door prizes will be awarded to
some of those who will attend. If
you are interested in overseas
travel we promise you an interesting  and   rewarding  evening.
SEE    YOU    AT    THE   GEORGIA
HOTEL   Wednesday,   February    2,
1966
Immunization
Clinics
Regular Immunization Clinics are held at the Health
Service, Room 114, Wesbrook Bldg. every
Tuesday and Wednesday
from 2-4 p.m.
Students requiring immunization for international travel certificates this summer
are advised to start their
immunization program now.
Civil Engineers
Graduate & Undergraduate
C/\J
Invites you to discuss
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Campus Interviews
February 3 and 4
For information,  applications   and   appointments
please  see   your  Student
Placement Office.
Famous Artists Ltd.
Queen Elizabeth Feb. 10 at 8:30 p.m.
Theatre
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
THE GREAT
STAN GETZ
In  Person!  with
• GARY BURTON
* GENE CHERICO
* JOE HUNT
$4.00 - $3.25 - $2.50 - $1.75
Upon presentation of this ad at the Box Office,
Main Floor or The Bay, between 10 a.m. and 5
p.m. daily, or at the Theatre the night of the
performance, you will receive a reduction of $1.00
on each ticket purchased at any of the above
prices.
New Shipment of Folk and Jazz Music
at
The Record Gallery
(Robson Opposite Library)
10%  Student Discount with A.M.S. Card
#BEST
FOREIGN FILM
OF THE YEAR
■XKW   YORK   FILM   CRITICS
TECHNICOLOR*
•3730 E*k
w.ieth    3 WEEK
324-:
437J
LORIZZOLI
•f***Mi*Film of
FEDERIC0 FELLINI
jpim
Spirits
GIIXIETTAMASINA
SANDRA MIL0
:;'.SYLVAK0SCINA
ENGLISH SUBTITLES
ADULT   ENTERTAINMENT
SHOW TIMES:  7:15, 9:37.
INSTRUMENTALLY
PF INTERVIEW
Chamber composer tells all
By  DOUG  MUIR
A native Canadian now
living in Vancouver, Barbara Pentland has studied al
Julliard and with Aaron
Copland at the Berkshire
Music Centre.
She taught at the Toronto
Conservatory of Music and
at UBC, but gave up teaching to devote all her time to
composing.
pf: What significant developments have you noticed
in Vancouver's contemporary musical tastes?
Pentland: Vancouver has
never had the interest in
contemporary music that it
has in contemporary art.
Here the symphony orchestra remains a museum featuring displays of the great
masterpieces of the past.
This results from a combination of lack of leadership from its conductors and
directors, and a lack of interest and support from the
public.
The university, however,
has made tremendous strides
on behalf of the contemporary composer. The Adaskin
Wednesday noon-hour concerts are a good example of
this growth.
But Vancouver is far behind other cultural centres
in Canada and must make a
conscious effort to catch up.
pf: Do you find much difficulty having your own
works performed publicly in
Vancouver?
Pentland: Yes. The CBC is
virtually the only outlet for
my work and remains solely
responsible for the develop-
p| 4our
music
ment of contemporary music
in Canada.
pf: How has Vancouver
influenced  your   composing?
Pentland: Not at all. I
formed my style and direction before coming here and
am now influenced entirely
by the eastern centres and
by Europe.
pf: What is your philosophy of music?
Pentland: I don't know.
Like breathing, I've been
compelled to compose ever
since my childhood.
Qualities of my own philosophy of life are apparent
in my music. I must be honest, direct, well defined,
clear and transparent, ordered and meaningful. I don't
like being aggressive, overpowering, heavy, thick or
bombastic. My aim is to
write meaningful music
using as few notes as possible.
pf: What has been the
greatest influence on your
music?
Pentland: The latest and
most important influence on
my work was the music of
Webern. My style now is distinctly recognizable as my
own and I don't know of any
o t her-Canadian composers
whose music resembles it.
I am not yet prepared to
experiment in the field of
electronic music, however I
am presently working on a
piece which uses the element of chance.
pf: Do you find yourself
more at home in any one
particular idiom?
Pentland: The modern
symphony orchestra is extremely difficult to write for,
hence the majority of my
works are for small chamber
groups and solo instruments.
pf: Has this media been
forced on you by cricum-
stance, or would your music
have turned in this direction
anyway?
Pentland: No, I'm happy
in this media, chamber music is most suitable for ex-
pressing my transparent
style.
Symphonic works contain
only one listening or melodic
line, supported by rhythm
and harmony, for the audience to follow.
Chamber music requires
much more concentrated and
intelligent listening because
the material passes equally
between  the  instruments.
pf: Have you anything to
say about your works to be
performed at next Wednesday's Noon-hour Concert?
Pentland: All of the works
have been written since
1960 and are good examples
of my current style in chamber music.
W^M%%$&W#%£@%8W^>Wffi%Z^^W%ffiW0%^@8M@Mi\
Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday,  January   28,   1966 ONLY ANSWER
TO EVIL
Rebels get right with God
By LYNN
President Macdonald is
seriously concerned for his
students and the state of the
university. His genuine cry
for help should not go unanswered.
A university is cited as being an institution organized
for teaching and study in the
higher spheres of learning.
A student is reputed to
be a learner, a seeker of
knowledge.
A student rebels because
he is dissatisfied.
He looks for — searches
— within the confines of the
university, but that for
which he is searching is
escaping him: either by its
total absence or by its fragility.
The physical and mental
filth of campus life is not
satisfying him. The acquisition of knowledge is not
enough either. He is still
rebelling.
• •      •
Maybe, with a frightening
thump he sees his last
chance of security in a respected organized body . . .
crumble.
Tolstoi after years of fame
and writing posed the question: "Why should I live ?
Why should I wish for anything ? Why should I do anything?".
And he toyed with suicide
till he found the answer,
which he could not find in
the realm of learning in
which he moved.
Is our student likewise
seeking an answer, before
the modern confused world
makes up his mind for him?
The answer is simple and
straightforward. So simple,
in fact, that it seems almost
like hitting below the belt:
Get right with God.
