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The Ubyssey Oct 23, 1979

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Array Gov'ts announce task force
Canadian University Press
Special to The Ubyssey
Provincial education ministers announced
the formation of a joint federal-provincial
task force to "examine the total question" of
student aid late Monday.
The ministers made the surprising announcement at the conclusion of an unpub-
licized meeting between federal secretary of
state David MacDonald and the provincial
council of ministers of education in Toronto.
The post-meeting release stated the task
force will look at students' debt load, portability of student aid (for students transferring from province to province) and accessibility to post-secondary education. Sources
say the task force could be the first step in the
establishment of a new student aid plan.
"It's a really good first step in assessing the
student aid problem, but there are two things
we would like to see," said John Doherty,
B.C. students' federation staff person.
"There is no talk of who is going to participate on the task force. We would like to have
students, financial aid officers and representatives from the general public."
Education ministers fo
plan student aid review
Doherty said a socio-economic profile of
students on campuses is essential to understand the current aid system and should be
examined by the task force.
"The last profile was done in 1974-75 and
the statistics are now out of date because of
tuition fees and the four-year deterioration
of the student aid program," Doherty said.
He also said a task force was set up in 1974
that was only a council subcommittee. Its report was never released, but Doherty said he
thinks it was mostly concerned with loan remissions.
"This time we have to avoid limiting input
to a small group of people," he said.
The announcement took the National Union of Students by surprise. In September
NUS was told by the council that it would be
able to meet with one of its subcommittees
before the council's January meeting. One of
the main topics of that meeting was expected
to be student aid.
NUS researcher Jeff Parr said when NUS
learned the council was meeting in Toronto
on the weekend and with MacDonald on
Monday, they contacted the secretary of
state's and the council's offices. Parr said
NUS was led to believe no concrete decisions
would be made at the meeting.
"NUS is hopeful there will be student representation on the task force," Parr said.
UBC's financial awards officer Byron
Hender said he was not surprised at the announcement of the task force.
"I think that there's an increasing recognition across the country that the existing programs are in need of an overhaul," he said.
Hender said other groups involved with
student aid are currently examining alternative approaches, and added he hopes to see
an increase in the total amount of money
available to students under the Canada student loans program.
The education minister also announced
that "at his earliest convenience" MacDonald would introduce amendments to the Canada Student Loans Act to make students in
trimester academic systems eligible for student aid. Currently students who are enrolled
in courses of less than 26 weeks duration are
not eligible for student assistance.
The ministers also announced the formation of two other task forces, one to study bilingualism in education and another on the
use of satellites in education.
Doherty said BCSF plans a tentative meeting with the Association of Student Awards
Personnel Nov. 2 and with the Universities
Council of B.C. later this week.
Student aid will be the main topic at the
BCSF executive meeting Oct. 27 in
Kamloops.
SFU housing
'disgusting'
gmm
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Simon Fraser residences are in a
shocking state of affairs, according
to a recent report by a housing review committee.
"The committee was shocked by
what they saw. The residences are
an embarrassment to the
university," committee executive
secretary Ted McRae said Monday.
SFU board of governors member
Reva Clavier said the university is
short of residences and the government is not giving them the money
they need.
"The residences are in a pretty
sad state of repairs," Clavier said.
The report offers a number of
recommendations on how the housing situation can be improved, but
does not mention the cost involved.
The cost of implementing the rec
ommendations could exceed
$100,000, SFU housing director
Bonnie McDonald said Monday.
"We're really anxious to see the
problem solved. I'm pleased to see
it being reported. I'm trying to let
people know we need to pour
money into the buildings," said
McDonald.
McDonald said some of the problems, like kitchen facilities that are
difficult to clean and stove ventilation systems that pose health problems, are due to poor design.
"There's a great deal of work
that needs to be done, that's why
the report was commissioned. I'd
like to see it up to standard with the
rest of the university," she said.
The housing department has been
See page 3: C'TEE
AMS week's end
justified means
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
The student priorities conference
was the perfect end to AMS week.
It was cancelled due to lack of interest.
"It wasn't well organized or well
advertised and the timing was all
wrong," student representative assembly member Bob Staley said
Monday.
The conference was cancelled on
Friday afternoon but a similar one
will be held next January, Staley
promised.
"The real problem was everyone
was too busy to do anything. And
there's no way the thing would have
looked good and we could have accomplished what we wanted it to
do," he said.
The conference was intended to
be the climax of Alma Mater Society week, which included such
events as a cancelled blood donor
clinic and a cancelled pep rally.
"The biggest reason the conference failed was because it was plan-
See page 3: ALL'S
Learn now, pay later
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Move over color TV sets, cars and real estate. It's
time for Dynamite Dollar education.
"Learn now, pay later," could soon be a new and improved package
deal at the University of Winnipeg if instalment plan education is implemented.
The concept gained popular approval during the university's registration
week when 20 per cent of total payment receipts were made as instalment
accounts.
The university is now considering extending the plan indefinitely and
hopes to iron out administrative difficulties and payment date problems.
"The plan's been reasonably successful so far and regular advertising
next year should mean an even higher percentage of people paying their
fees this way," the university comptroller said.
The new program divides tuition, I.D. and student association fees,
previously payable in two large instalments, into six small payments. Both
systems are interest-free until the current semester ends in February. Then
if implemented, the instalment plan will add a small service charge.
