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The Ubyssey Jan 13, 1966

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 Intellectuals
batty eyed
The one-eyed monster got all the attention Tuesday
afternoon with
Batman and his
friendly friend
Robin. About 50
students gathered
in the Brock Hall
TV room to watch
the battles of the
super  sleuth.
Vol. XLVIII, No. 35      VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1966 ^g|s*>48 CA  4-3916
AGRICULTURE UNDERGRAD SOCIETY types believe in safety in numbers to force a lone
coed to give her hard-earned pennies for a moldy apple in their annual apple sale
Wednesday. The sale was held to raise money for charity as part of the Aggie US
week on campus.  That's gratitude fellows.
WOULD BE UNIQUE
Industry waits
at UBC's door
Several major companies want to  establish scientific
research centres on the UBC campus, President John Macdonald told The Ubyssey Wednesday.
But    establishment    of   the
centres must wait until the
provincial government passes
legislation permitting use of the
university endowment lands,
for this purpose.
The arrangement would be
unique in Canada because UBC
is the only university with
enough space, Macdonald said.
He said university faculty
end students would be able to
use the facilities of the research
centres and to consult with the
scientific personnel.
Graduate students would have
opportunities of jobs with the
companies operating the centres. _
The companies would benefit by association with scientific experts at the university,
Macdonald said.
"There are industries knocking  at  the door,  wanting to
establish   research
here," he said.
centres
Macdonald told a group of
visiting MP's Saturday research would bring higher
prestige and better professors
to UBQ.
AMS may invade
your old school
The AMS has entered the
public relations field for
higher education.
Council was told Monday
letters have been sent to B.C.
high school principals asking
that UBC students be able
to visit their old schools this
spring to inform senior students about social, economic
and academic regions of university education.
Wheaton said an orientation session would be held
for students planning to help
in the program.
Hender raps
Board policy
on new SUB
The Student Union Building's cafeteria space may be
limited because of present Board of Governors' policy, AMS
president Byron Hender said Wednesday.
The board regards the AMS
SUB budget, drawn up by a
professional estimator, as being
too conservative, he said.
Thus the food services area,
set at a preferred 32,000 square
feet by $100-a-day SUB consultant Porter Butts, may have
to be reduced in area to cut
costs.
RAPS BOARD
"The question is whether the
Board of Governors are willing to pay for more of the cost
of food services," said Hender.
(The Board has stated it is
willing to pay $800,000 of the
total food services cost for the
new building.)
Referring to the Board's rejection of the AMS SUB budget, Hender said its decisions
have no basis.
"They (the Board) are talking through their hats," he
^aid.
In 1962 the SUB budget was
set between $3.8 and $4.1 million, said SUB committee chairman Roger McAfee.
If the board does not allocate
the increase in food services
cost, the only other alternative
is for "the students to pay the
difference," said McAfee.
COST UP
The present budget as submitted to council Sept. 20 in
a cost analysis brief prepared
by cost estimator George Parsons, puts the SUB cost at $4.5
million. — «
McAfee said the 1962 estimates for food services section
came to $800,000, and placed
the present projected cost of
the services at $1.1 million.
Hender said the $300,000
was  the   main  contention  be-
ITS KIND OF A GIVE-AWAY
By BERT HILL
The new Student Union
Building calendar will make
history Sept. 31.
Mainly because September
has only 30 days.
The calendar was put out
to publicize the building on
which construction is slated
to begin later this year at the
present stadium site.
There are four sketches of
the building from different
view points featured on the
calendar.
But September has an
extra Saturday.
"It was just a slip by the
proof reader," said SUB
chairman Roger McAfee
Wednesday.    "The    printing
was done by Mitchell Press.
"Oct. 1 is shown as Saturday so the slip is taken care
of and the calendar is otherwise all right.
"Buy one, an extra Saturday won't hurt you," he said.
The calendar, which costs
25 cents, is on sale at the
bookstore and college shop.
tween the board and council.
Council assumed the area of
SUB   food  services   would   be
the stationary figure, he said.
UNDER PRESSURE
"But now we don't know if
they want to build 32,000
square feet of food services or
$800,000 worth of food services."
The board gave the AMS
permission in fall 1965 to go
ahead with preliminary drawings, on the understanding
finances would be discussed
later, said Hender.
Now,   under   pressure   of   a
March 3 tender deadline, they
have indicated they want some
alternatives or alterations.
INFLEXIBLE
McAfee said his committee
"can't very well reduce the
size of SUB".
"The architects are' committed to 300,000 square feet," he
said.
The food services section is
part of the overall design,
which is inherently inflexible,
he added.
"Somewhere we must come
up with enough money to pay
for this."
IT'S MY TURN says engineering president Art Stevenson
as the girls run off the floor
at the EUS stag Tuesday
night. Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 1966
Dartmouth frats hit
for obscene letters
HANOVER, N.H. (UNS) — Three Dartmouth fraternities have been stripped of their self-government after publishing allegedly obscene news letters and pledge skits.
The administration also took
over  jurisdiction  of discipline
in the frats.
Dean of Students Thaddeus
Seymour said he felt student
fraternity leaders acted "irresponsibly" when they failed to
properly discipline the fraternities.
Two student leaders involved
in the controversy resigned
their posts charging the administration with "breach of
trust".
FIRST YEAR ENGINEERS marched on the Col lege Library Wednesday noon and axed a
frosh to death. A pool of blood (actually a cow's) was spread over two floors of Sedgewick.   Frosh in general were named as the  victim.	
The chairman of the undergraduate government and the
chairman of the inter-fraternity
council judiciary committee
charged the college reneged on
a promise to permit the student
government to dispose of the
case.
