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The Ubyssey Mar 16, 1971

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 MICH
hours
where
—david bowerman photo
EL CHARTRAND, eloquent Quebec labor leader, spoke to an audience of 700 people for two
Saturday night at Kitsilano Secondary auditorium. Chartrand left Vancouver Sunday for Montreal
he faces charges of membership in the Front de Liberation du Quebec.
Housing for fun and profit
The $25 deposit demanded
with applications to UBC
residences violates the B.C.
Landlord and Tenant Act, and
any student who contests it in
court will receive the support
of the B.C. Tenant's Council,
said secretary Bruce Yorke
Monday.
Housing director Les
Rohringer said the act does not
apply to the UBC single
students' residence.
He said the university legal
advisors said the act did not
apply to Fort Camp, Place
Vanier, and Totem Park
residences.
"This is not a legal
relationship. It is a
room-and-board arrangement
with no leases required," said
Rohringer.
Yorke said the act covers
both oral and written
agreements     as     well     as
room-and-board arrangements.
"The deposits are necessary
to ensure that a student is
serious in his application,"
Rohringer said.
"If a student can't pay the
deposit now, he can make an
arrangement to defer it," he
said.
Yorke supported the idea of
a deposit to hold a room.
"However, it should come off
to page 3: see HUMANISM
Tunny kind
of justice'
By KATHY CARNEY
and DICK BETTS
About 700 people experienced Michel Chartrand in
Vancouver Saturday night.
The Montreal labor leader, imprisoned for four months
under the War Measures Act, took people with him on a two hour
expose of the Quebec economic, political and legal system.
He drew links between Quebec and Ottawa: "The little
politicians in Ottawa control justice in Quebec," he thundered.
He charged that the Queen's Court Bench is nominated by
the Federal government making these appointments political in
nature. "There is no equality in justice and we can prove it," he
said.
"Come Leblanc was charged with membership in the Front
de Liberation du Quebec (declared illegal by the federal
government) for the color of his tie and two paragraphs from a
book he owned.
"The trial was a farce," he said. Leblanc, 22, is a Montreal
student.
Chartrand cited further evidence of political persecution
against a certain group of people by saying, "People are in jail for
alleged membership in the FLQ and they have not found a single
FLQer yet."
"The army and judges were used to terrorize the people of
Quebec," he said.
"Of 372 people arrested in a day in October, 1970, 174
were let go after a few days or a week because the government
failed to produce evidence against them. Still two of the people
arrested in October are still in jail — Vallieres and Gagnon!"
"Funny kind of justice and they want me to cry about
Laporte," he roared.
"I won't cry. As for Cross — I feel sorry for him but I was
kidnapped for four months."
Chartrand had scathing words for bar association political
parties.
"Bars are the best organizations against the people of
Canada there is," he charged. "They were afraid to speak out
against the injustices in Quebec.
"The army was sent into Quebec by Liberals, Conservatives
and some New Democratic Party members. They control us for the
capitalists," Chartrand said.
Chartrand spent much of his speech in dealing with
Quebec's and Canada's role in the international situation. He
maintained that Canada is dominated by the United States.
"One per cent of the population in the U.S. controls 600 big
corporations which run the American Empire.
"We have unemployment because of the war in Vietnam
where people are being massacred and because of U.S.
domination here," he charged.
"The government is doing business with the states. For
supporting the U.S. in Vietnam, Pelletier (Gerard Pelletier,
secretary of state) says we get 600 million dollars. This is what we
exchange for lives," he said.
"We supply anything to the U.S. against Vietnam."
to page 2: see WE GIVE .
Kicking Ottawa
textbook-wise
By JOSEPHINE MARGOLIS
Students are the victims of the textbook racket.
"Textbooks are too expensive relative to the ability of
students to pay for them and to the costs of either printing or
importation," writes Art Smolensky, student senator, in a brief
entitled The Textbook Racket to Ron Basford, federal minister
of consumer and corporate affairs, Jean-luc Pepin, federal
minister of industry, trade and commerce and Dr. John Young,
chairman of the Prices and Incomes Commission.
"It is essential to understand that the burden of blame lies
almost entirely on the publisher and the distributing agents rather
than the university bookstore which operates at virtually no
profit," said Smolensky.
"One of the aims of the brief is to give the government a
kick in the ass and tell them that there are 250,000 Canadian
university students buying on the average of $100 of texts per
year, who cannot afford to pay the price increases and price
differentials," said Smolensky who compiled the brief in
conjunction with Rob McDiarmid, Alma Mater Society
vice-president-elect.
A member of Basford's staff explained that the reason for
price differential is that "the mark-up from the U.S. price or the
factory price is just what the dealer feels the traffic will bear."
to page 3: see LEARNING A Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
'We give you Ottawa — take it'
from page One
Chartrand gave as an example
the Lapalme workers who were
laid off by the Post Office because
of loss of revenue by giving
concessions to American
publications such as
Sears-Roebuck, Time and Life, to
circulate cheaply in Canada. The
Lapalme workers were truck
drivers laid off last year. Trudeau
recently told them to "eat shit"
outside parliament.
There is supposed to be a 40
per cent tax on magazines and
other publications from the U.S.
when mailed in Canada but the
U.S. publications are exempt.
"President Kennedy phoned
Pearson and told him if the Time
and Life publications of the U.S.
were not exempt from taxes then
the U.S. would pull $400 million
of investment out of Canada
creating unemployment," he said.
"Crimes, scandal and terrorism
come from governments who
work with the international
bandits who kill people outside
the country scientifically and
systematically."
"What's the difference between
Stalin, Hitler, Mussolini and the
technocrats," Chartrand queried.
"Hitler, Stalin and the rest
never killed as many people
daily," he answered himself.
Chartrand described the
government's    accusations    of
From the SFU campus
to the labor movement
The situation in the political science, sociology
and anthropology department at Simon Fraser
University is taking new and interesting turns.
The seven suspended professors are back on
salary for another year due to the failure of the
university administration to notify them definitely
as to their status in the institution.
However, last week Donald Brothers, provincial
education minister, publicly urged in the legislature
that the salaries of the suspended professors be
terminated and that they be fired.
Directing his attack specifically against
Mordecai Briemberg for his involvement in the
Turner demonstration, Mar. 6 at UBC, Brothers
indicated that Briemberg should go immediately.
Later in a news release Richard Lester,
chairman of the board of governors at SFU
contradicted Brothers' wish and said that the
professors concerned would stay on salary until a
clear decision was made about their jobs.
In commenting on the situation Briemberg said
Friday that there seem to be contradictions
developing among the province's ruling bodies.
Citing the clause in Lester's statement referring
to academic autonomy Briemberg said, "It seems
they (board members) are still concerned about
their own territory and do not like to see provincial
officials meddling in their affairs. I would call it a
contradiction amongst the ruling classes."
In a university hiring meeting Saghir Ahmad,
one of the suspended professors, was rehired on a
unanimous vote by the committee members.
The others received tie votes in the decision of
whether or not to rehire them. With SFU president
Kenneth Strand's injunction against the profs still in
force, possible results of the decision are uncertain.
Now the issue is moving off the campus. Several
weeks ago Briemberg was nominated by the
Canadian Union of Pulp and Paper Workers to sit on
an arbitration board on their behalf. Later the
company in question, MacMillan-Bloedel, appointed
Richard Lester as its representative.
The press has been quick to focus on the two
men rather than the issue involved.
"I am afraid that this appointment by the
company will take light off the real issue which is a
move on the part of workers for better conditions,"
said Briemberg.
Briemberg said he is thinking of withdrawing
from the negotiations depending on what happens.
In the meantime Lester will meet with him in
Briemberg's office in the PSA department at SFU
for preliminary talks.
"apprehended insurrection" as a
farce.
"It was the least well-equipped
insurrection that was ever
apprehended," he said.
"The government offers $140
million to farmers not to grow
wheat when two thirds of the
world is starving.
"Older people are not smart
enough to organize a human
society," he charged. "We don't
want to accept the fact that
young people will build a society
in which we can live in solidarity
and humanity.
"The time will come when
there won't be enough soldiers
and police to stop the young," he
said.
"This is what we want for
Quebec.
"What other country do you
know that has two governments
for the same people," he asked.
"No people in any province are
satisfied with the constitution and
the BNA - I suppose the problem
is Quebec? We are not satisfied
either," he said.
"We gave you Ottawa, please
take it. We will make a normal
life. We will sell to China if we
feel like it, we will not sell paper
to New York Times if we feel like
it, we will sell to communist
countries if we feel like it," he
said of ambitions for a free
Quebec.
Quebec will try to change "our
civilization of toilet paper with
flowers and perfume and thick
newspapers.
"Students do not control their
universities," Chartrand pointed
out. "The most reactionary
people are on the boards of
governors in universities and, of
course, in parliament."