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UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No. 18
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, October23,1979
228-2301
—ron bumrtt photo
SAVE THE LAST DANCE for me, whistles referee as he watches UBC's Mike Emery tackle a tricky tango with
Simon Fraser University quarterback Dave Amer. Thunderbirds got hang of step before Clansmen could complete
Arthur Murray course of instruction and clobbered Clan 4-3. Weather failed to deter hardy fans, who managed to
get wet both inside and out, and soggy artificial surface produced many costly fumbles and frustration for both
teams. See sports story, page 8. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 23,1979
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
SRA suit fails to impress Trinity
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Trinity Western College is not
concerned about a possible law suit
by UBC's student representative assembly, Trinity administration
president Neil Snider said Monday.
Snider said he is satisfied the college went through all necessary legal
channels in establishing their new
degree-granting program. But SRA
maintains the provincial government should have obtained the approval of the Universities Council
of B.C. before giving Trinity the
power to confer degrees.
"We were going through the only
route we thought we had available," Snider said. "We visited
with the UCBC and nobody ever
told us we had to go through
them."
But SRA decided Wednesday to
investigate the possibility of suing
the provincial government for "a
gross violation of the Universities
Act."
Snider said he understood the
UCBC had no jurisdiction in the decision and said the controversy surrounding the issue was probably
due to a .misunderstanding of the
council's powers.
But council chairman Bill Gibson
said he found the provincial government's attitude in the Trinity decision "sobering" and added he will
watch the SRA's actions on the issue with great interest.
"It will be interesting to see how
the student law suit goes. When the
Universities Act was written, there
was no thought given to the existence of private universities," he
said. "There is no consumer protection in this case and we have no
power."
Gibson said the province has
granted the power to confer university-like degrees to an institution
which the council has no power to
regulate academically and which is
acting much like a university.
And UBC administration vice-
president Erich Vogt said he was
concerned the unregulated college
would erode the quality of post-
secondary university education.
"I think there is some concern.
We might have a problem with
transfers (from Trinity), but it
would have to depend on how much
Trinity intersects with us," said
Vogt.
But Snider said the college could
easily stand up to any academic
tests the government decided to put
it through.
"We have no fear of the UCBC
as far as academic standards are
concerned. Standards have always
been our mark," he said.
Bruce Armstrong, UBC student
board of governors member, said
the SRA investigation into the legality of suing the government is still
under way. And he said a law suit
will probably be the only way to get
government action on the issue.
He said the problem with the
Trinity decision stems from a misinterpretation by the provincial
government of the UCBC's function.
"It's a matter of interpretation,"
said Armstrong.
C'tee condemns
SFU residences
From page 1
given several grants for improvements in the past but this time a
much larger amount of money is
needed, she said.
She added the housing department also faces a shortage of space
and there is a long waiting list for
existing accommodation.
"We've got tremendous numbers
of people to cope with," said McDonald. The report states the committee was not prepared for the seriousness of the problems they encountered.
"We feel that the present state of
deterioration is such that if not corrected at once it will rapidly accelerate, since many desirable residents will be repelled and those in
residence will have little incentive to
help alleviate problems," it states.
The report states that in spite of
the gloomy picture at this point residents and the resident management
group are anxious to cooperate and
solve the problems if they are given
the funds.
The report was written by an external review committee set up last
summer at the request of SFU administration president George
Pedersen.
The committee's members were
Al Mclnnis from the University of
Guelph, Shirley Baker from the
University of Victoria and SFU administrator Peter Boyle.
The report's recommendations
include development of general policy on the role of residences, adoption of policy setting out standards
of behavior and rental rates sufficient to cover costs of repairs.
— ross burnatt photo
I DON'T BELIEVE IT, exclaims nursing student. "120/80 is the highest grade I've heard of on any course." Actually 120/80 is normal blood pressure reading, and nursing students are checking pressures during Health Fair in
SUB today and Wednesday. Students will also give advice on birth control techniques and control of venereal
disease in preparation for upcoming holiday seasons.
Physical plant shifts dirt blame
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC's physical plant is denying
blame for dumping the pile of dirt
that ruined climatology and air pollution experiments near Totem
Park.
But researchers are not buying
the excuses.
Physical plant head Neville Smith
said Monday the pile was dumped
near the station by provincial highway crews working on a nearby
road expansion project. He charged
that individual researchers who
were responsible for dealing with
the government road crews "experienced a breakdown in communications."
Smith said physical plant was responsible for establishing direct
contacts between the highways department and various university departments like plant sciences, who
operate the affected experimental
station.
He said there was a person within
the plant sciences department responsible for liaison concerning research projects, but plant sciences
head Victor Runeckles charged that
no such person was ever appointed.
"We don't expect to have to deal
with the highways department.
That's physical plant's job," said
Runeckles.
But Smith said he does not want
the responsibility and maintains
Runeckles could have prevented the
dirt pile from reaching an unacceptable level. When the pile reached
more than 10 feet it obscured sunlight and blew dust into testing
equipment.
"He could have stopped it before
it reached 10 feet. The highway
superintendent was under the understanding that what he was doing
was acceptable. There's no way my
department can be aware of all the
research projects going on at this
campus," he said. "It's a matter of
communication."
Smith refused to divulge the
name of the person he said was responsible for this communication.
But Runeckles said he is not concerned with who is responsible for
ruining the experiments, although
he is still trying to recover an estimated $20,000 in lost time and material for his ruined work.
"I'm not sure where the blame
lies, all I know is that my
experimentation is ruined. I have
nothing to show for my research
money. The pile is being moved but
that doesn't help me with my (research) results."
Runeckles said he will be meeting
with the UBC administration this
week in an attempt to get some
compensation for the work.
Smith said researchers and professors were told the general outline
of the road development plan in
February, 1978, but that general details were to be worked out through
faculty liaison. Runeckles said general proposals were all he heard until the dirt started piling up outside
his research station.