Stoff needed
The Ubyssey's doors are still
open for all those wishing to
join our illustrious news staff
says Editor-in-chief Tom Way-
man.
Engineers still
missing toilets
Engineers will have to pay
the bill for the toilet seats
they lost said AMS treasurer
Mike Sommers Wednesday.
The engineers collected
toilet seats from campus
washrooms in November and
piled them in Brock lounge
for the "asses in Brock."
Several seats were stolen
before they could be put
back.
POSTS ANNOUNCED
Our Mac
recognized
by science
UBC president John B. Macdonald will be the guest of
honor at the science-student-
faculty coffee party in Brock
Lounge at noon Tuesday.
Science Undergrad Society
president Dave Williams said
sciencemen want to recognize
Macdonald's achievements in
science and the help he has
given the science faculty.
"We as science students are
behind him rather than against
him as has been the general
tenure of the AMS this year."
Tuesday noon the coffee
party will see Macdonald receive the title "Honorary Scienceman" for his aid to the
faculty of science.
Wednesday noon, science-
men will hold a funeral. They
will bury ignorance.
In the Hebb Theatre noon,
Jan. 20, moralman will discover the immoral Crystal Ball
and there will be a filthy fee
fight.
GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
Meeting noon today in Brock
Council Chambers. Everyone
please attend.
The  modern   way  to tee  ii with
Contact Lenses
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT
MU 3-1816 70S Birks Bldg.
CUSO divies up
400 students
By  SHEILA   DOBSON
Canadian University Service Overseas applicants will
find out next week if they have been accepted for posts
abroad.
The selection committee in
Ottawa, made up of both students and professors, will notify volunteers of their jobs
and locations by March.
They will leave in late August after an eight week summer training program at UBC
and McGill, Loyola, and St.
Therese,  universities.
Under Dr. W. L. Holland,
head of asian studies, UBC
will train those going to Asia.
| CUSO is a national organization that sends Canadian
volunteers each September to
developing  countries.
This year the goal is set for
400 students who will travel
to 29 countries in Asia, Africa
South America and the Caribbean.
Their salaries are the same
as those of the workers of the
host country who are similarly
educated and employed.
Beverley Bie, UBC graduate
who is spending two years at
the Akrokerri Teacher's Training College in Ghana reported
recently:
"At first I thought that despite the poverty everybody
seemed very happy,  smiling.
'And to a certain extent that
was an accurate observation —
but only in comparison with
facial expressions  at  home.
"Ghanians do tend to have
large amounts of joi de vivre,
but that doesn't make it any
more pleasant to watch a three
year old child getting out of
the gutter or to have to turn
your back on the cured but
handicapped leper who approaches you on the street for
money."
Students who are interested
in taking the two years after
graduation working with CUSO
in an underdeveloped country
will find further details at the
CUSO office in International
House.
THE  COLLEGE  SHOP
UBC RINGS
- Orders now being taken
- High quality smart fashion
- Silver or Gold
Man's Silver Ring      6.95
Man's Gold  Ring    24.95
Ladies' Silver Ring    6.95
Ladies' Gold Ring    22.95
Order date closes January 28th
THE   COLLEGE   SHOP
BROCK
Open 8:30—2:30
EXTENSION
Mon.—Fri.
The Player's Jacket -fashioned by BANTAMAC in Terylcne*, a Cel-Cil fibre
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste      1
Come on over to
New!
Player's
Kings Thursday,  January   13,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Feel like
losing
your mind?
Everyone is a prisoner of his
own mind.
And most people want to
escape.
How do you escape?
According to Dr. Richard
Alpert with the help of a few
people.
And three or four milligrams
of LSD.
LSD is the Diethylamide of
d-lysergic acid, a compound
which produces hallucinatory
effects when ingested or injected.
Alpert, a former psychology
professor at Harvard, told 600
students Tuesday LSD is like
suddenly having the use of
one's arms for a short time.
"Seventy-eight per cent of
the people we studied reported
the most profound experience
of their lives," he said.
Alpert Was fired in 1963 by
Harvard president Nathan Pu-
sey for administering the drug
to a student during a research
project.
Alpert explained the conditions necessary to have a
"good" experience with the
drug.
"You need the help of someone who has escaped before,
someone you can trust, someone you can be safe with and
who will be there with you."
"LSD is only a catalyst," he
said, "Its effect depends on
your environment."
"You have to go out of your
mind to use your head," said
Alpert.
"We are using something
like 10 per cent or less of our
brain potential."
Alpert, with New York artist Steve Durkee and the two
men's families, is travelling
around the continent reporting on the experiments with
LSD which is illegal in the
U.S.  and Canada.
The drug, unlike heroin and
morphine, is not addictive.
Instead it promotes what Alpert called "a more harmonious life with more satisfaction."
FORMER HARVARD PROFESSOR, Dr. Richard Albert (right)
and artist Steve Durkee, spoke Thursday before 600 students in the auditorium about the drug LSD and its effects
on the user.
Council votes to contribute
to student's memorial fund
Student Council Monday night approved a motion to
send $25 to the Jock Turcot Memorial Fund.
Turcot, late student president of the University of
Ottawa, died suddenly during the Christmas holidays.
The memorial fund will be used to help pay for the
future student centre at U. of O.
c u. s o
2 years 'Peace Corps7 work
Africa, India, S.E. Asia
Latin America, Caribbean
Application Forms — International House
Selection Interviews — 24th January
Freshie paper
A Fresh Point of View, the
Frosh Newsletter, will hit the
campus with a second edition
Jan. 26.
Chris Brockhurst and Doug
Bruce are editors.
