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The Ubyssey Mar 9, 1979

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Array Solidarity swings with women's march
By PETER MENYASZ
"We are not losing our patience
— we've lost it!" shouted Began
Ellis, a member of Vancouver's
Rape Relief collective.
"And I still ain't — woa, they
lied —
And I still ain't satisfied."
—by Bonnie Lockhart
one another. We are the last hired
and the first fired."
International Women's ' Day
filled downtown Vancouver with
the sound of about 750 shouting,
singing, laughing, marching
women. But although there was
rejoicing and a generally positive
feeling in  the  air,   the  serious
overtones of this year's march
kept coming to the surface.
The theme of this year's
Vancouver march was isolation
and solidarity, said Janet Sawyer,
a member of the International
Women's Day committee.
Isolation in society — in the
home, in the streets, on the job,
and "locked away" — and the
role of solidarity in overcoming
that isolation provided a great
deal of ammunition for Thursday's display of strength by
Vancouver women.
Solidarity, strength in numbers,
becomes obvious as the only
viable solution for the needs that
women have.
"We've   tried   to   emphasize
Her voice was choked with
emotion, sinking deep into the
hearts of the emotionally-charged
women in the audience. Ellis
spoke harshly, but her statements
rang true.
"We are bought and sold. We
^are afraid to show affection for
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LX1I, No. 60
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 9, 1979
„48    228-2301
what we can demand together,"
said Sawyer. The women's
demands are logical, precise, and
ambitious.
In the home, they are simply:
affordable child care facilities; the
economic means to raise healthy,
happy children; the right to
abortion; an end to physical
abuse; and, equal custody rights
for lesbian mothers.
In the streets, they are simply:
an end to physical assault and
verbal harassment; an end to
sexist advertising; and, the right
to display affection for other
women without fear.
On the job, they are simply:
unionization; the end of all job
See page 3: WOMEN
SFU clerics call general strike
WITH FAWNING ADORATION, drooling atheist redcoats martyred
three false gods Thursday in cheap attempt at deja vu. Obscure religion,
developed on primitive South Sea island of Pango Pango, idolized qualities
of bigotry and ignorance. Frenzied fanatics clustered in true traditional
— ross burnett photo
conformity for awesome worship of campus wazzes. Skies darkened, heavens descended as Roman recreators groveled before foolish flunkies. Bare
skin bore special symbolism for campus cultists lacking in taste, culture
and common sense. Sacrificial sexist acts preceded ancient rite.
Feds give women token recognition
OTTAWA (CUP)—As the
federal government unveiled a five
year plan to guarantee the equality
of women, opposition party critics
blasted the Liberals' record on
women's rights.
The plan, called Towards
Equality of Women, was tabled by
justice minister Marc Lalonde
Wednesday and is aimed at improving laws governing 'maternity
benefits, sexual crimes, divorce,
pensions and child care.
It promises that the government
will increase job training for
women, examine ways of combatting sexual harassment of
women in the work place, aid im
migrant women and require
management accountability for
equal opportunity in the public service.
The plan pledges to study the role
of women in the economy, the
impact of the social security
program on elderly women, and
violence against women.
It also calls for provincial
premiers to meet before the end of
the year to discuss women in the
work force, acknowledging that
women "are currently experiencing
serious problems in the labor
force."
But several opposition critics said
the plan was a pre-election publicity
move, noting that there will be no
time to vote on the proposals before
the election is called. They also
accused the government of eroding
the progress women have been
making since International
Women's Year in 1975.
David MacDonald, Progressive
Conservative Women's Rights critic
said the government should set an
example for private business by
improving its own equal opportunity programs.
He proposed a motion asking the
House to "recognize the
unqualified right of women to work
in any and all fields of human
endeavor." The motion also called
for an  "end to the serious ex
ploitation of immigrant women in
the Canadian labor force."
Opposition ciritics also protested
recent cuts in job training and
unemployment insurance programs
which hit women particularly hard.
MacDonald criticized the government for trying to blame high levels
of unemployment on the increasing
number of women in the work
force.
Finance minister Jean Chretien
told a Toronto audience earlier this
week that women were to blame for
the high rate of unemployment. He
said there were fewer jobs available
because too many women were
trying to find work.
By TOM HAWTHORN
Clerical workers at Simon Fraser
University have called a general
strike to force the administration to
accept union wage demands.
The workers of the Association
of University and College Employees local 2 decided at a study
session Thursday by a 231 to 187
vote to call a strike with full picket
lines at the entrance to the
university.
At issue in the dispute are wage
demands, the union calling for a six
per cent wage increase from
November, 1978 to November,
1979, with a three per cent increase
during the following four months.
The SFU board of governors and
the administration have refused to
grant any increase larger than six
per cent overall.
The local decided to hold the
study session and call for a full
strike vote after workers in the
purchasing department were locked
out by the administration Thursday
morning, library division steward
Ann Sullivan said Thursday.
"We've been nice guys for too
long," she said. "It's such a small
amount for such a little time. The
strike is the best thing to do right
now."
At a 24-hour general strike
during the 13-week dispute, B.C.
Hydro bus drivers and other union
members refused to cross the picket
lines set up at the main university
entrance.
People who do not belong to the
bargaining unit are being encouraged to cross the picket lines,
Sullivan said.
The strike action is being directed
at the administration, with the
union refraining from an attempt to
stop students and professors from
going to classes, she said.
The members of local 2 have
been without a contract since late
March last year.
More lhan 40 library employees
were locked out Monday in what
the union called an attempt by the
university to force them to accept
the six per ecent wage increase
offer.
Thirty AUCE members will go to
Victoria next Tuesday to talk to the
government and opposition
caucuses, calling on the government
to settle the dispute.
The dispute between the union
and the administration has been
marked by a split in the faculty
about support for the striking
clerical workers.
Several professors wrote an open
letter to administration president
George Pedersen, calling on him to
ask the board to accept the union's
demands.
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY SUPPLEMENT
See page 5 Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
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Cassette Deck Friday, March 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Gay writers 'face hostile liberals'
Gay writers must face hostile
"liberal hypocrites," trite labels
and accusations of being too
political, a gay Vancouver novelist
said Thursday.
Many people only support gays
superficially and are nothing more
than "liberal hypocrites," David
Watmough told 20 people in SUB
212.
"That's the type of person who
says: 'Oh yes, we've got to do
something about gays,' " he said.
"But they're just as hostile as
someone who at least has the guts
to say that they're against gays."
When book reviewers say they
support gays because "it's chic,"
Watmough said it is like "bathing
in a warm bath of shit."
UCBC squashes
resource school
"I don't want to be labeled as
just a gay writer as I don't want to
be labeled as just a Canadian
writer," he said. Being recognized
as a Canadian writer and a gay is
only a starting point in achieving
identity, he added.
He said gay writers face the
danger of becoming "embroiled"
in controversial gay issues such as
Anita Bryant's anti-gay crusade
and gay activism. There is always a
danger of being too political as a
writer; he added.
But Watmough said writers still
receive many rewards from their
readers.
"There's a wonderful sense of
family in my readership. I get
letters and phone calls from people
all over the place."
Watmough said he feels
homosexuals have a sense of
solidarity because they are judged
as a minority group by society.
"It's a nice feeling that you
belong. It's an identifying thing.
You'd get that from any minority
group," he said.
Watmough said acceptance of
gays has improved over the years.
Fifteen or 20 years ago it was very
difficult to even find a rented room
for two men, he said, but today this
has changed.
"Life isn't all terrible, but it
doesn't take us in hand to meet
Lassie in the end either."
Watmough said he used many
problems faced by the average gay
as source material for his books.
Like most writers, he said he used
personal experiences and those of
his friends as inspiration.
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
The Simon Fraser University administration is upset and puzzled at
a recent decision by the Universities
Council of B.C. to squash an attempt to establish a school of
resource management in Kelowna.
The UCBC, in a letter to SFU administration president George
Pedersen, says the reasons for rejection were the lack of "the necessary
professional infrastructure" at
SFU, the question of employability
of graduates, the professional
qualifications of those graduates,
and the need for $1 million annually
to finance the project.
"We came away from the
meeting not fully comprehending
the reasons for the rejection of our
proposal," Pedersen said in a
prepared statement.
Council chairman Bill Gibson
refused Thursday to expand on the
explanation for refusal.
"(The reason) was stated in a letter to them, and they have made the
letter public. We are not going to
enter into any further discussion,"
Gibson said.
The school would have offered
third and fourth year classes in
resource management, according to
SFU economics and commerce professor Jock Munro, who had been
appointed director of the school.
Munro expressed puzzlement over
the reasons given for the UCBC
decision.
"I don't know what they mean
by that (qualification of graduates)
statement," said Munro. He said
the university had carried out a
survey to investigate post-graduate
job possibilities.
"We were satisfied that, without
a guarantee of employment,
chances were good," he said.
Pedersen said in his statement
that the council had "reaffirmed its
support for the program" only a
month ago, but Gibson said support would have been given "provided the budget and curriculum
were approved by council," and added that the proposal failed on both
counts.
The UCBC is an intermediary
body between the education
ministry and B.C. universities.
Women celebrate
From page 1
discrimination; the end of sexual
harassment; and, fighting against
anti-woman, anti-labor legislation.
For women who are "locked
up," they are simply: abolition of
solitary confinement;
decriminalization of victimless
crimes; the end of forced drugging
of women in institutions; and, the
end of the "psychiatric cure" for a
lesbian lifestyle.
Gay Hoon, recently acquitted of
accessory charges in an attempted
prison break, spoke to women
assembled in the courtyard of the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre after the
march.
"Women are the victims of
society," said Hoon. "Women at
Oakalla that slash up (slash their
wrists) are put in solitary. Solitary
confinement is no treatment for
women that slash up."
Not all of Women's Day was
taken up with recriminations and
demands. The march along Georgia
Street took on a cheerful, carnivallike tone. Various women's groups
some dressed in elaborate costumes
to make their points, jubilantly
marched through Vancouver's
conservative core.
Clown costumes, music, a
dragon, dancers and singers were
entwined with the more serious
elements such as Rape Relief, the
Vancouver Status of Women, the
B.C. Federation of Women,
women's self-defense groups and
union groups.
Reactions among the onlookers
were mixed. Most women
responded with applause and raised
fists, while men looked on in
surprise and disbelief, except the
few who participated in the march.
One of the event's organizers
pointed out to assembled women
that they were not alone in their
protest. She said that 15,000
women in Iran had taken to the
streets to protest their new
government's order that all women
must once again wear veils.
March 8 was set aside as International Women's Day in 1910
to commemorate the action of New
York's Lower East Side garment
workers. On March 8, 1908, they
marched in the streets to demand an
end to sweatshop conditions after
128 women had been killed in a
factory fire.
"No more drugs and idler —
ten that toil where one resposes,
But a sharing of life's glories;
Bread and roses! Bread and roses!"
— peter menyasz photo
WHICH WAY TO GO was no problem for this member of Vancouver's Women's Health Collective. Advocating
return to natural healing techniques, collective members joined in march commemorating 71st International
Women's Day. Women filled city centre with laughter, music, and serious protest noon Thursday. Not all
onlookers were spellbound, but most responded to magic of march with increased respect for women's rights.
'Opium with your meal, sir?'
By HEATHER CONN
The "wonder drug" opium sparked decades
of government corruption, bribery and fierce
British control in Hong Kong, a Chinese
Students' Association guest speaker said
Thursday.
"There was corruption built into every
government administrative body. Everybody
automatically had a certain cut of the money
(from opium trade)," Jim Wong Chu told 13
people in Buch. 322. "There was a strong
bribery system."
He said Hong Kong created a very safe,
closed system for opium in the late 1950s and
'60s because the drug was accepted by all as a
profitable business endeavor. Bureaucrats and
civil servants used opium profits to charter and
form their own accounting companies and
make investments, he said.
"It's ironic, but opium was a business.
There was too much money to be made. With
100,000 addicts who spent $20 a day on
opium, there was illegal revenue every day of
about $2 million."
Wong Chu said the Hong Kong government
passed an ordinance in 1925 to make opium-
smoking in public prohibited. But the law was
unenforceable, he said, because it did not
prevent sale of opium or define a public place.
So people smoked opium in alleys, on
balconies and rooftops, he added.
"Prostitution and high-class restaurants
took up the slack. They provided an extra
service of opium-smoking after dinner," said
Wong Chu. "They made nonsense of this
ordinance."
The government passed the ordinance, not
to protect society from opium, but to maintain
the British opium market and curb the
competitive influx of opium coming in from
China, said Wong Chu.
Before 1925, the days of "opium dens" were
great, "free-wheeling times," he said. Opium
was used in its refined gum form which was
rolled into a ball and then smoked in a pipe. A
"red pill" available with aromatic additives
also made opium a small sweet-smelling tablet,
he said.
Opium dens were like today's coffee shops,
said Wong Chu, with a variety of qualities and
prices. The high-class ones had many additional services such as "beautiful girls,":
fresh fruit and chauffeur services, he said.