"Democracy does not come
from heaven," he said.
"Capitalisim is not democratic.
The essence of capitalism is the
maximization of profit with no
public gain," Chartrand explained.
"Capitalism is fascism.
"No one will prevent us from
living like free people with a
socialist government in Quebec,"
he said.
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681-1825 Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—dave enns photo
FAMILIAR FIGURE of Karl Burau (the man who never misses a chance to address the masses) holds
attention of seated politicos at AMS all-candidates' meeting in SUB conversation pit Monday.
Learning the U.S. way
from page One
The brief states that "A
monopoly situation exists
between a number of foreign
book companies and their
Canadian distributors or
subsidiaries . . . and that a number
of foreign publishers conspire to
sell their products solely to one
Canadian distributor."
The brief states that it is the
opinion of the authors
Smolensky and McDiarmid — that
the justifiable mark-up for U.S.
and U.K. books is six per cent
over the foreign list price.
Smolensky cites the example
of Existentialism from
Dostoevsky to Sarte, a paperback
book edited by Walter Kaufmann
and published in the United
States, and distributed by Foster
and Scott of Toronto, which was
listed in July 1970 as retailing for
$2.25 in the United States. The
Canadian agents told UBC
professors the book would cost
students $2.75 — a differential of
22 per cent.
On Aug. 4, 1970, the UBC
bookstore was given the price of
$4.70 for the same book.
The brief points out that price
increases are most marked in
paperback books as opposed to
hardbound texts which is
coincidental with the fact that
publishers, five years ago, started
the paperback revolution on the
grounds that the net costs to
students were lower.
"The cultural implications are
implicit in the brief," said
Smolensky, "if only 2)6. per cent
of the texts are published by
Canadian-controlled companies
and the perpetuation of our
culture rests on the students who
are studying these texts there may
be no country for the politicians
to administer, the same politicians
who are allowing this to happen."
Although the brief refers
specifically to the publications
and marketing of university
textbooks, the authors believe
that there are implications for the
elementary and secondary school
systems and the whole country.
The brief suggests a course of
action which includes: a detailed
study of textbook pricing in
Canada; an immediate
investigation into the rights
exercised by those companies
with sole distribution rights on
certain books; an investigation
into the 'complimentary copy'
situation where professors receive
unsolicited free copies of texts;
and a price-increase control
system.
Humanism beats legality, kids
from page One
your fees immediately when you
pay them. They can't hold it back
after you occupy," he said.
At present, the deposit is
credited to the spring term fees. It
is confiscated if a student does
not accept his assignment or if he
vacates during the fall term.
on  the  deposits myself," Yorke
said.
The married residences have
written leases and thus obviously
come under the act. Housing has
refunded the original $30 deposit
to tenants in the Acadia Park
married residence and is no longer
charging it.
"I wouldn't mind the interest Rohringer defended the single
residences as not simply providing
accommodation but a continuing
educational experience as well.
"1 am always willing to talk to ,
students  about   their ideas," he
said,   "The   human   relationship
gives you more advantages.
"If I was a dictator, you could
ask for a legal arrangement."
AMS election:
another meet
By MIKE SASGES
Red baiting broke up Monday's Alma Mater Society presidential
candidates' meeting.
"I think the March 6 demonstration against justice minister John
Turner was a good preview of things to come on this campus," Hanson
Lau said in apparent reference to alleged participation in the
demonstration by human government supporters.
Steve Garrod of the human government slate replied during the
question period that he wasn't there and that none of the newly-elected
members of the AMS executive were present at the demonstration.
"I think that the demonstrators made a good point. If a huge
number of Quebecois had their freedom of speech removed so can
Turner," he said. "Elected representatives of the people are no
different, and that goes for AMS types."
Garrod was then interrupted by an unidentified member of the
audience.
"Do you believe in freedom of speech?" he asked. "Then why
wasn't Turner allowed it?"
"The people at that demonstration were there to shout down
Turner and prevent him from talking," he said.
The man then went on to discuss the difference between shouting
down a speaker and a heckler explaining "I am a heckler."
Boos, hisses and laughter followed from the audience.
Terms "fascist" and "communist" were hurled at him by other
members of the audience.
The heckler was silenced and Garrod and Lau answered other
questions until it was suggested that the meeting break down into
smaller groups.
The meeting had been quiet and orderly until the question
period.
Bill Broughton, the first to speak, said he was not a comedy-relief
candidate.
"1 feel the AMS should be anon-political organization,providing
student services," he said. "I'll work on your ideas, not mine, not any
slates."
Garrod, of the human government slate, said the AMS is a
political organization.
"The human government slate supports the Canadianization of
the university and its democratization," he said.
Garrod also promised to try to end discrimination against women
and the lack of summer employment for students.
"I don't feel our executive will be closed off to the students," he
said. "We're interested in your ideas."
Garrod said that since the human government already holds the
other seven AMS executive positions, the president should be from the
slate.
"You can say no to us any time," he said. "We still promise a
referendum in October for you to decide on our actions over the
summer."
Hanson Lau said he enjoyed being AMS president-elect for two
weeks.
At this point, he made his reference to human government
representation in the Turner demonstration.
He was met by hisses and boos from the audience but was finally
allowed to carry on.
"I am not here to talk. I promise action," Lau said. "The AMS
has already got 600 jobs this summer."
The AMS bureaucracy is uptight because I know how to change
the structures within the AMS, he said.
"If you want something, vote for Hanson Lau," he said.
The question and answer period then began but it soon broke
down into the argument over free speech for John Turner.
Mark it 1, 2, 3 or X
Every precaution is being taken to eliminate irregularities in
Wednesday's Alma Mater Society presidential election.
"You can either mark 1, 2, 3 on your ballot or an x", said
returning officer Andrea Smith Monday, referring to the use of the
preferential ballot to insure a 50 per cent plus one vote majority for a
successful candidate.
In the AMS constitution, a person does not have to vote
preferentially, said Smith.
"When we count the ballots and find there is not a majority for
one candidate, we will strike the lowest from our list and count his
number two choices for the majority," she said.
Smith said that the AMS cards will be punched by scrutineers so a
person cannot vote twice.
A member of the election committee will be going around every
hour to check each ballot box for irregularities.
Advance polls in SUB open Tuesday at 11:30 a.m. and in
residences at five p.m.
Polls on Wednesday open at 10 a.m.
Human government wins
The human government has scored another victory, said Graduate
Student Association vice-president-elect Alan Robbins, who was
acclaimed to the GSA executive with the other human government
candidates Friday.
The other members of the executive are: president Gince
Quijano; Aline Smolensky, secretary; Maureen Sager, internal affairs
officer; Mike Finlay, external affairs officer and two Alma Mater
Society representatives, Julian Wake and Tony Grinkus. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
THEU8YSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
MARCH 16,1971
But will it help ?
We have mixed feelings about the plan for
universities and student councils to buy the McClelland
and Stewart publishing company.
We suppose it's good for a number of people to be
organizing around some aspect of the Americanization
issue.
At the same time, it's becoming apparent that the
well-meaning people involved have been played for'
suckers in a gigantic publicity stunt.
M and S board chairman Jack McClelland's latest
plan is to turn the company into a public corporation,
using the recent publicity and anguish over the fate of
Canadian publishing to hype the sale of shares.
But even if that wasn't the case, there would still
be a lot of questions about the scheme.
First of all, if people like McClelland, who make
their living publishing books, can't keep the company
running, will university administrations and student
councils, which are notoriously inept at running
themselves, do any better?
More important, will buying McClelland and
Stewart really make much difference?
We know all the arguments about preserving
Canadian culture and we know the publishing industry
is crucial to that goal.
But will Canadian culture be any better or worse
through the presence of such M and S authors as Pierre
Berton, Bob Hunter and Simma Holt?
Besides, trying to preserve Canadian culture won't
do us a hell of a lot of good if the country remains a
colony in every other sense.
Canada's economy is based on the exploitation of
resources by and for American industry. We doubt that
any distinctive culture worthy of the name can exist in
that kind of environment.
Viewed in isolation, the McClelland and Stewart
purchase plan may not be all that bad an idea, but
unless Canadians are prepared to take major steps to
gain control of their own destiny, it won't do that much
good.
Illegal residences
Housing director Les Rohringer seems genuinely
surprised at the suggestion that his department has been
violating the landlord-tenant act for almost a year.
The dispute centres around the deposits students
pay when signing up for residence accommodation. The
question will probably have to be decided ini court,
although the act seems quite clear.
The interesting thing is Rohringer's contention that
residences do not come under the act.
He seems to think the university is doing students a
favor providing cramped, costly and repressive
residences and that students, therefore, aren't entitled
to the same rights as tenants as anyone else.
Sorry, Les.
Editor: Nate Smith
News Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire    John Andersen
Sports Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
The wondrous wielders of the
magical lenses finally got to write a
masthead.