AAC FINANCED
Higher education
backed by AMS
AMS council gave $1,360 to a conference for higher
education Monday night.
The conference in Brock
Hall will be opened by President John Macdonald Jan. 22.
It is being run by the Academic Activities Committee.
AAC chairman Ray Larsen
said the conference had orgin-
ated last summer and became
part of the now defunct Education Action Program.
AAC took it over after EAP's
failing in December.
"The big thing is that education discussion is being carried on," said Larsen. "This
will be one of the most positive
things done about the fee and
education questions, a teaching
conference, it is something that
has been sadly lacking."
Larsen emphasized that the
conference was positive in
every aspect.
"This is no protest," he said.
"We are seeking to give uninformed people background
material and change entrenched ideas or provide new ones
on education."
Larsen said the conference
would have speakers from both
the left and the right wing.
They will include Berkeley
philosophy department chairman Joseph Tussman, professor
of history at UBC John Norris and Berkeley Free Speech
student leader Stephen Weiss-
man.
DISGRUNTLED Sports Editor,
Ed Clark, is calling for reporters to aid his great department. All types of energetic students needed. Reply
UBYSSEY office.
Ubyssey great,
council admits
Student council has finally admitted The Ubyssey
is great.
Council approved Monday
night a motion congratulating The Ubyssey staff for
winning the Southam Trophy
and editor Tom Wayman for
winning the Bracken Trophy.
B.C. Hydro and Power Authority
requires
COMMERCE   and   SCIENCE   (MATH.)   GRADUATES
for the following CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES:
—COMMERCE GRADUATE IN TRAINING (ONE)
—Accounting Option
INDUSTRIAL   RELATIONS   TRAINEE    (TWO)
—Commerce/Industrial Relations  Option
—^SYSTEMS ANALYST-PROGRAMMER (THREE)
—Maths. Major
—Commerce/Accounting Option
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS - JANUARY 17, 18
Please contact the Student Services Office
for an interview appointment.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
HAPPY DAYS
by Samuel  Beckett
Student Performance - Mon.r Jan, 17 - 7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75c
THE AUTHOR OF "WAITING FOR GODOT" WRITES A WHIMSICAL COMEDY OF
THE ABSURD, WITH JOY COGHILL, DIRECTED  BY KLAUS STRASSMANN.
Note: Some tickets at 75c will be available for all the other performances,
January  14-22.
SUPPORT CAMPUS THEATRE Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 1966
mmssvi
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 13, 1966
"It is not the contexture of words, but the
effects of Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
SUBthing nice
It strikes us that this is a good time to assess the
new Student Union Building.
The closer the AMS moves to beginning actual construction, the more the new pleasure palace seems to
be plagued with sudden complications, overlooked details, and rising costs.
After hiring a slick American $100-a-day SUB consultant, plus innumerable student officials in the last
few years on the grounds that "for a project this size
planning has to be right", now the AMS appears to be
heading into a tussle with the Board of Governors about
the rising cost of constructing food services for the
building.
And already the SUB chairman is suggesting a new
gouge out of the student wallet to match the Board of
Governors' estimate of the costs.
At a time when it is becoming painfully obvious
—see Mr. Daly's letter opposite—that the present administration will find plenty of excuses not to do anything about Camp housing, surely the construction of a
$4.5 million (and up) ballroom-bowling alley-cafeteria
emporium looks a little ridiculous.
Since clubs will be operating out of locker space,
since there is no designated study space in the building,
since the whole mess is being built in the old stadium
site, almost diametrically opposed to the direction the
campus is moving, some kind of re-evaluation of the
scope and details of the project is surely called for.
Over the next few weeks, you can expect to see a
lot in The Ubyssey about what appears to be our very
own $4.5 million white elephant.
And since it's that ol' AMS election time again, we
hope you'll hear about it, too.
EDITOR:  Tom  Wayman
News       Ron   Riter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City    Al   Donald
Photo    Norm   Betts
Sports    Ed Clark
Ass't  News   Dan  Mullen
    Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't City    Danny  Stoffman
Page   Friday     ....   John   Kelsey
Managing         Ian   Cameron
Features        Mike    Bolton
CUP       Don    Hull
IN THE EAR
Wednesday saw Bert Hill,
Craig Tapping, Dennis Gans,
Anne Balf, Sue Gransby, Kim
Richards, Val Zuker, Jim
Good, Pat Rushaway, (cc)
Doug Bruce, Fearon Whitney, the hairy red mass,
Sheila Dobson, Marilyn Hill,
Stu Gray, and sleepy Chris
Brockhurst seething in the
office.
I've cp{
ihe solution
love problem.
—L_ U » I lU (V»A. 11- December every
-fees)
Oh, really
DEPARTMENT
RECREATION
Some social scientist recently said that with the
widespread use of birth control pill, "sex has become
recreational rather than productive and the whole basis
of our morality has changed."
If it's a pro-sport, let's
put it in the stadium.
—from   the   University   of
Washington Daily, June, 1968
NOISE
December, 1965, is on
weather books as the noisiest
on record.
Two claps of thunder boomed out over the city during
the month, compared with an
one clap in
every 14 years.
However, the weatherman
said, it is becoming more and
more difficult to detect thunder, with increasing noise
from the airport nearby.
Instruments are not used
for this and the weatherman
must depend on his hearing.
Otherwise the weather for
the month was comparatively
uninteresting.
—from The Province,
Jan.  1906
LETTERS TO THE   EDITOR
'Editorial misleading, unfair'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Your editorial on the appointment of Dr. Malcolm McGregor as Director of Residences is misleading to the
student foody and unfair to
Mr. Buttedahl and Dr. McGregor.