There were over 1,000 opium dens in Hong
Kong and they were fiercely competitive, he
added.
Opium was first introduced to China by the
late 1700s, and was originally popular in the
upper classes, said Wong Chu.
"It was a great thing, something you could
get into. To restrict their sons from being too
wild, upper class fathers encouraged them to
smoke opium. They figured they'd* lose their
initiative of having sex with every other individual they saw."
He said Hong Kong's famous opium war
with Britain was not a war at all, but a British
invasion.
"It was like Vietnam versus Cambodia.
Britain brought the ships in and started
shooting. It was a hostile, belligerent act."
Hong Kong today has a compulsory system
to register its 40,000 to 50,000 addicts, he said.
Opium's powder form, heroin, which has been
in use in Hong Kong since about 1949, now
sells for about $1,200 an ounce per kilo, he
said. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
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1
High farce
For an elected body which regularly proves that intelligence is an
increasingly rare quality, that common sense is an attribute beyond
reason and that an awareness and sensitivity to social issues is unnecessary, Wednesday was indeed a very special day.
The student representative assembly, in "congratulating"
organizers of the Lady Godiva ride, managed a feat many thought
impossible — lowering their already rock-bottom standards of conduct yet another notch.
It's hard to know where to begin when dealing with such a
repulsive situation. But because Thursday was International
Women's Day, a day dedicated to erasing the image of women —
which Godiva portrays — as smiling, witless sex objects, the SRA
should be "congratulated" for their timing in making a farce of
Women's Day as far as UBC is concerned.
Those SRA members who argued that the ride was a great way
of publicizing education cutbacks and impending tuition fee increases should also be "congratulated." The engineers' display of
Freeze the Fees signs at the ride has made the issue little more than
a laughing matter, in the media, totally discrediting a serious problem facing the university.
Bruce Armstrong should be "congratulated" for his spirited
defence of student spirit and a fun event. As a student leader he
must be proud of the redneck image UBC has presented, through
the ride, to women.
Arnold Hedstrom deserves hearty congratulations for congratulating the Alma Mater Society's women's committee on how
they handled "the ordeal" by not organizing a protest picket, an
act met with violence from ride marchers last year. At least this
year they know their place, right?
And of course the SRA should be congratulated for defeating a
motion censuring the student administrative commission for attempting to ban a Freeze the Fees banner from SUB during Open
House. It could only be SAC and SRA logic that a farcical protest
involving a naked woman on a horse is great, while an unseemly
banner is obscene and unbecoming ah educational institute.
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 9, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 22fc-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Heather Conn burst into the press club, knocking over the inert body of Bill Tieleman. "Do you
know what day it is?" she exclaimed. Mike Bocking looked up from cleaning his deer rifle and patted
his bird-dog Verne McDonald on the head. "Not the slightest," he said. Gary Brookfield and Peter
Menyasz, drinking scotch and playing darts, cocked their eyebrows at each other but said nothing.
Tom Hawthorn scratched his belly through his undershirt and adjusted the color of his t.v. image of
Guy Lafleur. "Thursday," he said, and flung his beer canover his shoulder at Ross Burnett, who was
busy pumping iron (if you know what I mean). Greg Strong and Geof Wheelwright looked up from
their poker hands and grumbled wordlessly. "You twit, its Intenationat Women's Day," said Kevin
McGee. Julie Wheelwright, fresh from a work-out with Rashnan, her six-foot-four Moroccan masseur
popped the cap of a Brador with'her teeth and said, "What the fuck's that?"
Also, there is a staff meeting today at 1 p.m.
*   Mil    L    I      ■ ■ I   H      I I. I mi             II..      I  ill        11      *
Letters
Pinko distorts facts
I recently heard Mr. Dave Barrett
give a speech on the affairs of B.C.
and I feel that the following points
should be raised.
1) He mentions the current status
of the shipping industry in Canada
and feels that we should start one to
deal with those materials sent to
Japan. Obviously he has no idea of
the capital required, the demand for
ships, nor the fact that Japan has
freighters in dry dock doing nothing
for them resulting in lower freight
prices.
2) He stated that his government
started the Afton smelter in
Kamloops which created 300 jobs.
He must have "forgotten" the fact
that the smelter was not needed and
that his government subsidized both
its construction and its operating
costs. Since this runs into millions
of dollars anyone can see how much
those 300 jobs cost the people of
B.C. Obviously this was a purely
political move for votes from uninformed people.
3) In defense of his mine royalties
act he claims that the amount was
only 5 per cent of the "value" of
the ore in the ground; not 5 per cent
of the profits! He must have
"forgotten" to mention federal
taxes, provincial taxes, mining costs
and a worldwide decrease in metal
prices. And yet he cries the blues
when companies like Inco leave
because of high cos.ts.
Up until this point I had felt that
Mr. Barrett was a forgetful man
speaking to an uninformed audience. He then had the gall to take
a shot at Mr. Pat McGeer. I am the
first to admit that Mr. McGeer has
a rather arrogant way of dealing
with certain issues, but at least he is
telling me the honest truth and during the current worldwide recession
the truth isn't what the public wants
to hear. Pat McGeer will get my
vote simply because I won't vote for
a  commie  politician  looking  for
votes by trying to give me a snow
job.
Barrett should be charged with
misleading the public.
John Sagman
mineral engineering 2
P.S. For a lesson on how to lie
with statistics read Barrett's pamphlet.
Godiva's origins
As a contribution to engineering
week, several students have tried to
research the origin of the engineers'
patron saint — Lady Godiva.
According to the Dictionary of
Mythology Folklore and Symbols,
the good Lady was the wife of
Leofric, an 11th century Earl of
Mercia and Lord of Coventry. The
now famous ride was a bid to
ensure that the lord would reduce
Coventry's heavy taxes. Lady
Godiva, with an entourage, rode
through the town, coverd only by
her  long  hair.   The  citizens  of
Coventry remained indoors, and
Peeping Tom earned his title by
being the only person to watch the
ride.
Tom, for his effort, was struck
blind and the Lord of Coventry
kept his part by freeing the town of
all tolls, except those on horses.
It is not known exactly when
Lady Godiva was adopted as the
symbol of engineering. There was,
perhaps, a spill-over from the many
centred in Coventry to the
schooling founded on them. Several
schools of engineering in England
are symbolized by the lady.
She seems to have immigrated
around the turn of the century and
references to her inclusion in
engineering tradition at the
University of Toronto go back to
1905. Toronto's school has a Lady
Godiva Memorial Band, organized
in the fall of 1948. The Lord Mayor
of Coventry at the time extended a
formal greeting upon hearing of the
band's formation.
Lady Godiva is now the patron
saint of engineering across Canada.
The main reason given for the
choice is that which prompted the
original ride—a sense of involvement
in community affairs, another
tradition which engineering schools
try to carry on.
Tricia Harrison elec. 3
Susan Smith mech. 2
Lome Sedun eng. 1
Sharlie Huffman civil 2
Heather Cressey chml. 3
Lisa Pomeroy civil 2
Ann-Marie Persson civil 3
Susan Clift civil 3
Marlea Haugen geol.
Nazis only need 'educating'
I am not suggesting that it is not
necessary or desirable to educate
both men and women as to sexual
discrimination and the means or
values of achieving equality of the
sexes. However, it appears that
many of the persons suggesting this
approach as being the only tenable
way to achieving equality are
themselves grossly blind and
narrow-minded when confronted
with the very material which
should, in fact, be educating them
and others.
The maxim "You can lead a
horse to water but you can't make it
drink" seems an appropriate
description of (apparently) most of
the UBC population. Denouncing
any action to halt what is perhaps
the most obvious symbol of sexism
on the campus, people are
simultaneously — and appallingly
without embarassment — calling
for "education." What better
example of sexism is needed? If it
cannot be understood that the Lady
Godiva ride is degrading to women
and must be stopped, how is it to be
expected that more subtle forms of
degradation of women will be
understood and stopped? All that is
required for "education" regarding
sexism is that people open their
minds, observe, read, talk to
women, question their own values,
open their eyes, listen. The
educating material abounds, to Say
the least. Teaching is an important
part of educating, but it is impossible to teach someone who
refuses to learn.
The Laay Godiva ride is
obviously discriminatory. It is
embarassing that in a university
community one would have to
point out that the general reaction
might be different if, instead of a
naked worftan, the engineers
paraded a Black in leg irons or a
Jew wearing a Star of David.
Would the reaction still be that it
was non-discriminatory, harmless,
good-natured fun,  a tradition
which should not be disturbed?
Is it also to be inferred that it would
have been better had there been no
outrage against slavery and the
treatment of the Jews? Should it
have been insisted that these two
groups concentrate on
"educating"? Should they have
merely    politely    asked    their
respective oppressors if perhaps
they might not reconsider the whole
matter — that they really didn't
wish to hurt their feelings, but
maybe slavery or genocide wasn't
very nice?
Susanna Neufeld
law 1
Ride insidious
"Feminism" refers to the belief
that women are falsely defined as
inferior to men and that this definition is used by society to relegate
women to secondary social roles
and deny them the opportunity for
self-development. This second-class
status has been perpetuated
through the exploitation of the
female body, an exploitation
leading to the alienation of women
from their bodies, by preventing
women from seeing their physical
being as an inherent, generic part of
themselves. (The argument is derived from Fanonist psychology.) This
type of exploitation being the basis
of the "Godiva Ride", the event
serves to entrench women in their
present socially inferior position.
To support the ride is therefore to
support the perpetuation of women
as second-class citizens.
Is that what the engineers want? I
think not. Presumably, most in the
faculty can see the truth in the
feminist argument. Hopefully then,
this clarification of the issue involved will prevent a repeat performance of Wednesday's "show".
The "Godiva Ride" aids a
discrimination of the most insidious
kind. Why continue the event?
David Dear
arts 4
Bomber strikes
I assume that everyone is aware
of what is happening in their fair city. Someone, or some people, are
going around bombing banks and
government institutions.
The question is: how are people
reacting to these events? It would
seem from the various conversations that I've taken part in, that a
lot of people support these actions,
or at least say that it's alright by
them that these buildings should be
blown up — especially the banks.
I think that it's great that people
should react so positively and why
not? Don't the banks deserve what
their getting? Don't they, at this
moment, have money invested in
Chile and South America? Are not
banks at the core of our own fucked
up society with its unemployed, its
poor and homeless, its racially
discriminated?
The university, we are told, is
supposed to be a place where there
is morality. If that is the case (if
only it were) then the university
community should publicly declare
its solidarity with those brave souls
who have found within themselves
the determination to attack the very
base of capitalist society. Go to it —
raze the banks to the ground.
Ralph Summard
arts 3  Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
NUTRITION AND LIFE
Good nutrition is important for
everyone of all ages regardless of
sex but because a woman has the
capability to reproduce, a new set
of nutritional demands is placed
upon her body.
The fertile woman, the pregnant woman, the woman taking
birth control and the older woman
all have distinct nutritional needs
above the everyday requirements.
Most people are aware that
women, because of the monthly
menstrual cycle, have an increased
need for iron. The absorption rate
of iron from a regular diet is small
as excess iron can't be excreted.
Men need to absorb five per cent
of the iron present in their diets to'
meet their needs. And a pregnant
Loss of bone mass in older persons is another problem women
face that Anderson believes can be
prevented through proper nutrition from early adulthood. It's a
disease of aging called
osteoporosis. It affects everyone,
but women, particularly small-
boned women, are at risk. What
happens is that calcium is drawn
from the bones to meet body requirements, resulting in less dense
bones—at an older age, pain,
deformity and often life-
threatening bone fractures.
The exact cause of osteoporosis
is not known, but Anderson says
several factors have been indicated. The aging process, increased para-hormone secretion,
You remember Popeye
and his consumption
of spinach which
made him strong?
woman uses up her body's stores
of iron at a dramatic rate.
Getting that iron is not all that,
easy, according to Alice Anderson, one of three nutritionists participating in a special lecture series
on women and nutrition at Simon
Fraser University.
You remember Popeye and his
huge consumption of spinach
which    made   him    marvellously
By MAUREEN
McEVOY
B.C. Bureau Chief
strong? Well, it turns out that
spinach also has a substance
known as an oxalate which inhibits the body's absorption.
Vegetable iron is generally poorly
absorbed. Other inhibitors are
eggs, bran, tea, phosphates, antacids and the prescription drug
tetracycline.
Iron absorption varies with
each individual. The less acidic the
stomach is, the less iron will be absorbed. Older people absorb iron
very poorly but this is compensated by a decreased iron need.
Ascorbic acid promotes iron absorption. Anderson recommends
that women first be tested for iron
deficiencies before they begin taking iron supplements. She also
recommends that empty calories,
such as pop, chips, cake be limited
and such snacks as dried fruit and
sunflower seeds be substituted.
vitamin D deficiency, smoking,
genetic characteristics and dietary
factors are being studied.
Estrogen has been indicated,
she said, because young women
who have had ovaries removed
often suffer from an earlier onset
of menopause and osteoporosis.