As head photo phreaks Daves
Bowerman and Enns shot it out with
Nikons at five paces, Brett Garrett
took shots of Shane McCune
wandering through the streets of
Gastown molesting the occasional
statue.
The rest of the staff held the 39th
weekly     meeting     of     Alcoholics
Unanimous, during which Kathy
Carney, Ann Arky and Sandy Kass
supplied libations to Bacchus played
by Michael Qulgley. The hardcore of
Michel Finlay, Ken Lassessen, Paul
Knox and Dick Betts communed with
their favorite uncle, then performed
their famed (?) animal act before an
unappreciative audience of Jennifer
Alley Josephine Margolis, Kathy
Stewart and Jinny Ladner.
Mike Sasges, resplendent in his
alterboy outfit, was heard telling
Sharon Boylan that Captain Morgan
was his idea of a real man. Thorn
Westcott, an AU dropout, was seen
smoking dope with Tom Campbell
after which they vanished in a cloud of
yellow smoke.
In the jock shop, Keith Dunbar was
seen snapping awav at Steve Millard
and Kingsley Artifact who were turning
light purple with unrestrainable joy.
And now a reminder of the gala
year-end bash cum Saturnalia this
Saturday. See your neighborhood
scandalmonger for time and place.
WLY KEEP A COW WREK YOU
YOUR MILK FOR FREE ^I^gg^
—new leaf
"We have become a milk cow for the U.S., a hewer of wood and a drawer of water."
— W. S. Fielding, 19th  century minister of finance.
LETTERS
More Turner
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Re: Friday's letter from John
Mcintosh:
I have been a member of the
Free Canada-Free Quebec
Committee since its formation
and attended Turner's speech in
that capacity. I am not in the
habit of attaching other groups,
such as the AMS, to my activities
if they are not concerned.
As I have previously pointed
out, to Messrs. Adrian Belshaw
and Michael Robinson in
particular, I have a mind of my
own and act independently.
As I disagree with infringements
on the? civil rights of others,
Quebecois and Turner included, I
had no intention of preventing
Turner from speaking but only
planned to register a protest.
Dissent is not YET illegal in.
Canada.
It would be appreciated if John
Mcintosh had the courage to
speak to me personally rather
than attempt character
defamation via the press. I am
available during the day in The
Ubyssey office.
KATHY CARNEY
AMS Arts Rep-Elect.
Referendum
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The industrial education
students have been out of pocket
for too long. They are situated
upon a Burnaby campus for 10
months of the year and are
required to pay the $15 SUB
building fund fee, from which
they receive no benefit at all.
Their one year program is long
and hard and when they are not
out practice teaching they spend
all day in classes, breaking only
for lunch.
A precedent has been set in the
fact that the nursing students at
Vancouver General Hospital have
been exempted from this fee
already. Also this referendum has
been run twice before and has
achieved over the two-thirds
majority needed each time by
obtaining 74 per cent and 69 per
cent. The trouble is that the
required 20 per cent of the
student population was not
reached.
Myself, as president-elect, and
the education undergraduate
society feel that these education
students should receive this $15
so thay can finance their own
program, as they intend to do.
KERRY BYSOUTH
President-Elect
Education Undergraduate
Society
Typists
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I want to complain about the
AMS typing service because it is
ripping people off.
I took a 6,000 word seminar
paper to them recently. Four days
later it came back and I foolishly
paid my nine dollars before
checking it.
When I got a chance to
proof-read it, I counted 40
typographical errors, spelling
mistakes and ommissions before I
gave up.
I took the paper back and got
an undertaking that it would be
re-typed.
Well, last week my paper came
back, looking like it was turned
out by a failing grade 10 typing
class, with black smudges all over
and, in some spots, the paper
worn out from the typist
hammering the same letter over
and over.
The pages that were re-done
had many of the same errors, as
well as a few brand new ones.
I was handed the mess and told
there would be no more repairs,
so jt's now going to cost me
another nine bucks.
Anyone thinking of using the
AMS typing service should follow
this advice: don't. If you do, you
fool, don't pay until you get your
paper typed properly.
DELL VALAIR
Law 3
English exams
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
It appears to me that the aim
of the English department is to
discourage students from
continuing their studies in English
literature. A quick glance at the
exam schedule for April 1971
raises the question of the need for
and the wisdom in holding an
English exam for second year
genre students.
In the genre division of English
200, there are more than 30
sections, comprising over a
thousand students. The various
lecturers are certainly told by the
English department what
materials they should cover in the
course of the year, but the fact
remains that each lecturer teaches
only a portion of that material,
using what he considers important
and of interest. Therefore, two
classes in English 200 genre rarely
cover all the same authors, or in
the same manner, or
with  the  same aspects stressed.
Yet the English department has
decided to hold a final exam,
worth an estimated 40 per cent of
the year's mark. The English
department has not, as yet,
informed (and supposedly will not
inform) their lecturers of the
content of the exam. The student
will not even know the general
areas to be stressed on the exam.
The student will write a final
exam totally blind, after
attempting to compress seven
months of work into whatever
amount of study time he may
happen to have before the exam
(there are other exams to write
besides English). Remind you just
a little of grade seven or eight?
BOB SHERRIN
Arts 2. Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
AMS campaign statements
The following statements
come from two of the
presidential candidates
running in Wednesday's Alma
Mater Society by-election.
The third candidate, Hanson
Lau, did not submit a
statement.
BILL
BROUGHTON
My platform is NO B.S. simply
because I believe that the AMS is
internally a non-political
organization that should be
devoted to representation of the
students' views to the university,
community, and the government.
I feel the AMS should work
towards Canadianization of
courses and making those who
teach teachers. Those are my ideas
if you disagree I'll work just as
hard on yours. I have the
capabilities to do the job and if I
am elected I'll do my damnedest
to work for you.
I'm serious about this election,
NO B.S. Vote Bill Broughton for
AMS President.
Help welcome Trudeau
MAYDAY, MAYDAY,
MAYDAY!
When Pierre and Margaret
Trudeau come to Vancouver May
1, to officially open the new
whale pool at Stanley Park, Inner
City hopes to have a welcoming
celebration all ready for them.
At present, the scenario
involves guerilla theatre and
assorted cultural events to be held
at Stanley Park, followed by a
Jobs: 50c an hour
Students who don't want to starve in Canada this summer can
starve in Europe, courtesy of the federal government.
After a lot of talk about alleviating student unemployment,
Ottawa has finally come up with 3,000 jobs.
Only problems are that the jobs are in various parts of Europe
and pay 50 cents an hour for a 50-hour work week.
UBC placement officer Cam Craik unveiled the possibilities
Monday with the disclosure of a government announcement of the jobs.
A letter from the government received by the UBC placement
office said: "The student must be 18 years or older and must have some
knowledge of the language and background of the host country. The
countries involved are Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France,
Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden and the United Kingdom."
"Student must agree to work for at least two months beginning
from mid-May or June. Students may need to put in as much as 50
hours a week at their jobs. Wages for students average about $100 a
month. In many cases room and board will be provided."
The students must pay for their own transportation but low cost
transportation can be provided from centres in Toronto, Montreal, and
Vancouver. Applications, available at the placement office, must be in
to the local Manpower centre by March 31.
feast and demonstration at the
Hotel Vancouver, where Trudeau
is scheduled to host a $50 a plate
dinner for the Liberal Party.
If you represent a group or just
yourself, you are invited to take
part in the planning of this event
on Saturday at 12 p.m. at the
Inner City office, Venables and
Columbia streets.
For further information
contact Bob Smith, 733-0618, or
the Georgia Straight.
mm
piTia
EAT IN .TAKEOUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus    •
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In — Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.       224.61121
In the Village
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare or Straight Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIA1   STUDENT  RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
KITIMAT
School District No. 80 (Kitimat)
Representatives will be on campus Wednesday to Friday, March
17-19 for interviewing with respect to teaching possibilities in Kitimat.
Persons interested in teaching positions are invited to make an
appointment for an interview through the Office of Student
Services (Placement).
Interviews will be carried on:
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Wednesday,
Thursday, and Friday, March 17-19
SAVE UP TO 50%
over    1000   New   and
Used
Standard Portable and Electric
TYPEWRITERS
Adders, Calculators, etc. at the
World's 1st Office
Equipment Supermarket
Absolutely the largest selection and
lowest prices in Canada.
Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
STUDENT RENTALS
LOW RATES
WE DELIVER & PICK-UP
PQLSON TYPEWRITERS
458 W Broadway - 879-0631
Open Daily inc. Saturday—9-6
Friday 9-9
Lots of Free Parking
1971 GRADUATES
I .A.C. Limited invites applications for Management
Trainee positions.
I.A.C. Limited, the largest Sales Finance Company
in Canada, is a member of the all-Canadian Group of
Companies comprised of Sovereign Life Assurance,
Merit Insurance, Niagara Finance Co., and Capital Funds
(I.A.C.) Limited.
