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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 23, 1976

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Array Students protest in East
Canadian University Press
Three thousand students in two
eastern provinces were on the
march Wednesday to protest
changes in student aid policies and
education cut-backs.
In Ontario, 2,500 students from 15
universities and community
colleges travelled to Toronto to
oppose the government's announcement that loan ceilings
would rise to $1,000 from $800 next
year.
They also demanded the
government reject a report which
calls for a tuition increase of 65 per
cent and an all loan, no grant
student aid policy.
The students argued that if all
student aid came in the form of
loans, students would be left with
large debts when they graduate.
Meanwhile in Fredericton, New
THS U8YSSEY
Vol. LVII, No. 43 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 23, 1976
228-2301
Brunswick, premier Richard
Hatfield has refused to make a
committment to improve the
provincial student aid program
despite a mass demonstration by
more than 500 students.
The students Thursday continued their peaceful demonstration outside the New Brunswick legislature while students
throughout the province boycotted
classes.
Demonstration organizers said
there would have been more
demonstrators, but an extremely
heavy snow storm kept buses from
arriving on time in Fredericton
from other New Brunswick centres.
Meeting with representatives
from the five provincial post-
secondary institutions, Hatfield
admitted that "our program of
student aid, as the students have
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—peter cummings photo
FLOGGING FARMER'S FROLIC tickets, Aggie cowpuncher Dale Anderson, aggie 2, swallows hard as
country bumpkin Anne Wallace, arts 4, sidles up to make purchases Thursday. Heiffers, steers and stud
bulls herd together Saturday night as week-long Aggie celebrations draw to close. Bring your own spurs.
Doug the Thug survives 'hit men
By GREGG THOMPSON
and BILL TIELEMAN
Two "hit men" filled a "contract" Thursday on administration
president Doug Kenny when they
strolled into his office and jammed
a shaving-cream pie in his face.
Kenny later described the incident as "of no significance and of
no interest" and repeatedly said in
an interview that it was a "private
matter."
Exact details of the assault
remain unclear, but The Ubyssey
has learned that the "hit" was part
of a contest sponsored by the
Engineering Undergraduate
Society.
The object of the contest is to
"cream-pie" various profs and
administrators on campus with
points being awarded for each
successful hit.
Rules of the contest, as outlined
on EUS stationery, read:
o The plate must be a nine-inch
pie plate or paper plate;
o A minimum of one-inch of
whipping cream or shaving cream
to cover the surface of the plate;
o The pie must hit the victim in
the face;
o All hits must be photographed.
No points can be awarded without
a picture;
q Potential targets will be
assigned points for degree of
difficulty;
o All hits will be judged for aim,
coverage and over-all effect;
• And the club (mechanical,
civil) obtaining the most points will
receive a reward.
The'pie in Kenny's face, worth a
reported 30 points, was the fourth
and to date the most valuable hit of
the contest.
Last Monday, the day the caper
began, Edward Auld, associate
professor of physics was hit as he
conducted a physics 115 class in
Hebb theatre.
Math prof Klaus Hoechsmann
was hit early Wednesday morning
in the civil engineering building.
At least one other UBC professor
has been successfully hit,
engineering sources said Thursday.
The sources said more hits could
be expected before the contest ends
at the beginning of engineering
week in early February. One
victim likely to be hit is lecturer
Donald McAdam, the sources
added.
In a prepared statement issued
late Thursday by an administration spokesman, Kenny
said: "Personally I regard the
specific incident as minor and silly
and I consider it closed.
"But I am a little disappointed
that there seem to be some
students on campus who can't see
that such episodes are not in
keeping with the real nature of a
university."
The spokesman said a camera
containing pictures of the episode
was voluntarily left in the
president's office when the
assailants departed. Original
reports were that the camera had
been forcibly confiscated.
EUS president Marty Tupper
denied Thursday that he knew
anything about the event.
The identity of the successful hit
men remains unknown.
pointed out, has not been overly
generous."
However, he did agree to present
the student demands to the
provincial cabinet for discussion.
Outside in the snow, University
of New Brunswick student
president Jim Smith said: "It just
seems like the run-around again."
UNB representative Jim Maclean
said the demands were presented
to the provincial cabinet three
months ago and no changes have
yet been made.
The demands included student
representation on policy-making
bodies relating to student aid.
"In reality, have we as much
input now as we will ever have?"
Maclean asked Hatfield.
"Yeah, right," replied the
Progressive Conservative
premier.
Hatfield predicted severe cuts in
government services next year,
including hospitals and road
construction, and said taxpayers
could not be asked to finance
improved student aid plans.
Maclean said the changes would
cost about $3 million — about the
cost of constructing three miles of
highway.
Hatfield said: "This is what
restraint means — we have to cut
back.
"If I could give you more money,
I would not hesitate, but the
government is not in a position to
do so."
In Ontario students booed loudly
as Harry Parrott, colleges and
universities minister, rationalized
the government's policy by telling
them "students should pay for a
component of the educational
cost."
He said students had "witnessed
a drop from 24 to 15 per cent in the
portion of the total educational
costs that students had to pay."
