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The Ubyssey Mar 16, 1972

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Array Editorial
We had thought the time was perhaps
past when AMS executives believed The
Ubyssey was created to be their personal
agent of glorification and propaganda.
It seems we were wrong.
The people present at today's annual
general meeting will witness another in the
continuing series of attempts to bring the
newspaper under the control of the AMS
executive. Not the students; not even so
much the student council; but the executive
— because in the Alma Mater Society it is
the executive that basically makes the
decisions.
This attempt comes in the form of a
constitutional amendment to the effect that
the editor will henceforth be elected by the
students at large.
Sounds democratic, doesn't it? Well it
isn't.
In fact, this motion is in absolute
opposition to any notion of freedom of the
press. And, as the history of
student-defeated executive attempts to
control The Ubyssey shows, infringement
on freedom of the press is something UBC
students will not sanction.
This is what will happen:
An elected Ubyssey editor will run for
office on the basis of a platform and will be
elected by only a small portion of the
newspaper's readership. He or she will then
be obligated to represent this electorate and
to carry through the promises made in the
electoral platform.
The members of The Ubyssey's staff
will be under the control of this individual.
They will not have the current freedom to
write what they want, on the subjects they
want. They will have, in effect, a correct line
to follow.
If they do not happen to like the
correct line, they will not have the current
option of trying to change the paper.
They will, in short, be faced with a
love-it-or-leave-it situation.
The diversity of political beliefs,
interests and backgrounds of the present
Ubyssey staff bears witness to the fact that
this is not the situation now.
A free press is NOT a legislated
representative entity. It is not meant to be, for
the simple reason that it must be free of
control by vested interest groups, free to take
a principled stand on the issues as it sees
them, free to publish what it knows without
fear of suppression or reprisal.
The Ubyssey is, however, a democratic
entity, as it should be.
It is controlled by the staff, as it should
be, and the whole staff elects the editor.
It is open, as it should be, to anyone
who walks in the door, states a desire to
work, does so, and thus helps shape the
publication.
This is why The Ubyssey is more
democratic than the Alma Mater Society
council and executive will ever be. Its staff is
NOT composed of the people who have
spent the most campaign funds to get
elected; its staff is NOT composed of those
who want to burnish their images for a small
number of voters; its editor is NOT the
frozen-person for a student council slate or
other interest group.
Talk of democracy and a free student
press is not just idle sloganeering.
See page 4: MORE
U of T students end sit-in, win demands
TORONTO (CUP) - Hundreds of University of
Toronto students Tuesday ended a day-long occupation of
the university's main administration building, after forcing
the administration to agree to most of their demands.
About 600 students re-occupied Simcoe Hall Monday
afternoon to press forstudent demands that the new $43
million library being built on campus be made open to all
members of the university as well as to the general public.
-A library committee report had recommended that access
to the stacks be limited to graduate students and faculty.
The re-occupation came after a mass meeting, called
next door to Simcoe Hall in the university's huge
Convocation Hall, heard details of Sunday's police attack
on demonstrators who had been occupying the senate
chambers of the university since Friday night.
In   the  Sunday  raid,   18  people  were  arrested on
"charges of trespassing, assault and obstruction. Among
those arrested were editor of the student newspaper, The
Varsity, Tom Walkom and student council president Bob
Spencer.
The Monday meeting heard faculty member Fred
Winters describe the series of secret administration
meetings leading up to the decision to bring the police on
campus. As the meeting ended, students almost
unanimously voted to hold Convocation Hall and to
re-occupy Simcoe Hall.
At the same time U of T carpenters were bolstering
the main doors with heavy sheets of plywood and campus
police  were  nervously guarding all the entrances. The
administration   building   had   been   locked   late   that
morning.
Students forced open the huge front doors and met
with no opposition from campus police as they took over
the whole building. Large numbers of students held
Simcoe Hall all day and in the afternoon formed a
negotiating committee to meet with acting administration
president Jack Sword, demanding that he return to
address the students at 7 p.m.
As the occupiers formed committees to deal with
security, food and press accreditation, small groups of
students went to classrooms and residences with leaflets, a
sound truck and bullhorns to get people out to the
meeting with Sword.
At 6:45 p.m., when more than 800 people had
squeezed themselves into the senate chamber and
adjoining hall, the negotiating committee sent word that
Sword would not appear until 9:30 p.m.
As students waited, the mood in the crowded room
became tense and hostile towards the administration.
When Sword appeared, he was greeted with boos and
hisses. Flanked by administration heavies, he pushed his
way to the front through the crowd, his face an ashen
white, and moved to the rostrum to announce the
compromise reached through negotiations. The main
points include:
An administration commitment to push through
proposals in the academic senate to open the stacks of the
Robarts Library to all users on an equal basis and reduce
the present public borrowing fee of $50 to a minimal
amount.
A commitment to press for the dropping of all
charges against those arrested when police broke into the
student-occupied senate on Sunday.
A commitment not to call the police on campus
unless there is a "clear and present danger to the essential
functions of. the university" and not to call on police
without prior negotiations with students.
After he left, students debated for two hours about
accepting the demands. They sent the negotiating team to
clear up some details of the agreement and about 200
students stayed in the senate chamber all night.
The negotiating team met with Sword at 11 a.m.
Tuesday and administration officials flatly turned down
any amendments to the original agreement. At a 2 p.m.
meeting in Simcoe Hall of more than 800, student
president Bob Spencer moved acceptance of the original
Sword concessions.
Speakers suggested that students should remain in
Simcoe Hall until the senate had actually ratified the
demands.
But after an hour of debate, students voted to leave
the chambers, accept the administration compromise and
mass for next Monday's senate meeting.
If the senate does not proceed to the satisfaction of
the students they will likely move to shut down the
university administration again.
The re-occupation ended at 3 p.m., almost 24 hours
after it had begun. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  16,  1972
Mental illness: medical
disease or social control?
The following is a preview of a panel discussion
on mental illness to be held today. The panel is
sponsored by the Mental Patients Association of
Vancouver.
By DS.FRUST
"Children of artisans and other poor
inhabitants of Paris up to the age of 25, girls who
were debauched or in evident danger of being
debauched, and others such as epileptics, people
with venereal diseases, and poor people with
chronic diseases of all sorts" were considered fit
subjects for mental asylums in the 17th century.
Times have not changed very significantly yet.
It is still common practice in Canada to incarcerate
persons against their will for indefinite periods of
time because they are "mentally ill".
A spokesman for the Mental Patients
Association of Vancouver calls hospital psychiatry
"a form of oppressive social engineering which
masquerades as a medical/scientific discipline and
functions as a political arm of the status quo. It calls
its victims mental patients and the imprisonment,
treatment."
Mental illness is regarded by our society the
way sex was by the Victorians, something vaguely
horrid that poor people do. As the spokesman says,
"most people don't want to know that 70 per cent
of admissions to mental hospitals are involuntary,
that patients cannot refuse drugs, electric shock or
any other "treatment" prescribed by the staff. In
fact, refusal is generally regarded as further evidence
of "mental illness" and treatments are typically
intensified".
It is well accepted here that in Russia mental
hospitals are used as jails for social dissidents. What
is not accepted is that the same practice is in wide
use in our society, here in Vancouver.
To    quote    Thomas    Szasz,    an    American
psychiatrist: "In Western nations and the Soviet
bloc alike, there are two contradictory views on
commitment. According to the one, involuntary
mental hospitalization is an indispensible method of
medical healing and a humane type of social
control; according to the other it is a contemptible
abuse of the medical relationship and a type of
imprisonment without trial. We adopt the former
view and consider commitment "proper" if we use
it on victims of our choosing whom we despise; we
adopt the latter view and consider commitment
"improper" if our enemies use it on victims of their
choosing whom we esteem."
Perhaps the most crucial point here is that no
one has yet come up with a satisfactory definition
of mental health. The working definition seems to
be that one is healthy/ill if one conforms/does not
conform to the status quo (and is wealthy/poor). A
ruler can become a worker and be considered just
eccentric, a worker who proclaims himself ruler is
mentally ill and must be protected from himself.
In a book called Positive Disintegration, a
Polish psychiatrist sets forward the thesis that all of
those actions and thoughts considered as neurosis
and psychoses by Western psychology are positive
and mentally healthy if they contribute to
personality growth.
Further he states categorically that no person
who does not go through some form of personality
disintegration at the primitive level can be mentally
healthy or creative. And even yet, people are being
sent up with sentences of a week to life without
even a hearing.
Today at noon, there is a panel discussion on
these questions with Dr. James Tyhurst from
Psychiatry, UBC , Dr. W. J. G. McFarlan from
Riverview, law prof Michael Jackson and John York
from the MPA, in BioScience 2000.
Grad class election invalid
Wednesday's balloting to allocate the
graduating-class funds has been declared invalid
because of mistakes on the ballot.
Grad class president Mike Tratch told The
Ubyssey the grant requested by the Lutheran
campus centre accidentally appeared on the ballot
as $5,000 instead of their asking figure of $1,200.
Architecture students were also inadvertantly
left off the voting lists circulated among the polling
stations, the fourth year applied science student
said.