Applicants should have sales and administrative
aptitudes.
Please send applications to:
Mr. Wm. V. Daly
I.A.C. Limited
777 Hornby St.
Suite 1400
Vancouver, B.C.
Candidates will be selected for interviews at the
Campus Placement Office.
STEVE
GARROD
I think we have all seen the
inability and unwillingness of the
AMS to deal with the real issues
of our lives. The AMS in the past
has been irrelevant; it must be
reformed or abolished.
We have the imagination,
ability and organization to work
to make changes in the AMS that
will affect your lives.
The AMS must deal with the
real issues that face students:
unemployment,    democratization
of the university, Canadianization,
and the descrimination against
women.
We have the people in office
now who can work for and with
you, and we need the president to
keep it together. Vote Steve
Garr«d for Human Government
President.
Tansar
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4th. avenue
INDUSTRIAL ED STUDENTS IN BURNABY
DO NOT USE SUB
VOTE
MARCH 17
IxMI
TO GIVE THEM BACK THEIR $15
NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
The Graduate Student Centre
The Annual General Meeting will be
held on Thursday, March 25,
at 12:30 P.M.
in the New-Wing Lower Lounge.
ALL GRADUATE STUDENTS ARE INVITED
TO ATTEND
Business will include a proposed fee
increase for Summer Session students.
a newjilm by
ingmar bergman
a SUB Film Soc presentation—
FRIDAY 19 & SATURDAY 20
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 21 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
Reporter McCune gathers information in import store.
Outside on Water Street, life plods on.
JLJL \ur    *■   M
One
a young r
down to <
Or, what happened when poverty
for brash, self-assur
Like most people I know, I used to enjoy going down to
Gastown.
It took an hour and a half on a cold and windy afternoon
to change my mind.
In that space of time I discovered how easy it is to ignore
poverty unless you're looking for it.
And I was looking for it.
I wanted a neat, black-and-white story showing how
helpless and miserable the bums on skid road are and how greedy
and capitalistic Gastown merchants are. One out of two ain't bad.
Although there are still many small boutiques and
restaurants in Gastown, some of them run by resident owners,
they are rapidly being overtaken by larger, slicker outfits.
One store clerk told me quite frankly that Gastown is
already too commercial and is becoming worse.
Most of the larger shops are part of chains with similar
branches in Toronto, San Francisco and other large cities. The
so-called "import" stores seem to import most of their junk from
the same area of Japan as any department store's souvenir
section. There isn't much of the exotic in an inflatable rubber
duck or a placard reading, "Teachers Pet, Do You?"
There is little difference in price between shops in Gastown
and other areas of town. Where differences exist, the Gastown
prices seldom compare favorably. When they say "cost plus" they
aren't kidding.
Admittedly there is a good time to be had by spending an
evening in the Spaghetti Factory or the Gastown Saloon, but only
if you forget or don't know who suffers while these places
prosper.
The Gastown nightlife depends upon the facile attractions
of garish decor, long-haired proprietors, hip or campy music, and
the myth that bums and panhandlers are cute. This latter attitude
finds expression in remarks such as that tossed off by the
manager of a Gastown coffeehouse, a very nice guy who told me
that "the old guys really like it; it's easier for them to panhandle
now."
He wasn't being sarcastic or deliberately condescending. He
just didn't know any better.
He went on to tell me about the former practice of doling
out unpublicized Thanksgiving meals to the old-timers — out the
back door, mind you — a practice that was "discontinued after
we had a couple of break-ins".
This is the most blatant example of charity toward
Gastown people in their own neighborhood that I have
encountered. But it reflects the thinking of most newcomers to
the area.
Most people don't realize that many Gastown "bums" have
been living there for as many as 30 or 35 years. Including
transients Who reappear from time to time, the "old" population
of Gastown numbers about 6,600.
This information was sup
secretary of the Residents of Ga:
two-year-old organization that h
to use Kuxhausen's words, of "pr
bums and drunks — can run their
The RGA's offices at 55A
little more than hope - or de
remained indomitably cheerful
admitted that "things look prett
to go."
The organization has bee
advice from the Company of Yo
even local merchants, but the o
come from the federal governmer
Ottawa has promised fund:
New Fountain hotels, but tl
$40-50,000 necessary to refurr
renovations should be finishe
accommodation: 150 persons.
It will take a miracle of fin
the old Gastown. As the area b
values soar and so do rents.
By this time most apartrr
reach for most of the old-timers.
BOOKS SOLD ON CONSIGNMENT
WE CARRY
TEXTBOOKS - GENERAL FICTION -
MONARCH AND COLE'S STUDY NOTES -
SCHAUM'S OUTLINE SERIES
THE BOOKFINDER
4444 W. 10th Ave.
228-8933
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REFERENDUM
-ED STUDENTS IN BURNABY
-RECEIVE NO BENEFIT FROM SUB
-NEED $15 FOR OWN PROGRAM
VOTE
YES
MARCH 17
SALE OF LOS
G00
MARCH 18th 11:30-2:30 an.
CHECK BEFORE
ARTICLES YOU M Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
'How come you got a suit an' I don't?' asked the Gastowner.
Photos by Brett Garrett.
• ' ■'  "f     ? './i, ' ,V. '£'-
ian went
iastown.
jcame part of the real world
Shane McCune.
J by Paul Kuxhausen, the
n Association. The RGA is a
:en doing an admirable job,
gfhat a bunch of old men -
neighborhood."
;11 (phone 684-8920) run on
ition. Although Kuxhausen
oughout the interview, he
m - there's still a long way
iceiving moral support and
Canadians, city council and
financial support so far has
renovate the old Stanley and
association must find the
them. Kuxhausen says the
y   mid-summer.   Maximum
; and public relations to save
nes more popular, property
5 and hotels are far out of
gardless of whatever housing
projects are successfully completed, many Gastowners will be
unable to live in their old haunts.
The blame for this situation rests with those of us who
continue to patronize Gastown without thinking of the
consequences to the original denizens of the waterfront — even
while we're tossing loose change to them or making bay rum
jokes.
The really frightening thing about this attitude is that it's
usually reserved for problems far removed from our everyday
lives. But Gastown doesn't qualify for that status. We rub our
noses in it almost every day.
The attitude of most boutique-hoppers is worse than
"benign neglect." The tatty, booze-swilling old men you meet on
the street are somehow supposed to be quaint, part of the whole
"intimate" atmosphere of Gastown. Every homeless drunk is like
ol' Gassy Jack, incarnate.
Make your next trip to Gastown during daylight, and talk
to some of the panhandlers before they police throw them into
the drunk tank. They don't need much encouragement.
The highlight (if you can call it that) of my miserable hour
and a half in daytime Gastown came after I had been hit for the
last of my change.
An old guy dressed in the perennial rubby uniform, nylon
jacket and peaked cap, hailed staff photographer Brett Garrett
and myself from his seat on the sidewalk.
& FOUND
IARCH 19th 11:30-1:30
ESALE FOR
' HAVE LOST
CREATIVE
INTELLIGENCE
An Introductory Talk on
Transcendental Meditation
Thurs., March 18 at 12:30
in Buch. 203
Maharishi Mahesh
Yogi
His shaky hand held a crinkled piece of wax paper
containing two green slices of bologna.
"Wanna piece of baloney?"
"No ... no, I've already had lunch," I answered stupidly.
"Go ahead, take some." He wobbled to his feet.
"Aw, c'mon fellas, can ya help me out?"
It was pitiful. His voice was beginning to crack.
"I'm sorry, but I don't have any more change, and I really
can't afford a bill. I'd like to help you - I really would, but I
can't." I hardly knew what I was saying.
Brett gave him some change. The old guy started to cry.
"You guys gotta help me ... you got fancy clothes, and I
don't. I'm just an old bum. Look at your suit. How come you got
a suit and I don't? How come you got fancy equipment and I
don't? (Brett's camera) I'm just a bum ... I'm sorry ... how
come you guys got all that?"
I didn't have an answer. He was weeping on Brett's
shoulder.
We left.
Five minutes earlier we had been playing super-journalists,
looking for easy contrasts, picking out the grubbiest-looking
bums to photograph, noting the worthless junk in the boutiques
and the closed-circuit television guarding it from shoplifters.
But now I didn't have an answer.
apoic^AA aoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooootfr
Yukon Seminar
MAY-AUGUST 1971
Working  in  local northern communities or other volunteer
opportunities ie Urban training Toronto.
contact
AUCM, Peter Fribley or George Hermanson
224-1614 or come to SUB 228 March 19
jCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART EIGHTEEN
Mike Six was a calm island in a raging sea of
war, a haven of escape in a dark forest of tyranny,
in short, one of those rare places that brings out the
poetry in everyone.