But she cautioned that estrogen
replacement therapy has been indicated as a cause of endometrial
cancer.
Physical exercise, resulting in
stress on the bones, guards against
osteoporosis. Often a person
whose leg has been in a cast for a
lengthy period will have a
'shrunk' leg once the cast is
removed.
Diet is important. Anderson
recommends that all women, from
early adulthood on, get the right
amount of calcium in their diet,
keeping in mind that excess
amounts can damage the kidneys.
Phosphorus and its similar
compound, phosphate, are
nutrients that work with calcium
to form strong bones, teeth and
skeleton, aid in the absorption
and transfer of other nutrients
and are essential for the regulation
of energy-releasing processes.
For calcium to be efficiently
utilized it must be balanced with
phosphorus, have a source of
Vitamin D and lactose or milk
sugar. Too much phosphorus
causes the body to draw calcium
out of the bones, so equal
amounts of calcium and
phosphorus is important.
Most foods that contain a good
source of calcium  have a  nice
balance of phosphorus, according
to Sue Ross, a Vancouver nutritionist.
It is the highly processed and
convenience foods that wreak
havoc because phospates are added. Eating a great deal of these
foods, she said, can tip the
balance so that too much
phosphorus is present.
A bottle of pop, Anderson says,
contains 500 mg. of phosphates
although the average daily requirement for a woman aged 19
and older is only 700 mg. and
most of that can come from a
regular diet.
Anderson also cautions against
a high protein diet. Eskimos, who
eat a lot of animal protein, also
have a very high incidence of
osteoporosis. Limit yourself to
five to six ounces of protein a day
and avoid enormous steaks and
excess phosphate.
Vitamin D and fluoride are two
substances that guard against
osteoporosis.
Women also have a higher incidence of hypertension than men.
Anderson says 50 per cent of
those suffering from hypertension, abnormally high blood
pressure, are not aware they have
it.
Anderson speculates that
hypertension could be caused by a
high salt diet because Japan,
which has one of the highest
hypertension incidence rates, also
has a high sodium diet plus pollution and increased urban pace of
life.
A balanced intake of protein
and carbohydrates is also important.
Women taking birth control
pills have special nutritional needs
because of the changes the body
undergoes as a result of the high
doses of hormones ingested.
The interaction of hormones
with vitamins, minerals, proteins
and amino acids in the body
causes fluctuating needs for certain nutrients. Few women, according to SFU professor Anne Pop-
ma, are aware of the effects of the
pill and other hormones on their
nutritional needs.
Women on the pill tend to
develop an abnormally high
tolerance of glucose. Therefore,
women   who   tend   to   develop
—wendy hamlin painting
the pill needs less Vitamin B3, K
and calcium. Vitamin K is found
in cabbage, cauliflower, soybeans,
spinach, organ meats, strawberries and whole grains.
But she needs more Vitamin C,
B6, zinc and folic acid. Folic acid,
which is found in leafy green
vegetables, brewer's yeast and
wheat germ, is often deficient in
the North American diet, according to Popma, and the hormones
aggravate the problem. It is best
to avoid taking high Vitamin C
and B supplements together as the
C may wash out some of their
already deficient folic acid.
Popma advised women current-
Women taking
birth control pills
have special
nutritional needs.
diabetes during pregnancy should
avoid oral contraceptives.
The hormones used in oral contraceptives also cause increased
synthesis of certain plasma proteins so that a woman on the pill
needs less iron, copper and
Vitamin A.
Copper can be found in green
leafy vegetables, seafood, organ
meats, whole grain breads, cereals
and dried fruits.
At the same time, a woman on
ly on the pill but who wish to
become pregnant, to wait for a
period to allow the body to return
to normal hormone levels.
She said the weight gain Com
monly associated with the pill is a
result of increased water retention
and the hormone progesterone
which increases the body muscle
mass.
The coronary risk profile of a
woman on the pill resembles that
of a man, she said. Friday, March 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
RETURN TO SCHOOL
Women who choose to return
to school are going to face problems, and the biggest one might
be guilt.
"Emotionally, women are conditioned to look after the interests
of husband and child first.
Therefore, one of the greatest existing problems in returning to
school is the guilt. There are fewer
other obstacles to overcome than
in the 1960's, because there is an
intellectual acceptance from men
and women for women to go back
By JUDY
ADAMS
of The Georgian
to school," says Barbara Opala,
director of the mature students'
centre at Concordia University in
Montreal.
One   woman,   very   active   in
volunteer   community   organiza
tions. I am careful not to criticize
my husband in the light of my
new-found knowledge—I keep it
to myself. As a result, my husband is more supportive."
Others are not so lucky. One
woman studying creative writing
finds herself out of her husband's
"physical and intellectual
sphere." The time she devotes to
her writing in solitude takes time
away from the emotional support
her husband expected her to give.
"What the relationship was
predicated on is no longer between
us."
Some women encounter overt
hostility from friends and
relatives. They are rocking their
social boat, but their spheres have,
changed.
"In my 'Woman's Identity and
Image' course," said one 40-year-
old student, "I realized that the
lack of achievement which I felt
was a personal failure was largely
due to social circumstances. Now
I am in touch with other women
One of the greatest
existing problems in
returning to school
is the guilt.
tions for many years, said she had
"gotten as far as possible in the
organizations" and found herself
"repeating the same, tasks year
after year." Although she encountered no discouragement in
going back to school, she did get
the feeling that her husband felt
threatened by the new situation.
"Some women become more
educated and realize that the basis
of their marriage was security, or
a desire to leave their parents'
of my age. I feel part of something
larger than myself."
One problem common to
women returning to school is a
lack of confidence. Each
discipline has its own jargon the
students must learn, in addition to
adapting to work habits. This problem is easily solved. They often
start off with only one course, but
as soon as they get their first
mark, they realize that they are as
capable as any other student in the
class.
"Women are good students,"
says Opala. "They overstudy to
compensate for their lack of confidence. Older women are well-
received at Concordia, by faculty
and students."
A great effect of returning to
school and doing well is the boost
it gives to a woman's self-image.
As one woman says, "at university, I am my own person, interested in my own brain. I am not
a wife and mother—I have my
own identity, one. that does not
depend on other people."
The women going back to
university speak of the experience
opening up "new worlds,"
"avenues," and "horizons." It
expands their knowledge, changes
their thought patterns irreversibly,
they say. One woman says she is
"taking charge of my own life in
ways I never did. If I gave up my
studies now, I would be
unbearable to live with."
Sometimes as new worlds open,
old areas close. One woman
described feeling alienated from
her neighbors who she used to
chat with about floor wax and
soap operas. She feels this unpleasant feeling isn't likely to change.
Another woman got negative
feedback from her fellow office
workers. "They feel it was bizarre
for an adult woman to want to go
to school," she said.
Many women get the encouragement and support they
need to take that first step from
their children in university. In
these instances, women find
themselves much closer to their
children, understanding what it
means to be a student, and identifying with their children about an
unreasonable   teacher,   surprise
A woman's image is what is
responsible for her returning to
university in the first place. According to many woman, especially 35 years and up, they find
themselves experiencing the
"empty nest syndrome." Their
children have left the home, or are
of university age and don't require
the same mothering as when they
were younger, which took up so
much of mother's time and
energy. These women find more
time on their hands, and often less
purpose in their lives. A job seems
a likely alternative. "But," says
Opala, "these women want good
jobs.
"In order to maintain the same
standard of living as the 1950's
and 1960's, two paychecks are
necessary.
They feel it was
bizarre for an adult
woman to want
to go to school.
quizzes, and last-minute cramming.
Some women get encouragement from their bosses. One
woman working in an office for
many years was denied a promotion in favor of a younger woman
with a degree. After complaining
to her boss, he suggested she go
back to school—something she
had thought about for many
years, but had never had the incentive to follow through on.
"I don't care if it gets me a
higher salary or not. It has opened
up new worlds for me," she said.
Her graduate son felt it was
strange for a middle-aged woman
to go to university.
Most women in the 40-50 age
bracket have children who are
busy with their own lives, and so
the absence of mother from home
is unimportant. For the most part,
women remain the cleaners and
cookers. Says one woman who
both works and attends university
on a part-time basis, "I just have
to be more organized. My husband helps out, but only when I
ask him to. So the house isn't as
clean as it could be. My children
will have to learn to pick up after
themselves."
Older women come up against
many obstacles when they want to
return to school. Most of them,
and their husbands, were brought
up to regard higher education for
women as unnecessary—their
goals were to be a wife and
mother. That attitude still exists
today, but society's expectations
have broken down somewhat,
making the woman's role more
ambiguous. Old attitudes are
assaulted by the media extolling
the glamorous, uplifting, rewarding life of the independent,
footloose and fancy-free working
woman.
Opala calls this ambiguity "split
consciousness." She says when
women are so involved with
housework, "they don't have the
same feeling of self-worth that
working women have. They suffer
a great lack of confidence when
they contemplate re-emerging into
the mainstream of society."
"In ever-increasing numbers,
women over 35 are spending less
time at home with the family and
more time in university. This
reflects a changing trend in
women's self-image. Pag* 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
UNION WOMEN
The six-month International
Nickel Company strike in Sudbury
has created a greater awareness of-
women's role in the labor movement, a woman striker said
Wednesday.
"The men used to ask me: 'Why
do you bother going to union
meetings? You're a girl!' " said
Shirley Hawes, of the United
Steelworkers of America local 6500.
"But since the strike, they've
started accepting the women's
movement and are really supportive."
By HEATHER
CONN
of The Ubyssey
She said she recently ran to attend an international INCO convention as the first-ever female
delegate. Out of 46 names on the
slate, all-male except hers, only 22
delegates could be elected to go.
Hawes was one of the chosen.
"That was a real eyeopener
around the union," she said. "I got
membership support."
Only 35 women are employed at
INCO out of a total of 11,700
employees, said Hawes. Women
must work at above ground jobs
because it is illegal for them to work
underground, she said. Although
this policy is in the process of being
changed, she added: "INCO's stalling it."
Women steelworkers often feel
isolated in their job, said Hawes,
and because of different work shifts
and long hours commuting, find it
hard to maintain strong solidarity
with other women workers.
"Lots of times there's only one
.woman in a plant and she's usually
doing process labor work," said
Hawes. "Because they work in different plants and have different
shifts, the women's committee finds
it hard to arrange times to meet.
Many have to go home and look
after families or else commute 40
miles."
But Hawes says the women's
committee of local 6500, part of the
union's bargaining committee, is
receiving strong support.
"Membership's standing
unanimously with the bargaining
committee. They received a standing ovation. Spirits are high."
The women's committee submitted a brief to INCO asking for increased benefits and maternity
leave, but INCO rejected it, Hawes
said.
"One of the guys from INCO's
negotiating committee said when he
got pregnant, then he'd consider
giving us maternity leave. That's
the sort of attitude they take."
But the entire Sudbury community is supporting the strikers except
for "less than one per cent," said
Hawes. She said local businessmen
are supporting strikers for the first
time. They are providing free bowling nights, ice hockey time and
other activities for strikers and offering movie showings with free
popcorn and pop for strikers'
children.
A citizen's strike support committee is publishing a bi-weekly
newspaper that supports the strike
and in December held a car raffle
that raised $15,000, she said. This
allowed the local to provide strikers
with a Christmas gift voucher to
give them an extra $5 per dependent
child.
Strikers have set up a voucher
system   for   food   stores,   using
$350,000 a week supplied by the
Steelworkers International strike
fund in Pittsburgh, Hawes said.
This provides strike pay of $25 a
week for single workers, $30 for
married members and $3 per dependent child.
"We need a lot of financial support," she said.
Hawes said the union is trying to
keep up Ontario hospital insurance
plan costs which amount to more
than $400,000 a month. More than
$116,000 a month is needed for life
insurance premiums and $100,000
for an emergency drug fund, she
said.
"But support's just great right
across the country. It's growing
stronger."
Hawes, who has worked four and
half years at INCO, and comes
from a family of 12, says union
members do not plan to go back un
til they get a decent agreement. INCO has been bargaining in bad
faith, she added.
"They (INCO) tell miners they
should earn less and get away with
it. If INCO's not ready for serious
bargaining, there is no sense talking
to them. They're not hurting and I
guess they don't care."
INCO broke off negotiations
with strikers Feb. 8 and have since
made no reply to proposals submit
ted by the union's bargaining com
mittee, said Hawes.
The workers are asking for "decent" pensions, the right to arbitration, a wage offer based on a collective wage study, she said. They are
also asking to keep their cost of living allowance which INCO has
stopped until October 1980, she
said.
INCO INVESTMENT IN CANADA
B> DOUG SMITH
of Canadian University Press
When John Rodriguez, the
NDP MP for Nickel Belt, asked a
House of Commons legal clerk
for advice on drafting a bill to
nationalize INCO, the clerk told
him he couldn't introduce such a
bill since only the government can
propose legislation that involves
the expenditure of funds.
