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The Ubyssey Jan 17, 1978

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 Strike nears,
UBC readies
_ —craig heale photo
ENRAPTURED G i UDENT Heidi Dopp stares fixedly at displays put up by UBC architecture school in SUB
art gallery. Show marks rare recognition for hard-working architecture students, who, according to legend,
spend most their lives crouched behind drafting tables in overcrowded quarters of Lassere building.
Profs upset over new regs
By VICKI BOOTH
Some UBC professors are upset
about new regulations governing
outside professional activities.
In a letter to law dean Kenneth
Lysk, 25 law professors expressed
concern over the various directives
they had received on outside activities.
The professors said "the
directives seem to us to go beyond
what is necessary for the
protection of the legitimate interests of the university."
The professors said they
recognize the legitimate interest of
the university in the outside activities of its faculty, but they
believe that these activities are
crucial.
Concern was expressed by the
professors at the "manner in which
the recent directives have been
addressed to us." They said the
directives should have been
preceded by full discussion.
The letter  preceded  a  report
released Oct. 27 which proposed
strict regulations on outside activities by professors.
The report, prepared by a joint
faculty-administration committee,
said faculty members must
receive special permission from
the administration president if
their outside activities demand
more time than one-seventh of a
calendar year, or 52 days.
The committee was set up after
two scandals concerning
professors' outside activities hit
the university.
In one, engineering dean Liam
Finn was accused of moonlighting
as an engineering consultant while
receiving his regular salary as
dean.
In the other, animal resource
ecology professor Julius Kane was
accused of using the university
computer for real estate enterprises and other personal
business.   Kane   was   suspended
from the university for six months
and he now faces charges of fraud
and theft.
Kane will appear in Richmond
provincial court May 23 to face
four counts of theft, two of fraud
and one of attempted fraud.
The report also condemns the
use of university facilities by
faculty members for non-
university purposes and recommends penalties for professors who
become over-involved in off-
campus activities.
But faculty association president
Richard Roydhouse said Monday
the report is for discussion only.
"There are some intricate
problems involved here. Certainly
some amendments will be made to
the report."
There will be a meeting of the
faculty association and the administration Thursday when the
report will be discussed and
changes will be made, he said.
The University administration is
preparing for a strike by 26 steam
engineers following their rejection
of the administration's latest
contract offer.
Chuck Connaghan, administration vice-president in
charge of non-academic services,
said Monday supervisors of all
university services have been told
to prepare to run their operations
without unionized staff, who will
respect the engineers' picket lines.
But    Bill    Kadey,    business
$20 million
authorized
for buildings
The provincial government has
authorized a construction program
for UBC totalling almost $20
million.
The program will include an $8.9
million psychology building, a $7
million expansion of nursing and
rehabilitative medicine facilities
and a $3.58 million home
economics building.
The proposed buildings are part
of UBC's five-year plan of capital
projects submitted to the
Universities' Council of B.C. last
December, council director Gerry
Schwartz said Monday.
The council considered the most
important improvements needed,
he said, and those on the UBC
priority list were granted first.
"The first go-around has approved these three, and there
might be additional buildings at a
later date."
University spokesman Al Hunter
said no sites for the psychology or
home economics buildings have
been chosen yet. Potentiaf sites are
being studied by the council's land
use committee.
The nursing and rehabilitation
medical facilities will be a fourth
floor added to the 240-bed acute
care hospital currently under
construction.
No dates have been set for
completion of the projects.
Building costs are based upon
1977 dollars, Schwartz said.
"I believe those (building costs)
are the maximum estimates
because the universities, the
council (UCBC) and the ministry
of education all agreed on them.
The University of Victoria was
also granted $6.58 million for a law
building, a $4 million fourth wing to
the Clearihue building and $500,000
for a visual arts building.
SFU will be building an $11.6
million teaching and laboratory
complex.
manager of the International
Union of Operating Engineers, said
the engineer's will not disrupt daily
student or faculty activities.
"We're not trying to stop
students from using the facilities,"
he said.
Kadey refused to say where the
union will picket or when the strike
will begin. Connaghan said the
strike can not begin until the
university receives word from the
provincial government that the
mediator who was handling the
dispute has handed in his report.
But despite Kadey's assurances
that the union's fight is not directed
at students, residences have begun
preparing for the possibility that
staff will be kept off work by a
picket line.
In Gage Towers, student floor
reps met Monday to organize
students to staff the reception
desk.
Students were told they would
not be able to use garbage chutes
because no garbage would be
carted away and that food services
would bring in outside cooks to
keep the cafeterias going at other
residences.
But Connaghan said it is "highly
unlikely" the university will bring
in outside help in the event
university services are picketed.
Preparations for a strike began
when the engineers rejected the
university's latest offer of a 15-
month extension to the current
contract, which runs from Jan. 1 to
Dec. 31, 1978.
The administration also offered
a 3.4 per cent increase based on
hourly rates. Steam engineers
salaries are currently determined
on a monthly basis.
The steam engineers have
demanded a 7.6 per cent pay increase or $156 a month, in order to
gain parity with other campus
trade workers.
Kadey said the university's
steam heating system will continue
to operate if the engineers walk out
because there are enough nonunion, certified engineers on
campus to run it.
But maintenance areas will be
affected if the 26 steam engineers
strike.
If piping, valves or the air
conditioning breaks down or needs
attention, the university will
suffer, Kadey said, because there
are insufficient numbers of experienced engineers to handle such
problems.
The union intends to put "as
much pressure on the university as
possible" with the support of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees and the Association of
University and College Employees, Kadey added.'
"CUPE will recognize picket
lines should they be encountered."
Constitution rewrite no solution — brothers
By TOM HAWTHORN
The rewriting of Canada's constitution as proposed by
prime minister Pierre Trudeau would not solve the problem of Quebec separation, a Canadian economist said
Saturday.
"A change in the distribution of constitutional powers
will not automatically change the distribution of
organizational power," Albert Breton told more than 500
people in IRC Saturday.
Breton defined organizational power as the collective ,
capacity of individuals to make decisions.
"It is an illusion to believe a rewriting of the constitution
would change many things," he said.
Breton, along with his sociologist brother Raymond
Breton, was lecturing on Quebec and the dynamics of
contemporary Canada as part of the weekly Vancouver
Institute lecture* series.
About 20 demonstrators from the Vancouver Student
Movement, a branch of the Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist}, distributed leaflets at the lecture in
protest against what they termed "the national unity
fraud."
During the question period, protestor David Puller
denounced the UBC administration for supporting and
allowing this "fraudulent debate" to occur.
Fuller blamed the ruling class for perpetrating the
national unity debate at the expense of the working class.
When his comments were drowned out by jeering from
the audience, Fuller said, "I expected this since this
crowd is full of members of the ruling class."
■ The Breton brothers said the current problems of
regionalism and Quebec autonomy are the result of an
unequal distribution of power within Canada.