There is no foundation for
your editorial insinuation that
Mr. Buttedahl was "replaced"
in the course of making "long
overdue reforms" in residence
administration. There was never any intention that Mr.
Buttedahl would become permanent director.
He was filling in temporarily while Mr. Haar was on
a year's leave of absence. Mr.
Haar resigned before the year
was up, leaving the way open
to appoint a permanent Director of Residences.
Mr.   Buttedahl   had   never
BY IAN CAMERON
Don t caress the tree!
Several years ago a cartoon
appeared in the Stars and
Stripes.
It depicted two soldiers
w a t c hing a
bare-breasted
hula dancer
with a long
grass skirt.
One was
i m p r essed,
but the other
was almost
asleep, because, as he explained
a leg man."
This has always been my
feelings as well. Mammary
glands may be cute milk containers, but they don't really
CAMERON
"I'm
impress me.
But a well-turned leg —
that's different.
Thus it is with horror that
I view the recent trend to
multi-colored stockings. The
black, blue, green, and brown
shades were bad enough, but
the new white cotton efforts
are the end.
These excuses for leg-covering should be sold with a small
bell, so that those who wear
them can have something to
ring as they walk around
chanting "Unclean, unclean."
For years, during the
Second World War, women in
England were willing to sell
their souls (or more materialistic things) for sheer nylons.
So now we have the sheer
nylons, in plenty, and what
are they wearing? White
cotton.
Have you tried running your
hand over a leg encased in
these things?
Most of them are complete
with raised embroidery, and
they feel as though you're
caressing a tree. Same results,'
too.
For a long time I have felt
that women do not please to
please men, no matter what
they say. This proves it.
Unless the man is a necro-
philiac or an Egyptologist.
wanted to leave his own field
of adult education, and had
just received a substantial
promotion to Associate Director of the Extension Department. As Acting Director of
Housing, he was responsible
to Dean of Student Affairs
Walter Gage, as Dr. McGregor
will be.
The "reforms" you mention
actually are the beginning of
the program Dr. McGregor
will carry on, aimed at increasing the quality of academic life in the residences.
Your suggestion that "a
primary task of the new director ... is the dissolution
of the huts of Fort and Acadia Camps" presents an entirely false picture.
The director is not responsible or able to shut down
residence buildings or to provide new buildings. These are
responsibilities of the Board
of Governors and the general
administration of the University.
President Macdonald has
several times pointed out the
development of residences is
a complex problem, under
active study. Because all
available capital had to be
committed to academic buildings, residences must be financed toy borrowing, with the
financing costs borne by residence rates.
The urgent requirements for
housing for married graduate
students is under study by a
President's committee.
A major question now to be
resolved about future undergraduate residence construction is whether it should be
used to replace the huts or to
increase the inadequate number of available beds.
While the Director of Residences certainly can make
general suggestions, it is most
unfair for you to picture him
to the student body as able to
undertake "the dissolution of
the huts of Fort and Acadia
camp."
RALPH DALY,
Director of
Information Services
'ERUDITE STAFF
Editor, The Ubyssey, Six:
I noticed in a recent
issue a statement attributed
to the Traffic Director.
This statement was with regard to a person whose car
had become stuck because it
did not have snow equipment.
Sir Ouvry's apparent statement was, "The owner was
told that if he brought his
car back on campus without
snow equipment it would be
impounded."
After perusing the traffic
regulations I do not see that
the Traffic Director or anyone else has the right to impound a taxpayer's vehicle on
a public road (regardless of
the fact that this person maybe a student).
I suspect that the rather
limited powers vested in the
Traffic Office have as usual
been enlarged by their own
assumptions.
Could you or someone on
your erudite staff clarify
whether or not these people
in the traffic office have been
vested with the power to impound anything other than an
illegally parked car.
A. C. DOULIS
Science IV
FOR MORE
LETTERS
see page 5 Thursday,  January   13,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND I Letters
Oops—twasn't
Mel at all
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir: ^v
Mock-ups can be muck-
ups, so say the Bad Boys.
Mel says: "The pix just great
but that beard is not I."
That's partner Bry trying
to steal some action — "I'm
the good-looking', big spending' customer." But both of us
are thick as thieves.
Thanks Ubyssey, anyway.
BRY and MEL
Bad Boys' Ragge Shoppe
Ed. note: It seems Mel's still
under contract not lo show
his face. So it couldn't have
been Mel and customer, as
our Tuesday caption said. So,
it's Bry (beard) and Mel
(back). Obviously.
NEGATIVE'
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
The executive of the Debating Union takes exception to
an item that appeared in your
pseudo-Wasserman column on
Friday last year with regard
to an item about a debate held
— "Resolved that Socialism
is the Scourge of the Twentieth Century."
We point out that the debate was sponsored and arranged toy the Debating Union.
The Union's practice is to
assign each team a given side
— often the side that they'd
prefer not to "debate.
Regardless of what their
conviction might be, it is their
task as debators to advance
their side of the resolution
with every argument that they
can muster.
Since your staff members
consider themselves competent
to prevent such an "expert"
debating critique as that in
question, the Debating Union
invites the members of The
Ubyssey to indulge in a drastic
change of pace—behind your
newspaper and into the open
where your views can be criticized and evaluated by
others on an equal footing.
In short, the Debating Union challenges The Ubyssey to
a debate at a time and place
AGAIN ... ifs Bry not Mel
of its choice.
The topic we suggest is:
"Resolved that a Newspaper
has a Responsbility to accurately and truthfully report
and represent the facts about
which it reports and comments."