Rodriguez told the clerk, "Who
said anything about spending
money?" The clerk was silent for
a moment and then said, "Oh, I
see what you want to do."
Rodriguez hopes to introduce
his bill for nationalization of
International Nickel of Canada
sometime within the next month.
And, although there was talk of
making it nationalization without
compensation, he now says there
will be a compensation formula.
"What we'll have to calculate
for is the damage to the environment, the damage to orphans and widows of the men who
have died working for INCO,
those who have incurred
disabilities working for  INCO.
"I think we will owe them $2.65
and I'll throw in the bus fare to
New York. With inflation and tire
declining dollar, it may even be up
to three dollars."
Rodriguez is proposing
nationalization because he says he
thinks it is the only effective way
for   the'   Canadian   people   to
develop and control their own
resources. He said that, eves if the
bill is ruled out of order, hell be
pleased because the person who
' witt have to make that ruling will
be Speaker James Jerome.
"Everyone in Sudbury will see
Jerome say he wants INCO to be
paid.
"Ninety-nine per cent of the
people will tell you that
nationalization is the only rational
process. The capitalist system has
failed to give any control to the
Canadian people over the
resources," Rodriguez says.
"People are realizing there is a
big difference between a
government-run    corporation
See page 14: INCO
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THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 9
WOMEN IN LABOR
As the Canadian unemployment total
climbs higher and higher every month the
theory that it is the result of too many
women working and taking away jobs from
men, is growing ever popular.
Federal finance minister Jean Chretien
recently voiced such sentiments, saying that
Canada's job shortage is partially a result
of the unexpectedly-high participation of
women in the labour force in the last few
years.
In reality women do not work out of a
luxurious need to occupy their time but out
of necessity. And the jobs they get are most
often non-unionized, poorly paid and have
little security. They are shunted into certain
areas of the workforce, areas where women
dominate. In fact they are segregated
according to sex.
As Connelly, in the Working Sexes, put it
"the married women most frequently
working were those with husbands who
earn low incomes. These women do not
freely choose to work but are economically
compelled to do so."
By CATHY
BOYD
of The Carillon
She begins with a very brief examination
of the conditions of capitalist development
and points to the parallel conditions under
which women work in Canada. As
capitalism developed, the basis for
agricultural labor shrank, freeing a
significant amount of the laboring
population in the primary sector. At the
same time the need for surplus labor in the
secondary was generated.
With the maturity of capitalism, she
argues, the basis for domestic labor has
contracted "freeing married women while
at the same time creating a need for female
labor in the tertiary sector of the economy.
Under these conditions women are
economically compelled to enter in the
labor force and constitute, in effect, a
reserve army for the capitalist labor
market."
Connelly analyzes the demand's of the
capitalist economy and incorporates a
description of changes in domestic labor to
help explain the entrance of women into the
labor force.
Simply stated, domestic labor is not
directly related to capital — it does not
produce surplus value. Therefore the
capitalist has no direct interest in increasing
its productivity. While a rise in productivity
of labor in the industrial sector has lowered
the cost of consumer goods, the mass
consumption of these goods has become
imperative to the functioning of the cap-
tialist system^
Through the creation of new needs, built-
in obsolescence and consumer debt, the
exigencies of the capitalist economic order
create the need, and consequent demand,
for labor-saving devices. This necessitates,
in most cases, a family of two wage-
earners.
Connelly believes that "as the standard
of living in Canada rises, married women,
whose husbands earn low incomes, must
work outisde the home to maintain their
relative standard of living." She then
asserts that through the purchase of goods
and services which are "rapidly becoming
indispensable," women are "free" to seek
employment.
At the same time, Connelly argues "it is
the production of these goods and services
that women themselves once produced in
the home which has led to the expansion of
'female' occupations. In other words,
married women are 'free' to work because
of the creation of necessities which in fact
determine their need to work.
It is the accumulation process itself, by
expanding the occupational structure and
creating 'female jobs' which determines
women's participation in the contemporary
labor force. The form of this participation
is that of a relatively permanent reserve
army which is the utlimate cause of
women's oppressive labor conditions."
The relevance of the consideration of
women in relation to the occupational
;tructure is apparent. The need of women
for outside employment, the fact that
women constitute a reserve pool of labor
and the effects of the family and women's
role as consumer all precede their market
capacity.
Women's labor force participation is
frequently related to three changes in the
labor market: (1) a temporary shortage of
male workers; (2) the rapid development of
new industries; and (3) the creation of new
occupations.
industries grew from 19.8 per cent in 1941
to 32.1 per cent in 1974.
These industries are not captial intensive,
productive industries and "as a result
salaries tend to be low. And these are the
sectors where women work. High wages
coincide with a low proportion of female
employees," according to Pat Armstrong
in Women and Their Work: The Canadian
Experience.
The movement of women into clerical
The influx of women into such areas as
finance, insurance, real estate and clerical
jobs reflects their response to changes in the
industrial structure and the creation of new
job categories. As a reserve army, however,
women are responsive to the demands of
the labor forces and have since the
beginning of industrial capitalism performed "many of the low-skilled, low-paid
jobs in the labor intensive sectors of the
economy."
Work performed by women in the industrial unit is similar in nature to work in
the home, with the division of labor by sex
reinforced by the fluidity of female labor
force participation.
During the last three decades there has
been a shift away from goods-producing
industries to trade, finance and service
sectors. Between 1941-1974 the percentage
of female workers in trade, finance, insurance and real estate and public administration increased. The concentration
of women (that calculation as a percentage
of all women workers) within these four
—above and cover photos   by   peter menyasz
jobs can be seen as a response to demands
of the market and coincides with the
growth in paper work.
Along with industrial divisions, women
are concentrated in a limited number of
jobs within each industry. Armstrong has
documented female concentration in the
top ten "female" occupations from 1941-
1971, noting that between 1941-1961 more
than half of all the women in the labor
force worked in those ten occupations.
For example, if the "domestic" category
is removed from the 1971 census, the
concentration of women in the remaining
nine occupations appears to have decreased
from 45.1 per cent to 43 per cent; however,
this decrease can be explained by the
division of labor (and the expansion of job
titles) within the office. In 1941 the
stenographer category included two-thirds
of all female clerical workers; in 1971 it
represented over one-third of all women in
clerical jobs.
By 1974 72.15 per cent of all women were
employed in clerical labor; over one-third
again of all employees were women.
Armstrong goes on to expose the inferior
position of women. As an example, using
1971 data, salesmen and sales persons,
"requiring some technical knowledge of the
products they sold," were 78.2 per cent
male while sales clerks were 34 per cent
male. The better paid secondary school
teachers were 55.5 per cent male while
elementary and kindergarten teachers were
17.7 er cent male. Sewing machine
operators were 9.1 per cent male while 72.6
per cent of the foremen in the broader
category, in which operators are the largest
occupation, are men.
Armstrong says that sex-typing of
traditionally feminine jobs has somewhat
faded but is not matched by the disap
pearance of "men-only" tags attached to
masculine professions. The conditions of
women's work in the labor force are
conspicuous by their relationship to low
wages, low prestige, little control over work
situations or machines and low skill.
It is "functional" (that, is, rational
capitalistic behavior necessary for the
smooth functioning of the capitalist
system) to maintain, a sex-segregated labor
force and women's reserve army potential,
because wages in these sectors are lower
In Women and the Workplace Hartmann
contends that the "roots of women's
present social status lie in this sex-ordered
division of labor. . . with men on top and
women on the bottom."
Sexual stratification was enforced by a
patriarchal system — "a set of social
relations which has a material base and in
which there are hierarchical relations
between men and solidarity among them,
which enable them to control women"
and later perpetuated and strengthened by
the development of capitalist modes of
production.
Men were able to extend the sex-ordered
division of labor, according to Hartmann,
because they utilized certain
"mechanisms" already available to them
— the traditional division of labor between
the sexes and techniques of hierarchical
organization and control. Hartmann posits
that one cannot ignore the role that men —
"men as men; men as workers" have
played in maintaining job segregation by
sex.
She says job segregation by sex sustains
the superiority of men over women through
the enforcement of lower wages for women
in the labor market. Low wages encourage
female dependence (on men) and underlie
the necessity to marry.
Married women do the domestic work
and thus men benefit "from both higher
wages and the domestic division of labor.
This domestic division of labor, in turn,
acts to weaken women's position in the
labor market.
"Thus the hierarchical domestic division
of labor is perpetuated by the labor market
and vice versa," she said.
Hartmann refers to this process as the
outcome of an interplay between the two
systems of capitalism and patriarchy
Males, seeking work in a competitive
market, have historically viewed the em
ployment of women as a threat to their
economic livelihood.
Tracing the development of capitalism,
specifically the separation of work from the
home, Hartmann says that "men increased
their control over technology, production
and marketing, as they excluded women
from industry, education and political
organization."
Women's jobs have been lower paid,
lower skilled and involving less authority
and control. Men have, through the
monopolization of trade union
organization and the enforcement of the
domestic division of labor, been able effectively to enforce job segregation
Women's subordinate position in the home
and their subordinate position in the labor
market reinforced each other.
Sex segregation is clearly evident in the
paid labor force in North America. Women
dominate, not only in specific industries
and narrowly defined occupational
categories but they are differentially
distributed among firms. Pag* 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
Br." "■?%%&
MORGENTHALER
BODY POLITICS
The interviewer lounges back in
his chair while the interviewee sits
upright, hands in her lap.
In a dynamic conversation a
woman is interrupted by a man:
she does not object.
Meaningless occurrences? Not
to Nancy Henley, author of Body
Politics. For Henley these are apt
examples of how body language
transmits messages of dominance
and power — and women, she
says, get the short end of the stick
in this power communication.
"Vibrations," body language,
non-verbal communications,
whatever you call it, it's a subject
popularized in several books
recently. Henley's Body Politics
(not to be confused with the
Toronto gay magazine of a similar
name) is an analysis with a difference. Not only is this book a
By KEITH
WILEY
CUP Fieldworker
careful scientific examination of
what goes on in the subtle silent
languages but it is a forthrightly
feminist analysis.
Henley hypothesizes non-verbal
communication is a power structure on a "micropolitical" level in
our society. It's a power structure
which resembles the dominance-
submission gestures of social
animals. This power structure is
basic to the human pecking order,
among all people, of course, but it
especially keeps women in their
place in that order. Henley suggests the accepted behavior patterns for women are the passive
and submissive ones.
For instance, the interviewer in
the example above is in a dominant position and can relax and
lounge while the interviewee, submissive and eager to please, must
maintain a tight posture. Henley's
studies show that women usually
keep a tighter, more submissive
posture; in fact, their dress
demands it. Men, on the other
hand,, take up proportionately
more space for their bodies, a
signal of dominance.
Similarly, a professor may interrupt a student in conversation.
The professor, being more powerful, can do this. Henley cites
studies that show men interrupt
women in conversation far more
often than the reverse — another
indication of male power.
Again, the climbing junior executive   doesn't   challenge   the
authority of his senior by staring
him down.
In the same vein, Henley
discovers that men continue an
eye contact with women longer
than women with men. Women
don't often challenge the male
superior role by staring men
down.
So too, the boss may come and
lay a friendly hand on the
employee's shoulder but of course
the employee dare not return the
gesture. If the employee is a
woman and the boss a man he will
probably use the friendly hand
even more, not necessarily for sexual reasons, Henley says, but
because he has that much more
power or ability to dominate.
If a woman risks the familiarity
of touching a man, on the arm
say, he may take it as a sexual advance. Because of this, women are
not allowed the power gesture of
casually touching men.
There are many more examples
in Body Politics as Henley carefully examines dominant and submissive signals in the areas of
time, space, touch, eyes, facial expression and gestures. Then she
looks at the signals most often used by women. Henley's ideas
about the power relationships in
non-verbal communication are
borne out by the empirical
evidence; the accepted behavior
patterns for women are the submissive ones.
Body Politics is for the most
part a dry and academic textbook.
Henley did her masters thesis on
the politics of touch. However,
the book does present exciting and
disturbing ideas. Following the
observations is a tight analysis.
Henley says the subtle domination of women by body cues is a
part of the cultural oppression of
women. Like the economic oppression in housework and
poorly-paid jobs, it is not
something women have passively
accepted but have had forced
upon them.
Finally, Henley talks about
breaking the oppression and improving the situation. And the
way to do it, she says, is by each
of us examining and changing our
own behavior. She recommends
men restrain their dominant
behaviors.
Ultimately, however, it is up to
women to break the pattern.
"Women can stop smiling unless
they are happy; lowering or averting their eyes when stared at; getting out of men's way in public;
allowing interruptions; restraining
their body postures; accepting unwanted touch."
GOLDSTEIN: In light of the so-
called liberal federal laws concerning abortion, how available is
abortion today?
MORGENTHALER: Well, the
availability varies according to the
location in the country—that's the
craziness of this law: that some
women can get it and some of
them cannot.
By TARA
GOLDSTEIN
of The Georgian
If you live in an area around
Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver,
Calgary, it's relatively easy to get
to a hospital where you can get it
or else in Montreal to a private
clinic such as this one here.