When most of the decision-making power is held in one
part of the country (Ontario), sub-committees such as
Quebec and B.Q. feel alienated and try to gain more power
for themselves, Raymond said.
"And if individuals want to change the distribution of
power, there are going to be conflicts and socially
dangerous confrontations," he said.
According to the Bretons' theory, a redistribution of
income through taxation will not give Canada's weaker
regions more power. The problem is that weaker regions
cannot use resources to gain power due to the rigid power
structure in Canada, said Albert.
"What happens is that weak areas use pressure and
confrontation strategies to increase power," Raymond
said.
"They try to force others to make concessions because
they have nothing to bargain with.
"If these weaker regions push too hard they may be
clobbered by retaliation."
The Bretons regard information exchanges and a
redistribution of resources as the only solution to the
problems Canada is currently facing,
"A strategy of mutually-advantageous exchanges
would increase the organizational power of weaker
regions without taking absolute power away from the
stronger region," said Raymond.
"It's really quite a simple-minded solution."
Raymond "called for the establishment of a class of
bilingual Canadians who would be able to participate in
advantageous transactions.
"It is in the interest of powerful organizational systems
to assist weaker systems because this would allow for
more beneficial and profitable exchanges," Raymond
said.
"The real problem is that sub-societies, whether they
are english-french, black-white or eastern-westerners,
cannot simply use resources to gain organizational power.
As a result, they feel alienated and confrontation can
occur." j Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1978
SI per student
Arts votes today on levy
By GREG EDWARDS
Arts students will decide today
and Wednesday whether to approve a $1 fee levy to finance arts
undergraduate society activities.
AUS president Fran Watters said
Monday that until this year the
society has been financed by
money earned from locker rentals,
Buchanan vending machines and a
yearly $1,000 Alma Mater Society
rgrant.
Watters said the AMS grants to
undergraduate societies were
abolished last year to encourage
societies to fund themselves and
become more responsive to their
members.
She said the society is seeking
more money from its members to
replace the lost grant money and to
increase the activities and services
offered to arts students.
Watters said the AUS intends to
publish an anti-calendar with
student evaluations of professors
and courses. An arts anti-calendar
has not been published in the last
three or four years, Watters said.
Hopefully an anti-calendar will
influence hiring and firing of
professors, but the main purpose of
the calendar will be to help
students choose courses and
professors, she said.
TODAY & TOMORROW
VOTE
FOR ARTS
Vote in the Referendum Today
BUCHANAN &
SEDGWICK
"We want to continue publishing
our monthly newsletter (The Arts
Perspective), holding beer nights,
having noon hour singers and increase the monies we give to
department clubs," she said.
We also want to hold more social
events like dances and start
financing sports trips for students,
Watters said.
"The AUS is also trying to get a
face-lift of Buchanan lounge," she
said. "The lounge layout makes
conversation very difficult and so
we want to open it up with more
relaxing furniture, wall murals,
hangings and plant dividers,
Watters said.
In order to have the lounge facelifted, the arts students will have to
fund it themselves. This would be
done by floating a loan with the
AMS and the society paying the
loan with payments from the $1
fee, Watters said.
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1 _ —— ^^^ Tuesday, January 17, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Candidates to battle for senate seats;
voters to decide today, tomorrow
ROGERS . . . against cutbacks
NELSON . . . supports feminists
SULEMAN
more phys ed needed
Students go to the polls today and Wednesday to elect five students to sit on senate,
the university's chief academic decisionmaking body.
The senate is composed of representatives
from most departments and faculties at
UBC, staff and students.
The senate meets monthly and is mainly
concerned with academic issues such as
tenure, admission requirements, promotion
and grading policy and education standards.
In this article, all eight candidates for
senators-at-large were interviewed on the
main issues.
The only candidate who has held any
elected office at UBC is Dave Coulson.
Coulson was Alma Mater Society treasurer
during the 1975-76 term, president Jake van
der Kamp's regime.
Coulson says close scrutiny of the effect of
education cutbacks on the university is
essential to ensure students are not shut our
of programs they want.
"Another important issue is that elections
for student board and senate reps could be
academic next year."
Deputy minister of education Walter
Hardwick said last October the provincial
government was considering eliminating
student representation from university
governing bodies.
needed
GILLESPIE . . . advocates industry links
"I will fight that tooth and nail," says
Coulson.
Coulson also said student senators should
present a united front on senate. "Students
are haphazardly organized now; we need an
effective student caucus."
One of the United Action Slate candidates
for senator-at-large is Fred Nelson, arts 3.
Nelson, a Young Socialist and former shop
steward for the Canadian Union of Public
Employees in Vancouver, says women's
rights is one of the most important issues he
would work on if elected.
He says he would push for preferential
admissions to professional faculties to
ensure that women make up at least a
minimal percentage of students in those
areas.
"Women have to be accepted who don't
quite meet the standards because they have
been systematically discriminated
against."
Nelson also says he would work for a
reform of the tenure-granting system and
hiring system to ensure that teaching
capability gets a higher priority.
Nelson says he would try to mobilize
students to fight education cutbacks and, as
a student senator, would encourage the
university to expand women's studies and
set up labor and native studies courses.
Secrecy Needless
The secrecy which surrounds university
governing bodies is needless and
reprehensible, Nelson says. Student
representatives should ignore secrecy
regulations and be completely open with
students, he said.
"I am absolutely and irrevocably opposed
to secrecy."
Lome Rogers, the other Young Socialist
candidate, says the Young Socialist slate is
offering a co-ordinated effort to push for
student interests.
Rogers says that although students have a
token representation on the board and
senate the Young Socialists can be a
"vigilant minority" if elected.
He says the main issues are unemployment, cutbacks and accessibility.
He says he would support and work for
UBC joining the National Union of Students
and the B.C. Student Federation.
Bruce Ross, arts 3, is also running for
senator-at-large on the United Action Slate.
A member of the UBC NDP club and AMS
external affairs committee, Ross says the
main issue he would address if elected is
accessibility to post-secondary education.
Ross says he would work for a tuition fee
rollback and against education cutbacks as
a means of making it easier for these groups
to get to university.
Ross also says he has read the Winegard
report on delivering post-secondary
education to the Interior and believes UBC
should be involved.
The report recommends Simon Fraser
University be given responsibility for post-
secondary education in the Interior.
Bob Staley, arts 1, says he wants to
promote "unity on campus". He says he
hopes to achieve this goal by working with
the student representative assembly to
unify all faculties, union and organizations.
Staley sees the importance of "going
public" in order to put pressure on the
Socreds. Administration president Doug
Kenny must be convinced to approach the
public, he says.
The key to student unity on campus lies in
the SRA, says Staley. Through its leadership, students must be made aware of important issues. Staley says demonstrations
are important in achieving this goal.
"There's mothing better than a mass
demonstration to make students aware of
what is happening," he says.
One of the priorities of the senate should
be the presentation of a report on accessibility, he says. "I am concerned about
the future of our university and the
deteriorating quality of education."
To improve student employment students
should be hired to work in the library and
other university areas, says Staley.