He continued amid increasing
jeers, which interrupted him at
almost every sentence. "Because
of the economic situation, all
people of Ontario should be ready
to make sacrifices."
Parrott said his government was
(committed not to increase tuition
fees for 1976-77, but could not give
the same guarantees for the
academic year 1977-78.
Opposition party representatives
attacked the government's
mismanagement of the economy
and pledged to fight any increase
in tuition for the next few years.
However, representatives from
the opposition refused to be
specific: the NDP's James Ren-
wick said: "until there is a serious
study of education there should be
no increase." Liberal education
critic James Sweeny said he too is
opposed to an increase and "that
education in Ontario unlike the
Soviet Union is for the individual as
well as the state (sic)."
Tenure sparks
senate debate
By SUEVOHANKA
A pointed exchange at senate Wednesday revealed one shortcoming in
the new agreement between the faculty association and UBC's administration which describes, among other things, the criteria to be used
in granting faculty promotions and tenure.
The exchange began when student senator Gordon Funt gave notice of
a motion asking the board of governors to set up a committee to investigate tenure at UBC.
Funt's motion asked that such a committee look specifically at "the
criteria used in granting tenure, the relative weight placed upon these
criteria and the methods utilized in ascertaining performance."	
After Funt read his motion, The agreement also says "when
chemistry    department    head    the  opinions  of  students   or   of
Charles McDowell was quick to
point out that criteria for tenure
are "covered in the agreement"
between the faculty association
and the administration, and
suggested Funt withhold his
motion until he had seen a copy of
the agreement.
Funt replied: "But there were no
students sitting in on it."
The agreement follows UBC's
longstanding tradition of refusing
to allow students access to any part
of the promotion and tenure
granting process.
And, the agreement does not
guarantee that student input be
sought as part of the means of
evaluating teaching by a professor
being considered for tenure or
promotion.
The section of the agreement
dealing with criteria says tenure
and promotions shall be granted on
the basis of a professor's teaching,
research, professional and
creative work, and service to the
university and to the community.
Concerning teaching, the
agreement says "evaluation of
teaching shall be based on the
effectiveness rather than the
popularity of the instructor."
It continues: "The methods of
teaching evaluation may vary;
they may (but need not) include
student opinion, assessment by
colleagues of performance in
university lectures, outside
references concerning teaching at
other institutions, course material
and examinations, the calibre of
supervised essays and theses and
other relevant considerations."
colleagues are sought it shall be
done through formal procedures,"
but does not specify what "formal
procedures" would be used.
At Wednesday's senate meeting,
student senator Ron Walls tried a
different approach to gaining
student input in tenure and
promotion decisions.
He gave notice of a motion that
senate strike an ad-hoc committee
to examine the procedure used to
measure the effectiveness of
teaching among professors.
Walls said Thursday his motion
is intended to work in conjunction
with the board committee urged in
Funt's motion.
"Teaching is not evaluated
uniformly across campus," Walls
said, adding the aim of his motion
is "to provide a campus-wide
uniform yardstick" to measure
teaching effectiveness.
He said students should be involved in teaching evaluation
because "students are the only
ones who can really adequately
evaluate teaching."
He pointed out that if his and
Funt's motions are passed by
senate and the two committees are
formed, at least one student representative would sit on each committee.
This would be the first time
students would become directly
involved in discussions with bodies
making decisions about the
evaluation of criteria used in
granting tenure and promotion to
faculty.
Both motions will be discussed at
senate's next meeting in February. rnaay, January ^o,   ly/o
Tween classes
TODAY
ART GALLERY
Final   day,  three  painters,   10   a.m.
to 5 p.m., SUB art gallery.
ALLIANCE  FRANCAISE
Rendez-vous,     midi,     le    salon,     la
Mason  Internationale.
EL CIRCULO  SPANISH  CLUB
Party    organization,    noon,    Brock
351A.
BAHA'I CLUB
Talk    on    meditation,    noon,    Gage
lounge.
SKI  CLUB
Cross-country     and     downhill     ski
films, noon, SUB auditorium.
UBC   FENCING  CLUB
Training   program,   7   p.m.,   winter
sports centre, gym E.
THE CENTRE COFFEE  HOUSE
Poetry     readings     with     Warren
Tallman     and     folk     singing    with
Denise    Larson,    8    p.m.,    Lutheran
Campus Centre.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Ireland,   the   struggle   continues,   8
p.m.,  1208 Granville.
SATURDAY
BAHA'I CLUB
Open house, 4 p.m., SUB 212.
CMDC
Dance with Black Sheep and a new
band from UBC, 9 p.m., Grad
Centre ballroom.
SUNDAY
PRO-LIFE SOCIETY
Protest march, 2 p.m., Vancouver
General Hospital.
MONDAY
KUNG  FU CLUB
Practice,  4:30  p.m., SUB ballroom.
FEMINIST  KARATE ASSOCIATION
Practice,     6:30     p.m.,    SUB    party
room.
ECKANKAR
Film   — Eckankar — a  way  of  life,
7:30 p.m., SUB 215.