If you live 500 miles away from
these big centres, you have to
travel. There are still areas in the
country, like the whole province
of Quebec where there's no
facilities at all and I still get people
here who've come from distances
750 to 1,000 miles away. I'm really
indignant at this point—women
have to travel so far.
danger of complication after 12
weeks of pregnancy is four times
as great as before twelve weeks of
pregnancy. Women are subjected
to much more danger because of
delays imposed by the law and
necessitated by law.
part of the abortions in the province.
But the St. Mary's, which is an
English Catholic hospital, doesn't
do any abortions either. It is more
a question of religion than
language. But since religion has
Some women can
get an abortion
and some can't
get one.
An abortion, if it should be performed, should be done as soon as
possible; it minimizes the
psychological consequences and
the medical consequences.
GOLDSTEIN: Did you find any
discrepancy between the French
hospitals and the English
hospitals?
MORGENTHALER: There is a
great discrepancy only because of
the   religious   factors.   French
MORGENTHALER .
A girl of 15 came with her
mother from Bonaventure which
is far up north in Quebec. It took
them 14 hours on a
train—imagine how tired they
are—for a 10-minute operation.
They should have nearby, they
could have if the law permitted
that. That's the craziness of the
law.
The committee system
established by law now involves a
lot of red tape and delays—it's a
well-known fact now in medical
practice regarding abortion that
any delay is a bad thing, especially
a delay over 8 weeks and especially  over   12  weeks—because  the
. "the law is crazy."
Canadian hospitals are mostly
Catholic and there are very few
French Canadian hospitals which
do abortions. There is only the
Notre-Dame hospital, the Maison-
neuve hospital in Montreal and
the University hospital in Sherbrooke. There are only three
hospitals who do any number of
abortions in the whole province of
Quebec.
The English-speaking hospitals
in the province do abortions mainly because they are not Catholic.
The Montreal General, Reddy
Memorial and the Jewish General
do abortions. They do the major
been linked with language for so
long, it overlaps.
GOLDSTEIN: Are most of your
patients peoplewho could not obtain abortions in a hospital?
MORGENTHALER: The people
who come here are those who
can't get an abortion in a hospital
or who don't want to wait six
weeks or eight weeks. Waiting is a
stressful thing. Once you have
decided you want an abortion,
waiting for it preys on your mind.
GOLDSTEIN: How well does the
whole committee process work?
MORGENTHALER: In principle, I know they don't work very
Th$;Jaw
The torn dfe
agalf^sf v
well. Everybody knows that. But
it varies from hospital to hospital.
In some hospitals, the doctors are
friendly, they have the proper attitude and they approve most of
the applications with a minimum
delay.
But these are hospitals in the
whole country that you can count
on the fingers of one or two
hands. The worst are those that
have a committee which doesn't
really function. They just put it on
paper and they refuse all the applications.
The second worst are those
hospitals where the doctors and
the hospital policy is to put so
many blocks and so many impediments in the way of obtaining
a legal abortion. They require that
a woman prove she is mentally
unstable or suicidal.
They make it extremely difficult
and these committees unfortunately create a lot of havoc and
sometimes tragedy. They delay the
cases beyond the safe limit. Then
women are faced with a much
more difficult procedure which
they cannot get at home. They
often have to go to the States to
get it. This involves a lot more
stress, anxiety and expense as
well.
GOLDSTEIN: How are these
committees selected?
MORGENTHALER: Most committees are appointed by a board
of directors of a hospital. It
depends very much on the board
of directors of the hospital, who is Friday, March 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 11
\ND ABORTION
e power in the hospitals. If the
:ople in power are against abor-
3n, they usually appoint doctors
i these committees who are
;ainst abortion.
ery often the men of the
jspitals are either run by
ligious organizations, especially
atholic organizations who don't
ant to have anything to do with
)ortion and then the hospital
ilicy is against abortion. They
ive a committee which does not
jprove anybody.
They will approve one or two
atients a year, this doesn't help
nybody really. And others have
lder doctors or conservative doc-
>rs—people who have been
rought up against abortion. They
Iso appoint a board of doctors
gainst abortion. It's a very
jstrictive policy.
lOLDSTEIN: Are there any
ospitals which refuse to have
ammittees?
IORGENTHALER: Yes. That's
ie trouble with the law. The law
oesn't require that hospitals have
Dmmittees, so a hospital which
lys we don't want to do abor-
ons, they don't do anything
bout it. Although it's a medical
ractice, and people in their com-
lunity need it, they just shirk
leir responsibility.
The law is an ass. The law
iscriminates against women in a
:rrible way. It's causing tragedy
) women. It's really a shame that
an ass.
ninates
?©n.in
way.
the politicians, the people in
power in federal government, the
Liberal government at this point,
have no intention of changing the
law. To my mind, they are not living up to their responsibilty they
have to protect the health and
welfare of women.
It's incredible that a woman
from Newfoundland had to come
to Montreal for an abortion
operation which takes 10 minutes.
This whole thing is absolutely inexcusable. And I think that it's
about time that people start
clamoring for their rights.
Some women can get it depending where they are and some
women can't get it because they
are far away from a centre.
It's also crazy that the whole
premise under the law was enacted
so that it is such a very serious
I've had cases from Nova Scotia
where situations are similar except
for the one hospital in the whole
province of Nova Scotia which
does abortions and people have to
go down to Boston.
GOLDSTEIN: Is there anything
we can do to change the situation?
MORGENTHALER: Sure.
Organize. Write letters to the
prime minister, the minister of
justice, organize yourselves in
every riding to demand that
whoever is going to run for
federal parliament in each riding
will be responsive to the needs of
women so that the women in every
riding will be able to have abortions, without having to go 500
miles  away and  without delay.
It's no longer a question of
whether abortion is good or bad. ■
Abortion
depends on how
well-informed
you are.
operation that it's got to be done
in the hospital. It's not true—the
experience in the U.S. and in my
own clinic shows that a well-
organized clinic can do operations
more safely actually, than the big
hospitals and because the stipulation that abortions have to be
done in hospitals is just ludicrous,
absurd. And yet the federal
government for 10 years hasn't
found the courage to change the
law.
There are certain areas in the
country, like New Brunswick for
instance, where most of the
hospitals are Catholic.
It's a fact of life. It is only a question of whether women will get it
here, a thousand miles away or go
to the U.S.
Abortion depends on your
geography, how well-informed
you are, how far from the border
you are, how far from a hospital
you are or how far from a clinic.
The situation in Quebec is very
unusual. After my trials the
government has decided not to
prosecute me or any other doctors
who do good abortions. So far
people in Quebec have more rights
now to abortion, than in the other
provinces.
ABORTION
ACCESS IN B.C
MORGENTHALER . . . "its no longer a question of whether abortion is right or wrong."
Securing an abortion in B.C. is
often a case of being in the right
place at the right time according
to a B.C. Federation of Women
health sub-committee survey.
The survey points out that an
abortion is available in most
hospitals in B.C. but arbitrary interpretation of abortion laws
often means delays that are
physically risky and emotionally
traumatic.
Most of the problems are
avoidable according to the survey.
Women are not always able to get
reliable information on abortion
in their area and may receive false
information from an unsympathetic doctor.
And the survey said, even with a
sympathetic doctor, a woman
must wait for approval from the
hospital's therapeutic abortion
committee.
A minimum of two weeks delay
to process the abortion application in all areas with waits of up to
eight weeks are not uncommon,
By MAUREEN
McEVOY
B.C. Bureau Chief
the survey said. But the longer she
waits, the higher the risks a
woman exposes herself to in having an abortion.
There are a total of 87 public
hospitals in B.C. eligible to perform abortions, but only 53 have
the necessary abortion committees.
Although it is not required by
law, the husband's consent for an
abortion is demanded in 20 out of
35 hospitals surveyed. In nine of
these hospitals legal papers were
necessary to prove separation.
In 29 of the hospitals surveyed,
the law is interpreted liberally to
mean mental and emotional
health, the survey said.
In nine of the hospitals the law
is strictly applied to mean only
physical danger, an arbitrary application of the law that is
discriminatory, the survey said.
No lower mainland hospital requires the husband's consent but
the Vancouver General and Peace
Arch Hospitals require a woman
to be a resident of the area. Thirteen out of 36 hospitals surveyed
required abortion patients to be
residents of their areas for periods
ranging from three months to up
to two years.
Eighteen of 37 hospitals do
abortions only before the twelfth
week of pregnancy although obtaining an abortion locally within
that time period is made almost
impossible. This means a woman
must face costly and time consuming travel to a larger centre.
"As it is the abortion situation
in B.C. puts women in a
degrading   powerless   position,
subject to the personal and often
arbitrary predispositions of mainly lawmakers and medical personnel," said Jenna Jordison of the
health sub-committee.
"Whether a woman can get an
abortion depends on chance and
luck, depending on where she lives
and the personal sympathies of
her doctor," she said.
Some centres surveyed reported
a complete lack of publicly
available information on birth
control.
"It is appalling that there is no
attempt to obviate the necessity
for abortion by providing birth
control information and encouraging responsible attitudes,"
Jacqueline Simpson, health committee chairperson, said.
"Even when birth control is used conscientiously, there is still the
possibility of unplanned pregnancy. Legal abortion must be
available as a back-up to all
women and must in no way be
labeled a crime."
The survey recommends that
abortion decisions be made by a
woman and her doctor, not the
abortion committee, a procedure
which should reduce the delays.
And if small hospitals and general
practitioners would take responsibility for performing early abortion instead of relying on large
referral hospitals and
gynecologists, delays would be cut
down even further, the survey
said. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
UNION LEADERS
Lauma Averts, an articulate
young woman with a warm smile,
hardly fits the stereotype of a
union chief. Yet she has been
tested in the fires of her first strike
as the president of the York
University Staff Association
(YUSA), and proven to be a successful and devoted leader of her
troops.
By KATHY
CANTY
of The Varsity
Avens is part of a new generation of union leaders, part of an
awakening among women in the
labor movement. She and others
like her stand at the forefront of
an explosion in the numbers of
women joining unions in this
country.
The statistics are revealing.
From 1965 to 1975 women's
membership in union's has grown
by  144 percent to form a force
which is about three-quarters of a
million women strong. And the
results of this development are
becoming increasingly apparent,
certainly to students at Canadian
colleges and universities.
Last fall, under the leadership
of Avens, the secretaries and
library workers of York University walked off the job in a fight for
better wages and working conditions. About 85 per cent of these
workers were women and while
they didn't get everything they
asked for, the strike is still regarded as a great victory.
What YUSA wanted was a nine
percent salary increase to match
the rate of inflation. What it got
was a 7.1 per cent hike in wages,
depending on salary level, a
substantial gain, says Avens,
when you consider the university
had placed a four per cent ceiling
on wages because of cutbacks in
education.
What's more, the strike was a
boost for the morale of the
women    workers.    The   support
staff had virtually paralyzed the
university when they went on
strike and it "wasn't until the
strike occurred was it
brought home to our own
members the value of their own
work," said Avens.
"Any of these strikes with
women are very good solid strikes.
They fight with a determination
which is unequalled." The women
showed "incredible" tenacity on
the picket line, said Avens, which
the administration did not expect
from what it regarded as "just a
bunch of secretaries."
In one sense this feeling of self-
respect is reflected in the new
YUSA contract. The union has inserted a clause which gives support staff the right to grievance
"if an employee is required to perform any duties of a personal
nature, not connected with the approved operations of the university."
Often a boss expects his
secretary to remember his wife's
See page 15: UNION
— peter menyasz photo
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THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 13
GLOBAL VIEW
Women's movements around
the world enjoyed varying degrees
of success mixed with failure this
past year.
In Spain, the Ministry of
Culture has formed a committee
on women's rights and is drawing
up laws for submission to
parliament calling for, among
other things, economic equality
and greater protection against
rape. Most women holding the
same jobs as men earn less. Proof
of guilt in rape cases must be so
specific it is almost impossible to
get a conviction.
By ALAN
MORANTZ
of The Georgian
The proposed law would ease
the women's burden of proof and
perhaps encourage Spanish
women to put aside fears of being
ostracized by the traditionally
puritanical society.
But activists in the women's
movement feel cheated by Spain's
new constitution, which makes no
reference to abortion, day care or
simple incompatibility as grounds
for uncontested divorce. Some
women are also upset by the
onstitution's  failure  to  change
the country's rigid custody law,
which gives husbands the absolute
right to custody of children in
cases of marital breakup. The
constitution does provide for
legalization of contraceptives,
although a doctor's prescription is
still necessary.
The biggest problem facing
Spanish women, however, is the
attitude and social fabric of this
macho-style country. Voicing the
prevailing attitude, one man told
an American correspondent,
"Our women are flying the coop.
And did you ever try to get a
bunch of chickens back in? I guess
it's all part of this democracy
thing. You give them the vote,
and the first thing you know they
want freedom."