And Jan DeVries, a member of
UBC's planning committee, said he
was very angry the physical plant
was trying to "dump the blame" on
someone else.
Smith said some of the pile is being moved this week at the department of highways' expense to allow
experiments to resume. He said the
pile could not be moved until
weather became cloudy and rainy or
dust from the move would disturb
measuring instruments.
All's well that ends
-ron burnett photo
From page 1
ned as a part of a week of events
(that were cancelled)," he said.
SRA decided last Wednesday
they wanted the event to go ahead
as planned, even though the planning was hasty and incomplete, Staley said.
SILLY GRINS ABOUND as hip flasks defeat torrential downpour by score of 12,420-1. Administration president Ml/iS external affairs officer Val-
beams over UBC's narrow Shrum Bowl win while Gordon Shrum clutches trophy after T'Birds 4-3 victory over 8eet Johl said if the conference had
SFU Clansmen. With game ended and hip flasks dry, Kenny and Shrum negotiated exchange of properties. Uni- 8°ne ahead it would have been just
versity gained Pacific Centre, while Shrum will manage new research park. another meeting of student hacks.
"If we held it people would have
said it was a meeting of old hacks
and if we didn't hold it we would
get people saying there were problems with the organization and we
didn't have our act together," she
said.
"I know it sounds like a cop out,
but finally when the SRA said to
hold it people tried to make it work
with as little resources as possible,"
she added. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 23,1979
it's not her "pressing amd
persistent behavior** i'm
worried about...
THE UBYSSEY
October 23, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Where will they all be in 10 years' time? Ace photographer Ross Burnett will undoubtedly be head honcho of the White Spot's famous car service department Cub police reporter Erica Leiren will be writing personal advice columns for a defunct daily/weekly Long-standing (or lying down) wired editor Verne
McDonald will be mainlining Coca-Cola and potato chips in a seedy rooming house in Cold Lake, Alta. Frustrated ace photographer Curtis Long will be
operating a photography studio specializing in wedding invitations featuring Kermit the Frog and Miss Rhina Piesporter. Last and almost least ace
photographer Jim Steel will be doing special effects photography of individual grass blades in Central Africa. Co-editor Tom Hawthorn will be chief flack for the
Short People's United Action Front, Other co-editor Heather Conn will be finishing off her fifth-straight two-year affair, living off the proceeds of Ontario Hydro
share sales. Geof and Julie Wheelwright will be standing trial for incest in a Kelowna court, ducking questions from ex-staffer Glen Schaefer. Sports editor
Kevin Finnegan will be assistant coach of the Thunderbirds football club.  Page Friday editor Peter Menyasz will be celebrating his tenth wedding anniversary.
Student aid
task farce?
When provincial education ministers secretly agree to form a
joint federal-provincial task force to examine student aid, we give
three words of advice:
Proceed with caution.
There's no quick and easy solution to student problems.
It's obviously a positive move when education officials agree, at
last, to acknowledge the urgent need for improvements in student
aid and accessibility to post-secondary education. A task force is a
monumental step in establishing a new student aid plan.
But despite its progressive objectives, students should not expect a task force to immediately annihilate all the horrors of student
aid inequalities. Finding a successful new program, beneficial to all
involved, will entail a long, slow process demanding cooperation
from many people.
Students, financial aid officers and public members should demand an input and participation on the task force. Announcement
of a task force doesn't end or solve an issue; it's only the beginning. We should not be content with any halfway measures of token
recognition.
After all, actions speak louder than words and past performance
tells a lot when promises are made. A task force was set up five
years ago as a subcommittee of the provincial council of ministers
of education.
Its report was never released. And problems of high student debt
loads and poor accessibility to post-secondary education still
plague us today.
And it's not over yet.
If education officials are suddenly so gung ho about improving
student aid conditions, Why was their meeting not publicized? Why
did their announcement not include the National Union of
Students, which recently faced education ministers in Winnipeg,
only to be rebuffed and ignored on questions of student aid?
These are questions we must all seriously consider in weighing
the provincial and federal governments' future commitment to student aid.
As an added plus, ministers have announced two new task
forces to study bilingualism and satellites in education. Once again,
it's a step in the right direction, but we'll have to wait and see if effective results occur. We all know that trial and error is a popular
government trend. Remember how governments work? When in
doubt, delegate.
Anti-gays exercise intellectual flabbiness
This letter is in response to one
printed in The Ubyssey last Friday.
The letter raises three points that
should be addressed: gays in relation to mental illness, the perceived
attempts of gays to expand their influence, and the validity of a call
for a boycott of a Vancouver
business.
With regard to the first item, no
one can argue that there are not
gays who are mentally ill. Some
gays, when confronting their own
homosexuality, and society's reaction to their sexual preferences (emphasized if they "come out"),
develop social responses that are
classified as mental illnesses;
responses that can vary from being
mildly neurotic to dangerously
psychotic.
The crucial point is that mental illness is not the fact of being gay,
but rather the fact that may result
from an individuals inability to accept or cope with being gay. In
other words, "if I am neurotic it is
because I am neurotic as a person,
not as a gay." This is a view that is
gaining ever wider acceptance in
psychiatric circles. It is a view held
by the American Psychiatric
Association (which struck
homosexuality from its list of mental illnesses), as well as an increasing
number of people doing research in
this field, such as William Masters
and Virginia Johnson.
The second point in the letter is
somewhat confusing. Are the
authors concerned about gays on
campus organizing as a group to exert pressure for changes in the attitudes of others toward them, or
are they raising the old bogeyman
of "recruitment"? If it is the latter,
it is perhaps an indication of the
authors' insecurity about their own
sexuality; for the rest of us, we are
adults supposedly possessed of
some understanding of ourselves,
and are hardly likely to succumb to
the blandishments of any group
against our wills.