Several groups whose statements appeared in
the Tuesday edition of The Ubyssey failed to appear
on the ballot.
But Tratch said this was the fault of the groups
rather than of the grad class executive.
"We said the deadline for applications was
Friday and they failed to get the information in
then,-so we couldn't put them on the ballot," he
said.
Affected in this way was the informal
community coalition, composed of campus daycare,
the Burrard food co-op, a women's rights handbook
and the mental patient's association.
The coalition and the other groups whose
names appeared on the last ballot are requested to
submit a 75-word brief describing their project to
SUB letter box 148 before 5 p.m. Friday. These
names will then appear on the ballot for the second
election, to be held next Wednesday.
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The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
A Souvenir of
Your Year on Campus
Available While Stock Lasts at
UBC BOOKSTORE - THUNDERBIRD SHOP
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE IN SUB Thursday, March  16, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
EMPLOYMENT STUDY
More jobs
needed
WHO'LL WIN THIS RACE? wonders photog Daryel Erickson, observing West End erection at north end of
Burrard bridge. Ubyssey photographers have become obsessed with high-rises as a result of recent campus
environment conditioning.
By JOHN TWIGG
A study on student summer
employment prepared by student
services has dire implications for
the future.
The study, despite a glowing
report of it in UBC PReports,
indicates students are having to
work longer to finance their
education and fewer students are
able to do it.
UBC PReports, however, said:
"On the whole, they were
successful in finding jobs; 96.5 per
cent of the men and 96.4 per cent
of the women who sought work
found it.
"This was a considerable
improvement over 1970 figures
which show that 85 per cent of
men and 84 per cent of women
students found work."
UBC PReports fails to make
clear that the people responding
to the survey handed out during
registration last September were
the people getting enough money
to return to university.
In other words, they were only
the people who found
employment. Only four per cent
of the students returning to
university were able to do so
without having a summer job.
A statistic which should enter
into the UBC PReports story but
didn't is the overall enrolment,
which this year dropped to just
less than 20,000 compared to
more than 21,000 in 1970-71.
The five per cent drop in
enrolment conforms with the 10
per cent increase in the percentage
of people returning to university
who had summer jobs.
Another statistic which reveals
the general tightening in the
student summer job situation is
the     percentage    of    students
AMS refuses to punish engineers
By JIM JOLY and MIKE SASGES
The Alma Mater Society council has
decided against punishing the engineers
responsible for publication of the March 8
racist newsletter.
A motion passed unanimously at
Wednesday night's council meeting "deplores
racism and sexism exhibited by a few
members of the Engineering Undergraduate
Society" and recommends measures "to see
"that racism and sexism be eliminated."
The motion recommends courses and
university-wide teaching be set up to examine
a society which gives rise to racism and
sexism, major reforms to alleviate the tension
and frustration which provoke racism and
sexism, an AMS committee be formed to
investigate implementing these proposals and
administration president Walter Gage strike a
committee to correct the tension existing
between the math department and the
engineering faculty.
During the lengthy discussion of the
newsletter, EUS president Doug Aldridge,
AMS president-elect, said he considers racism
to exist where there is malicious intent.
"There was no malicious intent in this
case," Aldridge said.
"By my definition, the newsletter wasn't
racist."
Council defeated another motion, moved
by AMS president Grant Burnyeat, which
deplored the newsletter and racism but which
was not as specific about action to be taken to
solve social problems which provoke racism.
Aldridge and Burnyeat will meet today
with the faculty council.
Aldridge said Wednesday he and Burnyeat
requested the meeting to ask the council if it
would investigate and suggest solutions to the
bad relations that have recently sprung up
between the mathematics department and the
applied science faculty.
Math profs voted Monday to support 10
of their colleagues who cancelled engineering
classes becau.se of racist jokes in an
unauthorized edition of the EUS newsletter.
The math profs have since transferred
their classes out of the engineering buildings
and have started teaching again.
Burnyeat said the math department profs
who cancelled their classes represent long-time
friction between the department and the
faculty.
"There is a problem in that there is an
underlying friction between the engineering
departments and the faculty," he said. "The
racial situation was the straw that broke the
camel's back."
Burnyeat said he and Aldridge will also
ask administration president Walter Gage to
set up a special committee to look into the
same matter.
At a Wednesday general meeting of the
EUS, 300 engineering students voted
unanimously to make a public apology.
"We, the members of the engineering
undergraduate society, sincerely apologize for
the actions of some of our fellow members
which deeply hurt many members of our
community. We hope that the measures we
have taken will ensure that these actions will
never occur again," the apology reads.
Aldridge explained that no EUS
organization will be able to publish the
newsletter.
He said the request for a president's
committee was the second measure mentioned
in the apology.
"I must stress that the apology is to the
community at large," said Aldridge.
Sam Kaplan, editor and publisher of the
Jewish Western Bulletin, said Wednesday his
paper had received an apology from a
"representative" of the newsletter authors.
"We're regarding it as a bona fide
authentic letter and it will be published in
Friday's edition," said Kaplan.
The Hillel Society, an organization of
Jewish students on campus, also asked for an
apology from the EUS executive in a letter
delivered Tuesday to The Ubyssey.
_w*j- <?$%?%x<~<<4ux®
requiring    a    part-time   job   to
finance their education.
In September 1971, 26.1 per
cent of the students responding to
the survey said they had a
part-time job, up from 25.6 per
cent in 1970 and 22.7 per cent in
1969.
As well, 39.1 per cent of the
respondents said they needed a
part-time job, down slightly from
41.2 per cent in 1970 but up
considerably from the 32.7 per
cent who needed a part-time job
in 1969.
What this means is that more
and more students are requiring
part-time jobs to earn money they
were unable to get in the summer
and fewer and fewer students are
able to find those needed
part-time jobs.
In 1971, 13 per cent of the
students were unable to find the
part-time job they needed, which
was down slightly from 16 per
cent in 1970 but up from 10 per
cent in 1969 and 1968 and six per
cent in 1967.
The figures seem to indicate
that more and more students have
to turn to such sources as Canada
Student Loans to finance their
education but such figures are not
included in the study.
Students also had to work
longer to earn their money. The
respondents worked a median
13.4 weeks in 1971, compared to
12.0 weeks in 1970.
While students were working
about 12 per cent longer than in
1970, the total earnings for men
increased only 12 per cent and
total earnings for women
increased only 15 per cent.
Taking the rising cost of living
into consideration, that means
male students earned effectively
less than in 1970-71 and women
students were not much better off
though their earnings show a
slight effective increase.
Another statistic which
illustrates the hardships facing
students is the alarming
discrepancy between earnings of
men and women.
Men students earned a mean
$1,324 while women students
earned only half as much, $752.
In other words, employers still
discriminate against women
employees.
Faculty was also an important
consideration in how much a
student earned.
Students in the technical
faculties such as forestry and
applied science earn considerably
more than students in such
faculties as arts and music.
Students    in    forestry    and
applied   science,   for   example,
earned over $ 1,600 mean while •
arts   students   earned just   over
$1,300 mean.
Women students were at a
disadvantage both in terms of
faculty and in terms pf total
earnings.
The respondents were 82 per
cent of those registering in
September but student services
exphasizes that the survey
indicates trends only.
A copy of the report is on The
Ubyssey's bulletin board for
anyone interested in seeing it. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  16,  1972
More editorial
From page 1
It is a reality which is reflected in every
colletively-produced copy of The Ubyssey you
pick up and read.
Its absence too, will certainly be a reality
when any one of you walks in the Ubyssey door
next year and finds that the person in authority is
a lackey of the AMS executive — and this isn't
idle speculation either, because if this
constitutional amendment passes there will be a
Students' Coalition-backed candidate for editor
and he will likely have lots of AMS money behind
his campaign.
We will be expanding upon our position
today at noon at the AMS general meeting.
We are not praying for rain or for the absence
of a quorum. Just the opposite.
We believe we will win this fight and we are
urging all of you to come to the meeting and to
assert that it is not the council nor the executive
but you, the members of the Alma Mater Society,
who are the publishers of this newspaper; that
you, as publishers and readers, will not tolerate a
muzzled press; that you, as potential staff
members or contributors, will not endorse a
system whereby a campaigning, money-spending
lackey can control the newspaper.
We've done our best to produce a good
newspaper this year and we think we've
succeeded. We've pulled some coups, had some
hassles, made some mistakes and had a lot of
good times.
Now we're asking you to join us in stating
that anything less than a free press whose doors
are open to all will not be tolerated.
Miracles
As we'd hoped, a final round of
commendations is due:
To the engineers, for taking a stand against
racist newsletters at their Wednesday meeting;
And to student council for its recognition
that the newsletters are not simply isolated
examples of sick humor or petty revenge.
Having recognized that the frustration and
alienation behind the newsletter outbursts find
their roots in society, the AMS should now be
able to extend this realization into the basis for
concrete programs next year.
The main wrenches in the works are AMS
president-elect Doug Aldridge, who can't seem to
understand that racism is racism — whether it's in
"joke" form or not; and vice-president-elect
Gordon Blankstein, who advocates revenge
against the math profs who had the nerve, the
gall, to protest a number of engineering actions
by temporarily cancelling classes.