TUESDAY
ECKANKAR
Discussion on tiger's fang, noon,
SUB   10SB.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN  FELLOWSHIP
Prayer     and     sharing,      noon,
conference      room,      Lutheran
Campus Centre.
HAMSOC-VE7UBC
General meeting, noon, Brock ext.
358.
WEDNESDAY
UBC  LOST AND FOUND
Lost   and   found   sale,   noon,   SUB
208.
POETRY READING     >
Canadian poet John Newlove will
read from his work, noon, Bu
202.
Arblfrafor okayed
The Association of University
and College Employees and the
UBC administration have verbally
agreed to the appointment of
lawyer Dick Bird as arbitrator in a
dispute between the union and the
administration.
Arbitration will begin March 3.
The dispute between the administration and AUCE began Jan.
6 when library stack attendants
Ian Mackenzie and Neil Bennet
refused to perform a task they
claimed wasn't part of their duties.
The next day the two men were
suspended without pay for five
days.
After losing grievances with his
immediate supervisor, his
department head and the
university labor committee,
Mackenzie, who is also the
president of AUCE, was granted
financial support from AUCE for
arbitration.
Arbitration will cost about $1,000
with the cost split 50-50 between the
administration and AUCE.
Our
'Delly" special
sub-
marine   counter  will   be
open
from  10 a.m.
to 5
p.m.
TRY OUR
JUNIOR
SUBMARINE
75c
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
'
HILLEL
SPECIAL EVENT
EIGHT QUESTIONS PEOPLE ASK
ABOUT JUDAISM    by Dennis Prayr and Joseph TMushkin
"/ congratulate you .. . You have actually written the intelligent skeptic's guide to Judaism."
- HERMAN WOUK
For four v
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2. V\i
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;tter, how does one account for unethi-                 BlI^L^HL^t^Ml^L^L^LBl
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ow does Judaism differ from:                                W~:'™*¥lm^mm\\\\\\\\\\\\wir
a) Christianity?                                                W   "^^^^^HHSHBS*1
b) Marxism and Communism?                          W          liiMJ^K]^^
c) Ethical Humanism?                                        M'^'i-1'    t^H^P  >i    es*"
hat is the Jewish role in the world?                       M%   tiMnl' ST****"
hy are so many young Jews alienated                    n*       iHH9HP^
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hy shouldn't 1 intermarry — doesn't                      &   ^hSKsIP'. a^^"^
jdaism advocate universal brotherhood?                 jfiJ ^^WJ^S^*^^
ow does one start acting Jewish?                             S^lp
Beginning January 28, 1976, with the author
Joseph Telushkin and continuing every Tuesday
with Rabbi Hier at Hillel House. Textbook
available, no admission charge.
#1 15
OrilX
How 6CM3D   fee* u
<3M  - I Pm
*^4:«Bif- 1°  TA»»e   i«j"tn». A~,\, ojeis.
THE SAILING CLUB
GALA WINTER
CARNIVAL
SATURDAY, JAN. 24
JERICHO BEACH 10:30 A.M.
FEATURING:
FUN AND GAMES
CRAZY RACES
DARE DEVIL STUNTS
INTENSE COMPETITIONS
FREE FOOD AND DRINK
ALL MEMBERS INVITED
And don't forget the Intercollegiate race eliminations on
Sunday, January 25.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 dsy $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m„ the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van, 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
65 — Scandals
FARMER'S   FROLIC   Jan.   24   Sat.   8:30   \
p.m.   upstairs   SUB,   2   Bands,   $2.00
each   at   Sub   booth,   AMS   or   from
Aggies. Ya'll come now!
A GENERAL GRAD Class Meeting will
be held on Thurs. Feb. 5, 12:30 p.m.
in SUB Ballroom.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB slalom Sun
day 1:00 p.m. B Lot. Bring your cars
and  have   some   fun.  Rain  or   Shine.
DANCE TO THE BLACK SHEEP! Also
introducing a new band. Saturday
Jan. 24th, Grad Centre, 9:00-1:00 a.m.
Full facilities. Only $2.00. Everybody
welcome. '
10 —For Sale — Commercial
11 — For Sale — Private
1   PR.   LANGE   "BANSHEE"   ski   boots.
Size   lO'/s.   New.   $110   obo.   1   HP-34
Calculator.   $80.   224-4866.
20 — Housing
STUDENT TO SHARE four bedroom
house with three others. Near Cambie  W.  13th. Phone 879-0305.
SHARE HOUSE with two graduate students. One person required Feb. 1.
Large modern home. Close campus.
Day 228-6194, evenings 263-7175.
I AM A DELUXE, spacious four bedroom house in Dunbar area requiring a fourth occupant. I need your
support and care.  731-1993.
WHY READ "HAMLET" when you can
watch it on film? Olivier's Hamlet on
Friday, Jan. 30 at 12:30 and Tuesday,
Feb. 3 at 12:30; Williamson's Hamlet
on Thursday, Jan. 29 at 2:30 and
Monday, Feb. 2 at 12:30. All shows
SUB   Auditorium.   75c   per   show.