Chris Niwinski says an important issue in
toe senate race is the lack of uniformity of
admission standards.
"When they got rid of matriculation
exams in the province it was a backward
step."
Niwinski says that under the current
system an "A" student at one school could
be a "C" student at another school.
"The university should take things into its
own hands by implementing a university
admission exam."
Niwinski says he is in favor of continuing
university programs aimed at emcouraging
women to enrol in male-dominated
faculties.
"There is a need for more women in
engineering, commerce and other
traditionally male faculties.
"I think you'd be amazed at the change in
the engineers."
Training poor
Don Gillespie, applied science 3, advocates increased co-operation between the
university and industry in order to improve
student employment.
Co-operation between faculties is needed
to design programs and degrees that will
enable students to get jobs, Gillespie says.
It is the responsibility of the university to
prepare students for future employment, he
adds.
University graduates are not being
trained for career possibilities, says
Gillespie. It is the responsibility of the
senate in co-operation with the alumni to
change academic criteria.
Women should be given special consideration in forestry and engineering
employment, Gillespie says. Jobs for
women in these areas are difficult to find, he
adds.
More flexibility is needed between
faculties to allow students to take courses
outside their regular faculty program,
Gillespie says.
Gillespie says these courses could be
given at alternate times, such as in the
evening, to offer a greater opportunity for
attendance.
Karim Suleman says his motto is
"working towards academic excellence."
Suleman says on of his priorities will be to
press for credit for physical education
courses.
"I don't feel that a university education
should be devoted entirely to the academic.
Physical education should come in too, to
develop a better quality student."
He says the university should also investigate and reform the course credit and
transfer system to increase student mobility
between educational institutions.
Suleman says the quality of education is
also an important issue, and that there
should be a reduction in class sizes.
He says he also favors a trimester system
at UBC which he claims would be a more
effective use of campus resources.
Peter Schmelcher was unavailable for
comment.
ROSS . . . young NDPer
STALEY . . . wants to go public
NIWINSKI
wants admission test
COULSON . . . recycled hack Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1978
It's democracy time
Get out and vote.
Today and Wednesday, students will
select two board of governors representatives
and five senators-at-large. And in the
faculties of graduate studies, science and
commerce, individual senators are to be
elected.
Far more important than anything the
candidates say or do in this election is the
fact that education minister Pat McGeer and
his deputy, Walter Hardwick, those
champions of democratic freedoms, have
advocated removing student representation
from governing bodies.
Student representation on the senate and
board are essential. In the past, critics have
pointed to the ineffectiveness of students on
these bodies and have said they are
outclassed     by     their     older colleagues.
While these charges are sometimes true,
student reps have often been the only board
or senate members to have brought up issues
or perspectives on issues from a student
point of view.
And in the past, a few effective members,
such as Moe Sihota, Svend Robinson and
Paul Sandhu, have made the relatively recent
experience of student representation in these
organizations a success.
Students have also proved in the past to
be far more willing to discuss the business of
the board and senate with the public.
This university, funded with public money
and charged with the task of educating
thousands, has an obligation to explain
publicly the reasons for its decisions and
policies, and open up the decision-making
process as much as possible to the public.
A strong turnout of voters in these
elections will make the provincial
government think twice before ending
student representation.
In our last editorial we recommended
that students support Paul Sandhu and
Elaine Bernard for the board.
In the race for the five senators-at-large,
we urge students to support Dave Coulson,
Lome Rogers and Fred Nelson.
Coulson has the most experience of any
of the senate candidates in UBC student
politics and we feel he best exemplifies the
principles outlined above.
Rogers and Nelson, although not as
experienced, seem to have a better grasp of
the issues and politics of UBC than the other
candidates.
NOW, Jl/ST
HOU) 5TI1L.
Letters
Acting like studs puts down women, says protester
Okay, it's easy to see why women
would oppose the Lady Godiva
ride, seeing a woman sex object
paraded around like the pig captured by Jack and his gang in Lord
of the Flies.
But there were some men
among the demonstrators against
the ride and speaking for myself I
wasn't there only because I object
to seeing a group of people
degraded (half the population, in
this   case).   I   was- protesting
because somehow as a man I also
felt degraded by it.
What really crystalized for me
why I was there was a comment
made by one of the red-jacketed
gears just about 30 seconds before
they smashed through the
picketers, throwing punches and
shooting off fire extinguishers. He
turned to face the rest of the
engineers and, in a parody of the
demonstrators, he yelled in an
effeminate voice "You guys are
just terrible!" and flopped his limp
wrists.
The other gears loved it, howling
with laughter. And there in a
nutshell was what this type of
event says to other men: if you
object to acting like a drooling ape,
you're a contemptible fag,
betraying he-man solidarity by
(shudder) acting as bad as those
sissy women.
With all my years of conditioning, it's tempting for me to
Arts services are worth 20 twizzlers
On Jan. 18, the arts undergraduate society executive is
asking AUS members to support a
fee referendum.
After lengthy consideration, I
have decided to make the ultimate
sacrifice and forsake one-twentieth
of next year's licorice allowance to
vote yes on the 18th. As you can all
imagine the decision was an extremely heart-rending one.
Fortunately the AUS executive
has an extremely persuasive case.
/ apologize
This is a letter of public apology
with regard to statements about
my fellow board of governors
candidate Elaine Bernard which
appeared in Friday's issue.
If such a statement is to be
quoted, it should be done so in
context. I was questioned about my
views on board secrecy — "would
I be secretive or would I be willing
to make many public statements? "
My response was that for the
board to operate effectively, not
every cough and whisper in the
meetings should be made public. It
would disturb me to have a student
representative who could possibly
damage our relationship with other
members of the board and thus
lose any effectiveness students
might have by making all business
public. Elaine Bernard happens to
follow this policy.
I an sorry Elaine's name was
mentioned during the interview in
which Mike Bocking also brought
up many names himself. It was her
policy with which I disagree with
that was the subject of concern, an
essential element of a good
campaign.
Deborah Macintosh
board of governors candidate
The decision boiled down to
whether or not his was worth
trading 20 strawberry Super
Twizzlers for an organization that
has (are you ready?):
• Supported and developed
departmental unions;
• Helped develop and found
funding for calendar supplements;
• Organized intramural sport
activities;
• Given us beer gardens;
• Founded the arts council;
• Funded the best rag west of
SUB, the Arts Perspective;
• Given us an ombudsperson;
and
• Given us each better, more
effective representation at
departmental and faculty
meetings (the latter being a herculean task), SRA, and a myriad of
committees at various levels.
Well, even I could see that this
was my big chance to invest* in
something of real and lasting
value. Please join me on the 18th,
and first of all vote and secondly
vote YES!
Kate Andrew
arts 3
We're short
The library needs 20 copies of the
Nov. 4, 1977 issue of The Ubyssey
(vol. 60 no. 23). If any readers can
spare us a copy or two or three, we
would be most grateful.