With these execptions, however, there may
yet be some hope for next year's student council.
At this stage, such a possibility is nothing
short of miraculous.
Letters
Freedom
I have been following the
engineering newsletter issue for
the last few weeks and am amazed
to find no one defending one of
our basic freedoms, namely,
freedom of the press.
No matter how distasteful or
sick these "jokes" are to the
majority of the university
community, and I include myself
in that majority, punishment of
the students responsible by the
student court or any other official
body is essentially putting a
double standard on freedom of
the press.
Either you have freedom of the
press or you don't.
Except for the FLQ, all
political factions from the Maoists
to the Nazis are legal in this
country and are allowed to
distribute literature outlining their
views.
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 16, 1972
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Scooby-dooby, I'm a doo-bee. But Jim Joly, found a folly. He said
Paul Knox, was unorthodox. And Mike Sasges says he met the AMS. But
poison ivy, grew in the alley. Where Mike Gidora, chose to dally. And now
we all have, funny faces. And Jan O'Brien was reciting silly graces. Then
Vaughn Palmer, told Leslie Plommer. That Gord Gibson, left for Lisbon.
But Kent Spencer, couldn't answer. 'Cause he discovered killer tempests in
the corner. Sandy Kass thinks, alcohol stinks. So we drank some, 'cause
we're all ginks. Please let me go home. I want to conform. And all the
radicals here give to me such great fear. Kini McDonald's, going bald.
'Cause the dryers, all got stalled. And Warren Mayes, wrote some plays.
Then Berton Woodward made me pray to my sweet lord. Lesley Krueger,
broke her ruler. And John Twigg said, life was crueller. Daryel Erickson, hit
John Andersen. So Sandi Shreve declared that she could count to ten. But
let's not sweat, life is no threat. We will all get, our big break yet. "Cause
the Sun's still chasing Howard Hughes the hermit. (To write poetry, Shreve
got her chance: will. Michael Finlay soil his pants?)
If these views take the form of
'jokes' I think any court would be
hard pressed to convict members
of the group responsible. I am not
by any means implying that the
engineering newsletter is political,
heaven forbid, but it is obviously
written by people who. do not
view racism and mass murder in
the same light as you or I.
However, does that give us the
right to discipline them with the
student court by suspending their
student privileges, privileges
included in all students' AMS fees
despite their racial or political
opinions?
Reaction and protest are
personal things and I am
wholeheartedly behind Dr.
Bluman and the other professors
or suspending their engineering
classes. However, we should all
beware of supporting the
administration and the AMS for
the punishment of the students
involved when in principle their
rights should be defended.
N.C.Sonntag,
Research associate,
TRIUMF.
We agree with your stand.
However, it is not correct to say
that no one has defended freedom
of the press in this matter. We
draw your attention to our recent
editorials on the newsletters, in
which we make the point that the
engineers responsible have the
right to publish any kind of
newsletter they want.
Incidentally, it's not quite true
that groups such as the Nazis
distribute their literature without
fear of retribution. The Hate
Literature Act bans .the
publication of the worst concepts
of their ideology.
Ubyssey
As asinine as it is, The
Ubyssey is worth saving as at least
a semblance of free speech in the
face of threatening censorship
contained in the second motion of
the Alma Mater Society's in
today's general meeting.
At present the editor is elected
by Ubyssey staff members and
ratified by council. Should the
proposed motion be passed, the
editor will be elected in the
general party elections of the
AMS.
Since parties rather than
individuals win UBC elections, the
elected editor will almost
invariably be a member of the
victorious party. The Ubyssey will
then become nothing more than a
propaganda mouthpiece for the
ruling party, via its puppet editor.
Doug      Aldridge      is
president-elect of the AMS, and
president of the engineering
undergraduate society. The EUS
dominates the AMS. The EUS is
responsible for the recent callous
anti-semitic newsletters.
If the proposed motion is
passed we can therefore expect
The Ubyssey to emulate the EUS
Rag — admirable journalistic
standards!
Something to think about in
Thursday's vote — do we really
want the recent EUS Rag to
become The Ubyssey?
Ron Davis,-
Fine arts 3.
Human
It is very disturbing to learn
that the engineering,
undergraduate society has for the
second time within a few weeks
published a newsletter full of
antisemitic and other racist
"jokes".
My memories keep going back
27 years to the day when, as a
soldier in the Second World War, I
helped liberate the Buchenwald
concentration camp from the
Nazis. I cannot forget the-
emaciated bodies stacked like
cordwood, the incinerators still
smoking, and the pitiful survivors Thursday, March  16, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
of that extermination camp barely
able to plead for a little food.
The same ugly attitudes of
contempt for minority groups, or
for anyone different from one's
own group, that are now
displayed at UBC, flourished in
Germany in the 1930s. They were
skillfully used and orchestrated by
Hitler and his backers to build a
monster out of the same German
■people who had given the world
Bach and Beethoven and Albert
Einstein. When it was all over, six
million Jews had been
slaughtered, but so had some 25
million other human beings.
It should not forgotten that
41,700 Canadians gave their lives
in the struggle to rid the world of
German and Italian fascism.
What has happened to our
educational system that the
terrible effects of master-race
attitudes can be so quickly
forgotten, and that the
hard-learned lessons of man's
mistakes are not passed on
effectively to the next generation?
" One can only applaud the
protests against the ugly attitudes
of some of the engineering
students made by the
mathematics professors, and
backed by president Walter Gage,
dean W. D. Finn, and by The
Ubyssey's editorial of March 10.
But where do UBC students as
a whole stand on this issue? How
is it possible for the EUS
newsletter to continue publishing
racist remarks, unless a substantial
proportion of the university
community fails to understand
what is dangerous in those
remarks?
Engineers are in a position to
do great good, or to wreak real
havoc, in our society. If UBC's
..engineering students graduate
with a contemptuous attitude
toward Jews, black people, and
women, how can we realistically
expect them to take pains to
protect the public against
radiation hazards when they
design nuclear power plants? How
can we expect them to respect the
fishing and hunting rights of
Canada's Indians, or the right of
the general public to recreation
and esthetic pleasure, when they
dam     rivers    for    hydroelectric
power? Why should they worry
about polluting water with
organic mercury wastes, if human
happiness and human dignity have
come to mean so little to some of
them?
Surely it is time for the faculty
of applied sciences to redesign its
curriculum so that engineering
students are taught not only the
theory and techniques of their
profession, but are also helped to
develop attitudes of interest in
and compassion for other human
beings. The same sort of
curriculum changes could well be
made by every other faculty at
UBC that trains professionals to
serve the public.
Thomas L. Perry, MD,
Professor,
Department of pharmacology
Apology
Open letter to concerned
students and faculty of UBC.
At a meeting of Jewish
students held at Hillel House on
Tuesday, it was unanimously
decided that we make clear our
position with respect to the crisis
involving the racial jokes
contained in the EUS newsletter.
We would like to make clear
that we are neither
"head-hunting" nor seeking the
suspension of any students, but
rather, we are asking for an
apology from those students
involved in the publication.
We do not feel that we are
over-reacting to the situation,
for the jokes which appeared in
the EUS newsletter show
insensitivity to the tragic realities
of recent history where people
were indeed made into soap and
millions were put into the
crematoriums (ovens). No
rational, thinking person could
dismiss those jokes as ethnic
innuendos.
We therefore request an
apology be made to the entire
community, for racial jokes
offended not only the Jews and
other ethnic groups, but the
Vancouver community as a whole.
The Jewish students
represented by Hillel House
Bylaw
LEARN FRENCH
WHERE FRENCH IS AT HOME
UNIVERSITE DE MONTREAL
ECOLE FRANCAISE D'ETE 1972
JUNE 29th-AUGUST 11th 1972
The latest audio-visual methods are used with beginners; advanced
students work in seminars.
A special attention is given to English-speaking French teachers;
to students of French literature and to people wishing to know
more about Quebec.
The social activities give opportunities to discover
French-Canadian life through folksinging evenings; theatre visits,
excursions into the typical Quebec countryside and sightseeing
walks through historic old Montreal. Also facilities for sports
activities.
Scholarships available. L'Universite de Montreal has been selected
as a participating institution in the Federal-Provincial Scholarship
Program for Canadian students who wish to learn French as a
second language.
Booklet on request at:   Ecole f rancaise d'ete
Universite de Montreal,
Service d'education permanente
CP. 6128, Montreal 101, P.Q., Canada.
We, the undersigned
individuals, hereby declare our
full support for removal of Bylaw
14, Section 6, Subsection C from
the constitution of the Alma
Mater Society.
This is the clause which bars
political clubs under the
University Clubs Committee from
running members in AMS
elections, and was used to prevent
the Young Socialist slate from
running in the last elections.
We urge all students to come
out and vote for removal of this
undemocratic clause at the AMS
general meeting today.
Dave Dick AMS treasurer,
Gordon Blankstein AMS
vice-president-elect, Tom
MacKinnon AMS
ombudsperson-elect, Steve
Boggis Former president, NDP
club, Kenneth Lassessen SUS
rep-elect, Svend Robinson
Member, UBC senate; AMS
science rep, Jim Schoening
AMS arts rep-elect, Dan
McLeod AMS arts rep-elect,
Carol Sulymka Education rep,
Vickie Meakes Education rep,
Diana Houston Rehab,
medicine rep, Shelagh Day Arts
One Instructor, W. Willmott
Professor, anthropology, D.