If it is the former, it is certainly
their right to challenge the aims of
any group on campus, but one
would hope that they would display
the intellectual toughness (absent in
their letter) to do so on a rational
basis.
As to the validity of a boycott of
Desmond Morris' business on West
4th Ave., it seems to me that there is
some merit in applying pressure to
an individual who openly
discriminates on the basis of a person's sexual orientation.
Old dogs give
out new tickets
Bill Romaine's article "Quasis'
reform" was a well-written article
and I appreciate the opportunity to
express my views with respect to the
future direction of the UBC traffic
and security department.
I would like to clarify the portion
of the article dealing with older
employees. It is true that I intend
not to hire strictly retirees and by
bringing in younger people, I hope
to obtain a mix of ages within the
department. By hiring too many
young people we would lack the experience and maturity that is found
in our senior members.
A. M. Hutchinson
traffic and security director
It is strange that if Mr. Morris
had refused to hire a "ragtop" or a
"coon," he would have faced condemnation in society, and if he had
persisted, prosecution. Yet when he
refuses to hire a "queer" or a "faggot" not only does this not occur,
but also, at least on this campus/receives some support.
By calling for a boycott, gays are
now taking the same approach
blacks took in Montgomery,
Alabama, in the early sixties.
Discrimination on the basis of a
person's beliefs is reprehensible;
discrimination on the basis of what
a person is, whether it be by sex,
race, age, or sexual orientation is
unacceptable. That gays are not
protected from discrimination by
law is a shortcoming of the law, not
of gays.
While it is refreshing, in a society
that is ever more complex and
cynical, to find adults who approach the world around them with
childlike simplicity, it is nonetheless
a mistake to allow this naivete to
foster attitudes that when measured
against the ideals of our society
must be deemed unacceptable. It is
particularly unfortunate that this
intellectual flabbiness is displayed
at an institution that more than any
other society is supposed to uphold
the principles of reason, rational inquiry, and measured response.
The authors of that letter
displayed an attitude that is
shameful, and ill becomes their
status as students in an academic atmosphere.
Jon Gates,
arts 2
Evil Knievel ramp soils campus
Thank you for publicizing the careless planning
which led to the obscuring of the UBC climate station (Dirt Dump Does In Tests — Oct. 18). For those
of you who don't go that way, the dump is a mountain, not a mole hill.
It resembles a Saskatchewan ski hill, or a ramp Evil
Knievel could use to jump Totem Park. It's about 10
metres high, 100 metres long, and reduces the quality
of climate measurements sufficiently that they fall
below national standards.
Physical plant is cooperating by removing the pile,
but the incident need not have occurred if land use
planning had been more careful. The incident raises
the following questions:
1) Why was the climate station compound size
reduced without consulting the operator (Don
Pierce), the professors whose experiments are involved, or the UBC climate committee? (Although UBC
weather might seem to be the result of committee
work, the climate committee claims no
responsibility.)
2) Why did it take a request from the UBC climate
committe'e, supported by a letter from the federal atmospheric environment service, to get action started
to restore the station to standard?
3) Why was the land use committee never involved
in the decision to store top soil near the climate station?
4) What are the guidelines under which land-use
decisions are rnade before a campus project begins?
We seem to-be continually reacting after the fact
rather than at an earlier stage, when changes are less
costly! On the subject of cost, you seem to have indulged in a little hyperbole; your figure of $190,000
includes the $125,000 which would have been spent
no matter where the pile was placed. For a more realistic figure (although still a disturbing one) add the
removal cost ($65,000) to the damages suffered by
experiments (in excess of $20,000). How ironic that
the whole issue arose from an attempt to save the top
soil, and some money!
Let's not indulge in too much name-calling or
finger-pointing, but let's use the incident to recognize
the need for better planning. The university should
be a model for planning, not a laughing stock. We
have a land use committee — let's use it before the
fact, instead of after.
Hu Wallis
soil science graduate studies Tuesday, October 23,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
'Batman and Robin' give brains a big BIFF!
On Friday night, Oct. 19, my
friend and I went to a local watering
hole in downtown Vancouver to do
a study of the inhabitants. The report, instead, turned out to be a
study on the abuse of power by the
Vancouver police.
After quaffing a few cool ones,
we left the drinking establishment
to catch a city bus home. While pro
ceeding down Hastings St., a silver
ghost car parked beside a paddy
wagon wheeled off as if he was going to a fire. Pulling a nice
"Kojak" style U-turn with his tires
squealing, I let out an appropriate
yet mild "yahoo" at his finesse in
handling all that horse power.
The ghost car then pulled up on
the   sidewalk   nearly   running   us
down. Batman and Robin jumped
out of the car and arrested us for
being drunk and something to do
with being a public nuisance.
To ensure that my rights were not
to be violated I wanted to get the officer's badge number and ask again
what the charge was. While rifling
through my pockets, one of the
policemen stated, "We're going to
teach you punks a lesson for being
so lippy."
My next statement came from the
ground as my face was ground into
the pavement. "Jesus, don't break
my fucking arm!" I said. With a
few well placed kicks to prevent
bruises, they got my wallet out of
my back pocket to check my I.D.
By this time the paddy wagon was
'We want fair, just and civil treatment'
We, of the Gay/Lesbian Law Association, take strong objection to
the sentiments expressed by McDonnell, Vryheid, and Druet in
their letter "All gays are mentally ill
— without exception" in the Oct.
19 Ubyssey.
First, Mr. Clifford Morris of the
Back-to-Eden Food Co-op has no
right to discriminate against people
with a different sexual preference.