Send the copies to G. Elliston,
series bibliographer, Main
Library; or drop them into the
librarian's office to my attention.
Thank you.
Graham Elliston
bibliography division
try to avoid the issue by denying
I'm a fag and acting as tough as a
drunk gear! But the unknown
gear's comment should be answered head-on for two good
reasons.
First, there's nothing wrong with
men "acting as bad as those sissy
women" if it means picking up
some of the qualities that women
have been traditionally known for,
like being sensitive and supportive
of other people, being affectionate
and co-operative, etc.
Second, anyone who thinks being
a fag is so disgusting should think
again, because that attitude
boomerangs  back  on  you.   Self-
contempt for whatever sexual
feelings you have for other men is
pretty self-destructive. And having
to be he-man to avoid being considered a fag turns sex with women
into an impersonal game of "hustle
and score", and emotional
satisfaction is left in the dust along
with your sensitivity.
More and more men are coming
to see that acting like studs not
only puts down women, it fucks
things up for us. Every day we do
and see smaller and more insidious
versions of the he-man behaviour
of the Godiva parade — let's not be
afraid to stand up against it.
Bill Andrews
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 17, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241 !< of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-23C1;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Chris Gainor
"Who are you voting for today? demanded a sickly Chris Gainor.
"Ourselves," replied Mike Bocking and Bill Tieleman. Marcus Gee strained
under the weight of contraband ballots as he trudged toward the voting
booths planning to vote for Kathy Ford, Steve "Graduate" Howard, Tom
Hawthorn, Vlckl Booth and Geof Wheelwright, but not for Matt King,
Mario Lowther, Jeff Rankin, Heather Conn or Greg Edwards. Verne
("V.S.M.") McDonald ran for every position In sight on a platform against
censorship, while Don Maclntyre, Tom Barnes and Carl Vesterback formed
the Throw Your Own Party. Craig Heale caught the whole spectacle In
striking black and white, assisted by Tony Trlvlsano. But thanks to the
bubonic plague, all the budding candidates lost their seats, and as a result
became the butt of El Rotundo's even sicklier jokes.
V
Taking action is logical
Like so many.other students, I know letter writing is more often than
not a bore. But when some issues present themselves, the effort and time
must be taken to present views and speak up for what is important.
In my case, Engineering Week has presented itself, and the issues are
the Lady Godiva ride, the Red Rag, and unnecessary violence used by
engineers when faced with the group of anti-Engineer (Godiva ride)
protesters. My comment will be directed to those students, Greg Fortin,
Andrew Metten, and Greg Felton, who have also taken time to present
their views.
Unfortunately for those three students, the effect of their efforts can
only be seen as a reinforcement for the actions taken by the women's
committee. In Fortin's case, leaving aside for now his false statement
that when struggling against a rapist, a rapist becomes more excited, he
displays his own anti-feminist views.
Why is a smart, thinking woman to be feared? Do you also fear a smart,
thinking man? If not, then there must be an underlying belief and attitude
that women are incapable of intelligent thought, unless of course you now
live in constant fear.
The women's committee did not "fly off the handle," but were
organized and acted in a rational manner. You seem to forget that it was
the engineers who confronted the protesters with physical and verbal
abuse, not the reverse.
As for Metton, the "sister" poster was obviously too deep for you to
comprehend. I can see from some reactions that you were not alone. The
point of the poster was to encourage students to do a bit of thinking about
their own attitudes and the stand that the women's committee was taking
regarding the ride.
Would the ride be such a joke if you saw your sister, Mary Sue, (just a
fictitious name, so please don't be confused), or your mother, your aunt,
cousin, etc., paraded around by some red jacketed, "socially illiterate",
students?
I think not. The Godiva ride becomes a personal insult, and if supported, perpetuates and reinforces the already too prevalent view that
women are objects to be treated differently and in this case, to symbolically represent in a perverse way, the masculinity or machismo of
Godiva supporters.
And Felton, the women's committee protest was not "illogical and
baseless." Our disgust is not with the woman portraying Lady Godiva,
but with the people involved in the organization and presentation of the
ride.
It is logical to take action against something that offends you and
violates your personhood. You can only boycott or attempt to ignore for so
long.
Carol Nielsen
arts 4 Tuesday, January 17, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
Canada diverted
from real problems
by unity battle
By DAVE FULLER
Last week, two professors from the
University of Toronto, Albert and Raymond
Breton, spoke at UBC.
This speaking tour is designed to whip up
public debate on the "national unity" fraud
of prime minister Pierre Trudeau and the
"independence" fraud of Quebec preimer
Rene Levesque. The aim of the tour's
organizers is to try and encourage the
students and faculty at UBC to participate in
the current dogfight that has broken out in
the Canadian ruling class.
The reactionary bourgeoisie in Canada,
both that section advocating "national
unity", and the section advocating "independence" for Quebec are a handful of
national traitors and sellouts to foreign
(mainly U.S.) imperialism.
The Breton brothers, one a sociologist and
the other an economist, claim that they are
speaking in favor of neither unity nor independence for Quebec. They present a
detached, academic front, and say that they
are merely presenting a "framework for
analysis" of the "national unity" problem.
The Bretons' "framework for analysis"
begins with the notion that society is made
up of organizations such as corporations,
government departments, religious and
educational institutions.
The individuals in these organizations
attempt to acquire as much "organizational
control" (in the broadest sense) as they can.
However, any society is split by "fundamental cleavages", the Bretons say,
along the lines of religion, social classes,
color, language, region of wealth. They
claim that such cleavages present barriers
to the acquisition of "organizational control" by individuals.
The two professors go on to say that in
Canada, the "fundamental cleavages" are
linguistic (French-English) and regional
(east-west). The linguistic barrier has made
it difficult for francophones to obtain
organizational control. So the only way for
francophones to grab more power is to
politically separate Quebec from the rest of
Canada.
Dave Fuller, a Mathematics graduate
student, is a member of the Vancouver
Student Movement, a branch of the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist).
The Bretons use this framework to
analyze various questions concerning
fj&tional unity.
This innocent-looking sociological model
shows its reactionary features upon closer
scrutiny. First of all, organizational control
in Canada is largely in the hands of foreign,
mainly U.S., imperialists who dominate the
Canadian economy, politics and culture.
The Bretons don't mention this well-known
fact.
But this fact, together with the observation that Levesque has many times
demonstrated his desire to keep the
economic lifelines of Quebec in the control of
the U.S., proves that Levesque's "independence" campaign is a fraud.
If Quebec secedes under Levesque, it will
still be a semi-colony of the U.S. and will not
have genuine independence. Since the
Bretons wish to promote debate on unity
versus independence, they conveniently
forget about the U.S. domination of Canada
so that one side of the debate does not fall
apart.
The second reactionary feature of the
Bretons' theory is the suggestion that
everyone in Canada is vying for
organizational control. In fact, this is a
pastime of only the ruling class — the
handful of the very rich, their state, some
highly-placed professionals, and other
servants of the rich.