Actually, it really wasn't that good, but given
the quantity and quality of dope that was available
there it's hard to think anything bad about that
place.
Mike Six was basically a fort run by the
Vietnamese militia. There were about 60
Vietnamese amateur soldiers who hung around
there, and about 20 Marines to provide heavy mortar
and recoiless rifle support to make the war seem
more authentic. All of us had come to the personal
conclusion that it was a lousy war but there wasn't
much any of us could do to actively oppose it.
The only thing left to do was forget about the
war and enjoy life. Walden Pond could hardly have
been better.
The village market had all the essentials of
life; rice, noodles, salted mackerel, animal crackers,
incense, beads and dope.
We had daily volleyball games on the
helicopter pad that kept us in whatever shape we
tried to maintain. But the big attraction of the
volleyball games wasn't the benefits of physical
culture, it was the thrill of chasing a runaway ball
over the perimeter and through the mines and
boobytraps.
Since we were visited once or twice a week by
officers and other animals who still believed in the
war, we had to keep a lot of guns around to keep
up our image. This had its advantages though, since
it was a lot cheaper and easier to use our Thompsons
and shotguns and such to make noise than to run
down to the village and try and buy a supply of
fireworks.
The Vietnamese were even more like kids than
we were in that respect. One day they discovered
that because of translation problems and our
general disposition to making noise, all they had to
do was look excited and point to a deserted patch
of woods and we'd lay out a full scale fire mission
for them.
During the next two weeks our two mortar
tubes burned up more ammunition than the other
ten tubes in the battalion combined.
Things quickly worked into an ideal routine.
About three in the afternoon, when everyone was
finally up and moving, one of the Vietnamese
honchos would come running down to our hut with
a grin from ear to ear, claiming proudly, "Vee Shee,
VeeShee!"
As soon as this happened everyone would take
up the call of "Fire mission!" and run for the gun
pits. Our gunners were fantastic people, straight or
otherwise they could set the guns up in about thirty
seconds. It also helped a lot shooting at the same
empty field every day.
The ambition of every Marine mortar gunner
is to fire a football field, a pattern of fire where you
shoot twenty rounds in a row without stopping
while moving the tube around. Since the Marine
Corps is really stingy with its ammunition, not
many of them ever get to shoot it. But it wasn't a
Marine officer directing our fire, it was a
Vietnamese freak. We had the happiest gunners in
all of Viet Nam.
There was only one problem with our fire
parties — the recoiless rifle — since we were having
so much fun, the RR crew wanted to get in on the
action. The recoiless rifle works on the idea that if
you have a big enough blast coming out of the back
you can balance the shell coming out the front and
you won't need a huge base and recoil mechanism.
The problem was that the field the
Vietnamese chose to shoot at was directly on the
other side of the recoiless rifle from our gun pits.
Accoustically it was a beautiful arrangement, full
quadriphonic sound loud enough you could feel it,
but the blast kept kicking up dirt and pebbles...
oh well, war IS hell.
Another thing we had to do with the mortars
was harrassment and interdiction fires, orH&I's. All
this involved was shooting at a dot on the map, the
idea being to make it more exciting for anyone who
was trying to sneak around at night.
I remember one night when the squad leader
trusted the job to a couple of us rank amateurs.
Since it was one in the morning, it took us about
five minutes to find the mortar pit.
I had just finished setting all the numbers on
the site and was going over to break down some
rounds before trying to line up all the little lights
when the other guy started dropping rounds down
the tube. When we finally managed to get it
together and call for help, we found we had only
missed by about a hundred yards.
They never asked us if we'd like to fire the
H&I's again, though. That was all right, I was
happier sitting inside and listening to the war on the
battalion radio net.
INDUSTRIAL
EDUCATION
REFERENDUM
YES MARCH 17
Tim
PATIO.
•EAT IN • TAKE OUT. DELIVERY"
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
GENERAL MEETING
Thursday—March 25th—12:30 noon.
SUB Plaza
EVERYONE OUT TO VOTE ON
CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGES
EDUCATION STUDENTS
IN FINAL YEAR
Give Your Support
To The B.C.T.F. Stand
On BILL 47
(Voluntary
Membership)
GIVE YOUR PLEDGE
IN ROOM 1
Education Bldg.
Before March 19/71
GRADUATE STUDENTS
The opening of your new expansion is on
Friday, March 19,1971.
Official opening 2:30 p.m.
Beergarden—Afternoon tea.
Dinner and dancing
in the evening.
Arrange a group or come alone.	
An ensemble in human research:
CREATION II
and
CHARLES
HAMMOND
ANDROID
You are invited to come and ask questions of a human
analog or duplicate.
WEDNESDAY NOON 12:35
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Across from UBC Administration Bldg.
a SUB Film Soc presentation—
FRIDAY 19 & SATURDAY 20
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 21 - 7:00
SUB THEATRE
AMS Students-50c
General Public—75c
COME IN T0DAY>
HEAP BIG
MEDICINE
ON YOUR
INCOME TAX
No need to be sick
about tax. Get Big
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wampum, too.
COMPLETE d
RETURNS   *
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We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return.
If we make any errors that cost you any penalty or
interest, we will pay the penalty or interest.
HR
CANADA LTD.
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3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST
6395 FRASER
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I           1685 DAVIE ST.            1
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSAR 71
-327-0461 Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Vancouver council asks for Jericho briefs
March 23 has been set as the
date for a public hearing into the
* Jericho Road proposals.
It will be held at 2 p.m. in
the council chambers at city hall,
and all persons wishing to speak
are asked to submit briefs to Ron
Thompson, city clerk, as soon as
possible.
Groups  already  scheduled to
appear before council include the
Alma Mater Society; the Citizens'
> Council   on  Civic  Development;
West  Point  Grey Area Council;
Dunbar, Kitsilano and Northwest
Point Grey Ratepayers
Association; and the Yippies.
A spokesman for the. city
clerk's office said Monday each
delegation will be allowed five
minutes to present its brief.
City council agreed last week
to take no further action to
develop the road until results of
the public hearing are made final.
The parks board decided last
week   to   send   a  delegation  to
Ottawa to confer with federal
officials, as to possible changes in
the present scheme. However, no
delegation has been officially
appointed as yet.
Mayor Tom Campbell was in
Ottawa last week, supposedly
conferring with federal officials
about Jericho Road, but to date
he has refused to issue any
statement regarding his trip.
Federal MP for Vancouver
Quadra Grant Deachman was in
town   this   weekend   and  spoke
with a representative for the
Spanish Banks Property Owner's
Association.
Ted Delmonico told Deachman
the SBPOA was not only opposing
the road on the grounds that it
would necessitate destruction of
Locarno Park Extension and
expropriation of houses along the
4400 block Marine Drive and
Belmont Street, but would oppose
the road facilitating townhouse
development on land which his
association feels should remain as
park.
Delmonico also protested that
city council refused to allow a
night public meeting into the
scheme, to which Deachman
replied that he would speak to
Campbell and "see what can be
arranged."
Shrum summonsed
U of S protests firing
SASKATOON (CUP) - In the face of
threatened disciplinary action from the
administration, over 600 Saskatoon students
re-occupied the upper floors of the University of
Saskatchewan's arts building Monday.
The action followed a rally in support of
student demands that economics professor John
Richards be rehired. The sit-in, which began
Wednesday, was temporarily suspended on the
weekend.
The   department  of economics and political
science met in closed session Saturday. Department
head, Dr. Leo Kristjanson, issued a statement that
the faculty had re-affirmed its decision not to offer
Richards a teaching position for next year.
Members of a student steering committee met
with Kristjanson and campus principal, Dr. R. W.
Begg on Sunday. At that time, the administration
head threatened disciplinary action against any
students who continued the occupation Monday.
Nonetheless, it was evident at the Monday rally
that support for the student demands in the face of
adamant faculty opposition has grown considerably.
A summons has been served on
B.C. Hydro chairman Gordon
Shrum to appear in court
Wednesday.
Shrum was charged with
common assault following a
disturbance March 6, where
federal justice minister John
Turner was prevented from
making a speech. Mark Warrior,
a former UBC student, swore out
an information statement against
Shrum last week.
The summons was served by
judge M. E. Ferguson and Shrum
will   appear   in   University   Hill
provincial court.
VOTE
BR0UGHT0N
For AMS Pres.
I'M SERIOUS
AND THAT'S
NO B.S.
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body.
Eczema, Pimples, Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
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action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
In the village
2136 Western Park Way    224*7013
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21
22
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23
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24
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FOTIII
How do you measure
job opportunities for
mining engineers?
• You learn all you can about the company offering the job and its requirements. • You learn how and where you
are expected to function in relation to the
people, company and industry with which
you will be working. • You learn all you
can about the rewards and further opportunities you can rightly expect for a
job well done. Then...and only then...
you...and only you...decide.