LONESOME this Saturday night? Then
come to the Grad Centre. Miet lots
of people, dance, '"refresh" and be
merry!! 2 bands playing. 9:00-1:00
a.m.   Only   $2.00.
^0 — Services
PERMANENT HAIR REMOVAL by electrolysis. Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
Joan Calvin.
DAYCARE    AFTER    SCHOOL    available
at Queen Mary Elementary just out-
! side the gates. 224-3921.
SKI    WESTLAKE    LESSONS,    tows,
country, trans. 926-2224.
80 — Tutoring
HYPNOSIS. Learn the art, private or
group. Improve concentration, relaxation, recall, grades. A.I.H. certified.
Phone 438-3860, 8-9:30 a.m., 4:30-6:30.
personalized   tapes.
TUTOR for Physical Chemistry wanted.
Mature student needs coaching to
raise   Chem  205   mark.   873-2593   eves.
BOGGLED   MINDS   &   WISDOM   HEADS:
Call the Tutorial Center, 228-4557
anytime or see Ian at Speak-Easy,
12:30-2:30 p.m. $1 to register (refund
able).
30 - Jobs
85 — Typing
35 - Lost
NECKLACE — uneven natural stone,
orange, with pottery pendant. Reward.  Call 263-6680 after five.
ESSAYS, THESES typed on IBM Selectric. Technical typing done too.
Phone Carol 228-3079 (Math.) or in
the evenings at 980-5373.
40 — Messages
LISTEN    TO    THE    CRY    OF    THE
aborted children. Their cry is no.
Their cry is a cry of terror. Heed
their  cry.
50 - Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to rent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5021.
60 - Rides
99 — Miscellaneous
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Friday, January 23,  1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ivory intervention plan nixed
By RALPH MAURER
In a rare show of solidarity, representatives of UBC students, staff
and administration have attacked
a proposal that senate enter future
UBC labor negotiations as a third
party.
The suggestion was made during
Wednesday's monthly senate
meeting.
Anthropology prof Cyril Belshaw
presented a notice of motion
suggesting that, prior to signature,
all proposed union agreements
should be placed before the senate
budget committee for "advice on
the implications to the academic
goals of the university and to
determine whether there are
adverse effects on those goals."
"I just don't believe it would
work," said administration
president Doug Kenny.
"I'm completely opposed to any
third party intervention in
collective bargaining," said Ken
Andrews, president of the UBC
local of the Canadian Union, of
Public Employees.
And Alma Mater Society
president Jake van der Kamp
reacted sarcastically.
"It's a fine idea to submit a
contract to two bodies like that,"
he said.
"The next time the faculty
association is in contract talks with
the administration or reaches
some kind of a contract, they would
submit it to the AMS for 'advice on
the implications to the political
goals of the university and to
determine whether there are
adverse effects on those goals'."
He said it is "an especially good
idea to take that to students. They
are the largest group on campus.
"If researchers and academics
receive this sort of consideration,
for academic goals, students
should receive likewise."
Van der Kamp continued,
"seeing as how Belshaw and I are
in such harmony, I'm certain he is
willing to present his own salary
for public review by students'
council."
Belshaw explained Thursday the
reasoning behind his motion, which
will come up at the next senate
meeting in February.
"People sitting around the
bargaining table are concerned
with immediate issues. They can
put words into contracts which,
upon reflection and later experience, turn out to have implications people didn't anticipate.
Humanism linked to
Christianity (surprise!)
By NANCY SOUTHAM
The crowd of 900 attending
Thursday's dialogue on
humanism: secular or Christian,
showed their concern for the issue
by remaining utterly silent, except
for occasional laughter and applause, for the one "and three-
quarter hour discussion.
Perhaps it was the seriousness of
the topic that hushed the crowd,
but their undistracted attention
showed a genuine respect for the
opinions of the speakers.
The dialogue, sponsored by
several campus Christian groups,
took place between Clarke Pinnock
of Regent College and zoology
professor Dennis Chitty.
Pinnock began the discussion by
defining humanism as the "belief
in the dignity and worth in human
life, and the commitment to the
well-being of other people." He
said both speakers were in general
agreement with the definition.
Pinnock's argument obviously
defended the religious viewpoint
that humanism cannot be
sustained solely on a secular basis.
"There is no purpose or order in
our lives today," he said. "The
painful art of Samuel Bacon shows
there is profound crises and emptiness in our lives."
Pinnock said the only way to a
more security is in the gospel of
Jesus Christ. "His participation in
life was full of purpose and order."
"I believe the Christian and
Biblical message is more clear
than the message in the
newspapers today."
Pinnock ended his introductory
speech by saying: "A Christian
does not have to explain his
humanist side. How does a secular
person describe his?"
Chitty admitted it is "a great
challenge to defend secular
humanism." He also said that he
wasn't quite sure why he was
picked to defend the viewpoint
since he respected the religious
humanist concept.
"There's more attendance here
today to listen to me talk on
something I'm not well versed in,
than there is in my classroom."