What the Bretons call a fundamental
cleavage between francophones and
anglophones is in fact a big fight between
two sections of the ruling class in Canada.
The section headed by Levesque wants to
continue to sell out Quebec to the U.S. imperialists, but no longer losing to Trudeau's
section some of the profits of sellout.
The Bretons', their UBC sponsors,
Trudeau and Levesque all promote the
fraud that this contradiction within the
Canadian ruling class is a genuine concern
of the Canadian people, and that the
Canadian people should take sides in the
dispute.
But the overwhelming majority of
Canadian people has no real interest in
supporting either side of this debate, or in
even participating in the debate. The
Canadian working class. and people are
facing many real problems of their own,
such   as   unemployment,   rapidly   rising
prices, cultural and spiritual devastation of
the youth, cutbacks in education spending,
state-organized attacks on immigrants, and
all sorts of other problems thrust upon them
by the capitalist system by the ruling class.
The Breton brothers fail to mention the
most fundamental cleavage in Canadian
society — that between the tiny ruling class
and the overwhelming majority of the
Canadian people. Of course, if they mentioned this cleavage, they would expose the
fraudulent national unity debate for what it
is — an attempt to divert the Canadian
people away from fighting the ruling class
which causes all their problems, and instead
to fight one another, behind the feuding
sections of the ruling class.
This campaign for national unity by two
reactionary professors at UBC is just a
continuation of the "Canada Day" extravaganza organized by the Trudeau
government last July 1. It was a collossal
flop, but since then, the Trudeau government has established a task force on
national unity which is to co-ordinate all the
advisory groups and set out to try and fool
the Canadian people that the only problem is
national unity.
This task force has met with such opposition from progressive and democratic
people across the country that it has been
forced to organize its meetings secretly and
only take submissions from select groups of
people.
The UBC administration is involved in the
promotion of the national unity debate in
other ways besides the current lectures.
UBC president Doug Kenny spoke to the
Vancouver Rotary Club on Oct. 11, 1977, in
support of the federalism fraud of Trudeau.
UBC vice-president Charles Connaghan, a
leading spokesman for monopoly capitalists
in the B.C. construction industry, is also an
active member of a national unity study
group.
The Vancouver Institute is now also on the
bandwagon of "national unity". In addition
to sponsoring the speaking tour of the
Bretons, it has also scheduled a speech by J.
V. Clyne on February 11, 1978, at which this
notorious anti-working class personality will
speak on the "constitution of Canada" and
praise the colonial British North America
Act.
This frantic activity on behalf of the
reactionary bourgeoisie and its agents in the
university administration is to prepare
public opinion for another big extravaganza
when the task force on national unity holds
its hearings at the Hotel Vancouver on Feb.
8 and 9.
The Vancouver Student Movement
(V.S.M.) invites all the democratic and
progressive people to discuss the real issues
facing the Canadian working class and
people, and how to make the rich pay for
their all round crisis.
perspectives
USE YOUR VOTE
ELECTIONS
JAN. 18th
BOARD OF
GOVERNORS
SENATE
— Ask the candidates
— How can the position of women
on campus be improved ?
— What they will do to improve
that position?
U.B.C.
WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
Don't be left behind!
burke's world wide travel
NEW DESTINATIONS & LONG DURATION
CHARTER FLIGHTS TO EUROPE
FOR SUMMER 1978
VANCOUVER TO LONDON-GATWICK
VANCOUVER TO COPENHAGEN
THURS. 27 APRIL & EVERY THURS. TO 17 AUGUST MON. 12 JUNE & EVERY MON. TO 9 JULY
ViaWARDAIR FOR 10 WEEKS FROM $419 to $529     Via P.K.A. FOR 3 TO 9 WEEKS FROM $509 TO $549
TUES. 16 MAY FOR 13. 15 & 16 WEEKS$439 ADD.TIONAL DEPARTURES 18 MAY & 14 AUGUST
TUES. 6 JUNE FOR 10, 12 & 13 WEEKS $499
Via P.W.A.
FRI. 23 & 30 JUNE FOR 10 WEEKS$529
Via BRITISH AIRWAYS
VANCOUVER TO FRANKFURT
THURS. 25 MAY & FREQUENT THURS. DEPARTURES TO
27 JULY FOR8& 12 WEEKS FROM $499 TO $559
ViaWARDAIR
VANCOUVER TO AMSTERDAM
FRI. 5 MAY & EVERY FRI. TO 4 AUGUST
Via WARDAIR FOR 8 & 10 WEEKS FROM $459 TO $549
VANCOUVER TO OSLO
SUN. 18 JUNE Via P.W.A. FOR 4 & 6 WEEKS $498
MON. 26 JUNE Via P.W.A. FOR 3 & 5 WEEKS $509
VANCOUVER TO STOCKHOLM
FRI. 16 JUNE Via P.W.A. FOR 3 & 6 WEEKS $496
THU. 22 JUNE Via P.W.A. FOR 2 & 5 WEEKS $496
ADDITIONAL FLIGHTS Via CP. AIR TO LONDON      j
AMSTERDAM, FRANKFURT & ZAGREB
TAX AND INSURANCE NOT INCLUDED IN ABOVE PRICES
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
"In the Village"
224-4391
Book HOW With  ^Z^rW wide travel Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
HILLEL HOUSE
Israeli     dancing     and     Instruction,
noon, Hillel House.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Sign-up for ski trip deadline Friday,
SUB 216A.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Weekly    student    fellowship,    noon,
SUB 205.
CANOE AND KAYAK CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
GAY ■PEOPLE
Informal     social     gathering,    noon,
SUB 113.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 130.
ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL
Architectural       retrospective,
a.m.-3 p.m., SUB art gallery.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,     noon,
212A.
11
SUB
Hot
flashes
Bibliographies
for sale — cheap
The library is providing a new
short-cut service for students with
long research papers.
For $5 the library will prepare
a computer bibliography on the
topic of your choice.
For more information, ask the
reference librarian in your subject
area.
The special price lasts only
until the end of March.
Vote today
Don't forget to vote. Elections
for student senators and board of
governors reps are being held
Wednesday with advance polls in
the residences today.
Polls on Wednesday are open
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 SEYMOUR ST.
688-2481
TODAY & TOMORROW
VOTE
FOR ARTS
Vote in the Referendum Today
BUCHANAN &
SEDGWICK
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Sign-up for ski trip, deadline Friday,
SUB 216A.
HILLEL HOUSE
Shefa vegetarian lunch, noon, Hillel
House.
VARSITY OUTDOORS CLUB
General   meeting   and   slide   show,
noon, Chem. 250.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Freesee:  film  series America, noon,
SUB auditorium.
SLAVONIC STUDIES
DEPARTMENT
Lecture:  Poland,  sovereign republic
or Soviet satellite? noon, Bu. 2244.
ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL
Architectural        retrospective,       11
a.m.-3 p.m., SUB art gallery.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Dance exploration, 3:30-5:30 p.m.,
SUB 212.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General    meeting   and   film,   noon,
SUB 205.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-In, noon, SUB 130.