This hasn't been tried. It'll
probably be the last thing
tried, if anyone attempts it
at all.
Nevertheless it remains
the only answer.
It's too simple for the
complicated theories the
proud mind is used to embracing.
The fear of the lord is
truly the beginning of wisdom, and we yawn in God's
face at our own peril.
But maybe there is no
God.
• •      •
Maybe:    "all    events    are
due to the interaction of
matter and motion acting by
blind necessity."
But I am not that gullible
and those who rebel are not
that gullible either. Oh, it's
fun to take issue issue with
Divine Creation and even
to deny God outright.
It's cute to banish God,
and throw out Christian
principles of life . . . but
look who's there to take
their place: Venus, Bacchus,
Mercury, Mars, and Freud,
who according to Lin Yu-
tang, "had the instincts of a
ground-hog whose first instinct is to head for dark,
subterranean regions and
ferret out the hiding places,
throwing a lot of dirt above
the  ground."
We face prevalent paganism, it engulfs us.
The classical words of
Pascal are true: "This, however, is certain, either that
God is or that He is not.
There is no medium point."
• •      •
We either live with a positive triumphant faith in God
or we do not and the agnostic
misses just as much as the
atheist.
And the underlying cause
of the rebellion in youth, because his last chance to believe in God is being withdrawn ruthlessly by learned
men who ignore or ridicule
God.
The student standi and
shouts, blasphemes and
curses—because he is lonely and scared. Because he
knows there is a God, and
because he is terrified that
he will never make personal
contact with Him.
The New Morality (as old
as the hills) requires that he
uninhibit himself, that suppression is bad, definitely
bad, that indulgence in the
orgies of respectable paganism is the order of the day.
But the relbel has tasted at
the fount of Baccus and has
found no honest justification
to keep tasting. From the
depths of his being he cries
out with Carlyle: "No lie
can last forever."
• •      •
And when times are at
their very worst for him, he
needs religion at its very
best. The profound, ineradicable regilious necessity in
man to believe in something,
to give himself to something,
must   be   met.   The   student
must collide with God now.
The challenge is there, for
the brave and the red-blooded. The namby-pamby can
embrace the opiate: that life
has no divine origin, no divine meaning, no divine destiny and thusly remain part
of the problem of life.
Only a fool ignores the
cross and the empty tomb.
Only a vain, ridiculous man
refuses to face Christ.
The rebelling student is
refusing to be either. He has
somewhere, sometime seen
in the spirit of man, a momentary likeness to the king,
temptations conquered, evil
habits overthrown, character
transformed. He has met a
spirit that has been saved by
God!.
It's a humbling experience
for a human being to acknowledge the need for
spiritual surgery, but as a
student rebels his cry is crystal clear: "Save me from
myself and from what I am
being forced to believe and
become."
A civilization always dies
first of all at the roots: it dies
in the spirits of men.
"The problem of lying —
which is called propaganda
. . . the problem of sefish-
ness — which is called nationalism or self-interest . . .
the problem of greed—which
is called profit or good business . . . the problem of license disguised as liberty . . .
the problem of lust masquerading as love . . . the
problem of drink, but we
must be sociable . . . the challenge of materialism — the
hook that is baited with
security ..."
(Peter Marshall)
"My people are destroyed
for lack of knowledge; because   Thou   hast   rejected
(Continued on Page 8)
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February 4-6
Cybernetics-Education
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 29
Friday, January 28,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9 BAY
HARLOW
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Peter Lawford
Plus
NINE  HOURS TO RAMA
Horst Bucholz
Jose Ferrer - D. Baker
STUDENTS 75c
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JAN. 28 & 29
YOUNG FURY
Rory Calhoun
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plus
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Br .Fours - Sheb Wooley
Johnny Cash
SPECIAL || EVENTS
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Down the mountain she whips,
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Phone: 224-1351
TRY THESE  UBC SPECIALS
DEAN'S FRIED CHICKEN, Individual Order
3 pieces of chicken, French fries, cole slaw.
Fresh roll     $1.25
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THE       UBYSSEY
NEWS ITEM: SUPAMAN LOSES JOB...
CHT8
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'BWfljJ
—from The Gateway, U.  of Edmonton
Anemic invective
gets pink slap
By RICHARD DALY
One senses from Michael
William's article "How to
Keep in the Pink, (PF, Jan.
21) that rather than try to
say anything you were trying to stir something up.
Let us hope so.
However, I feel your attempt is doomed to failure.
One does not simply stir up
the passive sludge of Canadian studenthood, at least
not with the Coca-Cola jargon students are told they
identify with.
Student newspapers unabashedly tell us they are
training grounds for the
outside pulp-world, for reality. As such they embody
fledgling techniques of industrial .psychology wherein the writer is asked to
take the right 'angle' and
pio his course between the
rightly juxtaposed esoteric
slogans.
Some examples from the
article in question: Bob Dy-
lan-capitalist-NDP; peace-
niks-vietniks-NDP.
Another tactic is anemic
invective such as weirdie
beardie, free-loader, peace
corpse.
I smell the workings of
your little mind when you
angle in, alluding to social
change at university level
and equating the desire for
change with dandruff and
free-loading.
This imposes on the reader, by implication, a feudal
view of morality, a morality which feeds upon the
untested personal mystique
of each of us, imposes a
pecking scale of compunctions based on toil, money
and prestige.
You say "Them as can, do,
others teach." Students are
obliged by society to teach.
After all, mere doing is
action, while teaching is
action for the sake of our
children's future.
Because I am I, not you
or Sigmund Freud or the
Texas Cowboy, I do not have
§IlPix;
to accept your point of view.
I have to question it to assert
my existence, to pinch myself to ensure I am  awake.
Your world probably contains theories explaining the
origin of my intrinsic behaviour but I am not morally compelled to act the
way you prescribe.
If we do not choose the
course of the humanist
there are only two alternatives: the game trails of the
armed carnivore and the calculating permutations of
our own man-made devices.
Because we, the immovable majority, fail to look
for the happenings in the
worlds around us, we are
being swept aside by more
vigorous units of history.