Instead, Mr. Morris has a duty, as a
member   of  society,   to   treat   all
humans with the same civility and
respect that he would ask them.
Second, homosexuality is not a
mental illness. Gay people are recognized by the psychiatric profession to be quite sane.
Third, there is support for gays
on campus. Witness ourselves, or
the 50 regular members of Gay People of UBC, or the collective agreements protecting faculty and staff
from discrimination on the basis of
sexual orientation, or the customers
I
■',.
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i
Introducing
^>SIDDHA YOGA^>
as expounded by
SWAMI MUKTANANDA
A Free Public Lecture by
SWAMI SHANTANANDA
October 24th & 25th, 1979 at 7:30 p.m.
Room 318, Buchanan Building
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, B.C.
ALL ARE WELCOME! For information call 274-9008
i^CCS8*i«S8»8»3»^»gg«3CC«S«3a33«»f«^^^
DONT BE LEFT BEHIND . ..!
Get  the   new   lightweight
skates from West Point!
SALE PRICED AT:
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Reg. $69.95 NOW $59.95
Lange Elite
Reg. $79.95 NOW $69.95
Lange Laser
Reg. $129.95   Now $109.95
3771 WEST 10th AVENUE
224-3536
 "The Hockey Specialists"
MM
Did you see
the
SHRUM BOWL"?
Then DONT MISS the
"RAIN BOWL"
at
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
Saturday, October 27 at 2:00
p.m. when the UBC T-Birds
play the Alberta Golden Bears
for First Place and the right to
host the Western Intercollegiate Football Championship.
who stayed away from the Back-to-
Eden store.
Fourth, we do not expect generosity from you. We will no longer
wait on charity. We expect fair, just
and civil treatment, just like anyone
else.
Fifth, gay people are not making
efforts to "expand their influence,"
whatever that might mean. Instead,
we are attempting to teach people
like Mr. Morris that their inhumane
and callous treatment of people different from themselves cannot and
will not be accepted by society at
large.
Sixth, and finally, gay people exist and are all around you. You probably have gay friends or acquaintances who might have been hurt or
shocked by your ill advised comments. There might come a time
when, being persecuted because you
are different, you call on them for
help. What will you say to these
"mentally ill" people then?
Gay /Lesbian Law Association
of UBC
there and my buddy had conveniently been thrown in so as not to
witness justice in action. I was then
thrown into the van and whisked
off to the Crowbar Hotel to spend
the evening. Once in their territory,
rights don't mean much.
I am not denying that I was mildly intoxicated, though they never
tested me to prove my state of
mind. My body did hurt the next
day and not necessarily from a
hangover.
So why spend research money on
travelling to police states to study
the behavior of the strong arm of
the law? We have our own example
of the KGB or SAVAK right here.
I don't know what motivates people to act like that. Maybe it is
power or prestige. I do hope,
though, Officer 467, Officer 316
and Officer McDonald of the Vancouver city police enjoy getting
their "kicks," because I think
you're really sick.
Douglas Wright
WANT  A  NATURAL   BEER?
MEET THE GOLD FAMILY:
Pacific Gold
The original member of the gold family,
Pacific Gold is a full-bodied brew
especially created for the
golden Pacific Northwest.
Distinctive hearty flavour
sets Pacific Gold apart
from ordinary beers.
It's B.C.'s liquid gold
Sold at hotel;., pubs, and other ofisale outlets.
The Draught Gold Beer Ball
At last it's here - genuine unpasteurized
draught beer you can take home!
Just 12" in diameter, the BEER BALL stores
conveniently in your refrigerator, but holds
an amazing 57 draught glasses of beer.
We're proud to be the first in B.C.
to offer you portable draught beer.
And we're proud of the smooth, refreshing
flavour of Draught Gold.
Take it home and tap it!
Yukon Gold
The gold rush is on again!
This light-coloured,
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Light taste - full strength.
A winning combination!
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The Whole Family
The ancient alchemists were certain that the
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spring water, our "modern day alchemists"
have formulated a pure liquid gold, brewed
by the long, cereal-based method which
produces beneficial compounds in beer. No
sugar, no preservatives or other chemicals -
just good taste.
It's the natural beer for B.C.!
Discover Gold!
Prince George Breweries — the only B.C.-owned brewery. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 23,1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
NURSING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Health fair, all day, SUB lobby.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cantonese class, noon, Buch. 220.
LSA SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Alex MacDonald speaks, noon, Law 101.
UBC SKI CLUB
Labatt's ramp show, noon, SUB plaza.
RUSSIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 1256.
NDP CLUB
Burnaby MP Svend Robinson, noon, SUB 212.
WEDNESDAY
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Daryl Keeling of the Monarchist League of Canada speaks on The role of the crown in Canada,
noon, SUB 215.
UBC CHESS CLUB
General meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class (intermediate), noon, Buch. 220.
JAPANESE CLUB
Slide presentation on the Japan exchange program, noon, SUB 212.
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation with video tape, noon, Buch.
217.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 207.
POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 251.
THURSDAY
UBC CHESS CLUB
General meeting, noon, International House upper lounge.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Dr. J. I. Packer speaks on The church present
and future, noon, SUB 207.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Introduction to medieval dancing,  noon,  SUB
215.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. Lear speaks on endodontics, noon, IRC room
1.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lunch and games, noon, SUB 125.
PHOTOSOC
Organizational meeting for upcoming social ac-
tivities followed by a trip to the Pit, 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
NDP CLUB AND GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Political activist and author of Son of Socred,
Stan Persky, speaks on gay history, noon, SUB
212.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Relax to live music and bar, open to final year
and graduate students, 8 p.m. to midnight, Cecii
Green Park.