He said, "man is continually
asking questions. Questioning the
nature of the world around us, and
questioning to find out about
ourselves."
Chitty added that the trend today
is toward reading the supernatural
out of our interpretation of the
world around us.
"Man tried to find the answers in
art, science, literature, and
religion." He said "a great many
people no longer are able to believe
in God."
Chitty said the whole western
civilization is molded by Christian
thought, yet in increasing numbers, people are accepting the
Christian message, but are not
believing in it.
"Somebody should be responsible for examining whether that
kind of result is a legitimate result
of bargaining," he said. "Some
body should take the wider
university view."
The senate committee would not
have veto power, but could only
make recommendations to the
parties in the bargaining, he said.
"But it gives a chance for points
of view to be expressed, it enables
reflection to take place on the
implications of what's going on."
He said the committee could also
examine any accord reached
between the administration and
the faculty association, but "my
feeling is that however, happens to
include a much wider section of the
academic community."
. Kenny said he "shares the
concern of Dr. Belshaw but at the
functional level I don't think it
would work. I'd be surprised . . .
but that's my own view.
"But that's up to senate to
debate. I'm just the chairman."
Andrews maintained that
collective bargaining can only take
place between two parties when a
third party such as senate, stays
out of it.
"I'm opposed to the intervention
of senate," he said.
—f stop fitzgerald photo
A DOG'S LIFE isn't much better than that of humans these days, especially if it involves hanging around
a classroom waiting for another boring lecture to finish. And for some strange reason, profs just don't like
having their legs pissed on.
Sex stereotypes linger, judge says
By HEATHER WALKER
When a person has a preconceived, stereotyped mental image
of women, the stereotype will
carry over into that person's
dealings with society and be
perpetuated, provincial court
judge Nancy Morrison said
Thursday.
Morrison was speaking to a large
group of education students and
faculty as part of an education
department conference on sex role
stereotyping in the classroom and
community.
Morrison stressed the importance of "small things which
appear trivial" in the large issue of
sexism.
"All big issues such as racism
are made up of small things which
taken together make up our attitudes," she said.
Morrison included the use of
words    as    what     she     calls
BCSF reps to confront McGeer
B.C. Student Federation
representatives are meeting today
with education minister Pat
McGeer in an attempt to influence
provincial education spending and
policy.
BCSF executive member Janet
Neilson said Thursday the
meeting's agenda includes a
number of issues ranging from
gaining student input into the
education department to forcing
McGeer to clarify Social Credit
education spending plans and
policies.
"We understand the Socreds
campaigned on the promise of
lifting the 15 per cent ceiling on
education spending, so we want to
know what budgetary guidelines
are to be used; what kind of controls the government plans to use
on the university administrations;
and whether they are going to
earmark    funds    for    specific
programs," Neilson said.
The BCSF committee hopes to
pressure McGeer's department
into lifting the spending ceiling on
education because post-secondary
educational institutions' percentage share of the provincial
budget has declined over the past
two years, Neilson said.
"The spending ceiling means
students are not going to have the
quality of instruction and
education facilities as university
enrolment continues to rise," she
added.
The committee is also seeking
student representation on the
province's negotiating team that is
currently renegotiating the terms
of the Fiscal Arrangements Act —
the federal-provincial university
cost-sharing agreement.
"We would like to see student
recommendations put into the
negotiations," Neilson said.
"Since there is also a 15 per cent
ceiling on federal transfer
payments to provincial education
departments, we would like to see
that ceiling raised or lifted," she
said.
Asked what recommendations
the committee has for the federal-
provincial negotiations, Neilson
said: "We'd like to see ancillary
services like day care and student
assistance included in the cost-
sharing program, which should
increase the transfer payments to
the provinces."
"We would also like to set up a
formal liaison officer between the
BCSF and the negotiating team,"
she said.
"bludgeoning terms" in her
definition of "small important
things."
"The word 'work' is one," she
said. "I used to ask women in court
if they worked, and they would say,
'No, I'm a housewife.'
"Then I began to ask myself
what on earth I was doing. Of
course these women worked. They
worked inside their homes.
"You have to realize that when
you're asking a kid if his mother
works. What you're really asking is
whether she works for money or
not."
She said "success" was another
bludgeoning term because it is
usually used to mean success in the
economic world and is judged by
how much money an individual
earns.
"It's not the words themselves
that are objectionable, but the way
they are used," she said.
"The word 'feminine' is a good
example. People say things like
'don't dress like that, it isn't
feminine,' but you don't say things
like 'don't sit in your room all day
and read, it's not masculine.'
"The word 'feminine' is actually
related to genital organs, not
clothes, although Roget's
Thesaurus is trying to work it
around to that sort of a definition."
Morrison said she was so
"programmed" by the time she
was in high school she deliberately
dropped out of a physics class over
the objections of her teacher.
"I believed I was unsuited to
math and physics, even though I
got my highest marks in them. I
thought I should be in English or
history."
She said there had been a few
examples of other good teachers in
her schools who had avoided sex
stereotyping.