Fortunately, some people
do attempt to face the action,
mostly those you label Leftniks.
You imply they are selling
out their r e v o 1 u t ionary
stance by using the tactics of
the status quo. You're right.
As the New Yorker said
in connection with the
Thanksgiving march on
Washington: "There are very
few revolutionary positions
that the Establishment does
not already, at least nominally, occupy."
So what is at stake ? Merely the existence of institutions which, by their very
being, are the acting crutches for their adherents.
Original creativity does
not well up from a consensus of like-minded people,
be it Pearson's cabinet,
SUPA, or The Ubyssey.
Each group has its own
esoteric jargon barriers to
defend its territory against
some other world. Yet at the
same time each group wants
to gain followers, to gain
approval of the joyful tidings exuded by its several
self-styled   leaders.
Since we are rather good
consumers, let's sit in at
the various super-markets
that sell us our way of life.
We will sift out the crap,
drop the right expressions in
the waste baskets and ask
to see what these groups
are really peddling.
Friday,  January  28,   1966
Page  10 PF  INTERVIEWS
PART  ONE  OF  MANY
Marijuana, heroin, authorities, and pot heads
By DICK CLEMENTS
Ex-UBC student Dick Clements, a veteran pothead,
interviews the experts on the
marijuana problem, and if
there is one.
Experts will include Staff-
Sgt. Gilles of the city police
anti-narcotics squard, a member of the RCMP narcotics
division, UBC pharmacologist Dr. James Foulks, campus chaplains Father T. J.
Hanrahan, Rev. S. L. Fox
and Rabbi Solomon, lawyer
Bill Devrell, Merv Davis,
head of the John Howard
Society, and Dr. Robert Halliday of the Narcotics Addiction Foundation.
Part one of several.
pf: Is the use of marijuana
on the increase here?
RCMP: Yes. It tripled in
1965, by reason that it was
almost unknown here before.
pf: How many people are
serving sentences for marijuana use and/or trafficking
here?
RCMP: Twenty-five.
pf: Is there a connection
between marijuana use and
heroin use?
RCMP: Not really, but it's
debatable. Generally, heroin
users have a criminal background and get acquainted
with it through 'their criminal
associations. Beatnik-intellectuals are not likely to take
heroin.
pf: Is marijuana dangerous
to the user?
RCMP: The federal health
department feels it is.
pf: Are marijuana users
dangerous to society?
•      •      •
RCMP: Haven't found it so
here but there are many instances where this has happened, documents by the
World Health Organization.
pf: Are there statistics or
only instances documents by
WHO?
RCMP: No statistics. But
in the U.S. 50 per cent of
marijuana  users have  other
crimes on their record. This
is not true here, however.
pf: Do you think punitive
measures will inhibit the use
of marijuana?
RCMP: I can't answer.
pf: Is it true the RCMP
narcotics division has a blanket search warrent, the
"writ"?
RCMP: Yes.
pf: In a thorough search,
involving ripping open mattresses and breaking walls,
do the RCMP pay for the
damages?
RCMP: Usually, yes. I can't
think of a case where we
haven't
pf: How do you prove intent to traffic in marijuana?
RCMP: Sometimes the
quantity would do it. A
couple of kilos is necessary.
This depends on the judge.
pf: Does the RCMP have
any recommendations on the
marijuana situation here?
RCMP: Only the federal
health department can make
public our recommendations.
pf: Is there a connection
between marijuana traffic
and the Mafia?
RCMP: Not here.
(Staff-Sergeant Gilles of
the city police said the force
hopes marijuana use is not
on the increase here.)
pf: Is marijuana dangerous
to the user?
Gilles: Anything used to
excess is dangerous. It can
have permanent mental and
physical effects.
pf: Are marijuana users
dangerous to society?
Gilles: Yes, they could be.
There's no place in medicine
for marijuana is there?
pf: Will punitive measures
inhibit use of marijuana?
Gilles: Not putting them in
jail would certainly increase
its use.
pf: Have you any recommendations about marijuana
use?
Gilles: Don't use it.
pf: How many people using marijuana here?
Gilles: We don't know. It
could be 100. We don't know
of any local high school kids
using marijuana.
pf: Is marijuana grown in
large amounts in B.C.?
Gilles: Not to my knowledge.
pf: Is marijuana addictive?
Gilles: It could be habit
forming. I don't know if it
could be addictive. It's a narcotic.
pf: It's been suggested the
police are now engaged in a
crackdown on marijuana
users.
Gilles: We never had an
arrest prior to two years ago.
So there is a crackdown and
-»^; "^
it is going to continue. Anything to do with narcotics is
strictly detestable.
pf: Do you make any distinction between marijuana
and heroin use?
•      •      •
Gilles: Not a bit. Marijuana
and heroin could be the same
thing. We regard both as evils
and particularly marijuana.
(Gilles then accused the amri-
juana users of, among
the marijuana users of, among
other things, dressing sloppily and lying around the
house all day instead of
working.)
pf: What's the connection
between the marijuana user
and other criminal activity?
Gilles: He could very well
go into crime.
pf: Have you any statistics on this?
Gilles: No.
pf: Prof. Foulks has said
marijuana is not addictive.
Any comment?
Gilles: I don't agree. Anyone who wants to use narcotics is a nut.
CONTINUED
NEXT WEEK
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Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Canadian Union of Students
SCHOLARS — TIRED OF U.B.C?
Applications for I.S.E.P. scholarships now available
from Registrar.
Grad Class
Meeting Thursday, February 3, in the Hebb Theatre
at noon.
The agenda will include the graduating class gift to
the University, and a vote on the Grad Class constitutional amendments.
Class of 1967:
1966 SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
MECHANICAL &  CHEMICAL
ENGINEERING STUDENTS
There will be a limited number of opportunities
in the pulp and paper industry for mechanical
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Friday, January 28,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11 Machines now educated
to high school level
By IRAJ BEHESHTI
A new era of production
has began.
Its principles of organization are as different from
those of the industrial era
as those of the industrial era
were different from the agricultural.