Violence in Nicaragua against
the Somoza regime has triggered
organization within the women's
movement there. Support for the
movement mushroomed after the
National Guard used tear gas
against a small group of women
demonstrating in front of the
United Nations building in early
1978.
The movement began a year
ago with a few informal meetings
of about 15 women concerned
with the mounting violence in the
country. Since then, the
movement has spread from the
upper and middle classes to the
wives of peasants and workers.
The movement, called the
Association of Women Concerned with National Problems,
has given priority to organizing
committees of women in slum
areas of the cities. Noisy
demonstrations have been held
and on one occasion two women
were killed when National
Guardsmen tried to stop the
protest. The movement also
helped plan a "hunger march" of
peasant women and that, too, was
repressed, resulting in two deaths.
In Italy the growing women's
movement contributed to the rise
of Tina Anselmi, the country's
first woman cabinet minister, who
was appointed labour minister in
mid-1977. Also in Italy, women
are moving into a job once
thought to be the bastion of males
— terrorism. A dramatically
increasing number of women,
dubbed by the Italian press as
"guerrillas with skirts", are not
any more the submissive companions of terrorist men as they
were once believed to be.
About 1,500 women in Greece
early this year enlisted for 14
months in the Greek military,
much to the displeasure of
women's liberation groups who
said  volunteers   would   offer
themselves for further exploitation in the traditionally
male-dominated society. It was
the start of Greece's first-ever
female volunteer army.
Throughout Greece, 20
women's groups have joined in
opposing women's military
service. They said they will not
accept equal responsibilities with
men when they do not have equal
rights.
-peter menyasz photo
The status of women is coming
under close study in Israel. A
government-appointed study
which produced 130 pages of
recommendations showed
widespread neglect of women's
rights. The most important
recommendation is for the
creation of a government office to
administer to women and to
monitor their status.
See page 15: ACTIVISM
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION PHONE 681-7836
CARRY ON
MMANNUELLE
Show  Times:   1:00  2:30
4:20 6:10 8:00 9:50
Sunday   2:30   4:20   6:10
i:00 9:50
«**
Warning:   Some   suggestive
^scenes & dialogue.—
B.C. DIRECTOR 	
voquE
918 GRANVILLE
685-5434
GEORGE C SCOTT
HARDCORE _
Show Times: Odeon 1:00 3:15
5:30 7:45 10:00
Sunday 3:15 5:30 7:45 10:00
Dunbar 7:30 9:30
> violence nudity & j
coarse
"language.— B .C
DIRECTOR	
OdEON duisbAR
I
881 GRANVILLE
682-7468
DUNBAR at :
224-7252
HAU.OWEE
Show Times: 12:40 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
Sunday 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
NATIONAL
LAMP««N.
ANIMAL
Show  Times:  2:05  43)5  6:0!
. tin-™: ■*"'<•■
IWarning: Occasional nudity, suggestive scenes,
|coarse language throughout. B.C. DIRECTOR
^peUfk^S^^
NOMINATED FOR 6 ACADEMY AWARDS including BEST PICTURE
Show Times
7:10 9:15
Warning: Frequent violence, coarse 707 w. BROADWAY |
language. B.C. DIRECTOR 874-1927
DROAdwAV 1
NOMINATED FOR 4 ACADEMY AWARDS including BEST ACTRESS
Ellen    Burstyn    and   Alan   Alda
Show Times: Park 7:20 9:30
Warning:  Some   suggestive  scenes.   B.C.
DIRECTOR .
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
NOMINA TED FOR 3 ACADEMY AWARDS including BEST
ACTRESS
an
Show Times: 7:30 9:30
I Warning:    Some    sug-
Igesttve    scenes    &
•■——■"— —_ — — —-  coarse language. B.C.
starring Jill Clayburgh  ^yyjL^ 4375 w. 10th
VARSITy
piTOETifARTH
—ORSON WELLtS   ^ffliU>
Show
Times
7:30
9:30
Fraser
FRASER at 47th
327-1837
HOLLYWOOD
3123 W.Broadway
738-3211
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A distinctive
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• Specially blended from Okanagan
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
INCO IN CANADA
From page 8
owned and run by and for the
people and a multinational which
is only interested in maximizing
profits and reducing costs."
He says his motion calls for the
nationalization of all of INCO's
assets, not only in Ontario, but in
all of Canada.
Sudbury East MPP Elie Martel
has also introduced a similar bill
in the Ontario legislature. He said
his bill is "not a punitive
measure." We are not trying to
penalize INCO but to plan for the
economic viability of the Sudbury
basin, we have to get control of
where the resources are mined."
Martel believes that only by
nationalizing INCO cam
Canadians determine where
refining occurs. INCO is currently
bypassing Canadian refineries in
ort Colburne, Ont. and having
much   of  its   refining   done
Wales, he said.
As well, INCO's reinvestment
policies have not been in the best
interests of Canada, Martel said
Rather, INCO has sent its profits
out of Canada, he said, to finance
operations in Indonesia and
Guatemala, as well as purchasing
various American industries such
as a battery plant and tire company.
The present tax structure is
woefully inadequate in dealing
with the mining companies,
Martel said. In 1971, when INCO
had profits of $100 million, they
paid taxes of $1 million.
Martel said he would be willing
to negotiate compensation, but
would want to see damage to the
environment, the workers, and
the economy calculated into any
compensation formula.
Graduates
Are you considering a teaching career?
Attend the informational meeting
THURSDAY
1:00 P.M
MARCH 15
SCARFE 100
The Directors of UBC's Elementary and Secondary teacher education
programs will be present to answer your questions on:
— job opportunities in teaching
— one year programs for graduates of other faculties
— entrance requirements
Your A.U.S. I S.U.S. Presents
SUNRISE
NIGHT!!
FEATURING
Shots, Sunrises and Tacos
SEE YOU THERE
MARCH 9
4-10 P.M. in
BUCHANAN LOUNGE
TWENTY-FIVE VOLUNTEERS
ARE NEEDED TO COMPLETE A STUDY
OF THE SIDE-EFFECTS OF A NEW
BIRTH CONTROL PILL.
The pill contains less of the female hormone estrogen
than current low-dose contraceptive pills. The pill has
been used in humans and effectively prevents pregnancy.
Volunteers will be asked to keep a diary of any side-
effects and a blood sample will be taken every six
months.
Contact:
Dr. Robin Percival-Smith,
Student Health Service
-228-2151
LSAT
LSAT • MCAT • GRE
GRE PSYCH • GRE BIO
GMAT • OAT • 0CAT • PCAT
VAT • MAT • SAT
NAT'L MED BDS
ECFMG • FLEX • VQE
NDB • NPB I • NLE
Sfcn&y-H. IWPMN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since 1938
For information, Please Call:
■■■M       (206)523-7617 a^B
In SUB
Basement
Sausage Rolls
Meat & Vegetable Samosas
Potato Chops
Italiano & other Submarines
Ice Cream
• Also Special Sandwich
Counter
Open from 10 am-3 pm
DR. GREGORY BAUM at UBC
TUESDAY, MARCH 13
12:30 SUB 205
"THE POLITICAL MOOD OF THE CHURCH"
7:00 PM, Lutheran Campus Centre
"THE JOURNEY OF GREGORY BAUM"
SPONSORED By: Lutheran Campus Ministry
Lutheran Student Movement
Cooperative Christian Campus Ministry
Vancouver School of Theology
has always
H* Commercial Electronics Ltd
offered some of the best loudspeakers you
could find in any stereo store.
Three new models from
Celestion n
strongly support this claim
The Ditton 662 has been
designed using a passive
radiator (ABR) system which
provides a reduction in bass
unit cone excursic.i and gives
increases in low frequency
power handling and low frequency output.
The complete system is
controlled by a 14 element
dividing network incorporating fuse protection for
the treble unit.
$749.00
The Ditton 551 uses a vented
box design giving significant
improvement in low frequency response compared with
the equivalent sealed box
design. As this form of loading
requires less excursion from
the bass unit, the desired performance can be achieved
with a reduction in bass unit
size. Tone controls are provided which enable the levels of
the treble and mid range units
to be adjusted by up to 2 dB
boost and more than 6 dB cut
as required.
$509.00
The Ditton 442 utilises a sealed box design which gives
controlled and extended bass
response below the bass resonant frequency of the system.
Inside the sealed box is a second sealed enclosure to
isolate the mid-range unit.
The system is controlled by
a 14 element dividing network
incorporating fuse protection
for the treble unit.
$469.00
Introducing three new Dittons
Celestion have been designing and manufacturing high quality loudspeakers since 1924, over half a century of
experience in sound reproduction. The three models shown here are the result of combining this experience
with the most modern design techniques and materials technology, available to the Celestion engineers. Each
model has been designed as a complete system and the drive units have been specifically designed for each application within the three systems. In accordance with Celestion policy the drive units are all manufactured in
the Company's own factories to ensure total control of quality standards. Superbly finished enclosures complete
each system and these, with their specially developed grille fabric, will enhance the most elegant decor. Should
you wish to remove the grilles, the front baffles and drive units are fully finished to give an attractive professional
appearance. Designed for use in mirror image pairs, these loudspeakers have their mid range and treble units
positioned asymmetrically on 'he front baffles to improve their directional characteristics.
The new Dittons are not exactly cheap but this kind of sound
is well worth the price. Come in today and judge for yourself at
-1} Commercial Electronics Ltd
"Since 1957 only Quality Stereo and Service"
1305 Burrard St., Vancouver, B.C.
(Free Parking at rear of store)
Convenient Financing Available
with 90 day interest free Cash Option
669-5525 Friday, March 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
-peter menyasz photo
ACTIVISM
From page 13
The study also recommended
that women's right to birth
control be recognized, family
planning services be made
available as part of the nation's
public health services, women
who claim personal or social
hardship be allowed to have
abortions and rape proceedings be
held behind closed doors, with
women being assigned to hospitals
and police stations. It proposed
that judges of both sexes preside
over rape cases.
The study made no recommendations on such issues as
religious restrictions on marriage
dates, women's rights in divorce
proceedings and child custody,
because of irreconcilable differences between religious and
non-religious members.
The study found unequal
training is given to women from
childhood on and that few occupy
UNION
From page 12
birthday, get coffee for him and
balance his chequebook, said
Avens, which shows the general
attitude toward the skills of a
secretary. YUSA is trying to crack
this habit. The secretary's job is to
fulfill the duties outlined in her
job description, not to run personal errands, and the "university
should -be in the forefront of this
type of fight. If the boss has a caffeine addiction that's not our problem, it's his and it usually is a
him," she said.
According to Avens, unions
must help women get a "decent
living wage." "That's why we've
supported the principle of equal
pay for work of equal value. The
government's lucky we're not
looking for back wages."
But, in the meantime, women
still continue to earn considerably
less than men. In 1972, for instance, the average wage of working women was 54.9 per cent of
the average wage of men, while in
1976 women earned 53 per cent of
what men earned.
Despite the belief that women
are working for "the frills of life"
many of the women in YUSA are
principal wage earners, who work
out of necessity, said Avens.
And this is not a phenomenon
confined to YUSA workers alone.
It is estimated ^that out of all the
women working in Canada in
1976, 30 per cent were single, 10
per cent were widowed, separated
or divorced and another 10 per
cent had husbands who made less
than $10,000 per year. According
to the Social Planning Council the
minimum income needed for a
family of four is $14,000.
Other issues which concern
women in unions are maternity
leave, day care, equal opportunity and paid leave to take care of
sick children.
Generally the occupations most
difficult to unionize are the ones
where women form the majority
high-paying positions. Generally,
Israeli women's salaries are only
60 per cent those of men. The
study recommended a law
guaranteeing equal opportunity
for men and women and
prohibiting discrimination in
salaries, job availability and
promotion.
In Afghanistan, where women
are among the least liberated in
the world, the government is
trying to help women break free
from their traditional subservience to men. Women are
beginning to make revolutionary
decisions, such as trying to get <
job or discarding their chadri, :
shroud covering their faces whili
in public. As a sign of its commitment to women's issues, thi
government is sponsoring the
Women's Organization to aid the
transition, and since mid-1977 the
constitution contains the first
specific guarantee of equal rights
for women.
of workers, says Debbie Fields,
equal opportunities officer for
the Ontario Public Service
Employee's Union (OPSEU).
this is because women are forced to work in a very narrow range
of the lowest paying occupations,
she explained. In 1978, 62.3 per
cent of all working women were
concentrated in clerical work,
sales or services, compared to an
average of 6.5 per cent of men
working in these sectors.
As a result, there are more
women competing for the same
jobs, making them more susceptible to the pressures of corporations against unionization.
"Management is very anti-union
and will do whatever is in their
power to prevent women from
organizing."
But now "there is a radicaliza-
tion going on among working
women," said Fields. "In the last
few months some of the most
crucial strikes have been with
women." Among these strikes is
one involving 4,000 OPSEU
caretakers and secretaries who
walked off the job recently at On
tario's 22 community colleges in a
bid for better wages and benefits.
~ THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1979 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Lord Lloyd of Hampstead
The Quain Professor of Jurisprudence in the University of London, Dennis Lloyd was
made Lord Lloyd in 1965. His reputation as one of England's great legal scholars has
grown from his work as a member of law reform committees; his association with the
Department of Law at the University of London; and his publications on topics of
public policy and the development of law in the United Kingdom. His book The Idea of
Law has a wide distribution, even being translated into Japanese. His is currently working on the question of a Bill of Rights for England.
THE FREEDOM OF THE PRESS
Saturday, March 10 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 p.m. (a Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
sponsored by
. The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
Introducing
something extra
from La
fe.
9&
.**
.<&**
*»*>
■>**   »
*£ **.   % $
'*&
*   »- ^:
<*?<
iii
Brewed for extra flavour, extra smoothness and extra taste
satisfaction, John Labatt's Extra Stock is our newest premium
quality product. You'll find it smooth and mellow going down.
Founded by John Labatt in 1828, and still owned by
Canadians, Labatt's is proud to introduce John Labatt's Extra
Stock. It commemorates our 150 years of brewing fine, quality
beer in Canada. It's truly something extra ...for our friends. Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
MOVIE LISTINGS EFFECTIVE MARCH 9—15
FAMOUS
PLAYERS
SHOWTIME INFORMATION 681-4255
)"BEST
PICTURE!"
Winner of
10 Academy
Awards!-™
IN WIDE SCREEN 70 MM and 6 TRACK STEREO SOUND
SHOWTIMES:
Mon-Thurs 8:00 only
FRI. SAT. SUN 7:00 9:45
MATINEES SAT. SUN. 2:00
LIMITED ENGAGEMENT
I GRANVILLE at l?lh
STANLEY
Cap: 1:40 4:15 7:00 9:50
Richmond Sq: 7:00 9:30 MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
Guildford: 7:00 9:40 MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
Park Royal: 7:00 9:30 MATS. SAT. SUN. 2:00
PARh ROYAL
 CAPITOL 6,
820 GRANVILLE MALL
RICHMOND SQUARE
 GUILDFORD
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE
NOMINATED FOR 3
ACADEMY AWARDS
Cap: 3:35 5:40
10:00
Lougheed Mall:
9:50 Mats. Sat.
2:15
starring
SEAN
CONNERY
DONALD
SUTHERLAND
LESLEY-ANNE DOWN
 CAPITOL 6,
B20 GRANVILLE MALL
Warning: occasional
violence and suggestive
scenes— B.C. Director
□
THE
GREAT
TRAIN
-LOUGHEED MALL _
BURNABY 9373461
"One night
you'll find me inside,
waiting...
\
|3:15 5:15 7:15 9:20|
CAPITOL 6
ELLIOTT GOULD
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
SUSANNAH YORK
Parser
Warning: some gory violence and
nudity—B.C. DIRECTOR
On December 4, 1926,
Agatha Christie, the world'*
greatest mystery writer, disappeared.
What may have happened during
the next eleven days is far more
suspenseful than anything she
ever wrote.
Capitol: 2:15 4:10 6:05 8:05 10:05
Guildfotd: 7:15 9:15 Mats. Sat. Sun
2:15
DUSTIN HOFFMAN • VANESSA REDGRAVE
-VANCOUVER CENTRE-
3RANVIILE& GEORGIA 6694442
 GUILDFORD	
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE 5811716
EVERY
Which Way
Sut Loose'
Downtown:  1:35 3:35
5:35 7:40 9:45
Lougheed    Mall:   7:15
9:30  Mats.  Sat.  Sun.
2:00
Richmond Sq. 7:00
9:00 Mats. Sat. Sun.
2:00
 DOWNTOWN	
965 GRANVILLE 685 6725
LOUGHEED MALL
Warning: frequent
coarse language; occasional nudity — B.C.
Director.
-RICHMOND SQUARE.
NUMBER THREE ROAD 273 4474
Fine Arts: 7:30 9:30 Mat. Sat. only 2:00
Paramount: 7:00 9:00 Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
WARNING: Frequent nudity—B.C. DIRECTOR
*-^_ FINE ARTS	
I1I7 WEST GEORGIA 685 7821
^—PARAMOUNT.
NEW WESTMINSTER
ANEW
EXPERIENCE
IN SENSUALITY
Emanuelle in
"BLACK
EMANUELLE"
"LOVERS LIKE US"  plus
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY ONLY |
Gates 7:30 Show 8:00
among
cEroticism
and
''Pleasure ,
 DELTA DRIN	
I2mi.W.of KNIGHT ST RR 27827
Goodbye
tiimw
Warning:   frequent  sex  and   nudity
-B.C. DIRECTOR
9 ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS
BESTPICT0BE
/pwwi^
 PARh ROYAL
WEST VANCOUVER
-VANCOUVER CENTRE-
GRANVILIE&GEORGIA 6694442
Vancouver Centre 2:15
4:05 6:00 8:00 10:00
Columbia 7:00 9:00
Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
Park Royal 7:30 9:30
Mat. Sat. only 2:15
 COLUMBIA	
NEW WESTMINSTER 521 083'
Murder by Decree
adevlllsniy clever mystery
-VANCOUVER CENTRE.
GRANVILLE 4GEORGIA 6694442
LOUGHEED MALL
Warning: some gory violence—B.C. Director
Van Centre 2:00 4:20 6:45 9:15
Lougheed Mall: 7:00 9:15 Mats. Sat.
Sun. 2:05
One mon against the worId
Paul Neuuman
Gibi Andersson   Fernando Rcli
Quinjet
Warning: some gory
violence—B.C. DIRECTOR
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINATION
for BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
FRENCH with ENGLISH SUBTITLES
GET OUT YOUR
HANDKERCHIEFS
__ DENMAN PLACE —
1737 COMOX 683 4647
Warning: occasional nude and suggestive scenes — B.C. DIRECTOR
Cap: 3:20 5:50 7:20 9:20
Columbia: 7:30 9:30
Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
 CAPITOL 6.
820 GRANVILLE MALL
 COLUMBIA	
NEW WESTMINSTER 521 0830
Warning: frequent violence and
coarse language — B.C. Director
THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL .
MEN
ADMISSION $3.00
FREE PARKING FOR BAY THEATRE PATRONS AT THE COMMUNITY CENTRE LOT, 1700 block HARO
Warning: some gory scenes; scenes of brutal violence
throughout — B.C. DIRECTOR.
 THE RAY
DENMAN at BARCLAY
Hard Men 7:30
Brazil 9:15
HAROLD
&
MAUDE
— LOUGHEED DRIN
BROADWAY E.ofBOUNDRY
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY ONLY
GATES 7:30 SHOW 8:00
Warning:  some violence and  coarse  language
throughout — B.C. DIRECTOR. Friday, March 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 17
By MARY-ANN BRUNORO
The Pacific Cinematheque is
showing throughout March, films
of the Czech New Wave which
came out of Czechoslovakia between    1962    and    1969.
Fri., Mar. 9, 7 p.m., &
Sat., 9 p.m., Closely Watched
Trains, Wed., Mar. 14, 7 p.m. &
Thurs., 9 p.m., A Report on the
Party. Most of the Cinematheque's
films are being shown at the
Robson Square Theatre.
Idera Films (International
Development Education Resources
Association) will present Tues.,
Mar. 13, 8 p.m., The Courage of
the People, a Bolivian film about
the events of St. John's Night
(1967), when striking Bolivian tin
miners were massacred by
government troops. Admission: $3,
place: Robson Square Cinema.
For an evening of music, satire,
and fun, come and see the Whilsom
Stringband, a Toronto-based folk
group, perform Mar. 11, 8 p.m. at
Spratt's Aik, 1036 Richards St.,
Tickets are $4.00; call 669-0931 for
revservations. Stringband will also
be playing Mar. 15 at the SFU
Theatre, 8 p.m. Student tickets:
$2.00.
For jazz lovers, the Vancouver
Jazz Society continues its concert
series for this spring. Don Cherry
on trumpet and Charlie Haden on
bass will perform Mar. 11, 8:30
p.m., at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre, 1895 Venables St.
Both artists first came to
prominence as members of the
legendary Ornette Coleman
Quartet. Tickets are $6.00.
The Kuijken Quartet, an internationally acclaimed baroque
ensemble from Belgium, will make
its first Vancouver appearance on
Mar. 11, 8:30 p.m., at the Pacific
Ballroom, Hotel Vancouver.
Student tickets are $4.00, call 732-
1610 for further information.
Isle of Man Productions presents
'McGuinn, Clark & Hillman with
Special Guests at the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre, Mar. 13, 8 p.m.
And last but not least, the
'Freddy Wood's production of
Shakespeare's All's Well That Ends
Well ends this Sat., Mar. 10.
Curtain is at 8 p.m. and student
tickets are $2.00.
Two of Canada's three
professional choirs will perform
together in the Orpheum. The
Vancouver Chamber Choir and the
Tudor Singers of Montreal will be
singing works by J. S. Bach and
NURSES!
- New Graduate?
- Want a Change?
- Want to Return to Nursing?
If you are undecided about an important career decision
Come Talk To Us
Let Us Help You Sort It Out
NURSING JOB FAIR
Saturday, March 17, 1979
from 1000 to 1700 hrs. (10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.)
at the Vancouver General Hospital Residence
Heather Street (at 12th)
Representatives from many clinical specialties will be on hand to discuss your
nursing career with you - individually - to help you make a career decision.
Audio-visual presentations or tours of many areas will also be conducted.
Drop in on March 17 (no appointment is needed) or call 876-3211, local 2500
for further information.
VANCOUVER GENERAL HOSPITAL
various Renaissance, Baroque, and Friday march 9. Tickets at the
modern composers. The event is in Vancouver Ticket Centre and
the Orpheum Theatre at 8:30 p.m.,     outlets.
JOHN TRAVOLTA SAYS:
The cure for "Saturday Night Fever
is to see it again.
tt
Thurs., Sun. 7:00
Fri., Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Extra show Sun. at 9:30
Only $1.00
228-3697
SUB Theatre
NO DANCING
, IN THE AISLES
PLEASE!!
M
^J
GfaateTwcC
RED LEAF    ~
RESTAURANT
„ • Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
. FREE DELIVERY
t from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
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U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
Hong Kong
Chinese Food
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
^UNIVERSITY BLVDV^
^S      Eat in and Take Out      i*r
jjh        OPEN EVERY DAY       ..
'        4:30 p.m. TO 9:30 p.m.     F*.
& Phone: 224-6121A
■CAFFE ESPRESSO1
LA BOCA BAR
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
ALL DAY TILL MIDNIGHT
^3625W4tjjet^ollinawoo^^
£?8sw
2.904 W. •**• AVE.    733-3713
'An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is ali about!
OPEN TUES. SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
tyieekrfoocC
ALEXI'S
GREEK RESTAURANT
Welcome to ~'
my house! *
GREEK FOOD AT
REASONABLE
PRICES
OPEN EVERY DAY :
11:30 a.m.-1 a.m.   i
SUNDAY 12-10 p.m.
FULLY LICENSED
2291B W. BROADWAY    734-4424
LUNCH
11:30 -3:00 Mon. -Sat
DINNER
5:00- 1:00 Mon. - Sat
5:00- 11:00 Sunday
4Ww.I0th.Aw.
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
Open For Lunch
Open TIM 2:30 Weekdays
3:30 Weekends
12:30 Sundays
738-9520        I  DOWNTOWN
or 738-1113     I   1359 Robson
361S W. Broadway |       688-5491
Dining Lounge - Full Facilities -
Take Out or Home Delivery
Late delivery call V2 hour before closing-
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily trom n a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
jli'ur=Jr=Jr=J>=Jr=JP=Jt=Jr=Jr=lr=icJf=lf=sJpJr=JRJp=J'=1f=J"=J
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228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave.
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a
a:
t!  ■
i
a
§eL3U
DINNER
FOR TWO
UNDER
$10.00
ELEPHANT & CASTLE
PACIFIC CENTRE.
RENOS
Pancake House & Restaurant
FULLY LICENSED
Breakfast Special
2 eggs, pancakes
with bacon or sausage
$1.90
Chargex Accepted
VISA'
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9:00-11:00
Sun. & Holidays 9:00-8:00
2741 West 4th Avenue
 738-3814
Brighten
a bad day
with us.
GRANVILLE ISLAND
685-4735
2523 Alma Street
(at Broadway)
Phone: 733-1225 Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion, midi, la Maison Internationale.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Lecture on The science of Christian  healing,
noon, Buch. 102.
UBC SKYDIVING
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Airbrush performs, call 228-5021 in advance for
tickets, 9 p.m., international House.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth with new form tetters, noon,
SUB lobby.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Voting for elections, noon, SUB 216A.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth with new form letters, noon,
SUB lobby.
UBC NDP CLUB
New  Westminster   MP   Stu   Leggatt  speaks,
noon, SUB 207.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
CCCM
David Roy speaks on Issues in Bioethics, 8 p.m.,
Buch. 106.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Bzzr garden and raffle draw, 7:30 to 11:30 p.m.,
SUB party room.