No doubt your organization will be anxious to take
the negative.
CASTRATION
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I thoroughly agree with you
about the disaster of 1921,
when they were allowed to
vote, — even if the evil came
from before that date.
I equally think that, "Education is controlled by, and
laced with the asinine frivolities of (certain) inadequate
women.
I agree with that castration
you mention. I agree with
everything, except with that
. . . How did you say, "Supply
and demand? I believe that
YES, they supply, but we demand.
"YES"  you  can  find  us  in
"BIRDCALLS"    under    "FLORISTS"
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5555  West   Blvd.
AM  1-7271
HMMmiNNESOTA [TUNING
■ClI J AND mANUFACTURING
M« ■ BOF CANADA LlfTlITED
P.O.BOX 2757 LONDON, CANADA
Interviewing 1966 Graduates
January 19th, 20th & 21st
INDUSTRIAL CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
in
ENGINEERING AND SALES
Preliminary  Information   Available
At The Placement Office
PAYMENT
of Second - Term Fees
A student whosg second-term fees are not fully paid
by January 14, 1966, will be excluded from classes
and his registration cancelled. He will be required
to pay $10.00 reinstatement fee, together with all
other outstanding fees, if reinstatement is approved
by the Dean of the Faculty.
"Women   I  hate   (wedding)
'em" said he.
Me too, but  I am  looking
for a good one, said I.
ALARES
RYERSON  UNITED CHURCH
CHORAL SCHOLARSHIPS
are available for
TENORS and BASSES
Monies applied directly to UBC or to approved private
music tuition in return for light duties in the Senior
Choir. Further details may be had from the Organist,
Hugh McLean, 731-7360.
Farmers' Frolic
/
Hard Times Dance with
HANK THE HOBO
January 15 — 9-1
U.B.C. ARMOURIES
$2.75 couple
Tickets from   A.M.S. or from Aggie  Building
**f
the
3&»y
GEORGIA   AT   GRANVILLE
^>
Campus Beat:
A suit fired with a quiet shattering celery green or yellow . . . both
sensationally hot numbers! Originally designed in New York . . . the
wool jacket, double buttoned, is
winged high with stitched, white lapels . . . effectively repeated on hip-
high pockets. Sizes 7-15. Each 49.95
The   Bay   Collegienne   Shop,   third   floor ^
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 1966
FRAT RAT
BY TAYLOR
Mardis Gras is charity
By GORDON TAYLOR
Fraternity Writer
Its Mardi Gras time again.
And if you think it's only a
two-night drunk you're not
with it.
Mardi Gras 1966 is charity;
it's   Mexico;    it's   a   fashion
_«=-*h©w.with the queen and king
candidates   as   models;   it's  a
Mexican bazaar and a Mexi-
■ can festival; it's cultural films
on  Mexico  and  even  a bull
fight.
^        So what,  you say — why
\   have  Mardi  Gras?   We  have
Mardi Gras because it donates
up to $15,000  to charity  an-
\      ^^ This year's Mardi Gras pro-
> ceeds will go to equip a lab
at the UBC medical complex
for   research   into   children's
mental illness.
Mardi Gras began in 1940
as a war-time charity effort
in aid of Red Cross and was
sponsored by the Greek letter
societies at UBC.
It soon became a two-night
affair allowing adequate accommodation for the large
numbers who came.
The dress rehearsal of the
floor show was opened to the
public a few years ago and
soon evolved into the popular
charity bazaar.
~*—-- This year we have the Pacific National Exhibition Show-
mart building for the ball.
With this we can accommodate an  extra  500  persons a
night and the dance floor is
twice as big as the Commodore's.
There will be two bands
furnishing continuous music
Ihroughout the entire evening except, of course, for the
half-hour floor show.
The bands will be Dal
Richards and The Vancouver
Accents.
Mardi Gras events began
Wednesday with a showing of
Speedy Gonzales cartoons in
the auditorium.
If you missed that there's
still plenty to come. You may
attend the Mexican Festival
in Brock, Jan. 19.
You will enter a Mexican
version of Shangri-La with
the queen candidates serving
you foods and many of your
favorite Mexican folk songs
being sung.
All this in an atmosphere
meant to soothe the disallus-
ioned UBC student from the
state of post-Xmas blues.
For those who are strong
of mind and spirit, there will
be an authentic bullfight in
the stadium at noon, Jan. 20.
Jan. 27 is the day of the
pep meet at War Memorial
Gym where various fraternities and sororities will present their king and queen
candidates with skits.
Students will vote for their
choice for Mardi Gras king
and queen.
Also, don't forget to attend
the Charity Bazaar the same
night at the Showmart Build
ing   where
candidates
special fashion show, "A Day
in  Mexico'
the eyes of
Each   individual
and sororiljy
booths   of
ment.
king   and   queen
will   present   a
,  as seen through
the tourist.
fraternity
will have its own
fun   and   refresh-
self-(
King
tion off
of edibles
floorshow
as a preview
Ball itself
test winners
ed.
candidates  will   auc-
created fantasies
and  the  complete
will  be  presented
for the Charity
Mardi  Gras  con-
will be announe-
And filially the Ball itself,
Friday anfl Saturday evening
from 9 pin- to 1 a.m. in the
Showmart Building at the
PNE. It's $5 a couple but we
promise yiou an elegant evening-
The House of Seagram
Interviews will be conducted February 7
for students graduating in
CHEMICAL    ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service for Information
and Interview Appointment
RENTALS
OF - SKIS
- BOOTS
- EQUIPMENT
- SKATES
ALL KINDS AVAILABLE
SKI SPECIAL!