The cybernation revolution
has been brought about by
the combination of the computer and the automated
self-regulating machine. This
results in a system of almost
unlimited productive capacity which requires progressively less human labor.
Cybernation is already reorganizing the economic and
social system to meet its own
needs.
Cybernation is manifesting the characteristics of a
revolution in production.
These include the development of radically different
techniques and the subsequent appearance of novel principles in the organization of
Academic symposium, cybernetics and education;
Feb. 4 to 6, Parksville, register AMS.
production, a basic re-ordering of man's relationship to
his environment, and a dramatic increase in total available and potential energy.
The fundamental problem,
posed by the cybernation revolution in the U.S. is its invalidation of the general mechanism so far employed to
under-gird people's rights as
consumers.
An adequate distribution
of the potential aboundance
of goods and services will be
achieved only when it is understood that the major economic problem is not how to
increase production but how
to distribute the abundance
which is the great potential
of cybernation.
There is an urgent need
for a fundamental Change in
the mechanisms employed to
insure consumer rights.
The increased efficiency of
machine systems is shown in
the rapid increase in productivity per man-hour.
From 1961 to 1963 productivity per man-hour rose at
MORE  GOD
(Continued from pf 5)
knowledge, I will reject thee
. . . and, therefore, will I
change their glory into
shame." (God, The Bible.)
Put away for a moment
your microscope ,your measuring tape, your litmus
paper, your biology textbook, your test tube, your
college diploma. Pay yourself the supreme favor of
abandoning your harmful,
decadent pride.
Be a man — stand upright
shielded by no inglorious,
destructive cliches — and be
still.
Admit you've messed up a
few years of life with less
than par living. Admit it. It's
been easy, has it not, to
cheat, lie, drink, swear,
falsely accuse and glory in
yourself.
It's been easy to put your
whimsy
an average rate above ZVz
per cent, well above both the
historical average and the
post-war rate.
Official unemployment has
remained at or above 5Vz per
cent during the sixties. Unemployment among teenagers has been rising steadily and is now at 15 per cent.
These figures seriously underestimate the true extent
of unemployment.
The statistics take no
notice of under-employment
and featherbedding. Besides
the 5% per cent of the labor
force designated unemployed, nearly 4 per cenet of the
labor force sought full time
work in 1962, but could only
find part-time jobs.
Cybernation raises the
levels of skills of the machine. Secretary of U.S.
Labor Willard Wirtz recently said the machines being
produced today have, on the
average, skills equivalent to
least a high-school diploma.
If a human being is to
compete, he must posses at
least a high-chool diploma.
The Department of Labor
estimates, on the basis of
present trends, as many as
30 per cent of all students
will be high-school dropout
in this decade.
The stubbornness and
novelty of the situation conveyed by these statistics is
now generally accepted.
Ironically, it continues to
be assumed possible to devise measures to reduce unemployment to a minimum
and thus preserve the overall
viability of the present productive system.
We believe, on the contrary, that the industrial productive system is no longer
viable.
We assert that the only
way to turn the technological change to the benefit of
the individual and the service of the general welfare
is to accept the process and
to utilize it rationally and
humanely.
foot flat down on the accelerator.
It is not easy to stand
quietly and for a blistering
moment with all the sham
and pretence thrown off,
earnestly seek God.
But when one does, the
supreme miracle takes place
within. It is so delicate, one
cannot bring it into view for
anybody else to look at.
It is so tremendous, one
cannot describe it. One can
never explain it to anyone
else.
We only know that it is
true. That the soul has made
contact with the creator,
God.
A voice has whispered,
"Because I live, ye shall live
also."
And the rebellion disappears.
And life abundant, dignified, quiet, humble, stunning
pervades the being.
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R      I tin   I V
Page  12
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday,  January   28,   1966 Friday,  January 28,   1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page   13
ORECR O UN
Seconder's statements
launch AMS campaigns
Election
PETER BRAUND
The AMS needs a competent, mature leader.
Why? Because it is imperative that we change student
government from a forum of
dissent into a vehicle of
action.
It requires a leader who
will act with strength and
experience, whose goal will
be student interest, and who
is not identified with any faction or any establishment.
It requires a person who
must deal with top university
and  community  officials.
It requires a leader who
must represent the students
of this university to governments of all levels.
The person to carry your
interests to these people and
institutions must have training and ability to successfully
carry out these obligations.
He must be a member of
this Society who commands
the respect of the people
with whom he deals.
Peter Braund is just such a
person  and  it is  with  confidence that I nominate him for
the position  of president.
RICK McGHAW
Commerce   President
GABOR MATE
Gabor Mate was a leader
of the ad hoc March of Concern Committee which embarrassed student council out
of its chambers and onto the
streets last term.
PETER  BRAUND
. 'commands respect"
Today
FREE CARTONS
OF POP
and other gifts at
Roy Charlton's
NEW
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SERVICE
(Behind the Village Stores)
Gabor effectively challenges
the concept of a student council which meets every Monday night in South Brock to
play with  itself.
He will do violence to rig-
idified sensibilities in the establishment..
He will offend the complacency of "liberal" bureaucrats who are content to
plump for minor adjustments
in administrative routine.
He is the only candidate
for AMS president who will
seriously work to make student government relevant  to
GABOR MATE
. . , 'effective challenge'
the real  concerns of its student constituency.
HANDY  ENOMOTO
Co-chairman
Academic   Activities
Committee
•      •      •
DON WISE
Don Wise has been at UBC
for three years, and takes a
keen interest in the campus.
He  believes  that  the present
DON WISE
. . . 'action AMS'
AMS   bureaucracy,    with   its
red tape, should go.
In its place, there should
be an action AMS, that gets
things done, and speaks out
on all the issues.
The residences have been
neglected, and the AMS
should get moving on better
accommodation.
Don once represented hundreds of students as stuntman
for first year engineers. AMS
stunts and soapboxing would
bring these issues directly to
the students.
A vote for Don is a vote for
realistic action. Vote for Don
Wise for AMS President.
DON   ALLEN
Engineering
Vice-president
NEW YORK
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Puberty not far off
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
In reply to the letter signed
"A Frosh" ajppearing Jan. 20
I would like to make a few
statements.