"When I was in school boys
didn't think they should be interested in listening to music, but
we had a grade six music teacher
who insisted that music wasn't a
sissy thing.
"And everybody who wanted to
skate had to help clean the ice off
the rink. There was no idea that it
ought to be a male's duty or
anything like that."
Morrison said she played hookey
often in school, and when the
principal saw her "all I got was a
smile and a nod.
"Now, I don't think that was
totally because my father was on
the school board, because the boys
always really got it whenever they
were caught.
"But I think I learned two things
-«rt5;
MORRISON . .. hits stereotypes
from that — those that has, gets —
because my father was on the
school board — and that girls get
preferential treatment.
"I do not appreciate the principal for encouraging those attitudes."
Morrison said the duty of
educators is to "teach people of all
ages to, question, to ask 'is that
really the case, is that really the
law' instead of accepting conventional attitudes." Tenure: the debate goes on
Jobs for life. Jobs for
life.
In the groves of the
academe, such security is
known as tenure.
It beats any union
contract. Short of going
completely bananas (and
even that doesn't guarantee
anything) a te nured
professor can teach until he
or she drops or retires.
Now the concept of
tenure itself isn't all that
bad. People are entitled to
some form of job security
and, after all, profs are
people.
Under an agreement for
bargaining between UBC and
the facu Ity association,
tenured profs are guaranteed
jobs for life.
The agreement does allow
for dismissal of 'lifers' for
"incompetence, gross
misconduct, or failure or
refusal over a substantial
period of time to perform
reasonable duties" (not
including refusal to cross
picket lines.)
It's an awfully iron-clad
agreement. That's why it's
so important to make sure
those hired are not only
excellent scholars but
GOOD teachers. The two
certainly don't follow
naturally.
The purpose of this brief
introduction is to prepare
you once again for the great
Film
tango
If anyone is in a good mood to
tangle with a bureaucracy, I
suggest a fast three rounds with
Filmsoc.
Originally, the problem had been
very simple. We had purchased
two tickets to see the Comedy
Classics from the Alma Mater
Society ticket office in SUB. Instead of getting discounts on both
tickets we had to pay an extra
dollar because a staff card wasn't
validated for this year. We were
reassured however, that a prompt
refund would result when we
presented the. staff card after it
had been updated.
We then paid out the money and
filled in the receipt (which was
kept) correctly and fully. This was
a fatal mistake. First, we believed
the person selling the tickets.
Secondly, we filled out everything
in the receipt correctly.
Returning to the scene of the
crime, little knowing we were the
victims, we presented the now
validated staff card. However, we
couldn't get a refund at the AMS
ticket office where we had bought
the tickets because "they didn't
handle that." We were then told to
go to the Filmsoc office down the
hall and ask there. Round one to
Filmsoc.
After catching somebody in at
Filmsoc, I was told I couldn't get a
refund. One, we had filled in the
tenure debate and
specifically how much input
students should have in this
decision-making process.
The issue surfaced in
senate Wednesday night
when student senator
Gordon Funt gave notice of
motion calling on the board
of governors to investigate
the permanent hiring of
professors.
Why is student input into
tenure  decisions  important?
Well, there are several
reasons. Off the top, when
you come to university you
come to learn. If you have
deadwood for a prof, you
won't get the information.
It's too boring. That's not
being cynical either. Not
every professor is* a Socrates.
Therefore, when a prof is
being considered for tenure,
who better to judge ability
to teach than his or her
students? Nobody!
Yet UBC academics have
steadfastly refused to allow
student input on these very
important decisions.
Under the new bargaining
agreement between the
administration and the
profs, the teaching
evaluation methods vary.
"They MAY include
student opinion..." says
one section.
Then again it may not.
Who decides one way or the
other?   It   isn't specified  in
this agreement which the
senate will probably point
to in attempting to block
Funt's motion.
"The criterion is'already
outlined in the agreement,"
some prof will say in
opposing the motion. "All
that needs to be said is
said."
Au cont rai re, There must
be guaranteed student
representation orY all tenure
committees     plus     those
concerned   with   hiring   and_
firing. And it must be voting
representation.
I n addition, before a
professor is considered for
tenure, student evaluation
MUST be taken into
consideration or else the
whole process is an
undemocratic, academic
sham.
Not to mention arrogant,
elitist and condescending to
the students who spend long
hours in class "learning."
Most of us have been to
school for more than 12
years and know a rotten
clunker when we see one.
So why can't we speak our
piece in such an important
decision affecting the future
'composition of the
university?
It's not a radical,
unreasonable demand. Why
isn't it happening here?
number of our student card and
staff card and so had probably got
the discount and were after more
money (there were at least a
hundred cards in that bundle and I
saw perhaps 10 which had all the
information filled out).
Secondly, there was nothing on
the receipt to say what we had paid
or whether or not we deserved a
refund (there's a lesson here,
never believe anything unless it's
written down in indelible ink).
Thirdly, he had to "protect
Filmsoc", after all, anybody could
walk in with the same story or even
a more believable one and ask for a
similar refund. He said he was
sorry, personally, he would have
given me the refund but in order to
protect the "club" which was no
doubt composed of people just like
him, he couldn't. Round two to
Filmsoc.