SKIS, POLES, RELEASEABLE
HARNESSES       _     	
only $39.95
VARSITY SPORTING GOODS
4510 W  10th
224-6414
I^urrovighs Business Machines Ltd.
—©	
Manufacturers of
THE WORLD'S LARGEST COMPUTER"
An Alert Leader in the Sale of Electronic Computers, Accounting and Data
Processing Machines and Systems, Adding and Calculating Machines.
BURROUGHS IS EXPANDING. -Outstanding Sales Careers with Professional
Prestige are available to you.
You will work closely with upper echelon businessmen. You'll employ your
special abilities and professional knowledge in solving their accounting and
data processing problems.
Income Potential is Unlimited.
Astronauts Lovell, Borman, et al were launched into
space by Burroughs.
LET US LAUNCH YOUR CAREER
INTERVIEWS:
January 17th & 18th, 1966
See Your Placement Officer for Appointment.
*\
(hwihsh. Cham®, to, S&s,
LARRY KENT'S
a
Uncensored'
BITTER ASH
Two Days Only
Monday, January 17th
Wednesday, January 19th
1L £C OuditoAiunL
Admission
$1.00
THOSE ATTENDING MUST
PRESENT THEIR AMS CARDS Thursday,  January   13,   1966
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
US. EXPLOITERS
Radical writer
wants revolution
By DENNIS GANS
The war in Viet Nam is a head-on clash between an
exploited people and their exploiters, John Riddel, the
Young Socialist Forum Toronto editor said Wednesday.
In a speech to 80 students
he said, "The only solution in
Viet Nam is going to be the
victory of the socialist revolution, and that is what I am
working for."
"The Americans are not
fighting for the independence
of Viet Nam and are not developing the country," he said.
"The industralists are trying to defend the empire they
have created in the last fifty
years by beating down any
revolution which may institute
economic reform."
He said escalation is leading
to open bombings of Cambodia,
Laos, and Thailand, conflict
with China and Russia and an
eventual nuclear world conflict.
"Land reform, one of the
three main purposes of the revolution, will not be carried
out by the Americans or landowners."
"The revolutionary movement grew up against French
abuses," said Riddel.
"Canada is in many ways
like the Dominican Republic.
It is a satellite of a foreign
government with its economy
controlled from abroad," he
said.
European trip
now 11 weeks
Students can spend an extra
week in Europe this summer
on the AMS charter flight.
A new contract with Canadian Pacific Airlines was approved at the council meeting
Monday night extending the
date of return from Europe by
one week giving students 11
weeks in Europe.
The flight leaves May 21 and
now returns Aug. 13.
Kyle Mitchell, charter flight
director said he expected no
problems in filling the flight.
At the end of December 1964
only 29 deposits had been
made for the summer 1965
flight compared with 60 deposits in December 1965 for
next summer's flight, Mitchell
said.
New degrees
for writing
creatively
The creative writing department is now offering two new
graduate degrees.
UBC president John Macdonald, in announcing the two-
year programs to be offered
in September, said they would
provide for master of arts degree in creative writing and an
inter-departmental master of
arts degree in creative writing
and theater.
Robert Harlow newly appointed department head said
UBC is the only Canadian university to offer the program.
The MA degree in creative
writing will be designed to
prepare students for careers
as professional writers of prose,
poetry, and drama.
The interdepartmental degree will be a joint program
offered by the departments of
creative writing and theater.
Those wishing to enter either
one of these programs will
have to submit examples of
their completed work demonstrating their ability to write
creatively.
Students will be required to
participate in a graduate workshop in either prose, poetry or
dramatic writing.
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
presenting
Mariko
and
Hank Pickett
Also Sounds  of the
South    Seas
ELDORADO
MINING AND REFINING LIMITED
Permanent employment opportunities for:
Mining Engineers, Metallurgical Engineers, Chemical
Engineers, Geological Engineers, Geologists.
Summer employment opportunities for:
Mining Engineers, Metallurgical Engineers, Chemical
Engineers, Geological Engineers, Geologists, Mechanical Engineers, Electrical Engineers, Civil Engineers.
Interviews Wednesday, January 19th
PLACEMENT SERVICE
UBC THUNDERBIRD Goalie,
Brian Wallace, netminds
against New Westminster in
hockey game at 8:30 at
Sports Centre.
CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE
LECTURE
Thurs. Jan .20   -    Bu. 100
Noon
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear Rentals
Tuxedos White &   Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts   <&   Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'   Coats 1(X;   UBC   Discount
OVER  2300 GARMENTS  TO  CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)    MU   3-2457
2608 Granville  (at 10th)   4691   Kingsway (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
i: i ■ m :4'i
Husky Oil Canada Ltd.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
IN
EXPLORATION GEOLOGY
INTERVIEWS: JAN. 17 and 18, 1966
UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
SPECIAL 11 EVENTS
presents
Two Canadian Premiere Engagements
THE BYRON POPE JAZZ QUINTET
"As a composer I analyze
many moods of my time and
link this basic foundation to
advancing imagination.
"I am collaborating with
interesting musicians who reflect varying musical backgrounds in jazz. As a group
we feel we are approaching
avant-garde music.
"We hope to provide our
audience with a unique jazz
experience."—Byron H. Pope
Direct from New York and the Detroit Jazz Poetry Center
TODAY     12:30 AUDITORIUM    50c
Direct from the Matrix in San Francisco.
FRIDAY, 12:30. BROCK, 50c
DALE BARTLETT — pianist — TUESDAY, JANUARY 18th
Playing Ravel, Chopin, Lizst and John Lennon
AUDITORIUM 35c Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 13, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Jazzie Pope performs
Contemporary jazz with the
Byron Pope Quintet noon today in Aud. 50 cents admission.