Wilkie Professor, psychology,
Roger Seamon Ass't professor,
English. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 16,  1972
Technology as such cannot be
to which it is put; the technolc
of domination which operates
and construction of techniques
— Herbert Marcuse,
..-rffSa.
COMPUT
OFCAHAMSm
PART ONE: THE COMPUTER DREAM
The year: 1984
The place: Every University, Canada
The situation: A day in the life of two students at
Every U.
Winston Windermill (IBM number 108-284-801),
honors biochemistry student, is cramming for his
undergraduate examinations. He has chosen to write
his exams in mid-June in order to have a leisurely
summer, and has only 45 days left to prepare.
His friend, Harlequin Tlitmaster (IBM
159-482-951), is preparing for his finals, too, so they
both meet on the way to school and chatter about
hockey statistics. Harlequin, in the same academic
course as Winston, has decided to write his exams in
early July.
Building 47, like most other buildings at Every
University, is a highrise, glass and steel, somewhat
sterile-looking. Inside, the elevator, with
uncomfortable acceleration, whisks our heroes to the
8th storey of the library, a floor similar to every
other floor.
Winston and Harlequin walk to a cubicle, shut
the sound proof door, sit down next to a computer
terminal    and    dial   the   central   data    bank   of
biochemical     information,     located    in    far-away
Ottawa. For the next three hours, the pair carry on a
dialogue   with   computers   across   the   country   —
learning, criticizing, perfecting, watching film clips on
the TV monitor, typing questions and responses into
the machine, hearing audio snippets from medical
speeches, discussing findings with each other and
collecting  reams of printed  data which they take
home with them and study.
Just an average day at the university, really ...
* * *
Science fiction? Only in the sense that it hasn't
happened yet. The computer, and the incredible
potential   of   computers,   has   already   begun   to
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revolutionize universities and the learning process.
In a very short time, most of the basic parts of
the traditional educational institute — the library, the
classroom, the professor and the administrator — will
disappear from our universities — or at best play a
supplementary role to computer-assisted learning.
In fact, the entire structure of the university, as
we know it today, could be radically changed in the
next 20 years. And 20 years is too far away for any
computer theorist to predict what might be possible.
The potential of computers snowballs daily, as
new applications are discovered and put into practice.
This rapid pace of changing computer
technology, plus the high cost of sophisticated
hardware, is holding universities back from jumping
feet first into the concept of the electronic university.
But as universities continue to do their own research
and development, and study the needs of education,
the day of intensive computerized learning gets closer
and closer.
The machinery used by Winston and Harlequin
has already been designed; and is already being tested
in North America and Western Europe. The major
drawback today is the question of financing.
Computers, as they were first envisaged by
scientists, had fairly simple uses: they could be
programmed mathematically to solve scientific and
technological problems much faster than humans
could. Their chief virtue at that time was speed.
In a sense, the computer is a direct descendent of
the adding machine: both are useful where there are
problems involving time-consuming, repetitious and
voluminous operations with facts and figures.
They were also useful originally, and still are, for
performing more complex calculations and/or logical
determinations.
In the late 1930s, when scientists at Harvard
were developing the first electronic computer, man
discovered he had a new tool. No one knew at that
time the far-reaching implications that computers
would have.
Then during the  1950s, the scientists realized
they had a new educational tool - an electronic tool
with    the    potential    for   collecting,   storing   and
transmitting all the assorted data involved in man's
vast body of knowledge of the world.
* * *
In less than two decades, computer technology in
the field of education has advanced dramatically from
the adding-machine level to a stage where
technocratically-run universities are foreseeable.
How can computers be plugged into our
universities?
In many ways; among them: the study of
computers, studying other subjects via computers and
information storage banks, the changing of libraries
from book warehouses into electronically accessible
data banks, administration of the university, and
national computer networks to facilitate the flow of
academic and administrative information.
All these things, and others, are available now.
The only deterrent, as far as university and
government are concerned, is the prohibitive cost of
the equipment.
The first advantage of integrating computers into
the academic world is an obvious one — the ability to
instruct students in the use of the equipment and
teach them how to program computers. As computers
become more and more omnipresent in our daily lives
— the computer industry will be the largest single
industry in the world by 1980 - society needs people
from all walks of life who understand and can
administer the technology.
Inevitably, as universities buy or rent computers,
they also set up departments of computer science to
train their students in the finer points of operating
and programming the machines.
In this way the university plays its traditional
role of acting as a supplier of skilled manpower to
meet the current needs of industry.
The next step is to program other academic
courses through the computer, so that the computer
can help students learn other materials such as;
science, mathematics, or foreign languages. This is
usually called computer-assisted instruction (CAI).
The concept of CAI has not yet been explored
very far, but already several important breakthroughs
have been made. Experiments to date have come up
with three basic types of CAI.
The first, and simplest, type is the drill and
practice system, whereby the student, subjected to an
audio or visual stimulus, types his response into the
computer. This system has been used for teaching
spelling to grades four through six. The computer is
used to supplement the tutorial system and has been
used to teach mathematics and reading. It is a
self-contained system in that the computer teaches
directly, by electronic exposure. In this system, the.
teacher supplements the computer.
The final type of CAI, still being explored, is the
dialogue niethod which involves a direct interaction
between the student and the computer. Students can
put questions to a programmed computer, and the
a 4
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THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
slated from the use
ical society is a system
ready in the concept
ne Dimensional Man
SRizanoN
nvERsrnES
By Ian Wiseman
Canadian University Press
lachine fulfills the particular details of the question,
utting together a coherent answer. This system is
Mnpletely self-contained.
Computers have already been designed that
lable the student to respond to auditory and visual
.splays by three different input modes: a hand-held
jht-pen, a typewriter key-set, or a microphone
icorder.
Computer-assisted instruction on a mass scale
jcessitates large comprehensive data banks for
orage of information pertinent to university
mrses. This means electronically accessible libraries,
ith efficient information retrieval.
More science fiction? Nope, it has already been
Dne. Computerized data banks are becoming fairly
Mtimon now as several of the large computer
irdware producers have developed systems for data
trieval. The most common method consists of
icrofilm for storage, video screens for retrieval and
wnputer terminals for electronic control.
This method is quite primitive in the face of
cent developments which include storing the
intents of books in mechanized form as they are
lblished; indexing and cataloguing by computer;
:signing a computerized dialogue to aid students in
tiding information that they do not have publication
ita for; computerizing an analysis of the material's
mtent rather than just its title; building centralized
ita banks that are accessible thousands of miles
vay by direct transmission; mass-producing
[dividual computer terminals so that students can
lug into this computer library at any time.
Now that we can foresee the demise of the
assroom, the lecturer, and the library, lets turn to
e administrative functions of the university.
Computers are being widely used in North
merica by university administrations for efficient
gistration and for rapid analysis of sociological and
:a_d,emic trends among the student and faculty
jpulation. Registration at most universities in this
mntry is done by computer cards.
Computers are useful for calculating university
sources utilization; particularly in studying the
>mplex patterns of room allocation (space
.oblems), time slots for lectures, and the availability
? staff.
And, of course, computers can be used to
cilitate top-level administrative information-flow,
_>th internally and between universities. File cards
l exchange students and faculty are an example of
is use of computers.
A by-product of this mechanization of university
[ministration is the loss of jobs for lower-echelon
Iministrators. The ever-growing automation-
:rsus-employment dilemma.
So, as we bury the lecturers, the classroom
aintenance people, and the libraries; let's also write
"f a portion of the administrative personnel.
That   leaves   us  with  only   the   students,  the
>mputer   people,   a   few  academic, supervisors,  a
indful of administrators — and a whole bunch of
;w, gleaming, whirring computers.
■.. * * *
That's today's computer dream for education.
Tomorrow's reality? The moral and political
questions raised by the possibilities are many.
The danger of a 1984-Brave New World type
society where all students in this country, or more
likely, on this continent, are programmed by the
same central computer experts is a very real one.
An extension of this will be the evaluation of
students, and the grading of their courses. Some
computer scientists envision a continual objective
evaluation by compute which will mean an end to
examinations. The computer could record and assess
a student's progress every time the student uses it.
But students will still spend only a small part of
their days learning from the computers. How does a
computer mechanically judge the human experiences,
the day-to-day influences of the world outside the
computer laboratory?
How will we be able to relate to
computer-learning in an aga, of increasing alienation
caused in part by our advanced machine technology?
Will the computer universities so systemize the
present form and content of higher education that
the occasional outbursts of creative non-conformity
which occur now and then — such as Simon Fraser's
parity in 1972 — will be eliminated?
Who is going to own, operate and control the
educational computers? Private corporations? The
government? It's inconceivable under the existing
social system that such an all-encompassing form of
mass education would be allowed to serve any
interests other than those of the status quo.
What about the potential for state control and
conditioning — technocratized mind-control and
indoctrination on the national level such as the world
has never seen before?