FRIDAY
SCIENCE EDUCATION
Conference on Science as a human activity, 9:30
a.m. to,4:30 p.m., Scarfe.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Hallowe'en party and costumes are required for
admission, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., Cecil Green Park.
SATURDAY
LAW UNION OF LAW STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Dance with Ad Hoc, admission $3 and $3.50 for
judges, 9 p.m., graduate centre.
Svend f© give
socialist J folk
Will the socialist hordes overcome the cautious conservatives?
Will PetroCan survive the federal
government? What is the procedure
for harboring a Chilean refugee?
Svend Robinson can tell you.
And Svend Robinson, outspoken
NDP member of parliament for Burnaby, will speak to the NDP club in
SUB 212 at noon today. Drop on by
and be sociable or socialist or whatever tickles your fancy.
Getting burned
If your burning desire left you
with a burning feeling in the washroom, the nursing undergraduate
society may be able to help.
Nursing students are conducting
a health fair in SUB this week to
demonstrate the in-depth training
of the bachelor of nursing program.
HOW THE
HEALTH
ARE YOU?
Hot flashes
Actually, it's all a preparation for
patching up the participants in
Thursday's Tea-cup game between
nursing and home economics at
noon on Mclnnes field beside SUB.
But that's another hot flash in itself.
.S*
The students will be taking blood
pressure readings and offering advice on birth control and venereal
disease all day today and Wednesday.
7500
SCIENCE FICTION
PAPERBACKS PLUS
15,000 NEW & USED
PAPERBACK FICTION
BITTER BIT BOOKS
4393 W. Tenth Ave.
Vancouver
"We trade paperbacks"
SUBFILMS
PRESENTATION
$1.00
.SUN    7:00
SAT   7:00 MO
SUB AUD.
Loan-seme
Before you pawn your watch,
ring and camera to pay your next
month's rent, stop by Speakeasy
from noon to 2:30 p.m. Thursday.
Awards office representative
Keith Gilbert will dispense advice on
grants, student loans, scholarships
and financial aid in general.
Rapp raps
Tired of rapping the B.C. Lions
each time they pass up a golden opportunity to get ahead in the CFL?
Take out your sporting frustrations on Lions' head coacb Vic
Rapp, who will be giving a combination lecture/audio-visual presentation in SUB auditorium Oct. 30 at 8
p.m.
The talk will also include a discussion of the Lions' strategy for this
year's CFL playoffs — if they need a
playoff strategy.
Representative
UNIVERSITY of
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
to be on campus
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24
Graduate study information — all fields of
Letters, Arts & Sciences
CONTACT:
STUDENT SERVICES OFFICE
PONDEROSA ANNEX "F"
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OUR TOWN
by Thornton Wilder
OCTOBER 26 - NOVEMBER 3
(Previews - Oct. 24 & 25)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $3.00
(STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - Four Plays For $8.00)
BOX OFFICE    *    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE    -    Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
Tues. Oct. 22th • Fri. Oct. 26th
Tues: Jews in the Diaspora. Why? Second in a series.
Guest: Rabbi Baruch Zaichyk, Spiritual
Leader, Schara Tzedek Cong.
12:30 Hillel House
Wed. noon: Vegetarian Lunch Bar
Menu —Spanakopita (spinach pie)
Greek Salad
12:30 Hillel House
Wed. evening: Coffee House — Relax with coffee
and a bagel.   8-10 p.m. Hillel House
Thurs: Hebrew Classes and Holocaust Seminar.
12:30 Hillel House
Fri-Sun: "Agenda for Survival: Rethinking Judaism
and Christianity." A weekend of Interfaith
dialogue. Call 224-4748 for more info.
for the ultimate
in fine coffees
and pastries
come to...
DAILY
8- Midnight
WEEKENDS
In-Midnight   2134 WESTERN PARKWAY
—————"IN THE VILLAGE"	
mis
espresso bar
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
master charge
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
VISA
5784 University (next to Bank of Commerce)
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines. 1 day $1.50; additional tines 36c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.75 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van.. B.C. V6T ;Wff
5 — Coming Events
70 — Services
MEMOIRS OF A
"COMPLETED JEW"
MIKE GERTZMAN
ANO
MESSIANIC PROPHECY
7:30 p.m.. Thurs., Oct.25
LUTHERAN CENTRE
Charismatic Christian Fellowship
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and
racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
11 — For Sale — Private
HP-67 fully programmable calculator. Standard Applications pac. Excellent Cond.
$450 O.B.O. Call David. 733-1897.
READING SKILLS. Reading, Comprehension, Retention and Speed. Plus Note Taking/Study Techniques. One Day Course.
Ideal for Students. 266-6119.
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander,
graduate of Juiliiard School of Music.
Member of B.C. Registered Music
Teachers Ass'n 731-0601.
AUDITIONS and interviews for musicians,
arrangers for strings and horns. Unique
Records of Canada. Phone 873-5161.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
15 — Found
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accu-
ate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
EXPERT TYPING, theses, term papers, etc.
IBM Selective. Fast, efficient service. Call
Irene, 734-3170.
PAPERS and/or theses typed and proofed.
IBM Selectric. Phone 732-9465 evenings.
TYPIST will type essays, theses, w.h.u.
Reasonable rates, include original plus
copies. Sheila, 437-7589.
90 — Wanted
30 — Jobs
STUDENT COUPLE need sitter for 16 month
old. Vh days per week. 225-9181.
99 — Miscellaneous
35 — Lost
BLUE SWEATSUIT and anorak at Station 7
of Arts 20. Please return to Athletic office.