Dear A Frosh: :
I submit to you that when
the day comes that one sex
is no longer interested in
pleasing the opposite sex
there will be no such thing as
love or happiness.
I secondly submit that
when you can grow up and
learn to deal with emotionally laden topics such as sex,
only then have you reached
maturity and a realistic outlook on life. In part this is
what you should be learning
in your next three or four
years  out  here.
(1) I agree with you that
the too-tight jeans on many
males are not very impressive.
(2) I agree that some articles on female morphology
are in poor taste (but not the
article to which you made
reference).
Finally dear frosh take
heart, you will grow up, you
will learn to understand. Puberty can not be too far off
now, then it will be on to
maturity.
A GRAD
•       •       •
'ANGRY, PREGNANT'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I wish to thank your Cat
Reporter and yourself and our
many well-wishers for the interest taken in the loss of my
wife's sculptured cat.
I should also wish to record
that the animal mysteriously
reappeared at the Lassere
building, still hungry, angry
and pregnant.
E. G. SCHWIMMER
DRIVING THIS TRUCK IS GORDON DARLING, ARTS II
IT'S  HIS WAY OF  RELAXINGI
SOUNDS CRAZY DOESNT IT?
WHY DON'T YOU TRY IT?
SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS,   UBC DETACHMENT,
RECRUITING, UBC ARMOURIES,
TUESDAY, FEB. 1st, 7:30 p.m.
STUDENTS IN ALL FACULTIES:
There's a rewarding future for you
as a CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
Learn how and why, February 7 to 18
During this period, members of The Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C. will be at UBC to
interview students who expect to graduate in 1966.
Arrangements for interviews may be made
through Mr. J. C. Craik at the University Placement Office. Earlier interviews may be arranged
by telephoning the Secretary at MUtual 1-3264.
Your opportunity to join a challenging
and fast-growing profession
Chartered   Accountants   play   a   decisive role   in
Canadian business, industry and government. Many
have attained executive positions of considerable
stature and influence; their training and experience enables them, as one writer has put it, "to
disentangle the threads of profitability that hold a
company together."
CA. training offers interesting employment with
practising chartered accountants. Your work "on
location" will introduce you to a wide range of industrial, financial, commercial, service and governmental operations.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 Burrard St., Vancouver 1
MU 1-3264 Page   14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January   28,   1966
LOOKING AHEAD
TO  SCHOLARSHIPS?
SFA supreme in 1970
—dermis gans photo
MARDI GRAS QUEEN candidates Marilyn Bricker, left,
and Heather Horner turn their best sides towards the
camera during noon pep rally in Memorial Gym Thursday.
Battle of words
for McGoun cup
By KRIS EMMOTT
Two unbeaten debating teams fight it out in Brock Hall
tonight at 8:00 for the McGoun Cup, annually awarded to
the best university debators in Western Canada.
UBC debators Wolfram Ray
mer and David Amor will take
the positive side of the question, "Resolved: that science is
the opiate of the 20th century."
The negative side will be
argued by Michael Sinclair
and Jay Prober of the University of Manitoba.
Sinclair and Prober are both
second-year law students.
A simultaneous debate at
the University of Alberta in
Calgary will see UBC debaters
Jim Taylor and Jim Watts
taking the negative side against
the other half of the Manitoba
team.
"The McGoun Cup is definitely the highest-prestige debating award in western Canada," said Prober Thursday.
"The winners of this cup go on
to the National Championships, -which will be held this
March in Winnipeg."
"The competition tonight
will be hard-fought because
both teams have won all their
debates this year," said UBC
debate teams member Peter
Watts.
Watts said that the topic Is
not a clear-cut question.
"There might be various ways
to interpret a statement like
Science is the opiate of the
twentieth century.
"It is the job of the positive
team to define the question before the debate begins."
The topic was inspired by
Karl Marx' statement, "religion is the opiate of the masses,"
said Watts.
This is the first trip to British Columbia for Winnipeggers
Prober and Sinclair.
"It's a beautiful place," said
Sinclair, "and we'd rather be
here right now than back in
Winnipeg. It's forty below
there."
Prober remarked the Manitoba team had seen the Totem
Park Residences.
"I can't for the life of me
understand why the University
would spend $80,000 on a
brick wall," he said.
"It looks like Stony Mountain Penitentiary," added Sinclair.
The Manitobans disapprove
of the fees controversy at
UBC.
"We had a referendum at U
of M concerning universal
accessibility," said Prober. "It
was defeated two to one."
"We're a quiet, conservative
group," admitted Sinclair.
"We're individualists and we
prefer to pay our own way."
UBYSSEY reporters interview
UBC basketball coach, Peter Mullins,  January 28, 1970.
By BRIAN CASSIDY and
JOHN  RODENHIZER
UBYSSEY: Coach Peter
Mullins, what explanation can
you give for the 'Birds loss
tonight?
MULLINS: Well, men, I
don't really think an explanation is in order.
UBYiSSEY: But coach, Simon Fraser 128, UBC 13. Surely, you must have something
to say about that atrocious
score.
MULLINS: Yes, I do. As
you know it was an improvement over our game last
month with SFA. Remember
that   128-12   walloping?
UBYSSEY: Do you think
SFA's height advantage has
anything to do with our failure?
MULLINS: Definitely. Do
you know that we haven't had
a player over 4'10" for the
last two years?
UBYSSEY: Holy sports
socks! Why not?
MULLINS: SFA gets them
all.
UBYSSEY: Holy popcorn!
Why?
MULLINS: Same reason
they are getting the football,
baseball and hockey players.
UBYSSEY: Why?
MULLINS: Athletic scholarships!
UBYSSEY: SFA must have
a terrible academic rating.
MULLINS: Not at all. They
have one of the best.
UBYSSEY: But our President, John B. Macdonald says
athletics and academics are
incompatible.