What happened next really
surprised me. It was, after all, he
said, your own fault because we
didn't have what we were charged
on the receipt. Therefore, because
we originally believed someone
selling the tickets for them, arid
they didn't believe us now, it was
our fault for not believing they
were out to screw us originally and
so try to protect ourselves. Round
three, game, set, and match for
Filmsoc.
As it happened, that night I went
to a movie presented by these
same people. It was called Catch-
22, and you know, I felt right at
home screwed by
bureaucracy again
Rick Lymer
Letters
Duffle
This is just an informational
letter to warn any of your readers
planning to buy a duffle coat. On
many of these coats made by the
English firm of Gloverall, the
toggle fastenings are made of
whalebone.
In the United States they could
not be sold in this condition. In
Canada they are, and this information is not carried on the
labels of the garment. Consequently, one can buy one of these
coats and be unaware that they are
made in part using materials
coming from slaughtered whales.
These toggles could easily be
made of wood or plastic, and on
many other brands of duffle coat
they are.
I urge anyone thinking of buying
a Gloverall duffle coat to consider
the above.
Robert Marris
arts 4
Judy, Judy
In your report of the views of
Stephen Judy on the teaching of
English, the undifferentiated "we"
is freely used. "We" have never
been very good at teaching
English; "we don't really do very
THE UBYSSEY
FRIDAY, JANUARY 23
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
"What a far. out party!" laughed Ralph Maurer as he struggled to
retain his balance. Gary Coull and Doug Rushton dueled with em rulers
as Sue Vohanka brained Chris Gainor with a pie after he told one
groaner too many. Marcus Gee stole Doug Field's, Peter Cummings' and
Matt King's cameras. Gregg Thompson trembled with delight as Heather
Walker, Susan Alexander, Bill Tieleman, Paisley Woodward and Greg
Edwards tripped over the thread he had strung across the door. Mark
Lepitre entertained Bob.Rayfield and Autar Bains with locker room
jokes. Anne Wallace, Nancy Southam, Bob Diotte, John Sprague, Brian
Gibbard, Dan Miller and Merilee Robson were struck with pies as they
staggered across the floor. Dave Wilkinson sketched the scene, hoping to
blackmail his helpless victims. Ian Morton, John Ince and Greg Strong
passed out. A drunken fight erupted between Ted Collins, Eric Ivan Berg
and Jan Home.
much with writing in the schools,"
etc. As you report Judy, it is not
clear whether he meant Michigan,
or the United States, or Canada, or
all three, or even the whole
English-speaking world.
Judy appears to regard what he
calls "bonehead English" as a
normal and acceptable feature of
university education — naturally
enough, perhaps, since it is a
traditional feature of United States
universities. However, your report
gives no indication that he is aware
of a somewhat different tradition
in Canada, still less that he
recognizes that there might be
some merit in requiring the high
schools to solve the problem of
basic literacy.
Perhaps Judy made some
distinction in his talk between the
United States and Canada, with
their— different educational
traditions and structures, and their
different social and cultural needs.
If so, your report does him an
injustice, and represents him as
naively assuming the universal
validity of the educational values
and needs of his own society.
Geoffrey Durrant
English professor
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. . t
V
- ? V.
■a * fi Im fi Im H Imfi Im fi Im fi Im fi Im fi Im H Imfi Im fi Im fi Im fI Im
Cinema 16 gets the silver screen
By PETER CUMMINGS
and JAN HORNE
Have today's endless array of
drab, unimaginative, production
line detective flicks left you with a
gut reaction that borders on
nausea? If you feel so afflicted
Cinema 16 of the UBC Film Society
offers you the perfect remedy for
your film time blues at an incredibly low price. This term they
are presenting two film series, one
on Comedy Classics and the other
on Contemporary French Cinema.
Both of these series have already
commenced with Buster Keaton's
hilarious films Four Clowns and
Cameraman in the Comedy
Classics series. Already seen in the
Contemporary French Cinema, Je
t'aime Je t'aime, Bags and The
Pistol. However, it is not too late to
purchase your C-16 tickets which
can be bought from the SUB ticket
office or directly from the Film
Society office in room 247 SUB. A
single series pass cost $4.50 which
offers probably the most economic,
quality movie viewing anywhere in
town.
Cinema 16 films are shown every
Monday night at 6:00 and 8:30 in
the SUB Theatre alternating
weekly between the two series.
For a preview of the forthcoming
films which have been
meticulously scrutinized by the
Cinema 16 selection staff read on.
COMEDY CLASSICS SERIES:
Feb. 2 — The Gold Rush
Charlie Chaplin —
Chaplin once stated that The
Gold Rush was the film by which
he wanted to be remembered.
The madcap classic revolves
around the activities of a little
prospector (Chaplin) who heads up
to the Klondike hoping to make his
fortune in gold. In Alaska Charlie
shares a small shack with his
counter image, "Big Jim McKay"
and falls in love with Georgia, the
local dance hall queen. The film's
comedy is developed from the hard
times that prospectors had to
endure and the glamorous times
that they fantasized.