These questions remain unanswered as the
technological juggernaut rolls steadily onward.
Next week: Part 2: The Canadian Viewpoint;
Part 3: The Monopoly Obstacle.
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A
look
at
who
One might think that a corporation like IBM
which controls 80 per cent of the world's
computer market would have its finger into every
possible political and economic pie. While this is
likely true in a vast array of unstructured ways
having to do with the common ideology of the
ruling class, most of the big men at IBM seem to
be kept pretty busy just keeping track of the
corporation's $5 billion assets and the company's
expansion.
Of the twelve major executives and directors
of IBM Canada listed in the Financial Post's
Directory of Directors, all three vice-presidents
and three of the directors devote the majority of
their time to their home company.
Chairman and executive officer J.E. Brent,
on the other hand, is obviously the public relations
jack-of-all-trades in the group. The 15 corporations
in which he is involved (aside from IBM Canada)
include financial institutions (insurance and
banking), cultural and philanthropic (Toronto
Symphony, Council of Christians and Jews) and
education (University of Toronto board of
governors arid University of Western Ontario —
vice-president and director, and chairman of the
advisory committee of the School of Business).
Henry Borden is more into industry. His
14-item list (aside from IBM Canada) includes
Brascan, Bell Canada, Brinco, Churchill Falls, Rio
Algom Mines, Tinto Holdings, Massey-Ferguson
and Industrial Estates. And there are a couple of
investment and insurance companies for good
measure as well as a seat on the University of
Toronto board of governors.
Arts and finance man is T.S. Bata, with seven
listings including Bata Financial, the Chamber of
Commerce, National Ballet, Toronto Art
Foundation and Canadian University Services
Overseas . . . and the board of governors of Trent
University.
Keeping tabs on institutions in Quebec is
Marcel Faribault, who has numerous French
language art and financial institutions on his list.
Another industry and finance man is A.T.
Lambert, the kingpin of the Toronto-Dominion
Bank. Lambert, who has 19 other listings also has
a seat on the board of governors at York
University.
Former University of Western Ontario
president G.E. Hall was, until his recent death, also
an IBM director.
As may be noted, one common area of
interest among IBM Canada directors is financial
institutions. Another thing that most of them have
in common is that at least seven of the twelve live
in Toronto or its environs.
The remaining executive officers listed in
the Directory of Directors hold only 15 executive
or directorship positions in addition to their IBM
involvmements. Seven are in Toronto, two in
Ottawa and one each in Vancouver and Montreal.
Who mentioned interlocking directorships?
Who said ruling class? Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  16,  1972
U of A paper reps on commission
EDMONTON (CUP) - The
Gateway, student newspaper at
the University of Alberta, will be
represented on the commission
investigating the method for
selection of its editor.
At a U of A student council
meeting (March 6) council agreed
to place two members of the
Gateway staff (to be chosen by
the staff) on the commission.
Engineering rep Howard
Christenson, who made the
motion, explained that since two
people who had voted in favor of
the personnel board's choice of
editor had been put on the
commission, some attempt should
be made to balance it.
Law rep and president-elect
Jerry Riskin opposed the motion
on the grounds that it would
cause the number of students on
the   commission   to  exceed  the
RECORDING ARTISTS
MARTY GILLAN
and
KAREN O'BRAY
Appearing Nightly
from 9 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
with THE
TOWN PUMPERS
Described by Leisure Magazine as
THE BAND OF THE YEAR
Their new Stereo L.P.
"WE DID IT OUR WAY"
NOW AVAILABLE AT LOCAL
RECORD STORES
THE
TOWN
PUMP
WE ARE
STILL
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AND HERE'S WHY!
1. Factory trained mechanics
2. Lowest repair prices in town
3. We stock and use only genuine
Volkswagen spare parts
4. All     our     work     is     fully
guaranteed
5. We've   served   the   University
community for over  10 years
Specialists in Major Repairs
SALES AND SERVICE
Oak St. 263-8121
number of non-students. He said
he had understood the
commission to be a method of
ruling out a political consideration
in this matter by asking people
not directly involved to do the
investigation.
But  he   said  he  could  only
support the motion if for every
Gateway staffer added there was
also someone added from off
campus. He later withdrew his
qualifications of the motion after
listening to the debate.
Gateway editor Bob Beal said:
"We are faced with a dispute
between the newspaper and the
student council and it is necessary
Abortion vote set
March 22 is the date set for a
referendum asking UBC students
their opinion of Canada's abortion
laws.
Wednesday night's council
meeting passed a resolution by
outgoing ombudswoman Joan
Campana that UBC students be
asked "Do you favor repeal of
those sections of the Criminal
Code dealing with abortion?"
Council     endorsed     the
referendum as well as a cross
country Abortion Law Repeal
Conference called for March 18
and 19 in Winnipeg.
Campana, a member of the
UBC Abortion Action Committee,
said Wednesday the committee
feels "abortion should not be
considered a criminal act, but
should be up to the individuals
concerned to decide for
themselves."
that either both sides be
represented or neither be
represented on any body formed
to solve the dispute."
The commission was created to
look into the method of
appointment of future Gateway
editors and the present
appointment dispute of a
Gateway editor.
The dispute began on February
14 when students council
appointed a Gateway editor who
had received no support from the
Gateway staff and with whom the
staff would refuse to work.
The Gateway s taff
subsequently went on strike and
refused to publish regular
Gateway editions for two weeks.
Council then appointed the
commission to investigate the
dispute and the staff ended their
strike pending the outcome of the
commission.
&P6H AU-eUMMEA
■me lowest prices
it1~&uM...
•on c&m|>u6*
A.M.S. GENERAL MEETING-MARCH 16-12:30
Constitutional Amendments
I. MOVEMENT OF "NON-CONTROVERSIAL
INTO THE A.M.S. CODE.
WHEREAS the Student Council has recommended that
certain procedural sections of the Alma Mater Society
By-Laws be removed and placed into the Alma Mater Society
Code:
Are you in favor of the following sections being removed
from the By-Laws and placed into the Code?
By-Law 4 (2), a section dealing with the appointment of
honorary members of Student Council;
By-Law  4   (4)   (2),  that  is a  section   dealing with the
appointment of an Honorary President and his/her duties;
By-Law 10 (2) to 10 (7) that is sections dealing with the
procedure for the levying of a fee upon each member of an
undergraduate society;
By-Law 11 (9) and 11 (10), that is sections dealing with
procedure by which the Alma Mater Society Budget shall be
accepted and by which the A.M.S. Treasurer shall deal with
fees levied by Undergraduate Societies upon their members;
By-Law 12 (1) to 12 (3), that is sections dealing with
prohibition of gambling, the drinking of intoxicating liquors
and the approval of advertising and distribution of materials
on campus;
By-Law 14, that is a by-law setting out the procedure for
dealing with subsidiary clubs and organizations;
And all other changes necessarily incidental to the foregoing
amendments.
PARTS OF THE A.M.S. CONSTITUTION
Effect of the change:
Provisions which are presently in the A:M.S. Constitution
can only be changed by a vote of all students by means of a
referendum vote where the minimum vote must be about
4,000 voters. On the other hand, the A.M.S. Code can be
amended by a 2/3 rds vote of the Student Council. It is
proposed that certain "procedural" sections would be better
dealt with in the Code and this change would allow those
sections to be removed from the Constitution and placed in
the Code.
The sections involved in no way affect the basic operation
and organization of the A.M.S. but rather they are procedural
details which should be placed in the A.M.S. Code so that
changes as they become necessary can be made more easily.
A bi-partisan Constitutional Revisions Committee of
Council met to determine what "non-controversial" provisions
could be placed into the Code and their recommendations
were unanimously accepted by the Student Council which
now presents this change for your consideration.
This "housekeeping" change can facilitate a much more
instant response to the changing needs of administrative detail
and you are urged to vote YES for these changes at the
MARCH 16, 1972 SPRING GENERAL MEETING.
II. CHANGE IN THE SELECTION OF THE EDITOR OF THE UBYSSEY BY-LAW 4(3)0)
OF THE A.M.S. CONSTITUTION.
BY-LAW 4 (3) (i) NOW READS:
The Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey Editorial Board, who shall be an appointed and not an elected
member of the Council. He shall be appointed by a vote of the Incoming Students' Council before the
end of the spring term on the recommendations of the Editorial Board.
AMENDMENT WOULD REPLACE THAT WITH:
"The Editor-in-chief of the Ubyssey Editorial Board shall have successfully completed his/her first
year or its equivalent. He/she shall be elected in the same manner as the Executive of the Students'
Council."
III. REFERENDUM (NOT A CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE)
In view of the performance of The Ubyssey staff this year, are you in favor of a cut in the present
budget allotment of $36,500? Thursday, March  16,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Pag* 9
Hot flashes
$$$ deadline
extended
The deadline for government
scholarship applications has been
extended to Friday from
Wednesday.
Applications are being
accepted in Buchanan 207.
To be eligible a student must
be registered at a provincial
university and must intend to take
a full course load at university
next year.
Organization
Five former campus organizing
committee members of the Office
and Technical Employees' Union
will hold a meeting at noon today
in SUB 215 to discuss campus
organizing questions.