MULLINS: Have you ever
heard   of  a   Rhodes   Scholar,
kid? Besides, if we had an athletic scholarship system under
PETER MULLINS
. . . five years hence
which the athlete - scholar
would have to meet the standard UBC entrance requirements, how could the academic reputation of UBC be
damaged? The scholarship
athlete would be shown no
more consideration than the
athlete of today. Except that
his scholarship would make
up, at least in part, for the
sweat that he sheds in not
only keeping up his marks
but in turning out for the
glory of the old blue and gold
as well.
UBYSSEY: Well coach,
what solutions can there be
to the attendance problem on
campus?
MULLINS: For the past
two years we have been giving away A-cards. We just
can not pay people to accept
one!
And furthermore, it may
not even be necessary to increase the attendance. Decreasing the size of the gymnasium could accomplish the
same effect. Our 43 fans will
look like a thousand!
UBYSSEY: Is that why the
Board of Governors have suggested, of late, that the 'Birds
move to the  Women's Gym.
MULLINS: Yeh.
UBYSSEY: Well, coach,
one last question. Where and
when did this tragic downfall
of UBC and this ridiculous
upsurge of SFA occur?
MULLINS: Well, it was
four years ago to this very
night. The Jayvees and the
Clansmen were playing a preliminary game. Since the
Clansmen had beaten the Jayvees earlier in the season,
everyone figured that the Jayvees would really be out for
blood. But SFA beat the Jayvees 76-65!
I guess that was the beginning of the supremacy of SFA
with its athletic scholarship
system, over UBC, with its attitude.
Another  rugby
team  organized
An increased number of
players has led the rugby
coaching staff to expand the
number of teams representing UBC from four to five.
The Braves open their league play against the Kats at
2:30.
Totems and Tomahawks
play Trojans II and Mera-
loma IV respectively at 1:30.
The new team, Papooses,
host Royal Rhodes at 2:0O.
All games are at Wolfson
Field Saturday, and anyone
interested in playing should
be there by 1:15.
The 'Birds have a bye this
Saturday.
Honors for
servants
The Alma Mater Society is
mirthfully looking at nominees
for its most important honor —
(he HAA award.
The HAA — honorary activities award — is given annually
to a few students picked for
"outstanding service to the organization and administration
of the AMS."
GIANT   SALE   ON
RECORDINGS
ALEXANDER 6c AXELSON
4558 W.  10th Ave. CA 4-6811
12th ANNUAL CLEARANCE
 See alt these special bargains	
All Opera Sets |/    ftf|
Mono and Stereo       #3     WIT
Classical  LP Records
Mostly mono	
Vi off
All  Deutsche Grammophones
and Archive LP Records
Special      1	
25% off
Special to Clear
Folk - Popular - Classical LP's
Discontinued Items or Scuffed Cover  _.
50% off
All our Regular Stock
of NEW LP.'s	
20% off Friday, January 28,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
UBC THUNDERBIRD SCORING ACE, Bob Barazzuol, puts
in two of his 20 points in leading UBC to 68-59 basketball victory over University of Hawaii Rainbows Tuesday. Rainbows Steve Brien (left) and Harvey Harmon (51)
look on.
Rodent helps self to chunk
of lead curlers good hand
A rat has finked on Soren Jensen.
Jensen—lead man on the Jack Arnet curling rink from
UBC, was bitten by a rat on the finger of his right throwing arm and will be lost for the rest of the season.
Arnet has replaced Jensen by moving John Brewster
to lead and placing Glen Walker in his familiar position.
Walker, earlier reported to miss the season because of
a head injury, decided to return to the rink
Brewster took over Walker's position last week.
The Arnet rink, winners of the A event in zone three
playoffs last weekend, plays in the Pacific Coast Curling
Association finals Saturday and Sunday at the Burnaby
Winter Club.
Slopemen
second to
Huskies
By LEISH  BROUSSON
The UBC Ski Team gave
the champion University of
Washington Huskies a tense
duel for top spot at the U. of
W. Invitational Ski Meet at
Crystal Mountain this past
week.
Sparked by new slalom ace,
Elwood Peskett, the 14 man
Thunderbird team gathered
378 points behind Washington
with 396. The University of
Idaho was third ahead of last
place finishers, the University
of Oregon.
Peskett, a new upstart for
the T'birds this year, upset almost the entire Washington
team with two near perfect
runs on the steeply pitched 60
gate slalom course. Dave Turner also finished strong in
fourth place.
Snow conditions unfortunately caused UBC's champion
downhill artists a second place
showing.
After three days of non-stop
shussing on the boiler-plate
course with its no less than
eight roller-coaster pitches,
drop-offs, and rolls, UBC had
scared hell out of the Washington team.
But with the fresh snow fall
on Sunday the Birds applied
the wrong temperature wax
and were only able to manage
a seventh place finish by Dave
Turner.
Other individual winners
were Jan Atlung who sweated
to a third place in the crosscountry behind two of his former pals from Norway, now
skiing for the U. of W.
Jan incidentally was running despite two badly frostbitten ears, frozen during the
Canadian Nordic Championships  at  Prince  George.
Other winners were Brian
Hume, Bernie Kahlert, and
Dave Gibson placing seventh,
eighth, and ninth respectively.
UBC also showed promise in
the jumping event with Eric
Peterson's fourth and Peasoup
Ruelle's sixth place finish.
The team will be looking for
revenge this coming weekend
at the International Intercollegiate ski meet in Banff, with
Montana State, U of Alaska,
U of Idaho, U of Alberta and
U of Washington competing.
UNIVERSITY   TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction  Paper  Backs
New and Used
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
McMASTER UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS
The University offers Graduate Teaching Fellowships lo support graduate
students working towards a Master's Dgeree in Biochemistry, Biophysics, Civil
Engineering, Classics, Economics, German, Greek, Latin, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Philosophy, Politics, Romance Languages, Russian, Sociology and Social Anthropology; and for a Master's or Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemical Physics, Chemistry,
Mathematics, Metallurgy, Molecular Biology, Physics, Psychology and the Religious Sciences.
The Fellowships vary in value but in all cases the stipends provide adequate support for a' full year's study. Most awards are renewable for subsequent years. Holders of Fellowships will devote approximately one-fifth of their
time lo instructional duties.