Commerce
Needed   by
LOST, men's glasses at
Oktoberfest. Silver frames,
myopic student. 521-8601.
40 — Messages
50 - Rentals
INSTANT
PASSPORT
PHOTOS
«6^^*^CAMERAS Ltd.
4538 W. 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
WANTED: Models for figure photography
(females preferred). Fees negotiable.
Phone: 224-5447. 5-9 p.m.
CHERYL
So go ahead and take him. Sae if we care.
He's too obnoxious anyways.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
To Sell -
Buy —
Inform Tuesday, October 23,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Coach pleads no defence
By DAVE FRANCIS
The UBC men's soccer team won
one game and lost another on a
weekend road trip coach Joe Johnson said he would like to forget.
The 'Birds lost to the University
of Calgary 5-1 on Thursday, but re
covered to blank the University of
Saskatchewan 4-0 on Friday.
"UBC played very poorly against
Calgary," said Johnson. "In goal-
keeping and in defence we were very
weak and Calgary exploited this
problem."
Playoff spot clinched
From page 8
soon season had started, concentrating as they were on trying to remember their names. About 100
people were left at the SUB traffic
circle after all 15 buses chartered to
take pre-game revellers to the
stadium were filled.
UBC coach Frank Smith said after the game he wouldn't object to
playing American rules in next
year's Shrum Bowl but he would
like the game to be played at the end
of the season.
Meanwhile, the Thunderbirds
clinched a playoff spot in the Western Intercollegiate Football League
without playing a conference game.
Both the University of Alberta and
the University of Manitoba lost
over the weekend, leaving the 'Birds
guaranteed to finish at least as high
as second. The other playoff position will not be decided until the
weekend, when UBC meets Alberta
Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium
at 2 p.m. and Manitoba hosts Saskatchewan. If UBC wins they will
finish first, and if they lose they will
finish second.
The Lower Mainland alumni of
the University of Alberta has donated the "Rain Bowl" to go to the
winner of the annual football game
in Vancouver between UBC and the
Golden Bears.
They might have been a week
late.
• •      • •      I       \ Z       •
Johnson cited changes in the lineup and in defensive strategy as factors in the 'Birds resurgence Friday.
At half time in Thursday's game,
Kelly McKnight replaced Scott
MacDonald as goalkeeper, curbing
Calgary's scoring drive in the second half and later shutting out
Saskatchewan completely, said
Johnson.
In Friday's game, UBC changed
from a four- to a three-man back-
wall defence, putting more men in
midfield while at the same time emphasizing more effective defensive
play overall, he said.
CANADA WEST
UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Men's soccer standings
W
L
T   Pts.
Victoria
4
0
2      10
Calgary
3
0
3       9
Alberta
3
1
2       8
UBC
2
4
1       5
Saskatchewan        0
5
1        1
"Defenders who performed
poorly against Calgary were not included in the revised lineup against
Saskatchewan," he added.
THURSDAY
Men's soccer
UBC 1 Calgary 5
FRIDAY
Men's football
Shrum Bowl
UBC 4 SFU 3
Men's soccer
UBC 4 Sask. 0
SATURDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 4 Brandon 6
Women's soccer
UBC 1     Wesburn 3
Women's ice hockey
UBC 2 South Delta 4
Men's ice hockey
Game abandoned
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Thousands of drunken hairy puce blorgs
swarmed to see the local blorg
snowball squad combat the arch
rivals from S|t.ly Freudian Academy
in the sometimes annual Scum
Bowl. Both teams were washed
away in a flood but the partying
blorgs in Colony Stadium didn't
even notice.
OPTIC
ZONE
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
EDITING
SERVICES
Editing and rewriting for professors,
editing and tutoring for students, by
Ph.D. with extensive writing and
editing experience. Some typing services also available.
Affiliated with company which has a
word processor, which eliminates
much re-typing of manuscripts and
produces perfect copy with justified
margins.
call: DR. CARTER
733-5294 (mornings or evenings)
K0RRES
I * MOVING AND T
HI TRANSFER LTD
1STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th-
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages. Basements. Yards
CLEAN-UPS
Playing this week-8:30 p.m.
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT
Wednesday
DAVE ROBERTS JASS  BAND
Thursday
MOM AND POPS
Friday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Saturday
KANSAS CITY 5
Members 42.00 - Guests M 00
TUES/WED/THURS — FREE lor Members
LIVE-NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873 4131
_    YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — S3 00   _
CURE
ALL SICK
BUGS
..••
*••».
VO L KSWAGENS TOO!
VOLKSWAGEN
MOTORS REBUILT
12 Month Warranty
12,000 miles (Bugs Only)
$360 and up
'e
WE
ALSO
REPAIR
IMPORTS
ERIC'S BUG STOP
CHARGEX
1505 West 3rd 731 -8171
(UNDER GRANVILLE ST. BRIDGE)
Intramurals This Week
Thurs. Oct. 25
12:30
"Great Pumpkin"
Cross Country Cycle Race.
Men and Women. Mclnnes Field.
Prizes: "Pumpkinesque."
Sat Sun. Oct. 27,28
10:00 am - 10:00 pm
Men's Curling Cash-Spiel.
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
Careers
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW
GRADUATING ENGINEERS
AND GEOLOGISTS
Are you concerned about Canada's energy
resources? Would you like to help play a significant role in the orderly development and conservation of these energy resources? If so, let's discuss
the matter. We can provide you with a unique
opportunity to assist in this important activity.
We will provide graduates with a significant and
relevant training program, excellent opportunities
for continuing professional and technical development, and advancement and career development
based on merit and individual interests.