FINE ART STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Organizational        meeting,        noon,
Lasserre 105.
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Introductory  lecture on  TM, noon,
Bu. 316.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
THURSDAY
ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL
Architectural        retrospective,       11
a.m.-3 p.m., SUB art gallery.
CUTBACKS COMMITTEE (SRA)
Committee   meeting,   all   welcome,
noon, SUB 230.
BFJld^^JgaddriddgBddididdi^^cli^idplpidjddddadriidd^
ii   ,
M
a'
a.
Q
a
i
Candia Taverna jtifi
SPECIALIZING IN '
228-9512 0BTpErE  228-9513
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
Jddfdri^riiaiJaiaaflBiaBBiaHBCiaqpPPP^ddrdFJgggggEEJl^i^g^
APPLICATION
FOR GRADUATION
Application for Graduation cards are now being mailed to
students registered in the graduating year of the following degree
programmes: B.A., B.F.A., B.Com., Lie. Acc't., B.Ed. (Elem.),
B.Ed. (Sec), and B.Sc. All students who expect to graduate this
Spring are requested to complete and return both cards to the
Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) as soon as possible, but no later
than February 15, 1978. Any student in the graduating year of
these degree programmes who does not receive cards in the mail
should confirm with the Registrar's Office that his/her local
mailing address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining degree
programmes, except Graduate Studies, may obtain their
"Application for Graduation" cards from their Faculty Offices.
Students on. the Graduate Studies programmes may obtain their
Applications from their graduate advisors.
"Application for Graduation" cards are available in the Office of
the Registrar.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the students to apply for their
degrees. The list of candidates for graduation to be presented to the
Faculty and to the Senate for approval of degrees is compiled solely from
these application cards.
NO APPLICATION - NO DEGREE
Dean off Women's Office
Maryke Gilmore, Assistant to the
Dean of Women, Career Counsellor
"GO HIRE YOURSELF
AN EMPLOYER"
Career Counselling Workshops
I. For WOMEN and MEN (4th year), in Arts and
Science
Thursday, January 19, 26, 12:30 - 2:15 p.m.
Buchanan Penthouse.
II. For WOMEN (4th year) in Arts and Education
Thursday, February 2, 9. 12:30- 2:15 p.m.
Buchanan Penthouse.
III.
III.
For WOMEN (2nd year) in Arts
Thursday, February 16, March 2, 12:30- 2:15
p.m.
Buchanan Penthouse.
For    MATURE,   PART/FULL-TIME   WOMEN
(All Faculties)
Thursday, March 16, 23, 12:30 - 2:15 p.m.
Buchanan Penthouse.
Workshops   will    include   evaluations   of   skills,   career   and
lifegoals, resume writing and interviewing-techniques.
PRE—REGISTRATION REQUIRED
Please sign up on
Dean of Women's Door
Buchanan, Room 456
or call:   228-3449
(The World's Largest Traveling Multi-Media Production)
THE BEATLES:
AWAY WITH WORDS
Comes to Vancouver's acoustically perfect QUEEN ELIZABETH
THEATRE for (9) nine unforgettable performances, Friday, Saturday &
Sunday January 20th, 21st, & 22nd. Performances Friday & Saturday at ,
6:00 p.m., 8:00 p.m., and 10:00 p.m. Sunday Special Matinees at 4:00
p.m. & 6:00 p.m. with final performance 8:00 p.m. Sunday night. Advance
tickets only $3.75 on sale now at Vancouver Ticket Center, ALL Eaton's
Stores, both Information Centers (in Champlain Mall) and (Richmond
Square in Richmond). All tickets $4.25 at the door.
CANADIAN RED CROSS SOCIETY
Summer Employment Opportunities
RED CROSS WATER SAFETY SERVICE
Area Consultants
Several vacancies exist from May 1, 1978 to August 31, 1978.
The Area Consultant is a Red Cross/Royal Life Saving Society Instructor
and Evaluator of broad aquatic experience. This individual has proven
leadership qualities, is independent and is able to work without
supervision. Responsibilities include supervising approximately 30 water
safety programs, conducting instructor clinics, and effecting public
education programs.
Salary and benefits comparable to senior aquatic positions in British
Columbia.
Small Craft Safety Program Co-ordinator
The successful candidate will be an innovative and energetic individual with
considerable experience in the operation of Small Craft including canoes.
Experience in conducting water safety programs would be advantageous.
Responsibilities include organizing and conducting Small Craft Safety
Instructor Schools as well as promoting and implementing the Red Cross
Small Craft Safety Program.
This position involves extensive travel throughout British Columbia and the
Yukon. The incumbent must be able to meet and work productively with
local recreation organizations.
Period of Employment: May 1, 1978 to August 31, 1978.
Salary and Benefits: Comparable to Senior Aquatic positions in B.C.
SUBMIT DETAILED RESUMES TO:
Director, Water Safety Service
The Canadian Red Cross Society
B.C.-Yukon Division
4750 Oak Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6H 2N9
APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL FEBRUARY 3, 1978.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; addition.il lines 35c.
Commercial — 3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice. Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. VST 1W5
10 — For Sale — Commercial
RACQUET SALE — Wide choice for
squash, badminton, racquetball and
tennis, at exceptional prices. Reasonable rates for stringing. Phone 733-
1612 or visit Community Sports at
3616 West 4th Ave.
ORGANICALLY GROWN Okanagan fruit
and vegetables. Wholesale prices in
bulk. Free delivery. 738-8828.
11 — For Sale — Private (Cont.)
1970 MAZDA 1200. Good cond. New
muffler, tires, battery, tune-up. 43,000
miles. Phone 733-4675.
20 — Housing
FREE ROOM AND BOARD to responsible, mature young man, undergrad or
grad student, in return for occasional
light duties caring for boys in boarding residence. Please phone 224-1304,
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
FREE — Large bright upstairs sleeping
room for responsible studious student,
male preferred, vicinity 25th and
Granville. No cooking. Phone 224r6090.
25 — Instruction
PREPARE for the February and April
LSAT with the Law Board Review
Centre's Intensive LSAT Weekend
Review. For further information call
us toll-free  at  (800) 663-3381.
65 — Scandals
BORED? DISCOURAGED? Feel like
something new and different? Then
vote in the Arts Referendum. For
only a dollar you too can have a great
undergrad society.
OPGELET: HOLLANDSE STUD. Gezocht
voor regelmatig borrel avonden bijv
vrijdag bel 731-2367 voor inlichtingen.
65 — Scandals
LAZY PEOPLE! For only 75c sit down
and watch Subfilms' presentation of
"Marathon Man."
85 — Typing
CAMPUS DROP OFF point for typing
service. Standard rates. Call Liz, after
6:00 p.m., 732-3690.
FAST, ACCURATE typist will do typing
at home. Standard rates. Please phone
anytime, 263-0286.
FAST, EXPERT typing. IBM selectric.