Travel advances are available to assist students who are coming to the
University from distant points.
Further information and application forms maybe obtained from:
The Dean of Graduate Studies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
THE
CAULIFLOWER
ERR
By ALAN  CHRISTIE
UBC goes big-time sportswise.
Saturday, the much-heralded wrestling team hosts
Western Washington State in a dual meet in the Women's
gym at 2 p.m.
Western has whomped Washington State and is considered on a par with Oregon State which, in turn, is ranked
in the top ten of American wrestling.
The 'Birds may be without the services of heavyweight
Ken Christiansen who suffered a badly bruised neck last
weekend and has not yet returned to the mats.
Coach Paul Nemeth no doubt will have the boys ready
and we may expect a few upsets.
Those in the B.C. wrestling field respect Nemeth a
great deal as a contributor to the sport. He is one of a
small minority group at UBC, for instance, to have published a book regarding the game of wrestling.
In another light, the 'Birds gymnastic team performs
at the War Memorial Gym, also at 2 p.m. Saturday.
It is rumored that coach Dr. H. Whittle, may turn out
to the meet.
Apparently the word is that the gymnasts are unhappy
with Dr. Whittle who seldom shows at practices, and is
not very knowledgeable in the teaching of gymnastics.
It could just be that UBC is in the market for a new
gymnastic coach, in order to allow Dr. Whittle to concentrate on his administration position in the School of
Physical Education.
Thunderbirds hockey coach, Dr. Bob Hindmarch, will
present his players to the ice tonight at 8:30 and 3 p.m.
Saturday to play the University of Saskatchewan Huskies
in the Winter Sports Centre.
It is hoped in some circles that Hindmarch will start
"flip-flop"  goalie Brian Wallace.
This young Jacques Plante makes so many fundamental
errors that he is low camp (that is he is so far out he is in,
but he is not the only one).
But perhaps Hindmarch will have cool Ken Broderick
tending the twine.
I may be wrong and the coach will put Broderick at
the forward spot where he added offensive power last
year.
Finally, the basketball 'Birds journey to Olympia,
Wash., and returning to the squad after a two game suspension  will be Ken  Atkinson.
It seems that coach Peter Mullins did not like the idea
of Atkinson practicing with Simon Fraser star, Gunnar
Kuehn, last week. So Ken missed the two-game Hamaii
series.
I suspect some bad feeling here in that Mullins lost
Kuehn to a major California university a few years back
and when he returned to Canada, chose SFA over UBC.
To quote a well known football coach "What the hell,
Peter".
BIS
TOE
ON A SMALL BUDGET!
If you're heading for Europe this year and you're really interested
in visiting exciting places ... let us help you explore Israel!
You'll visit new and old sites, make friends with "Kibbutz"
members . . . see Jerusalem, Galilee, the Red Sea and the
Negev. All this and more on a student's budgetl For a complete
Student Travel Kit, write to:
ISRAEL GOVERNMENT TOURIST OFFICE,
1117 St. Catherine Street West, Montreal, Quebec. Page   16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  28,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Black mass surpassed
A live allegorical and artistic
atrocity with audience ambivalence. Performed by R. Wik-
strom & Co. of New York.
Better than a black mass. Aud.
noon 35 cents.
GIRLS' GOLF CLINIC
Anyone interested in taking
some free lessons from one of
Vancouver's leading golf professionals please phone Lauris
Innes, CR 8-1115 or Galyle
Hitchens, YU 7-9156.
INDIA STUDENTS SOC
Republic Day program Saturday 8:00 p.m. at IH. Films,
food, entertainment. Tickets $1
at door or IH office.
ARTS   ANTI-CALENDAR
English iconiclasts mieet noon
Bu. 182.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French day at OH. Film and
discussion at noon.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speaker — Emotionally Disturbed Children — Monday
noon in Bu. 202.
CHINESE  VARSITY  CLUB
General     meeting     Monday
noon in Bu. 205.
EL CIRCULO
Dr. Livermore andi facutly
discuss Spanish as a modern
language in Bu. 204 at noon.
LUTHERAN   STUDENTS
M. Hoave of Grad. Studies
will speak Monday noon in Bu.
104. Vespers tonight at 10 p.m.
in the Student Centre at 4608
W. 10th.
FUS
Would any Frosh who wishes
to participate in coed badminton and/or volleyball please
sign the list posted in the Frosh
office Brock Ext. 156.
690 on the Dial
7:45 in the Morning
-CBU RADIO-
MONDAY  through   SATURDAY
Jan.   31—"Writing   God's  Obituary"
Feb.   1—"A   Christian   View  of  th*
'U'"
Feb. 2-"The Secular Storm"
Feb.   3-"At   the   Wailing   Wall   of
'Nothing-ness'"
Feb. 4—"Frozen Categories and the
Gospel Thaw"
Feb.   5-"The   'Who   Am   I?"   Que*,
tion"
Brief meditations by Pastor C.
Robert Pearson, Canadian Lutheran Council Chaplain at UBC
UBC GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Color sildes of Australia will
be presented toy Mr. Ross Robinson Monday noon in FG 233.
JAPAN SUMMER
EXCHANGE
Applications invited for participation in this year's exchange. Slides and questions
Monday noon in Bu. 203.
VIET NAM COMMITTEE
General meeting. Discussion
plans for M-26-D. Noon in
Bu. 203.
LAW SOC
Grand moot: Must doctors
keep secrets? Law School tonight at 8 p.m.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Important  meeting  at  noon
in Gym 211.
NDP
Hear Dave Barrett, NDP
MLA speak Monday noon in
Bu. 106.
ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM
Applications due Jan. 29 at
AMS for the symposium at Island Hall Hotel, Vancouver
Island from Feb. 4-6. Topic
Cybernetics-Education.
PHOTO SOC
Meeting noon in club room.
Vote on selling 4x5 enlarger.
VCF
Rev. Calvin Hansen will
speak today in Ang. 110. All
students welcome.
PRE-LAW SOC
General meeting with guest
speaker Tuesday noon.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Film Monday noon   in Bu.
204.
• •      •
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General    meeting    Monday
noon in Bu. 223.