The meeting is open to all
organizing committee members
but not to union officials or
salaried officials.
These members repudiated
their OTEU membership last
week, after investigating the
U.S.-based    union's   constitution.
Expression
An "Asian Canad ian
Experience" is being held all this
week in the SUB art gallery.
Sponsored by the Nisei Varsity
Club, the show is intended to act
as "an expression of the Asian
community on campus," a
spokesman said.
Ronald Con, regional liaison
officer for the secretary of state,
will speak at noon today in the
SUB gallery and Asian-Canadian
poet Sean Gunn will read his
poetry in the gallery at noon
Friday.
An exhibition of historical and
contemporary Asian photos will
be on display all week.
Letter
A personal letter for Sara
Gunnard, author of an article in
The Ubyssey's Sisterhood edition
which appeared last week, is
waiting for her at the newspaper's
office.
It's tacked up on the bulletin
board.
'Tween classes
Cities
TODAY
NVC
Meeting at noon in student council
chambers SUB.
EDUCATION COMMITTEE
Panel   discussion  on  Mental  Illness
and   the   Right   to   be  Different  at
noon in Bio 2000.
ALPHA OMEGA — UKRAINIAN
VARSITY CLUB
General   meeting   at   noon   in  SUB
213.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
New committee, old club at noon in
IH upper lounge.
CAMPUS MINISTRIES—AUCM
Annual    meeting    AUCM   at   noon
SUB 215.
CCF
Talk   by   missionary   pilot   of   Peru
Ralph Borthwick at noon SUB 211.
NEWMAN CLUB
Film:      The      Committee     and
discussion   by   Bernice   Gerard   on
abortion at noon in SUB 207-209.
HILLEL HOUSE
Talmudic   Laws   of   Marriage   with
Rabbi Marvin Hier at noon at Hillel
House behind Brock.
BAHA'I CLUB
Meeting at noon in Buch. 230.
KUNG FU CLUB
General   election   at   4:30   p.m.   in
SUB 205.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Spectrum '72 academic counselling,
representatives from all schools and
faculties available for discussion 12
to 2:30 p.m. in SUB ballroom.
FRIDAY
VOC
Banquet    at   Coach   House,   North
Vancouver.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
FAMILY COUNCIL
Coffee house with a singing and jazz
pianist at 9 p.m.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Women's liberation and sexual
development, a discussion with
Meridith Kimball of UBC psych
department at noon in Ang. 207.
UBC SKYDIVERS
Executive elections in SUB 205 at
noon.
CLASSICS CLUB
Pat Merivale to speak on Orphans
Among the Critics at 3887 West
Twelfth, 8 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Murray Perry from Manpower
speaks on Real Reform, at noon
Gimmick or Real Reform, at noon
in SUB 111.
SATURDAY
HILLEL CLUB
Film Getting Straight, starring
Elliott Gould and Candice Bergen;
refreshments, at 8:30 p.m. in Hillel
house, behind Brock.
SUNDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk mass, 11 a.m., at St. Mark's
chapel.
Architect Arthur Erickson will
speak on the future of Canadian
cities today at 3:30 p.m. in
Lasserre 104.
His talk will be presented to an
open Urban Studies 200 class and
will be followed by discussion
with students.
Beautiful
clothes. .
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"a step ahead"
776 Granville 687-2701
WOMAN'S LIB
AND
SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT
A discussion with Dr. Meridith Kimball of the UBC
Psychology Department.
Friday, March 17 — noon — Angus 207
ACCESSORIES AND PARTS FOR THE IMPORTED CAR
$y%
4442W. 10th
228-9755
OVERSEAS
AUTO
RUSS HILTON - BOB COURTNEY
INCLUDED IN OUR LINE OF PRODUCTS ARE SUCH
FAMOUS NAMES AS -
Abarth, Amco, American Racing, Ansa, Armstrong, A.S.M.,
Bell, Cannon, Carello, Castrol, Cibie, Classic, Cosmic,
Derrington, Dunlop, Fapa, G.T., Haan, Hepolite, Heuer,
Iskenderian, Janspeed, Koni, Lucas, Lukey, Marchal, M.G.
Mitten, Maserati, N.G.K., Personal, Pirelli, Renamel, Repco,
Smiths, SAH, Stebro, Stevens, Svezia, VDO, Warneford,
Weber.
Special Discount to
UBC Students and Faculty
#y%
Distributors of:
Robbins Auto Tops
for Western Canada
THE ACADEMIC
SPECTRUM '72
TODAY
Discuss Academic Objectives
Discover Academic Possibilities
Get Information
S.U.B.   Ballroom
12:00-2:30 p.m.
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village)
224-3939
0 BARTON BUCKS  0
with each Gasoline Purchase
over $1.50 you will receive redeemable coupons
Good for Cash or Merchandise.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 line*,   1   day  $1.00; 3  day*  $2.50
Cammarcial  -  3  lines,   1   day  $1.2$;  additional
linos 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline it 11:30 a.nu, tha day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENT'S
Dance
11
POLKA PARTY: LAST ONE OF
the year. Friday March 17 IH
8:00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m. '
DANCE. SUNSET CAVALIERS
Steelband, Sat. March 18th, 9pm
- 1 am. Admission $1.00  each   Ev-
. eryone welcome. GRAD STUDENT  CENTRE.
Greetings
12
AND I THOUGHT: APHRODITE.
No Greg the said, she's Joan
Schoults, one of the sixteen who
left for the West Coast.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: BEADED NECKLACE
Egyptian turquoise and coral
beads, lost on Tesday March 7th
en route from Old Auditorium
to Buchanan inclusive Reward
offered.    Contact   922-7435.	
LOST: GOLD JADE RING — IN
women's washroom, 1st fl. educ
bldg. Monday 9:30 — heirloom,
sentimental value Reward offer-
ed.   Contact Gail   876-6853.	
LOST MARCH 6th IN MEN'S
washroom Buch. man's gold and
silver diamond ring Contact
Shirley  Menifee.   263-5047
FOUND — SMALL SUM OF
money  on   campus.   Call   274-2018.
LOST HITCHING S.W. MARINE
Wed. March 1st blue umbrella
Phone   327-7720.	
LOST FAIRLY NEW BROWN
wallet belonging to Jack Morran.
Last Sunday at new gyms. About
$25 and IDs. Phone 738-8293 or
put   in   lost   and   found.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent  furnished   condominium   opposite Gondola,  224-0657 eves.
BIG BLOCK BANQUET TICKETS
on sale now at Memorial Gym
or from team managers. The
men's biggest athletic event of
year on March 16.  Students $4.00.
YAC MEMBERS AND GUESTS —
your last chance to see the best
of the old films—Chaplin, W. C.
Fields, Laurel and Hardy. Thurs.
March 16 at Cecil Green Park,
9  p.m.	
NEW CONCERT BAND FORMING
— Point Grey area. Anyone interested phone 224-1910 or 684-
7750.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone   684-8638.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED '60 UP 'AUSTIN OR
Morris 850 or 1100, also good used
sleeping   bag.    936-3101.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autoc For Sale
21
'62 FAIRLANE 500 NEW PAINT,
engine overhauled, very clean
See  and make offer 943-1364.
'62 FORD GAL. 500 AUTO., 390 hp
New power brakes, steering, new
snowtires, radio Come see &
make offer 263-5640. $10 reward
to  anyone   helping   to   make   salfe.
195!) VW DELUXE. GOOD CONDI-
tion New clutch $250. or offers.
732-9244.	
'58 VW DRIVEN DAILY $150 OR
best offer.  Phone Ruth 224-3166,
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
DO YOU WANT A NEW ID
card? See the experts at Corky's
Men's Hair Styling, 4th and Alma
731-4717.
Typing
40
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829
from 10:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Quick
service   on   short   essays.
"TPYED YOUR OOWN ESSAT
lass time". It's easier to call
Pari.    738-6498.	
TYPING DONE — I.B.M. ELEC-
tric — Elite type, essays, term
Papers, Thesis, etc. Stencils and
Mimeograph.   My   home   327-5381.
PROFESSIONAL BILINGUAL
typing, IBM Selectric. Open days
evenings, weekends Phone
Madeleine at 738-3827. Reason-
able rates.	
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION -
al typing. IBM Selectric — days,
evenings, weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745.   Reasonable   rates.   ,
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYP-
ist. Experienced Essay and
Thesis typist. Beautiful work
Mrs.   Ellis   321-3838.	
ESSAYS, THESIS, MANUSCRIPTS,
Term Papers. Fast, accurate.
Near 41st & Marine Drive, 266-
5053.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
ai
COUPLE TO MANAGE ISLAND
campground June 15 Sept. 4. Salary $500 plus cabin. Phone 224-
0539.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early Limited enrollment.  Gi1 Alfred, 261-4764.
Tutoring Service
63
TUTORING CENTRE CLOSES
Friday, March 24. Your last
chance now to get help for exams.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ENGLISH DRUM KIT. DOUBLE
side Toms on Ludwig Stand.
Cymbal, pedal, stands. Rod 876-
5406.	
SONY TC-127. new condition, with
microphones and tapes total value $225, will sell for $150 or best
offer. Phone Dave at 228-9537,
after 7 p.m.