Members of the quintet will
meet any interested jazz types
at  11:30   in   the   Jazzsoc   club
room.
THEOLOGICAL  SOC
Meeting  Union  College   103
at  noon  today.   Dr.   C.   Tuttle
speaks.
UN CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 220. All members welcome.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Field trip  to Indian Centre
leaves from Marine Dr. in front
of Faculty Club tonight at 6:30.
All  concerned please  attend.
UBC NDP
General meeting today at noon
in Bu. 204.
SOCIALIST  CLUB
Panel discussion on Radical
Students Bu. 102, noon today.
VCF
Dr. Westcott discusses the
Dead Sea Scrolls Friday in
Ang. 110 at noon.
UBC LIBERALS
Policy meeting Bu. 214 today at noon. All members
please   attend.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Film, Les Trois Mousque-
taires, noon Bu. 100. Members
25 cents, non-members 50 cents.
SUS
General meeting today noon
in Hen. 200.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
General   meeting   and   film
noon today in Bu. 216.
PHRATERES
All-Phi   meeting   at   noon
Friday   in   Bu.    104.   Election
speeches.
EAST ASIA SOC
Two Japanese colour films
at noon today in Bu. 100. Free.
Everyone welcome.
Medics get
$500 gift
The Employees' Charity Committee of the Vancouver Ply-
w o o d division, MacMillan,
Bloedel and Powell River Ltd.
has donated $500 to UBC's Department of medicine.
The donation was in gratitude to the department for
saving the life of a MacMillian
employee by treating him over
several months on the artificial
kidney unit at the Vancouver
General Hospital.
A special pump for the unit
will be purchased with the
money.
Mussoc seeks
accompanists
Mussoc is making a play for
players.
Music players, that is.
Mussoc needs 26 musicians
to play for the musical-comedy
Take Me Along, Feb. 7-12.
Six of the musicians will be
paid for blowing, sawing or
banging, but they must be
union members.
All types of instruments are
needed.
The musical features Gerry
Cooke, Jan Rae and Quinn
Halford in the leading roles.
TOASTMASTERS
Engineer's Toastmasters Club
is conducting an eight week
session of speech craft for male
students. Fundamentals of public speaking. Engineers Club,
633 Hornby. Today at 6:30
p.m.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Club   open   today   between
1-3 p.m.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting plus Tokyo
Olympics' Yachting Films. No
admission charge. Today, Ang.
110.
CLASSIFIED
Rales: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
rOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
FOUND ON DUNSMUIR AFTER
Rossland Ski Week, assorted ski
equipment. Call John, TR 4-7711
before  10 a.m., after 10 a.m.
LOST — LADY'S GOLD WATCH
between H. Angus and library,
on Monday, 3rd, 9:15-10:15 a.m.. or
in the library. Large reward. Call
RE  3-6097 after  5:30.
WILL THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my raincoat in mistake from the
College of Education phone to arrange an exchange. N. Brearley,
Local   2807.
l,OPT—RROWN LEATHER WAL-
let, vicinity of Women's Gym and
Fitldhouse. Please contact Charlie,  Acadia Camp,  CA 4-9934.
.'OCND — CIGARETTE    LIGHTER
with   engraving.   Phone   733-3754.
PIA: FOUND TOM'S SHOES IN
Peter's car. Phone Marilyn, 431-
7957.
FIVK WHO TOOK MY WALLET
from gym on Friday, please phone
266-4778 and tell me where it and
papers are. Keep the money if you
are   that   plebee.
r,A DIE'S WATCH FOUND OUT-
side Buch. Mon. 2:30. Apply Publications,   Ubyssey  —  Brock   Hall.
LOST HOOD TO HEAVY COAT IN
55 Plymouth please phone Brian
AM   1-1979.
FOUND. VALUABLE RING NEAR
Ponderosa Cafeteria. Phone 133-
8044.
FOUND — LADIES WATCH. OWN-
er claim upon description. 738-
9392   after   6   p.m.
ROSSLAND SKIERS OF IT B C
Thunderbird ski week: Would the
person who rescued my bright
yellow skis last Sunday, Jan.. 2,
please contact Isabel at UBC local
3241   or   684-6871   after  6  p.m.
FOUND: SMALL AMOUNT OF
money Tuesday, January 11. Between Library _ and Bookstore,
Phone 327-3083.
LOST KEY RING, FOUR KEYS
also contacts in case. Dave Verner.
third floor, Kootenay lower mall.
224-9817.
LOST ON TUES., .TAN. 11, ONE
dark blue medium-length winter
coat on main floor of Chem. undergrad wing. Finder please phone
224-9888  and  ask for room  fi
T.OST — FOUR KEYS ON CHAIN
with small green stone, probably
in Chem. building or Brock. Please
contact Rill at Totem Park. CA
4-9933.
Special Notices
13
WANTED — APPLICATIONS FOR
counsellors, diabetic summer
camp last two weeks in August.
Phone  Kerry,   AM. 1-5944.	
DANCE TO "THE CHESSMEN" AT
the Lower Mall Ballroom, January 14, 9:00-12:00. Admission $1.00,
75c.
INTERESTED IN WEEKEND
work in Vancouver's newest find
swingingest nlte club opening
soon? We are looking for attractive "go-go" dancers, waitresses, cigarette and check mom
girls, 18 and over. Phone 682-
9144. 	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO IVSUR-
ance   rates?   If   you   arc   over   20
inii have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rales.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
FARMERS FROLTC HARD TIMES
Dance with Hank the Hobo, Jan.