• •      •
GAMMA DELTA
Meeting at noon in Bu. 2201.
with a Valentine Greeting
in the Classified
Place Order by FEBRUARY 10th
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE: BROCK
65 On Your Campus Radio Dial
UBC Radio News
GOES CAMPUS
Up to now, the emphasis has been on local and
national news. Starting today, Campus News is
King. Phone in your Campus News story to
CA 4-3245
After 5:30
CA 4-3242
Local 33
Daytime
U.B.C.  Radio will award a record album for the
best news story of the week.
YEAR END
SALE!
SUITS     -     SLACKS     -     SHIRTS
from our regular stock
Cambridge
Made-to-Measure
at 20% Off
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
2174 West 41st in Kerrisdale
LTD
AM 1-2750
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock HalC Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8t Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
A WOMAN'S GOLD WATCH EN-
graved with H. C. M. 1965. If
found phone RE 3-4925 after 6 p_.m.
FOUND SMALL LEATHER
change purse. Phone Tony at CA
4-3480.
POUND — LADIES WATCH NEAR
Wesbrook. Owner may claim saTne
upon description. Phone 738-9392
after  6  p.m.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.  Phone Ted Elliott,  224-67.07.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN MAN-
agerial duUes for T-Birds Volleyball teams please contact J. P.
Daem O.K. 205 Lower Mall. Ph.
224-9049.
ALL FROG PANS WANT WAYNE
Merwin  for Fort  Camp  King!	
DANCE TO THE PLAYBOYS FRI-
day, Jan. 28th. Gordon Shr,um,
Common Block. 9 to 1. Big Stomp!
EDUCATION FORMAL FEB. 5 AT
the Commodore Cabaret. $3.50 per
couple with card, $4.50 regular.
8-12 (dancing until 1)—Tickets
on  sale A.M.S.  or Ed.  Lounge.
BE ORIGINAL — SAVE MAILING
a card. Send Valentine and Birthday Greetings to your friends with
a   Classified   ad.
PLEASE HAND IN ALL OUT-
standing questionnaires for Anti
calendar to Bu. 182 (A.U.S. office)
Now!
DID YOU SEE ACCIDENT AT
Marine & Dunbar (9 p.m.) on Jan.
15 (Farmer's Frolic Dance). If so
please phone LA  6-8162.
BATMAN, HOLY POPCORN! THE
Cognoscent are pulling a caper on
Wed.       Robin.
WEBSTER'S THIRD NEW INTER-
national Dictionary, Page 440,
column 2, last word; Library,
Main   Desk.
55   CHEV.   —   "283";   4 Bbl.;   VET.
Cam;    Solid   Lifters; Vet.    Comp.
Clutch;   Floor   Shift; 4:11   Gears;
Etc.   Jim   224-6961.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, 120
up. Also Typewriter repairs St
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters. 2140 W. 4th. Phone RS
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Gran-
ville,   263-4530. .__
FAST ACCURATE TYPING THE-
sis, Essays, Etc., on new IBM Executive typewriter. Phone 263-4023.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations In Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West   Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
MEN OR WOMEN. WONDERFUL
extra income part time. Flexible
hours. Training provided. Car
necessary. Pleasant dignified wdrk.
Phone 255-8748 between 9 to' 10
a.m. and 5 to 6 p.m. for Interview.
Work Wanted
sa
INSTRUCTION
Music
Transportation
14
CARPOOL WANTED FROM MAR-
pole for 8:30 classes. Phone
263-7379;	
"WANTED: CARPOOL DRIVER IN
Oakridge vicinity for 8:30 classes.
Phone Frank 327-7824.
DRIVERS   NEEDED   FOR   NORTH
Van.  Carpool.   Lonsdale area.   Phone
Dave  YU 8-1372.
CARPOOL FINKED OUT NEED
ride vicinity 10th & Alma. Phone
John, 224-6855, or Gordon, 224-1605,
after five.
Wanted
i%
WANTED! LIVE DRUMMER WITH
own skins. Exp. necessary call
Jeff  AM   1-4192.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
58 V.W. DELUXE SUNROOF UN-
dercoated radio excellent $650.
Phone   922-4350.	
1959 BLACK SIMCA OCEANE CON-
vertible, 33,000 miles, new roof,
good condition, offers to $500. Can
be seen at Faculty Parking Lot
by Henry Angus Bldg. Phone CA
4-3522.
1958 M.G. A. — MECHANICALLY
good. Best Offer. Phone Jean
261-0468   evenings.
'56 STUDE' CHAMP SEDAN; O.D.,
radio. A good running car in nice
shape.   Private. 8225.00.  FA 1-9J56.
8   FIAT   600   CHEAP   TRANSPOR-
tation   $175.    CA   4-4136.
GUITAR—SPECIALIZED INSTRUC-
tion by experts in every type of
Guitar and Banjo playing at "The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone  CA 8-8412.
Instruction Wanted
66
WANTED TUTOR FOR PHYSICS
12. Someone who has hat least
Physics 200. Phone 988-0884 after
< p.m.  Ask for Mrs.  Burgis.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
USED   FURNITURE   MART
Where You  Shop at Auction Prices
3207 West  Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store)
WONDERFUL CLASSIC GUITAR
with case. Bargain $80. 224-5856
(after 5:00 p.m.)
ZOOLOGISTS! ENGINEERS! SUS!
One large animal cage for sale.
Phone   Val   224-0044. " R
Rooms
81
ROOM NEAR THE GATES. COOK-
in facilities. $35 a month. 224-9092,
4506 West 9th.	
4 BLOCKS TO GATES lst-2nd YR.
quiet male students toshare large
room 2nd study room, 2 beds,
lamps,   desks,   etc.   224-1631.
Room (t Board
82
ROOM AND FULL BOARD—HALF
block from gates, laundry, $75
mo. Phone Mrs. Worner, CA 8-8380.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR 2 MALE
students non-smoker, non-drinker.
224-7174.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
FEMALE    STUDENT    TO    SHARE
furnished     apartment.     $30.     Phone
Judy after  6.  736-5'271  near  Alma.

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