BIRD CALLS
UBC's   Student   Telephone   Directory
Now only 25c
at Ihe Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and  AMS  Publications Office
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM, KITCHEN. $60/MO. ON
campus 5745 Agronomy Road, 224-
9549. Live on campus, exams are
coming.	
ROOM,    3    GOOD    MEALS    DAILY.
Color TV for 1 wk. Mar. 16 or 17
to Mar 23 or 24. 21 meals and
clean   sheets  $25.  263-5640.
Room & Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
SUITE TO SUBLET MARCH 1ST
-Sept. 1st. Three large rooms,
good view, partly furnished. Near
Broadway and Oak. $110.00 per
month.   Call   Bill   873-2228.
ETAOI   TA
Unf. Apts.
84
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 16, 1972
CANDICE BERGEN
ELLIOT GOULD
GBWffiSlJWGW
REFRESHMENTS:
FREE POPCORN
Adm.: 50c members
75c non-members
Time: 8:30
Sat. Mar. 18
PLACE: Hillel behind Brock
sports light
By GORD GIBSON
Ubyssey Sports Editor
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD
4450 W. 10th Ave.
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
famous charbroiled steaks — spare ribs
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720 - 224-6336
OPEN FOR LUNCH - SPECIAL MENU
HOURS - MON. To THURS. 11 a.m. to 3 a.m.
i FRI. & SAT. 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. - SUNDAY 4 p.nrt to 2 a.m.i
CO
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CM
■
rx
oo
to
1123-1125 ROBSON STREET
20% DISCOUNT TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
r>
00
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vo
CC
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od
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LU
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O
H
How many of you can honestly say that
you don't read anything The Ubyssey has to
say? Do you pick the paper up three times a
week and read nothing from it? Do you read
any articles that do not affect you in the
least?
Just because some of the articles seem
uninteresting to you, is this any reason to
deny others the chance at reading them? It is
often said that The Ubyssey does not
represent the students. But should it?
The Ubyssey reflects the opinions of
each writer and not the opinions of the AMS
executive. But anyone, including AMS
executive members are allowed to contribute
towards the paper. No one is denied this
chance.
The AMS executive claim they have a
list of people who were denied the chance to
write for The Ubyssey.
Baloney.
The AMS has a list of people who were
unwilling to spend the time to work on the
paper, to learn to write, or to submit their
articles for revision, if necessary.
Many people come in who have no idea
of how a newspaper article is written and
who are unwilling to learn.
One person came to me with a sports
story that read like a novel rather than a
sports reporting story. But he refused to
listen when I offered to show him what was
wrong with his writing or how to revise his
ideas into readable reporting. He left
disgusted with The Ubyssey probably to add
his name to the AMS list.
One fellow came in and told me he was
going to write a hockey column under his
own headline even though I already had a
good hockey writer. He refused to write
about other sports. The hockey story he did
bring in needed rewriting but he refused to
do it. He never came back. Another AMS
signature?
People seem to think they turn into
excellent writers the moment they walk
through the office door, and these ones
refuse to change their articles to fit the
paper. A person's style shows through his
articles but it has to be good style — bad
writing we do not want.
The majority of the writers are first year
people with the paper but they still had to
take the time to learn to write. Not one of
the senior staff members would be around
now if they had refused to submit to
rewriting if their first few articles didn't
meet the requirements of the paper — their
technique had to be good.
Rewriting can be very embarrassing to a
new reporter but it's something one should
expect.
The AMS executive claims that The
Ubyssey does not reflect their opinions. Are
they afraid of criticism? Do we have some
information on them that reflects their
ability to run the AMS? When one seeks a
position of power over his fellow students,
he leaves himself open for criticism of his
activities, be they good or bad.
The Ubyssey was criticized by the
present executive of being a house organ of
the human government. But they now want
us to be their house organ to "represent
their views to the students" as they so aptly
put it. They want to dictate over The
Ubyssey so they can remove material that
does not suit them.
We're damned for backing them, and
we're damned for criticizing them. Which
way are we to turn, except to reflect our
own opinions on the matter?
And what about the budget? The
students contribute $36,500 towards The
Ubyssey, while advertisers, among whom the
AMS is a major advertiser (at cheaper rates
as well), contribute about $48,000 to run
the paper. That's about $1.85 per student or
about 2.6 cents per issue.
The Ubyssey seeks to inform the
students about the university and society
around them. How many of you use The
Ubyssey to read about upcoming and past
events on campus?
Is 2.6 cents really too much to learn
what's happening, who's playing sports,
what's on at the SUB theatre, who of
importance is speaking on campus, when do
the clubs meet, and what is the
administration doing around the university?
Cutting the budget will deny you this
information media.
These have been some of the issues you
must think about when you are asked for
your vote. Support your newspaper. And, if
you want to write for us don't run to the
AMS, come in and talk with us. We do speak
your language.
TODAY — NOON
A*_M*S*
GENERAL MEETING
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
REPORTS (ONLY A FEW)
SPEECHES (NONE)
HARANGUES (USUAL NUMBER)
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS (ONLY TWO)
AND A BAND ("SUNSHINE")
HELP—Make the Quorum—4000 Needed —HELP
Soccer review
UBC Thunderbirds lost to
Victoria West 2-0 in Pacific Coast
soccer league play Saturday at
Victoria's Royal Athletic Park.
Both goals came in the first
half of the game, the first in the
opening minutes and the second
one in the twenty-fifth minute of
play.
After giving Victoria the
two-goal lead, the 'Birds settled
down defensively keeping the
Victoria team well-marked and
nearly scoring several times
themselves.
The loss did not affect the
'Birds' position in league standings
as the other teams tied with or
near UBC suffered the same fate
as the 'Birds.
The next three league games
are of great importance to UBC if
they are entertaining any thoughts
of finishing up in the top echelon
of the Pacific Coast League. Their
next game is this Sunday at 1 p.m.
against New Westminster at
Empire Stadium.
In intercollegiate action, the
UBC    eleven    will    host    the
University of California one week
from today, March 23 at 12:30 in
Thunderbird Stadium.
The Occasional soccer team
was formed in 1965 so that
students and faculty could play
soccer in the B.C. Mainland
League, one of the more
important senior soccer leagues in
the province.
Since 1965 the Occasional
have worked their way up from
the fifth division to the second.
At present they find themselves in
the middle of the second division,
having recently beaten Vancouver
Labatts 1-0. The team is also in
the last 16 of the Imperial Cup
run by the mainland league.
The soccer club is looking for
players for the coming season.
They will be continuing training
sessions and pre-season games in
preparation for the 72-73 season.
Any players interested in
playing for the team to help them
on their climb to the first division
should contact Geoff Herring at
228-3030 or 731-7274. Play
soccer on Sundays. Thursday, March  16, 1972
THE      U BYSSEY
Pag* 11
Big Block banquet
Tonight at the Big Block Club Awards Banquet,
40 of UBC's top athletes in 16 sports are going to
get it.
They'll get their first ever big-block athletic
award, receive a sweater initialed 'BC which
signifies membership in the Big Block club, and
become another one of the more than 1,500
life-time club members.
It's a chance for them to meet some of the
other top athletes in other campus sports, and stars
from  past years.
At club meetings, beer nights, the annual
awards banquet, and through the club newsletter
they'll keep in touch with athletics at UBC long
after their athletic careers are finished. Founded in
1912, the club's membership list includes Art Lord,
John Turner, James Sinclair, Herb Capozzi and
many others.
The   players   on varsity  teams  are   awarded
explained Wednesday, "it's not necessarily the best
players on the best teams who get the awards. Team
leadership, effort, attendance at practices, character,
and so on, are all considered."
And the club is not just for athletes. Although
the cheerleaders are excluded, managers of teams
are eligible. This year Derek Swain, the manager of
the basketball team, and Geoff Thomas, the
manager of the hockey team, will receive their big
blocks. Geoff kept the team going with his jokes.
In addition to the big block awards, varsity
team-membership pins, Silver Totem awards, Gold
Totem awards, and small block awards are given.
Last year Pierre Trudeau was named an
honorary member. This year Wally Gage was
presented with an honorary membership. He says
he'll wear the sweater to the banquet tonight.
The Honorable John Turner, Canada's minister
of finance, will be the guest speaker at the awards
PETER HERD ..
BOB MACANEELEY
. . . receive their first Big Block awards at tonight's banquet at which John Turner, Canada's minister of
finance, himself a Big Block winner, will be the guest speaker.
blocks on the recommendation of the coach, and
ratification by the awards committee, which is
composed of members of the club, the Men's
Athletic Committee President, representatives from
athletics at UBC, and a faculty advisor.
This year there were approximately 70
application recommendations from the coaches.
Thirty of these were rejected; the other 40 made it
through.
As   1971-72   club   president   Derek   Sankey
Badminton - Al Larson
Basketball - Bob Dickson, Darryl Gjernes, Peter
Herd, Derek Swain (Mgr.)