THIS AMAX KIT MAY HELP
It contains the profile of our corporation.
Titled "Economic Growth and Quality of
Life," it tells in part the story of some
16,000 people and how they meet challenges and contribute to a highly diversi
fied industry, the nation and the world.
The kit documents their successes...and
future objectives. Read it, and you'll still
have questions. But "Economic Growth
and Quality of Life" will be a useful yardstick for measuring job opportunities with
AMAX...or any other company.
HOW WE GOT THE TITLE
AMAX believes that continued, vigorous
economic growth properly directed is one
worthwhile way to enrich the quality of
life.That by providing meaningful opportunities and rewards, you promote personal
contentment. Such thinking attracts capable people—the kind of people you would
probably like to be with and work with.
May we send you the AMAX Kit, "Economic Growth and Quality of Life"?
Mail the coupon or, if you wish, write direct to our Personnel Director.
P
rrjTTr
79
]
AAA AX
AMERICAN METAL CLIMAX. INC
Personnel Director
AMERICAN METAL CLIMAX, INC.
1270 Avenue of the Americas
New York. N.Y. 10020
Please send me AMAX Kit "Economic Growth and Quality of Life"
I am attending College/University, and will graduate.
I am majoring in
n in
(date)
Name
Address
City
State
Zip
V   , Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
TUESDAY
CREATION II
Play, Dead Sun ilise in SUB   ballroom
at noon.
PRE MED
Elections in Wesb. 201 at noon.
CANOE   CLUB
Meeting at SUB 117 at noon.
NEWMAN   CLUB
General meeting at noon in SUB lis.
UBC  ANTIWAR  COMMITTEE
Meeting in SUB 215 at noon.
WEDNESDAY
CREATION   II
A play by Charles Hammond will be
presented, in the  Lutheran Centre  at
noon.
T BIRD MOTORCYCLE  CLUB
Meeting in SUB 105A at noon.
VOC
Elections in Aug. 104 at noon.
UCC
Elections in clubs' lounge at noon.
'tween
classes
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
Panel on housing in I.H. at noon, upper lounge
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Meeting in Bu. 232 at noon.
THURSDAY
T-BIRD  WARGAMERS
Meeting in  SUB   119   at   noon.
PRE   MED
Field-trip to VGH, meet in Wesb. 100
at  noon.
ANGLICAN   UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
If you want to go to Madness phone
224-1614.
YOUNG   SOCIALISTS
Socialist student council at VCC A-130
at noon.
AQUA  SOCIETY
Elections in SUB 207/209 at noon.
UCC
Wine & cheese party—club executives
only, in SUB 207/209 at 8:30 p.m.
ENGLISH   DEPT.
Medieval   English   Dialects   by   Prof.
Mcintosh,   Edinburgh,   in   Bu    102   at
noon.
HISTORY  DEPT.
Success and Failure by Prof. Costigan,
Univ. of Washington, in Lass.  102 at
noon.
VCF
Bible study and prayer in SUB 117 at
noon.
SIMS
Meeting in Bu. 203 at noon.
EDUCATION STUDENTS
IN FINAL YEAR
Give Your Support
To The B.C.T.F. Stand
On BILL 47
(Voluntary
Membership)
GIVE YOUR PLEDGE
IN ROOM 1
Education Bldg.
Before March 19/71
OAt&H
*:.
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720  - 224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. — Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
STUDENTS
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
VOTERS
FOR THE UPCOMING A.M.S. ELECTIONS
ALL APPLICANTS ACCEPTED
Tltilli
'G HAPPENS
Today-(Tuesday) (advance polling)
S.U.B. (by cafeteria) 11:30-3:30
Residences (Ft. Camp, Place Vanier, Totem Park)
5:00-7:00
Tomorrow—Wednesday, March 17th
BARN
BUCHANAN
BUS STOP
EDUCATION
CIVIL ENGINEERING
MAIN LIBRARY
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
SUB
WOODWARD LIBRARY
AUDITORIUM-CAF.
LAW
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
(HOURS - 10 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.)
o
o
N.B.-This election will fill the position of PRESIDENT. There will also be a
referendum included dealing with the return of Student Union Building fees
to Industrial Education Students studying at B.C.I.T.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
A group is going to Madness, phone
224-1614 if you wish to go.
FRIDAY
STUDENT   CHRISTIAN   MOVEMENT
Information   on   Yukon   Seminar   in
SUB 22 all day.
CREATION  II
Play, P & C. in SUB Aud. at noon.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Meeting in SUB 125 at noon.
SATURDAY
AQUA SOCIETY
Grand  finale  party,  find   information
in 207 Thurs. noon
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting in field between T-Bird Stadium and Marine Drive at noon.
JOB'S  DAUGHTERS
Rummage sale at 112 West Broadway
from 10:30-1:00 p.m.
KERRISDALE  FIGURE SKATING CLUB
Land  of Dreams, at     pjn.  in Kerris- ^
dale Arena.
MISCELLANEOUS
WEST COAST TRAIL CLUB
Anyone interested in going on six-day
hike along the West Coast Trail
leaving approx. May 3, should contact
club president (and sole member) .
John Twigg any noon hour in the
Ubyssey office — SUB 241K Leave
message   if  John   isn't  in.
YES
MARCH 17
CLASSIFIED
Rotes: Campus - 3 fines, 1 day $1.00? 2 days $1.75.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by
in advance;
telephone and are payable
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
•PERSONA'. PRODUCED BY ING-
mar Bergman, represents a personality duel between two women.
See it in SUB Aud. Fri. and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30, Sun., 7:00. AMS card
holders $50c.
Lost & Found
13
LOST BLACK PURSE. PLEASE
mail all papers to Room 412 Ross
H. Place Vanier, UBC.
PLEASE — IP YOU KNOW THE
whereabouts of a pocket watch
taken from War Memorial, Thursday, phone Cliff at 224-9833 for
large reward. It has great sentimental value.
ONE BLUE SKI JACKET WITH
car keys and gloves in pocket. 4th
Floor, Hebb Building. Need keys
urgently. Phone Dave at 325-6715.
Special Notices
15
CONSIDERING ALASKA? ACCUR-
ate, comprehensive brochure about
opportunities in construction, oil,
fishing and canneries, others.
Send $2.00 cash or money order.
JOBS IN ALASKA, P.O. Box 1565,
Anchorage,  Alaska 99501.
A.G.S. QUALITY CASSETTE
Tape C-90. Guaranteed against all
defects $1.90' each. Call Peter 732-
6769. Can arrange for delivery or
pickup-pt.   on   campus.
•PERSONA', PRODUCED BY ING-
mar Bergman, represents a personality duel between two women.
See it in SUB Aud. Pri. and Sat.,
7:00 & 9:30; Sun., 7:00. Ams card
holders  50c.
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa, Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St.,  Van.   1,  B.C.
TRAVELLING  OVERSEAS   ON  A
LIMITED BUDGET?
Then come to the travel meeting on
Monday, March 22nd at 7:45 p.m. in
the Auditorium of Erie Hamber
Secondary School, 5025 Willow
Street, Vancouver. Experienced
travellers will be talking to you, and
will help you save hundreds of dollars! Everybody Welcome — No Admission Charge. Sponsored by the
Canadian Youth Hostels Association.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1969 MGBGT WIRE WHEELS
overdrive, immaculate condition.
Must sell. Best offer buys. Ring
684-0988  to  midnight.
1959 VW FOR SALE $150.00. CALL
224-1983.
1960 VW. GOOD CONDITION, SA-
dio, sunroof. Phone Pat 228-2627
day; 731-9628 night.
1965 VOLVO 122S 4 DR.. RADIADS,
radio, roof rack, good cond. $1,100.
Phone 435-7665.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
DYNAMIC READING CHARTER
class. Almost half regular price.
Call Tom 733-9246.
FIRST YEAR DENTS GET "A+"
in surface anatomy — Marsha.
Typing
40
— AMS TYPING SERVICE —
30c  per  page  with   2   days   service.
12:30   -   1:30   in   SUB  Co-ordinator's
office  weekdays,  879-0095.  Evenings
and weekends.
— SEE US FIRST! —
TEDIOUS   TASKS — PROFESSION -
al Typing Service IBM Selectric —
Days, Evenings, Weekends. Phone:
228-9304 — 30c per page.
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable Rates — 321-3838.
STUDENTS: WILL TYPE TERM
papers, etc., fast service and reasonable rates. Call Yvonne, 738-
6874.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, FOR ES-
says, term papers, .etc., reasonable rates, in my home. North
Vancouver,   988-7228.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING.
Theses, essays, term papers. Fast,
accurate.   Reasonable   Rates.   Call
Mrs.  Duncan,  228-9597.
TYPING DONE AT MY HOME.
Neat and careful work. Essays,
Thesis. Reasonable rates. North
Van.  985-0154.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
Rates. Phone 263-5317.