Close to campus. 224-2437 evenings.
90 — Wanted
TRAVEL COMPANION wanted. Female
preferred for Europe, June-July.
Please submit travel plans and references to Box 90, Ubyssey, Rm. 241
S.U.B.
750 PEOPLE who would rather have a
newspaper, beer gardens intramurals,
dances, anticalendars and much, much
more than one big Mac and a side of
fries.  Vote in the Arts.
99 — Miscellaneous
SUPPORT a -vanishing species. Vote a
dollar for the Arts today! Buchanan
and Sedgwick.
COSTA D^L SOL — Share the ownership of a new villa ($12,000). Ph. 594-
6501.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
=j^=Jr=ir=i|=Jr=Jr=Jr=il=Jr=i[=Jp Tuesday, January 17, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
Women drop hoop heartbreakers
By TONY TRIVISANO
Despite playing well, the UBC
Thunderettes basketball team
continued its losing ways at the
War Memorial Gym over the
weekend by dropping a pair of
game to the University of
Saskatchewan Huskiettes 65-56 and
63-59 in overtime. Frustration is
the best word to describe the
results for the Thunderettes, who
are now 2-8 in league play.
On Friday UBC got into early
foul trouble and fell behind immediately. Saskatchewan led
throughout the first half mainly on
the strength of accurate free-throw
shooting, scoring 14 of their 32 first-
half points from the foul line.
In the second half UBC's
aggressive style of play finally
paid off as Saskatchewan turned
the ball over a number of times,
allowing UBC to get back in the
game. The Thunderettes took the
lead for the first time with 12
minutes to play when Jane Broatch
connected on two free throws to
make the score 42-41 in favor of
UBC.
At this point UBC took control of
the game playing with authority
and containing the Huskiettes'
every move, but foul trouble
plagued them again as Lorna
Calancie, who is probably the best
outside shooter on the team, fouled
out with over ten minutes to play in
the game. The lead changed hands
a number of times in the final
minutes of play before Saskatchewan pulled away to win it.
Saskatchewan's Nancy Brentnell
led all scorers with 21 points, nine
from free throws, and Sheila
Brennan had 14.
For UBC Jane Broatch had 14
points, six from free throws, and
Lorna Calancie had 12 before
fouling out.
Despite the loss UBC's rookie
coach Gay Coburn was happy with
the team's performance.
—craig heale photo
HOT AND HEAVY on headgear, UBC's Peter Farkas (right) grapples with Larry Nugent of Southern Oregon
State College Red Raiders in wrestling action Saturday at War Memorial Gym. Match ended in tie, but referee
gave decision to Farkas. UBC lost meet on basis of points totals.
Wiley takes charge of ruggers
By TOM BARNES
In the absence of the Thunderbird rugby coach, team captain
and scrum half Preston Wiley took
charge as the UBC squad returned
to action after the Christmas break
to handily down Cowichan 33-9
Saturday at UBC's Wolfson Field.
The diminutive Wiley's influence
was clearly evident as he rallied
fellow homunculus squad members Gary Hirayama and Andrew
Bibby to participate in the lion's
share of the scoring. Wiley and
Bibby each scored two tries while
Hirayama got one. Winger Dave
Whyte accounted for UBC's other
13 points by converting three tries,
collecting a try of his own and
chipping in a penalty goal.
"Our forwards played pretty
well, although the lay-off over the
holidays has left us with a bit of a
fitness problem," said Wiley. "The
backs came up with one of the big
games of the year."
At times the 'Birds appeared
rusty, but they had little trouble
moving the ball against a less than
mobile Cowichan backfield.
"We just ran to the side and we
were getting over-laps all day,"
said Bibby. "Both times I scored
were opportunities that arose out
of that situation."
While effective, UBC's backfield
still showed it has a way to go to
reach its potential. Several rushes
were ! xtbook examples of the
intricate passing rugby is known
for. Others sputtered.
"We sometimes just don't keep
the ball alive," said Bibby. "Itgets
out to the corners and dies. The
main thing there is the lack of
backfield pacing. One guy will get
a break and the others just aren't
TODAY & TOMORROW
VOTE
FOR ARTS
Vote in the Referendum Today
BUCHANAN &
SEDGWICK
able to keep up to take full advantage of it."
"On the open field though,
nobody can stop us."
While the scrum has been the
weak spot on the 'Birds' side this
season, the pack got most of the
play in the set scrums and the
loose.
Spence, who was  attending  a
conference in Toronto — which we
are informed is a town in Ontario
— will return in time for the 'Birds
See page 8: HOME
s
SCIENCE
STUDENTS!
YOUR T-SHIRTS ARE READY , . .
$3.50
PICK THEM UP AT YOUR
SUS
OFFICE
216 AUDITORIUM ANNEX
J
you too
CAN SUPPORT ARTS
FOR ONLY $1.00 PER YEAR
vote for - lhe Arfs perspective
Intramural Sports Support
For Dept. Clubs
Dept. Anticalendar
Beer Gardens & Dances
VOTE FOR ARTS
•   VOTE IN THE REFERENDUM TODAY
(& TOMORROW')
BUCHANAN & SEDGEWICK
"I was very pleased with the
overall play of the team," said
Coburn. "The early foul trouble
really killed us. Otherwise we
played a good game."
In Saturday's thrilling overtime
loss UBC played much better and
were unlucky not to win. Their
passing was more precise and the
team played with confidence and
poise.
In the first half UBC suffered a
serious setback as Jane Broatch,
who was the leading Thunderette
scorer in Friday's game, was on
the receiving end of a stray elbow
and had her nose broken in three
places. She was taken to the
hospital and Coburn said she does
not know if Broatch will miss any
games.
UBC led throughout the fast-
moving well-played game only to
have Saskatchewan take the lead
with two minutes to play. Pat
Griffin made two crucial free
throws to put UBC in front again
but Sheila Brennan tied the game
for the visitors with 30 seconds to
go-
Saskatchewan missed a great
chance to win the game when
Donna Veale was fouled with two
seconds left on the clock but she
failed to make either of the two
free throws, forcing the game into
overtime with the score 55-55.
During the five-minute overtime
UBC could not get untracked and
played poorly as Saskatchewan
went on to win 63-59.
Nancy Brentnell and Sheila
Brennan were again the top
scorers for Saskatchewan with 22
and 15 points respectively.
For UBC Margot McCullough
had 14 points, Lorna Calancie 13
and Pat Griffin and Jane Atkinson
10 each.
Next weekend the Thunderettes
travel to Victoria to play the highflying University of Victoria
squad, which is undefeated this
season and has not lost a league
game in over two and one-half
years. Next home action is Jan. 27-
28 against the University of
Alberta Pandas.
PACKAGE INCLUDES:
• Bus - Vane./Kelowna & Return
« 2 Nights Deluxe Accommodations
• 1 Dinner in Tramps Night Club
• Lift Tickets & Mountain Transfers
• Complimentary Use of Saunas,
Exercise Room & Heated Pool
YOUR CAMPUS REP. - RANDY BURKE
THE CAPRI HOTEL &
BIG WHITE MTN.