We invite you to review our brochure in your
Canada Employment Centre office and to submit
your resume to them before 31 October 1979 for
forwarding to us.
ENERGY RESOURCES
CONSERVATION BOARD
r
Esso
Summer
and
Regular
employment
Application Deadline
at
Placement Office
OCTOBER 25, 1979 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 23,1979
'Birds float
to Shrum win
SPORTS
The Thunderbird football team
won its second consecutive Shrum
Bowl Friday, defeating Simon
Fraser University 4-3 in a driving
rainstorm at Empire Stadium.
The weather made a mockery of
the vaunted passing offences of
both teams and turned the match
into a kicking contest.
The winning point came late in
the fourth quarter when Thunderbird punter Kevin Konar hammered
a 39-yard kick into the end zone
where SFU receiver John Pankratz
fumbled. The Clansmen recovered
the fumble but gave up the game-
winning single.
WESTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
FOOTBALL LEAGUE
Standings
W
L   Pts.
UBC 'Birds                     S
2      10
Alberta 'Bears               4
3       8
Calgary D'saurs             4
4       8
Manitoba Bisons            3
4       6
Sask. Huskies                 2
5        4
The only other points in the game
came on field goals. Simon Fraser
placekicker Brian Grant hit on a
24-yarder in the third quarter and
UBC's Ken Munro tied it with a
19-yarder in the fourth.
Simon Fraser fumbles proved to
be the difference in the game as the
Clan dropped the ball nine times
and lost it twice. UBC fumbled
three times and lost one.
'Bird quarterback Greg Clarkson
found it impossible to throw with
any accuracy and completed only
three of 14 attempts for 13 yards
Clan quarterback Dave Amer
didn't fare much better, completing
eight of 19 for 46 yards.
Both teams threatened to score
late in the second quarter, but UBC
defensive back Mark Beecroft intercepted an Amer pass in the end
zone to snuff out SFU's drive. The
'Birds recovered a fumbled punt
return on the Simon Fraser 27-yard
line several plays later but could only go backwards with losses and
penalties.
Many of the 12,420 spectators at
the game were unaware the mon-
See page 7: PLAYOFF
.««*«fc!**r SMftNUtv
SIGN OF THINGS to come, runner splashes down and ball takes off on
Simon Fraser's first play from scrimmage in Friday's Shrum Bowl. Clan recovered this and six other of their own fumbles but finally succumbed when
— ross burnett photo
Kevin Konar hit a home run with the bases empty in the eighth inning to
give UBC the 4-3 win. 'Birds got help elsewhere to insure a playoff spot in
Canada West league.
Field?,., what field? Do you see a field?
The UBC women's field hockey
team won one game, tied one and
lost two others in the second round
of the Canada West University Athletic Association tourney in Saskatoon last weekend.
In    Saturday's   action,    UBC
dumped the University of Saskat-     UBC rallied against the University
chewan 3-2 in a delayed game, but
later lost a hard-fought contest to
the University of Alberta 2-1 in a
game hampered by driving snow.
On Sunday the University of Victoria shut out UBC 1-0, but later
of Calgary for a 1-1 draw.
"It was not a weekend of
skillful playing," said UBC coach
Gail Wilson. "It was a weekend of
survival in harsh playing conditions."
At first Saskatchewan was reluctant to arrange for snow removal
from the pitches, preferring to postpone the tourney for a second time
in as many weeks, said Wilson. But
they finally gave in agreeing to
other measures as well, such as
halves shortened to 25 minutes and
the use of an orange ball instead of
white for greater visibility in the
snow, she added.
"We played better in every game
than we did three weeks ago," said
Wilson. "This fact isn't obvious as
our record is poorer this time. In
the first round of the tourney, Victoria clearly dominated us, but this
time we matched their play evenly."
The Thunderettes take a one
week break then head to Calgary
for the third and final round of the
Canada West University Athletic
Association tournev Oct. 27-28.
Rallying 'Birds
shoot lights out
—jim st*«l photo
CLASSIC EXAMPLE of overkill sees four women trying to squash same spider during soccer match on Maclnnes
field Sunday. Wesburn player on left got there first, is now recovering nicely from three sets of cleat marks on
foot. Besides guaranteeing seven more days of rain, Wesburn women defeated UBC team 3-1.
So you think an ice hockey team
without a power play is in trouble?
Imagine an ice hockey team without
power.
Sunday night the Thunderbirds
survived a poor first period against
the University of Regina but rebounded in the second to lead 3-1
when the buzzer signalled the end of
the period.
It was also the signal for the lights
to go out.
A power failure on campus
knocked out the ice rink lighting
and after a 30-minute delay the
match was called.
UBC second-period goals were
scored by Marty Matthews, Hugh
Cameron and Jim Allison, while
goalie Mike Parsons stood the Cougars on their heads with some spectacular saves.
"Parsons kept them in it, that's
for sure," said Regina coach Reg
Higgs. "If he's not hot it's three or
four nothing for us."
In a Saturday night game the
'Birds lost 6-4 to the University of
Brandon in a penalty-filled match.
UBC led 2-1 after the first period on
goals by Dino Sita and Matthews,
but the Bobcats scored three unanswered goals in the second to take
the lead for good. UBC got third-
period goals from Terry Shykora
and Bill Holowaty.
The fate of Sunday's game has
not yet been decided.
The Thunderbirds hit the road
this weekend for three games in
three nights against teams from the
Great Plains Athletic Conference.
Friday they meet Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Saturday they
play the University of Manitoba
and Sunday the University of Winnipeg.
UBC's next home game is Nov. 2
against defending Canadian champions University of Alberta.

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