TYPING — ELECTRIC I.B.M.
29th & Dunbar
Tel: 224-6129
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Reas. rates. 10:00
a.m. to 9:00 p.m., phone 738-6829.
Quick service on short essays.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
EXPERIENCED PART-TIME SER-
vice station man required for
weekends and evening work, Varsity Esso. G. Burnside, 224-7424.
INSTRUCTION ft SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3644—10 a.m. to
3 p.m.
DON'T WORRY OVER EXAMS.
Register at UBC Tutoriig Centre.
Tutors in almost every subject.
SUB 100B 228-4583, 12-2 weekdays.
$3.00 an hour.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student Telephone) Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the  Bookstore,  Thunderbird  Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Furnished Apts.
•3
ROOM-MATE NEEDED: FEMALE.
May 1st - Aug. 31st. Share apartment in Kitsilano; furnished. Call
731-4032.
Unfurnished Apts.
84 Tuesday,   March   16,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
Flu bug winner WfJUTsWim
as T'Birds lose rrm i,rrm
JACK MOORES. . .
. . . alone as all-star
SUDBURY, Ont. - Laurentian University Voyageurs
trounced University of British Columbia Thunderbirds 7-4 to win
the consolation final of the Canadian intercollegiate hockey
championship Saturday.
Doug Forrester scored twice and Mike Fox, Ed Taylor, Andre
Lajeunesse, Bryan Slywchuk and ESill McEwan added single goals as the
A Sudbury-based university opened up a big lead and coasted to victory.
Bob McAneely scored two goals for the Thunderbirds with Norm
Park and Richard Longpre adding the others.
Fox gave the Voyageurs a 1-0 lead when he banged in Paul St.
Cyr's pass midway through the first period. Taylor made it 2-0 less than
two minutes later while his team was a man short.
Lajeunesse increased Laurentian's lead to 3-0 when he batted the
puck past Thunderbird goalie Ian Wilkie with the second period only 64
seconds old. Slywchuk gave Laurentian a four-goal lead 49 seconds later
when the puck bounced in off his shoulder.
McEwan scored about two minutes later followed by Forester to
. up the count 6-0.
McAneely and Park scored within 36 seconds of each other
midway through the period to put B.C. on the scoreboard.
UBC won the first round of
consolation play at the Canadian
Intercollegiate Hockey
championships Friday night,
defeating Loyola College Warriors
of Montreal 6-4.
In an earlier game, St. Mary's
University Huskies of Halifax
defeated Laurentian University
Voyageurs of Sudbury 4-2 to gain
a berth in the championship final
against University of Toronto
Blues.
The Blues defeated British
Columbia 3-2 Thursday.
British Columbia scorers were
Barry Wilcox  with  three  goals,
Doug Buchanan, Steve Fera and
Bob MacAneely set up by Wilcox.
Pat   McCool   scored   twice   for
Loyola and Mike Thomassin and
Chris Hayes once each.
McCool gave Loyola a 1-0 lead early in the first period but Wilcox
tied the score about four minutes later. Thomassin and Hayes made it
3-1 for Loyola by midway through the first period, before British
Columbia broke the game open with four goals.
Wilcox counted 50 seconds after Hayes' goal and added another
one between goals by Buchanan and Fera.
MacAneely scored the last B.C. goal with 26 seconds remaining in
the second period. McCool ended the scoring with less than four
minutes in the game.
The Thunderbirds fired 27 shots at Loyola goaltender Rocky
Martin. The warriors had 25 drives on Ian Wilkie in the B.C. ne-t.
"I just can't say enough about the way the team played under
the circumstances," said 'Bird coach Bob Hindmarch.   "We had seven
or eight guys sick enough to throw up before the game, but they still
• managed to go out and play   Wilcox was so sick before the game, that I
didn't think he could play."
Despite his praise, the "All Canadian" hockey squad was named
and Thunderbirds were conspicuously absent from the team. The only
Westerner was defenceman Steve Caryle from the University of Alberta.
Others named to the team were Dave McDowell of University of
Toronto on defence; Chris Hayes, of Loyola College at centre; Morris
Mott of Queen's University and Murray Stroud of York University as
forwards, and Keith Lelivre of the University of New Brunswick in goal.
Toronto defeated St. Mary's 54 to retain the championship they
won last year.
Perhaps Thunderbirds could have won it all if half the team
wasn't sick. 'Birds' second top scorer over the Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic Association season, Tom Williamson, didn't see
any action in the three games. Williamson alone may have made the
difference in the opening day loss to Toronto.
The loss to Laurentian? ... well three games in three days to a
weakened team such as 'Birds were was just too much.
The all-star team for the tournament was named during the
" match. Members were: Chuck Goddard, St. Mary's, goal; Jack Moores,
UBC,  and Dave  McDowall, University  of Toronto, defence; Ron
Hindson,  St.  Mary's, Ed Taylor,  Laurentian  University  and Terry
Peterman, Toronto, forwards.
Oarsmen win
The UBC Rowing tearrn
successfully started their 1971
season by winning all three events
against Western Washington State
College last weekend.
The competition was held on
Shamish Lake, just south of
Bellingham, over a 2000 meter
' course.
In the first two events, the
Jayvee   coxed  eight  and coxed
three events
four teams won with times of
6:45 and 7:25 respectively.
In the final event, the Varsity
eights won with a time of 6:33,
seven seconds better than their
opponents.
Two first year oarsmen for the
Varsity eights, Trev Josephson
and Jack Bryck, rowed an
excellent race despite their limited
experience.
" Big Block Awards.
The annual Big Block Banquet will he held this Thursday,
March 18.
Established in 1915 to honour outstanding atheletes at
UBC, the Big Block Award has a number of well known
personalities on its honour-roll, some of whom may be present at
the Banquet.
The Right Honourable Pierre E. Trudeau has been invited.
He will be awarded the Varsity Pin and become an
Honorary Legacy Member by right of his marrying the daughter
of a Big Block winner, the Honourable James Sinclair.
Justice Minister, the Honourable John Turner, is also a Big
Block winner.
The following athletes are to be awarded their first Big
Block this year.
BASKETBALL:
FOOTBALL:
JUDO:
SKIING:
Stan Callegari
Jim Blair
Doug Rogers
John Rogers (Mgr.!
Jack Hoy
Doug Hume (Mgr.)
Joseph Laing
Peter Tchir
Rod Matheson
Rick Peck
John Mills
Kent Watts
SOCCER:
Bob Whitehead
ROWING:
Peter Humphries
Bob Advent
Phil Sanford
BOWLING:
GOLF:
Rod Bell-Irving
Glenn Jackie
Alan Defoe
Benj Clark
SWIMMING:
Bruce Hutchison
CRICKET:
GYMNASTICS:
RUGBY:
Andrew Keir
Tim Yeomans
Keith Russell
Ray Banks
TRACK-CROSS
Rod Holloway
COUNTRY:
CYCLING:
ICE HOCKEY:
Steve Fera
Bob Jickling
John Squeo
John Hawkins
George Desmoulin
Fred Masuch
VOLLEYBALL:
Norm Park
Gordon Hood
FIELD HOCKEY:
Roy Sakaki
SAILING:
Rick Fister
Rod Silver
Allan Cullen
WRESTLING:
Ron Miller
Jeff Wilson
Patrick Finnegan
Taras Hryb
Rugby team
wins four,
loses none
The UBC Rugby team returned
home Sunday from Oregon, after
a four game tour without a loss.
Under rainy conditions
Thursday, the 'Birds defeated
the University of Oregon 21-0,
while the Braves^lumped Oregon's
second team 10-0. Spence
McTavish scored twice for the
'Birds, and Ray Banks added
seven points with his fine kicking.
Saturday the two teams
travelled to Corvalis to oppose the
Oregon State rugby teams. Again
the 'Birds dominated the play and
dealt the O.S.U. a 19-0 defeat,
while the Braves managed a 9-9
deadlock against O.S.U.'s second
team.
The 'Birds will be looking for
their 19th victory this Saturday
when they meet Washington State
University at 2:30 p.m. in
Thunderbird Stadium.
Intramurals
Rugby—Dentistry beat Betas 10-8 yesterday.
Arts 20 Road Race—Of the nine teams
of eight competitors each., the road race
was won by Forestry with a time of 36
minutes, 22.5 seconds, missing the previous record by two minutes.
Volleyball—Final had Fort Camp defeating Grad Studies by 2-0.
Ice Hockey—Before five excited fans.
Commerce defeated  PE 3-0.
£>£?
arsity Sports
4510 w. io Ave. Centre Ltd. 224-6414
ANNOUNCES THEIR
SECOND ANNUAL STOCK CLEARANCE
SALE
Clearance on
SKIS
Wood Gresvig
Metal Rossignol
Fibreglas Atomic
Ski Boots
Le Trappeur
Heschung
La Dolomite
Ski Jackets from 12.95        Ski Pants from 16.95
Savings on Gloves—Mitts—Touques—Goggles etc.