IN KELOWNA
Only $75.00
per person
double occupancy
BOOK NOW
FOR THIS WEEKEND
CONTACT:
733-0983 Evenings
CLASS OF '78
Written Applications are now
being accepted for:
I. The $4.00 per graduating student rebate
for funding of grad composites and/or
functions. The application must specify:
(a) What your committee will be using the funds
for;
(b) The funds required;
(c) In    the    case    of    composites,    submit
photographers name, and;
(d) In the case of a Grad function, submit date,
place and details;
(e) Name   of   applicant   and   their   faculty   or
department.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
JANUARY 27, 1978.
||. Grad Class Gifts and Projects: The proposed Gifts and/or Projects should provide a
service to the University Community and/or
the Community at large. The applications
must include:
(a) The name of the group requesting funds;
(b) The nature of the gift or project;
(c) If it is a gift OR project;
(d) The amount sought;
(e) A one-hundred (100) word description of the
girt OR project and of the planned allocation
of any funds granted.
Deadline for applications is February 10,1978
Send applications (and questions) to SUB
Box 118. No applications will be accepted
after the deadlines indicated.
Submitted by,
MARIA KRAVJANSKI,
Public Relations Officer,
Grad Class Council. Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1978
UBC hoopsters hogtie Huskies
By DON MacINTYRE
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds evened their Canada West
University Athletic Association
record at 5-5 over the weekend,
sweeping both ends of a weekend
doubleheader from the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies at War
Memorial Gym.
Jock
shorts
Most of the opposition must have
been home watching football over
the weekend, because UBC's men's
ski team grabbed first place, while
the women's squad came second at
the Crystal Mountain Invitational
qualifying ski meet.
An outstanding performance at
Washington's Crystal Mountain
was notched by UBC's Kathy
O'Sullivan, who won both the
slalom and the grand slalom.
Ten U.S. colleges comprised
UBC's competition at the meet
which prepares for next month's
championships at Bogus Basin,
Idaho.
Ken Garrett kicked a penalty
goal to give UBC a 1-0 win over
Lobbans in B.C. soccer League
action   at  Thunderbird   Stadium
Saturday.
•    »    *
The UBC Thunderettes hockey
team improved its record to 7-5
with a pair of wins over the hosting
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies. In Saturday's 7-5 win, Ted
Sostey and Rob Jones each scored
two goals for UBC, while singles
were scored by Sean Boyd, Peter
Moyls and Lane Lavik. The 'Birds
had a 6-0 shut-out Friday on a pair
by Brian Hepp and singles by Tom
Blaney, Jim Stuart, Moyls and
Dick Jellama.
Home stand
From page 7
second game of a three-game
home-stand Saturday against the
Meralomas. A week from Saturday, Oregon State University will
be in town.
The 'Birds are not participating
in any conference play this spring
for the first time in several years.
Game time Saturday is 2:30 p.m.
at Thunderbird Stadium.
TODAY & TOMORROW
VOTE
FOR ARTS
Vote in the Referendum Today
BUCHANAN &
SEDGWICK
UBC took the opener 60-40 in a
somewhat sloppily played contest.
The low score was indicative of the
style of play, a boring and tedious
excuse for basketball.
Both teams faired a little better
in Saturday's rematch although
the 'Birds' walked away with a 78-
54 win.
Saskatchewan's attempts to slow
the tempo of the game failed and
the 'Birds' shot holes in the Husky
zone defense.
The lowly Huskies, now 1-9 on the
season, were unable to keep up
with the quickness UBC displayed
at both ends of the court.
Saskatchewan's offence was slow
and methodical, attempts to get
the ball inside were unsuccessful
for the most part and when the
Huskies   resorted   to   outside
THE EMPIRE
BUILDERS
by Boris Vian
Translated from the French
by Simon Watson Taylor
Directed by Charles Siegel
JANUARY 18 - 21
8:00 p.m.
Saturday Matinee
JANUARY 21
2:00 p.m.
Tickets:    $3.00
Students: $2.00
Tickets:   Room 207
FREDERIC WOOD
THEATRE
UBC DOROTHY
SOMERSET STUDIO
shooting the results were even less
rewarding.
The 'Bird's sporatic use of the
man-to-man full court press kept
the Huskies off balance and
resulted in 17 turnovers.
UBC took advantage of
Saskatchewan's inexperience,
particularly at guard, en route to a
40-27 first-half lead.
In the second half the visitors
switched from zone to man-to-man
defence in an attempt to stop
UBC's effective outside shooting.
The 'Birds' responded and began to
move the ball inside, making use of
a slight height advantage.
The Huskies showed signs of
almost reasonable basketball
ability in the second half, at times
being downright determined, but it
was not enough to keep the game
even close.
Despite UBC's large margin of
victory the game's high scorer was
Stewart Bauck of Saskatchewan
with 22 points, 14 in the second half.
High for the 'Birds' was team
captain Chris Trumpy with 20
points. Trumpy almost single-
handedly crushed the visitors' zone
with his gunning from the outside,
counting 12 points in the first half.
Mark Adilman followed with 18
points and a game high nine
rebounds. Adilman broke the
Huskies back in the second half
with his ability to score from inside.
Adam Yawrenko finished with 10
for the 'Birds. Yawrenko shares
centring duties with Adilman and
showed his effectiveness in the
second half, using his size to work
in close for easy buckets.
UBC coach Peter Mullins went to
his bench often, evident by the fact
that nine of 11 players who saw
action cracked the scoresheet.
The 'Birds are at .500f or the first
time this season but the pair of
weekend wins must be classified as
delayed Christmas presents from a
troubled Husky squad.
As for coaches Tom Thompson
and Guy Vetrie and their
Saskatchewan Huskies, it's going
to be a long season.
UBC, high after the pair of wins,
will have to come back to earth
before next weekend, when they
face division-leading University of
Victoria Vikings in Victoria. The
Friday night contest will be
televised in a delayed broadcast
Saturday at 1 p.m. on CBC.
In other league action, Victoria
Vikings beat Lethbridge
Pronghorns 86-75, 103-75.
Again in 1978, the B.C. Ministry of Labour is initiating a
program designed to create as many summer job opportunities as possible, for B.C. students and unemployed
youth. We will co-ordinate job openings in many other
government ministries and help private businesses, farms,
and non-profit organizations pay the wages for extra summer staff.
ASK ABOUT A SUMMER JOB FOR YOU!
In the Provincial Government, many ministries such as
Forestry, Recreation and Conservation, and Consumer and
Corporate Affairs open up many interesting and remunerative summer jobs. By filling out one of our computerized
application forms now, you will be considered for a job
that closely matches your interests and abilities. Details
and application forms are available at:
U.B.C.
Office of Student Service,
Ponderosa Annex "F"
January 16 to 27,1978
Province of
British Columbia
Ministry of Labour

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