UNIVERSITY LECTURES COMMITTEE
Lecture on the End of empire, noon, Buch. 315.
REVOLUTIONARY TRUTCHKEYITE
SISTERHOOD
Bread and roses, bread and roses,  post-IWD
celebration, 6 p.m., Trutch House,
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
CSA
Annual general meeting, 6 p.m., SUB 207.    .    .
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Disco dance, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.. Holiday Inn on
Howe St.
CSA
Movies, 2:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
SUNDAY
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Lion and lamb regional, slalom, 10 a.m., B lot.
MONDAY
VISITING POETS
Poetry reading by Anne Marriatt and Seymour
Mayne, noon, Buch. 203.
TUESDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper at 6 p.m. and Gregory Baum tells of his
journeys at 7 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
SKI CLUB
Elections, noon, SUB party room.
ZZL
AMS
ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
MONDAY
March 12, 1979
Sub Auditorium
12:30
RECALLED    DUE    TO    LACK    OF
QUORUM ON MARCH Sth
F?8"  ;'s.
ISRAE!
SIMCHA JACOBIVICI
Secretary-General North American
Jewish Students Network.
ISRAEL AND THE MEDIA
Monday 12 March 12:30
SUB Room 207-209
MARON MEDZINI
Former Head, Israel Government
Press Bureau
Tuesday 13 March 12:30
SUB Room 207-209
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i Faith, noon,
SUB 113.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
SCHOOL OF LIBRARIANSHIP
Finding your way with government publications,
11:30 a.m.. Main Library room 839.
WEDNESDAY
ART OF LIVING
Dale Maranda speaks, noon, Buch. 319.
VOC
General   meeting   with   constitutional   amendments, noon, Chem. 250.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
LION & LAMB
SLALOM
Presented by the UBC Sports Car Club
part of the Lower Mainland Regional
Championship
SUNDAY, MARCH 11
10:00 a.m., "B" Lot
MM
NATIVE PEOPLE
AND NATIONHOOD"
Representatives of Inuit, Dene and Yukon
Indians to speak on their concept of nation and
native rights, with response by
Gregory Baum and Terry Anderson.
Thursday, March 15, at 12:30 in SUB 125
Appearing now at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Mark Hasselbach's
"AIRBRUSH"
CBC Recording Artists
Music for your Head and Feet!
9 p.m., March 9th
$2.00 Non-members $1.00 Members
IN ADVANCE or Phone 228-5021 to RESERVE
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3815 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
64 DART. V-8, auto, tested. Excellent
"mech. cond. New brakes, exhaust.
$650 o.b.o.  298-6669  eves.
RESUME Service. Expertly prepared—
Excellent rates. Yvonne Patrick
Steno  Service  Ltd.   594-7722.
85 — Typing
DANCE CONTEST
$200 FIRST PRIZE
HONEY BEE DISCO
3371 HAZEL ST., ABBOTSFORD, B.C.
March 8, 9, 10
8:30 p.m.-2 a.m.
The Future of
YOUR AMS
The Fee Referendum next week will
determine how effective YOUR Student Society will be in providing: Intermurals Program, Student Union
Building Operations, Undergraduate
Society Funding, and all of the other
AMS Services presently offered.
VOTE YES in the AMS Fee
Referendum   to   ensure
continuation   and   expansion of YOUR AMS.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
LORD LLOYD OF HAMPSTEAD
HEAD, DEPT. OF LAW
UNIV. OF LONDON
"THE FREEDOM OF
THE PRESS"
Widely known as the author of a
number of books on law, Lord Lloyd
has been active on law reform committees and has more recently been concerned with the uses of a bill of rights.
Saturday March 10th 8:75 PM
Woodward Building, UBC
11 — For Sale — Private
Need a Graduation Dress?
Bring your fabric and patterns to
"&& &teatio*t&
THotue'
Special Offer: $25.00 to
make your dress. Offer expires 30 March, 1979. By appointment only: 734-5015.
HP67 Calculator. Excellent condition.
$499 o.b.o. 224-9980 or 224-9805. Ask
for   Debbie.
20 — Housing
HOUSE for rent. West Vancouver. 3
bedroom. Near school and bus. Ocean
view. $580 per month, available May
1. Lease  1 year.  922-8286.
SINGLES, Doubles, available now. 2280
Wesbrook. Phone 224-9679 after 5
Ask   for  Greg  or  Mike.
30 - Jobs
JOBS M/F. Sailboats! Cruise ships! No
experience, high pay. See Carribean,
Hawaii. Europe, world! Summer
career. Send $3.95 for info to Sea-
world, HD Box 60129, Sacto, Ca.
95860.
EXOTIC JOBS! Lake Tahoe Cal! Little
exp. Fantastic tips pay $1700-$4000.
Summer. 35,000 people needed in
casinos, restaurants, ranches, cruisers, river rafts. Send $3.95 for info
to LAKEWORLD, HD Box 60129,
Sacto, Ca.  95860.
35 — Lost
LOST: Light brown suede leather ooat.
Contact Alan  224-4798.
40 — Messages
PAST Golden Coffee Cupper: Happy
birthday M.H. Love the "Round
Table Gang" Inc.
65 — Scandals
ANYONE witnessing the accident at
16th and Thunderbird Blvd. Monday,
6:00  p.m.   please  call Scott  261-4093.
SATURDAY
NIGHT
FEVER
...Catch it.
At SUB Theatre Tonight
70 — Services
M.A. Grad will proof read theses and
papers. Can also check bibs. 684-7940.
Tony.
WEDDING Photography Specialist.
Complete professional coverage at
very reasonable rates. Call for consultation at your convenience.
732-9651  eves.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
FOR ACCURATE typing on an IBM Selectric Correcting typewriter call 986-
2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush work accepted.
FAST efficient typing. Reasonable
rates.  266-5053.
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-4870   after   6:00   p.m.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast, accurate.   Bilingual.  Clemy 324-9414.
TYPING: Exp. Secretary will type
theses, essays, reports, at 70c per
page. Can transcribe from tape recorder.   872-0505   (mornings).
ATTENTION Students: I will do your
typing in my home. Electric Typewriter. Manuscripts, thesis, etc.
Phone   Adrien   987-3569   anytime.
PROFESSIONAL Typing. IBM Selectric.
Essays, thesis, etc. Kits area. Phone
Lynda 732-0647.
90 — Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   eres.
AFRICA  — Overland  expeditions London/Nairobi     13     weeks.      London/
Johannesburg 16 weeks.
KENYA SAFARIS—2 and 3 weeks.
EUROPE — Camping and hotel tours
from 4 davs to 9 weeks.
For      brochures     contact      TRACKS
TRAVEL, Suite 3C0, 562 Eglinton Av«.
East, Toronto, On*. M4P  1B9.
CANCUN, exclusive eondo. available
April on Mexican Car'b. Mayan ruins
nearby.   $300/week.   433-4801.
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
t   PHOTOS
'*^    4538 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Friday, March 9, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
ALCOHOLISM
There is more of a moral stigma
attached to a woman drinking
than a man. As Jackie Manthorne
of the Women's Information
Referral Centre puts it, "For a
good mother, it is a much greater
fall from the pedestal."
By
SONIA
SELLAN
of The Ge.orgian
According to Donna Cohen,
Psychiatric Social Worker at the
Montreal General Hospital, this is
also the reason women tend to
drink   alone.    This    "closet
VANCOUVER
ISLAND WEST
School District
No. 84
Qualified Teachers wishing to teach in
School District No. 84 during the 1979-80
School Year should submit applications
and vitae to
Dave Price, Director of Instruction, Box 100, Gold River, B.C.
VOP 1G0, before March 16, 1979.
Teachers granted interviews in
Vancouver,   March   26   and   27,
1979, will be contacted by letter
or telephone before
March 23, 1979.
alcoholism" sometimes goes
undetected for long periods of
time, even by the alcoholic's own
family.
"The woman who drinks at
home is usually bored, fed up and
that is the reason that when, and if
she enters therapy it is very important for her to find a substitute for
the alcohol, in order to prevent
boredom, such as work outside
the home," Cohen said.
Jean-Guy Poirier, social worker
at Beaver House Rehabilitation
Centre feels the social stigma attached to a drinking woman is
decreasing.
He says that the career woman
is another "type" of alcoholic
woman. Her working environment drives her to drink for different reasons which are often
stress-related. Because she has the
opportunity to go out "with the
boys," she is often introduced to a
regular drinking pattern. "Very
often," he says, "she seeks help
because it is affecting her work
and her employer pushes her to do
so."
Another big factor for women
who drink is depression. In the
book The Personality of the
Alcoholic, Howard T. Blaine
writes, "Women use alcohol like a
medicine to narcotize thinking
and feeling in times of pain and
distress."
One expert found twice as many;
women as men attributed their
alcoholism to a specific incident
such as the death of someone
near, divorce or constant depression and said a lot of women are
moderate consumers of alcohol
until an incident triggers uncontrolled drinking.
. According to Edit Gomberg, a
social worker and an expert in the
field of alcoholic studies, another
factor in alcoholism in women
seems to be the biological
phenomena, such as infertility,
high incidence of miscarriage and
menopause. One sociologist says,
"Women are more tied to their
biological selves...the link between these biological events and
excessive uncontrolled drinking is
often clear cut."
THE
SEA
HORSE
By Edward J. Moore
An M.F.A.
Thesis
Production
Directed by
Bill Murdoch
MARCH 14 - 17
8:00 p.m.
Ticket: $3.00
Students: $2.00
Ticket: Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre
Dorothy Somerset
Studio
On October 12th, after
three intensive years of
studying the theory of
relativity, Wayne Thomson
left his lab, lit up a Colts,
paused, reflected, and decided
to become a phys ed major.
Colts. A great break.
Enjoy them anytime. Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 9, 1979
Und* Old, CA88ETTE SYSTEM
• It's ultra compact ind big on sound!
— Locking fast forward — Separate balance
and tone controls — Reversible slide-out —
Tape running indication
COMPLETE WITH:
— Flush mount mobile twin speaker kit —
Full spectrum response — Oust sealed voice
coils — Moisture resistant cones — Padded
black grills
INSTALLED
*159
95
IMPORTS
DELIGHT!
INDASH IMPORTED CAR SPECIAL
T-608 Cassette Stereo Tape Player with
AM/FM MPC Radio-Stereo indicator
— Lett/right balance — Local/Distance
switch for FM — Tone controls — Adaptable
to Craig Power flay amplifier for up to 72
watts—9414 Flush mount speaker kit — Full
spectrum sound—Dust sealed voice coils —
Moisture resistant cones — Padded black
grills
INSTALLED
*229
95
FULLY
FEATURED!
T607 Auto Reverse Cassette Player with
AM/FM Road-Rated Receiver..
— Locking Fast-Forward/rewind — Auto,
reverse w. illuminated direction indicator —
FM Muting — Local/Distance switch — Plug-
in   for   optional   power   play   amp.   —
Illuminated direction indicator.
PLUS 9428 Convertible
Car Speakers — either
surface   mounted   or
flush   —   Superior
linearity   and   greater
flux density — Dome
radiator   for   wider
frequency response.
*339
Complete
System
95
A ■)    SIMCfc 19SO
OK. AUTOMATIC RADIO'
C3r»Fi
VISONIK
DAVID» Mo
The Rally Model CXR2376 features Auto-
reverse — Locking fast forward and rewind
— Indicators for FM. AM and tape direction
Fits foreign cars — Two-year warranty. The
D-302 is two-way ultra compact loudspeaker
capable of full, accurate sound across the
entire frequency spectrum. The power is
provided by the Car-Fi 310, 5 band Graphic
Equalizer   with   60   watt   booster
Total
System
*649
95
INSTALLATION INCLUDED!
This complete stereo system is one of the best we've ever put
together. The CR420 AM/FM stereo receiver has 25+25 watts RMS
at less than 05% total distortion That's very clean The yP-B2 belt
drive semi-automatic turntable includes hinged cover and top
rated magnetic cartridge. Match these with the NS-220 rock
monitor 8" 2-way speaker systems and the sound is exceptional
Top quality and top value, you get both from YAMAHA AUDIO and
A&B SOUND. This system offers you a full 5 year warranty.
FULL FIVE
YEAR
WARRANTY!
599
95
SUPERSCOPE
CASSETTE      ~
RECORDER
Features
• Built-in Condenser
Microphone
• Automatic Shut-Oft
• Automatic Recording
Level (ARL)
• Pushbutton Operation
• Locking Fast Forward
and Rewind
• Cue and Review
• Tri-pod Mount
• Dual Flywheels
• DC Servo-Control Motor
• Earphone Monitor Jack
• Record Level/Battery
Strength Meter
• Operation in Any
Carrying Position
Pop Up
Cassette Eject
Ni-Cad Battery Pack
(Optional)
Interlocking Pause
Control
$59
Capitol
LOOK
TOP 100 SINGLES AT
VERY SPECIAL PRICES
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144

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