Also Reduced
Hungarian Training Shoes — Ice Skates — Hockey Equipment — Golf Clubs
Golf Balls — Badminton Racquets — Tennis Racquets and More!
Open 9-6 and till 9 p.m. Thursday and Friday
ALL SALES FINAL Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  March   16,   1971
Men who make wounds
Norman Bethune, a Canadian doctor, was in the
medical corps during the Spanish Civil War and later was a
medical officer in the Red Army in the Sino-Japanese
War. He died there in 1939 after writing Wounds which is
reprinted from New Frontiers.
I he kerosene lamp overhead makes a steady buzzing
sound like an incandescent hive of bees. Mud walls. Mud
floor. Mud bed. White paper windows. Smell of blood and
chloroform. Cold. Three o'clock in the morning,
December 1, North China, near Lin Chu, with the 8th
Route Army.
Men with wounds.
Wounds like little dried pools, caked with
black-brown earth; wounds with torn edges frilled with
black gangrene; neat wounds, concealing beneath the
abscess in their depths, burrowing into and around the
great firm muscles like a dammed-back river, running
around and between the muscles like a hot stream;
wounds, expanding outward, decaying orchids or crushed
carnations, terrible flowers of flesh; wounds from which
the dark blood is spewed' out in clots, mixed with the
ominous gas bubbles, floating on the fresh flood of the
still-continuing secondary hemorrhage.
Old filthy bandages stuck to the skin with blood-glue.
Careful. Better moisten first. Through the thigh. Pick the
leg up. Why it's like a bag, a long, loose, red stocking.
What kind of stocking? A Christmas stocking. Where's the
fine strong rod of bone now? In a dozen pieces. Pick them
out with your fingers; white as a dog's teeth, sharp and
jagged. Now feel. Any more left? Yes, here. All? Yes; no,
here's another piece. Is this muscle dead? Pinch it. Yes,
it's dead. Cut it out. How can that heal? How can those
muscles, once so strong, now so torn, so devastated, so
ruined, resume their proud tension? Pull; relax. Pull, relax.
What fun it was! Now that is finished. Now that's done.
Now we are destroyed. Now what will we do with
ourselves?
N
Text. What an infant! Seventeen. Shot through the
belly. Chloroform. Ready? Gas rushes out of the opened
peritoneal cavity. Odor of feces. Pink coils of distended
intestine. Four perforations. Close them Purse string suture.
Sponge out the pelvis. Three tubes. Hard to close. Keep
him warm. How? Dip those bricks into hot water.
Gangrene is a cunning, creeping fellow. Is this one
alive? Yes, he lives. Technically speaking, he is alive. Give
him saline intraveneously. Perhaps the innumerable tiny
cells of his body will remember. They may remember the
hot salty sea, their ancestral home, their first food. With
the memory of a million years, they may remember other
tides, other oceans, and life being born of the sea and sun.
It may make them raise their tired little heads, drink deep^
and struggle back into life again. It may do that.
And this one. Will he run along the road beside his
mule at another harvest, with cries of pleasure and
happiness? No, that one will never run again. How can
you run with one leg? What will he do? Why, he'll sit and
watch the other boys run. What will he think? He'll think
what you and I would think. What's the good of pity?
Don't pity him! Pity would diminish his sacrifice. He did
this for the defence of China. Help him. Lift him off the
table. Carry him in your arms. Why, he's as light as a
child! Yes, your child, my child.
How beautiful the body is; how perfect its parts;,with
what precision it moves; how obedient, proud and strong.
How terrible when torn. The little flame of life sinks
lower and lower, and with a flicker, goes out. It goes out
like a candle goes out. Quietly and gently. It makes its
protest at extinction, then submits. It has its say, then is
silent.
Any more? Four Japanese prisoners. Bring them in.
In this community of pain, there are no enemies. Cut
away that blood-stained uniform. Stop that hemorrhage.
Lay them beside the others. Why, they're alike as
brothers! Are these soldiers professional man-killers? No,
these are amateurs-in-arms. Workman's hands. These are
workers-in-uniform.
ANOTHER PIECE ... it's like a bag
No more. Six o'clock in the morning. God, it's cold in
this room. Open the door. Over the distant, dark-blue
mountains, a pale, faint line of light appears in the east. In
an hour the sun will be up. To bed and sleep.
But sleep will not come. What is the cause of this
cruelty, this stupidity? A million workmen come from
Japan to kill or mutilate a million Chinese workmen. Why
should the Japanese worker attack his brother worker,
who is forced merely to defend himself. Will the Japanese
worker benefit by the death of the Chinese? No, how can
he gain?, Then, in God's name, who will gain? Who is
responsible for sending those Japanese workmen on this
murderous mission? Who will profit from it? How was it
possible to persuade the Japanese workman to attack the
Chinese workman - his brother in poverty;his companion
in misery? N,
I s it possible that a few rich men, a small class of
men, have persuaded a million men to attack, and attempt
to destroy, another million men as poor as they? So that
these rich may be richer still? Terrible thought! How did
they persuade these poor men to come to China? By telling
them the truth? No, they would never have come if they
had known the truth. Did they dare to tell these workmen
that the rich only wanted cheaper raw materials, more
markets and more profit? No, they told them that this
brutal war was "The Destiny of the Race," it was for the
"Glory of the Emperor," it was for the "Honor of the
State," it was for their "King and Country."
False. False as hell!
The agents of a criminal war of aggression, such as
this, must be looked for like the agents of other crimes,
such as murder, among those who are likely to benefit
from those crimes. Will the 80,000,000 workers of Japan,
the poor farmers, the unemployed industrial workers —
will they gain? In the entire history of the wars of
aggression, from the conquest of Mexico by Spain, the
capture of India by England, the rape of Ethiopia by
Italy, have the workers of those "victorious" countries
ever been known to benefit? No, these never benefit by
such wars.
D
'oes the Japanese workman benefit by the natural
resources of even his own country, by the gold, the silver,
the iron, the coal, the oil? Long ago he ceased to possess
that natural wealth. It belongs to the rich, the ruling class.
The millions who work those mines live in poverty. So
how is he likely to benefit by the armed robbery of the
gold, silver, iron, coal and oil from China? Will not the
rich owners of the one retain for their own profit the
wealth of the other? Have they not always done so?
It would seem inescapable that the militarists and the
capitalists of Japan are the only class likely to gain by this
mass murder, this authorized madness, this sanctified
butchery. That ruling class, the true state, stands accused.
Are wars of aggression, wars for the conquest of
colonies, then, just big business? Yes, it would seem so,
however much the perpetrators of such national crimes
seek to hide their true purpose under banners of
high-sounding abstractions and ideals. They make war to
capture markets by murder; raw materials by rape. They
find it cheaper to steal than to exchange; easier to butcher
than to buy. This is the secret of war. This is the secret of
all wars. Profit. Business. Profit. Blood money.
Behind all stands that terrible, implacable God of
Business and Blood, whose name is Profit. Money, like an
insatiable Moloch, demands its interest, its return, and will
stop at nothing, not even the murder of millions, to
satisfy its greed. Behind the army stand the militarists.
Behind the militarists stand finance capital and the
capitalist. Brothers in blood; companions in crime.
w„
'hat do these enemies of the human race look like?
Do they wear on their foreheads a sign so that they may
be told, shunned and condemned as criminals? No. On the
contrary, they are respectable ones. They are honored.
They call themselves, and are called, gentlemen. What a
travesty on the name. Gentlemen! They are the pillars of
the state, of the church, of society. They support private
and public charity out of the excess of their wealth. They
endow institutions. In their private lives they are kind and
considerate. They obey the law, their law, the law of
property. But there is one sign by which these gentle
gunmen can be told. Threaten a reduction on the profit of
their money and the beast in them awakes with a snarl.
They become ruthless as savages, brutal as madmen,
remorseless as executioners. Such men as these must
perish if the human race is to continue. There can be no
permanent peace in the world while they live. Such an
organization of human society as permits them to exist
must be abolished.
These men make the wounds.
FOR A.M.S. PRES.
vote it;
VOTE
BR0UGHT0N
YOUR NO B. S.
CANDIDATE
2/V-W
CREATION II
Returns
March 16-12:30-SUB Ballroom-"Dead Sun Rise"
March 17—12:30—Lutheran Campus Center-
"Charles Hammond"
March 19-12:30-SUB Aud.-"P & C"
-NURSES AT VGH GOT THEIRS
-INDUSTRIAL ED. STUDENTS
IN BURNABY RECEIVE NO
BENEFIT FROM SUB
VOTE YES ON MAR. 17
TO GIVE THEM BACK THEIR $15

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