15, 9-1, UBC Armouries. <2.75
couple. Tickets frpm AMS or from
Aggie   Building.      	
rCE HOCKEY A-GO-GO — Science
women vs Nurses, Monday January 17, 12:30 at Winter Sports
Centre.   FREE.	
SKI WEEK-END — JOTN THE
Varsity Christian Fellowship Club
for a fabulous weekend on Bn>er
at The Firs Chalet. Its tlie woek-
nd of the 21st of .Tan. \"d the
cost is a mere $17. Avoid 'the
rush and get your registration
form at AMS now. Deadline "for
registrations   —   Mon.,   Jan.   17.
Wanted
15
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM 43RD AND
Balsam, M.W.F., 8:30 lectures.
Phone   Chris,   261-8582.
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY OF
33rd and Arbutus. Call Diaijne.
261-3753.
TEXTS  FOR GERMAN   210  NEED-
ed.     Phone   Peter  at  AM  6-4038.
CAN ANYONE GIVE FIRST-HAND
information on travel in South
America? Write N. Janosy, t246
Pendrell.
DRIVERS     WANTED    FOR    NEW
Westminster carpool   (Sapperton
area)   Phone  LA  1-2765  or   LA" 2-
1366.
WANTED: — FEATHER-COLLEC-
ters to pick up after featherbrained council. Members beat
themselves to death, between Buchanan and library, noon today.
Sined: — Aggies.   "
STEREO TAPE RECORDER WILL
pay cash. Phone Al local 2253 or
Chem.   bldg.,   room   100A. "
WANTED ONE JUDOGY, SIZE
W-4, Phone 224-9072 — ask 'for
John Weltfe,  RM 674.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'57 CONSUL IN GOOD HEALTH
needs a new home. Call grieving
owner  at AM  6-4974 after  6.
1957    VW.     JUST    PAINTED.    EX-
cel.   mech.   cond.   $435.   224-6857.
Scandals
39
EXTRAVAGANZA: SCIENCE PEP
Meet! Tom Northcott, famous
actors, beautiful girls, noted poet:
E. Koster. All for 25c. 12:30 ThOrs-
day,   January   20.   Hebb   Theatre.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS. 120
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RR
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and
Granville, Phone 263-4530.
STUDENTS. TYPING DONE, MY
home, essays, reports, etc. low
rates,   Phone  261-2996.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age' or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West  Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
$400 PER MONTH WHILE BEING
trained to sell Business Life insurance. Career position with unlimited possibilities; age 21-30.
Good education and background.
Character subject to scrutiny.
MU   5-7234.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKI BOOTS, SIZE 10, GIRL'S ICE
skates, size 6; men's skates, gize
9. All in good condition. Good
bargains.    AM  1-7448.
WELCH ALLYN OPHTHALMO-
scope, Tycos Aneroid Manometer,
Hellige Sahli Hemometer and
Hemocytometer Head Mirror; ^Re-
lex Hammer. 733-3769 after 6
p.m.
"GOOD   AS    NEW"    INFANTS   TO
adults   clothing.      Discount   prices—
new  cribs,  playpens,  buggies,   etc.
Rentals      "Good    as   New."      2846
West  Burnaby.     RE  1-3310.
SCIENCE JACKET AND SWEA-
tef size 44. Phone Rod, FA 7-4551
2  p.m.-lO   p.m.   $15.00   for  both.'
Rooms
81
LARGE, BRIGHT BED-SITTING
room with desk. Carpool available.
$35 per month. AM 1-7448.
COMFORTABLE ROOM — EXCTJL-
lent meals — Good study conditions,   close  to bus.   CA  4-5905."
Room 8c Board
82
Furn. Homes & Apts.
83
DESIRE FEMALE STUDENT .TO
share furnished suite in Sojjth
Granville area. Please call 7.33-
2869   evenings.
FORMAL AND
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental and  Sales
TUXEDOS    -    WHITE    DINNER
JACKETS - TAH.S - MORNING
COATS        -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Size Rang*
McCUISH
STUDENT   RATES
FORMAL WEAR
LTD.
MON.-SAT.-9:30 to 5:30
2046 W. 41st
PH. 263-3610
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CUSO Applications Forms
Application forms for a position next September
through the Canadian University Service Overseas
are available at International House for anyone who
plans to graduate or receive some other degree or
diploma this year.
It is recommended that these should be filled out at
the earliest convenience.
Academic Activities Committee:
POSITIONS OPEN:
Chairman of Summer Symposium; A symposium tra-
ditionaly concerned with international political
affairs.
Chairman of Science Symposium; Symposium concerned with the role of science in the world today,
briefly the science of man.
Applications should be addressed to
Chairman of Academic Activities, Ray larsen.
Box 1, Alma Mater Society Office,
The University of British Columbia,
Campus.
Homecoming Chairman:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Homecoming Chairman for 1966-67. Appplications
should be addressed to the Secretary AMS (Box 54)
stating qualifications. Applications close Thursday,
January 20ih.
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 19, 1966
for the following positions:
Slate I
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Slate n
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Nominations must be received by the A.M.S. Secretary
before:
Slate I—4:00 p.m. Thursday, January 27, 1966
Slate 11—4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 3, 1966
Nominations will be posted only by the A.M.S. Secretary and will not be posted until such time as an eligibility form has been received by the Secretary.
The open candidates meeting will be held on Monday,
January 31, 1966, in Brock Lounge for the first slate,
and on Monday, February 7, 1966, in Brock Lounge.
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate-Wednesday, February 2, 1966
2nd Slate-Wednesday, February 9,1966
Nominations forms, elegibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. Secretary.

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