Fencing - Robert Best
Football - Ron Fowler, Jim Vilvang
Ice Hockey - Doug Buhr, Jim Fowler, Rich
Longpre, Bob MacAneely, Geoff Thomas (Mgr.), Ian
Wilkie
Judo - Gary Forsgren
Rowing - Ian Gordon, Karel Jonker, Michael
Neary, Edgar Smith, John Wilkinson
banquet tonight at the UBC faculty club. A former
Big Block winner in track, and Canadian sprint
champion in the late forties, Turner won his 'Blue'
in track at Oxford while studying there on a Rhodes
scholarship.
Presentation of the Bobby Gaul Trophy will be
made to the UBC male athlete who, in the opinion
of a Faculty Committee, exemplifies outstanding
qualities of sportsmanship, athletic excellence,
contribution to athletics, and scholastic ability.
Rugby - Rob Burns, Garth Hendrikson, Barry
Legh, Eric Lillie, John Mitchell
Sailing - Alan Drinkwater
Skiing - Ed Day
Soccer - Clark Glanville, Rick Gunn
Swimming - Bruce Clarke, Ken McGuire (Mgr.),
Mike Stamhuis
Tennis - George Lea
Track and Cross Country - John Beers, Rick
Cuttell, Rick Hanna
Volleyball - Hugh Jones, Bruce Kennedy
Wrestling - Dave Higashi, Bill McDonald
Intramurals doles out awards
Men's intramurals held their
annual awards banquet Monday
night to dole out the numerous
awards to the winners of 24
events and 2,400 people who
participated during the year.
Nearly 180 persons turned up
causing a disaster to start — food
ran out and the bottle openers
disappeared. The situation was
quickly remedied with sandwiches
from the cafeteria.
MC's for the entertainment of
the intramural winners were
football coach Frank Gnup and
Ray Herbert, Q.C. who said he
felt like "a one legged man at an
ass kicking contest" because of
his limited athletic ability. He
described men as "narrow in he
hip and broad in the shoulders —
except Gnup - he's just the
opposite."
Gnup started calling off the
names of the winners stumbling
over some of the more
unpronounceable ones, "where
the hell do some of you guys
come from anyway?"
Dave Meehan of forestry and
Bill Ruby of Betas were the big
winners. Meehan collected five
trophies while leading forestry to
three team trophies. Ruby
collected four honours including
the trophy for the top intramural
athlete with 195 points.
The engineering team walked
off with the President Walter Gage
Cup for the highest point totals.
The gears won three team
trophies.
Fort Camp received special
recognition for their high
participation and point totals.
This is Fort Camp's last year in
existence and the team tried
extra-hard to bring home the
hardware, three team trophies in
all.
The Fort ended in third place
in the standings behind the
engineers and forestry. This was a
rise from an eighth place showing
the year before.
Gnup had been complaining
that the intramurals never paid
him for MCing so he was
presented with five boxes of
cigars. Ray Herbert received a
bottle for his efforts.
Thunderettes end season
The basketball season came to
an abrupt end for the UBC
Thunderettes on Saturday - they
lost the B.C. and Canadian
women's senior championships all
in one game to the University of
Victoria, 41-39.
From the beginning of the
game, the play was of a calibre
seldom seen in women's
basketball with the smaller
Vikettes trading basket for basket
with the UBC team.
Gail Carlson with 11, and
Yvonne Lettlier and Rose Jossul
with 10 points each led the UVic
team. Terri McGovern netted 11
and Debbie Phelan had 8 points
for UBC.
Sowars
saw
. flanntDi
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EDELWEISS HAUS
"SPORTS SPECIALISTS"
WEEKDAYS TILL 9
EDELWEISS HAUS
1230 N. State (Next to Shakey's)
Bellingham, Wash. - 733-3271
MONEY AT PAR
 ••••••••• Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  16,  1972
Arts elects activists
An activist arts undegraduate society executive
was acclaimed Friday for the 1972-73 academic
year.
The group intended to run in the arts elections
as a united slate. Those acclaimed were Dea Martin
arts 3, treasurer; Brad Loomes arts 1, secretary;
Brian Loomes arts 3, president and Brian
Mullihville arts 1, vice-president.
"Our platform which was never run included
cultural events such as free dances, poetry readings
and other events," said Martin.
"Our main political aim is to move arts students
in a direction which would mean more control over
their situation out here."
"We want people to have a say and to speak out
over who does and does not teach them, who gets
tenu.re, and what kinds of courses people take," she
added.
"People have already begun to do that this year
in faculties like Slavonic studies and anthrosoc,"
said Brad Loomes.
"Just speaking out isn't enough," he said.
"Students have to be involved in projects which give
them a voice in the affairs of the Arts faculty as a
whole."
The fact that they were acclaimed rather than
elected did not seem to upset members of the new
executive.
"I've been working in community politics for a
long time and it's not who you are but what you
do," said Martin.
"People don't know us yet but we'll try to give
them as much leadership as we can," she added.
The new executive's first project is an
anti-calendar planned for publication for the fall
registration.
The new executive has been meeting to plan
their program for next year.
Selling your home?
Ph. Joan Bentley, 224-0255
Rutherford-Thompson-McRae
733-8181
WHY WAIT???
BIOL ATE!!!
Know your physical, emotional and
intellectual levels well in advance of
that certain date. See the
BIOLATOR at the Thunder Bird
Shop U.B.C.
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
NOMINATIONS
ARE NOW OPEN FOR
GRAD STUDENT ASS'N:
PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
INTERNAL AFFAIRS OFFICER
GRA COORDINATOR
Nomination forms available
in Grad Centre Office.
Nominations close 5 p.m.
March 20,1972
Tutoring losing business
The UBC tutoring centre is losing business.
But co-ordinator Judith Miller says she can't
determine if the loss is because of Term Papers
Unlimited or "because people just feel it's too late
to do anything about their courses."
Term Papers Unlimited came to light several
weeks ago when the international essay writing
service opened a Vancouver office.
TPU owner Wayne Zimmer told The Ubyssey
Wednesday his firm has a booming business.
He said there are "plenty" of students using the
service but that the exact figures are "confidential".
Miller estimates the tutoring centre's business is
about half what it was at the beginning of the term.
"There were about 17 people coming then
during two week periods and even though it's
picked up some lately there are about 10 less people
coming in now in the same periods of time," she
said.
She said the centre will close March 24, because
"not enough people have indicated interest to keep
the centre going longer than that."
Miller said the number of tutors has also
decreased, especially for commerce courses.
Registration at the centre, located in SUB 228,
costs $1 for both tutors and students seeking help.
Once registered, students and tutors can attend the
centre as often as they wish free of charge.
With 'friends' like these ..
A surprised Vancouver lawyer has tentatively
joined B.C. appeal court judge Nathan Nemetz in
the race to succeed chancellor Allan McGavin.
The nomination of Robert Thorpe, a 1950 UBC
alumnus, was received Tuesday by UBC registrar
Jack Parnall but his candidacy isn't definite.
"I talked to Mr. Thorpe Tuesday night and he
seemed quite surprised that his name had been
proposed," Parnall said Wednesday, the day
nominations closed.
"So I gave him five days to discuss his
candidacy with his friends who nominated him and
then make up his mind as to whether he'll run or
not."
Parnall said a possible June 7 ballot for the
three year chancellorship would only be necessary if
Thorpe declares on March 20 that he really is a
candidate.
"Otherwise Mr. Nemetz will be elected by
acclamation," he said.
Thorpe said Wednesday evening that he was
both "surprised" and "flattered" by his nomination.
"Several months ago a few of my friends said
they would nominate me for the chancellorship but
I thought they were just joking," Thorpe said.
"I'll have to consider their action carefully, as
it's flattering that they've gone to this much
trouble."
Thorpe said he was meeting with his
nominators Wednesday evening to discuss his
candidacy.
ROBERT   EDGAR  presents nTlQP* 20
8:30 pm
an  informal evening with
am monUPee
and  ROBBIE KING
ARTS CLUB THEATRE
1181 Seymour at Davie
ALL   SEATS ■•$1.50 Tickets:   687-531S
"ONE OF THE BEST
CONCERT FILMS
"^
SO FAR!"
— N«w York Timms
c
r    lEONftVSSSU     ,
The Master of Space&Time
^
./STHffri ttwoRfn tniwe plea/uk Pcapa/OF ftmaacft
=£
ITS A MOVING PICTURE
J
HEBB THEATRE, U.B.C.
7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
Admission 75c
THURSDAY, MARCH 16
FRIDAY, MARCH 17
SATURDAY, MARCH 18
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
A T REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room
to offer you better service.
Open Every Day From Friday
4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. 4:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
INSURANCE   COMPANY
o
□
c\
cn
r\
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name.	
Residence
Address	
City
{Please Print)
Phone: Home   Office _
Occupation  	
Prov..
I
Age      Married □ Divorced □      Male Q
Separated D  Never Married □ Female Q
Date first licensed to drive —	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes □ No □ (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended? 	
Are you now insured? 	
Date current policy expires	
This  coupon  is  designed  solely  to  enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile...
Make of automobile..
No. of cylinders __.
Horsepower 	
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.).	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area.*	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
—Days
..Miles.
YesQ NoQ
Car No. 2
...Days
..Miles
Yes G No Q
Give number and dates
of fraffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
FPR UBC 50

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