This film is pure Chaplin at his
absolute funny best as well as
being perhaps the most highly
acclaimed Chaplin film.
What is the
Baha'i Faith?
meet Baha'is
at an open house
Sat., Jan. 24
in SUB 212
4-8 p.m.
Music & Refreshments
No charge
GOOD GRIEF!
SUBFILMSOC
presents
candy
Technicolor' CRC
E
this Thurs./Sun. 7:00
Fri./Sat. 7:00/9:30
in SUB Aud. 75c
Bring AMS card
& your trench coat
Floorwalker — Charlie Chaplin
This film although not as highly
acclaimed as The Gold Rush
typifies the Chaplin style. Charlie,
who plays a customer in a
department store, happens by
coincidence to bear a striking
resemblance to the store's floorwalker. The floorwalker is crooked
and conspires to rob the store and
leave Charlie to taite the blame.
Charlie, more by accident than
design, foils the storewalker's
plans and is the film's hero win-
nining the hand of his favorite film
belle Edna Purviance.
Feb. 16 — Mack Sennett Era
This evening's showings concentrate on the Mack Sennet era
and features a medley of the
classic Sennet films.
Mack Sennet is probably best
known for his Keystone Cops, but
his achievements in the history of
film are substantial.
It was from him that Buster
Keaton and Charlie Chaplin
learned many of the rudiments of
comedy   in   the   cinema.   Con
sequently it was Sennet who spent
many years pioneering comic
techniques in the cinema.
Sennet's film career went
through many periods from
learning under the auspices of D.
W. Griffiths to discovering many of
the latter-day film greats like Bing
Crosby and W. C. Fields.
Many people attribute Sennet's
fame and success to his ability to
make money and bring creative
people together. Nonetheless his
impact in comedy can not be
overlooked.
March 1 — Laurel & Hardy
Two Tars
This film is one of the most
famous Laurel and Hardy films
and includes an incredible car
demolishing scene.
Big Business
Laurel and Hardy in this film
play the roles of Christmas tree
salesmen. When one would-be
customer decides not to buy a tree
they decide to tear down his
resistance by completely
destroying his house in the most
chaotic   destruction   scene   ever
filmed.
Two other Laurel and Hardy
films will be shown this evening,
Clown Princes of Hollywood and
Way Out West.
March 15 — W. C. Fields
This evening's films are three
films representational of W. C.
Fields' work. They are The Golf
Specialist, The Dentist and You
Can't Cheat An Honest Man.
W. C. Fields ranks right up with
Keaton and Chaplin as being one of
the most talented cinema clowns.
Fields was an eccentric who kept
to himself, but on the screen was a
brilliant comedian. His face by
itself was enough to make people
See PF6: CINEMA
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TRADITIONAL CHINESE FClftb
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HOURS
Man. to Fri. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.
Sun. 5:00-10 p.m.
Open 7 days a week.
There'll be a whole heap of guitar
pickin', foot stompin' music and some
display's o' country humer at the
FARMER'S FROLIC
SAT. JAN. 24, 8:30 to 12:30
Featuring: "FRANK McCORMICK"
and "HOMEGROWN"
Tickets: $2.00 each - SUB Ballroom and Party Room
Full Facilities Hard Times
i^apri f^L
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Hours: Monday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. - Sunday 4 p.m. to 1 a.m.
FILM
"ECKANKAR -
A Way of Life"
7:30 Monday Jan. 26
S.U.B. 215
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
PROF. NOAM CHOMSKY
Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
HUMAN NATURE: THE
LINGUISTIC EVIDENCE
A highly controversial figure, Prof.
Chomsky is regarded as one of the
world's foremost experts on
linguistics.
SAT., JAN. 24, 8:15 P.M.
lectures take place on
Saturdays at 8:15 p.m.
on the ubc campus
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional  resources
centre
admission to the genera
public is free
Page Friday, 2
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1976 musicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusic
Pete's charm still there
By DAN MILLER
For the first time in recent memory at a UBC
concert, ushers were organized enough to find places
for almost all ticket holders in the hall's unreserved
seating.
The audience responded by keeping down the usual
bickering over open seats, and not rolling in the aisles
during the performance.
An undistracted audience is important, because at
Pete Seeger's concerts, the audience counts as much
as Seeger.
Seeger stamped out the beat with his work boots,
and aimed his voice straight to the back of the hall.
"Sing along with me, give me a little help on this."
A quarter of the audience responded almost immediately, and most of the rest fell in on the second
number, "Twelve Gates to the City."
In classic style, Seeger achieved personal contact
with the audience. Starting with well-known gospel
songs so all would recognize the words, he sang in a
soft voice so the audience would pay as much attention to its own singing as to his. When the audience
knew the melody, he threw his head back and shouted
out harmony.
When Seeger's voice went up, the audience
followed. When Seeger's voice came down, the
audience stayed up.
Despite his tired voice, Seeger's professionalism
won the audience completely to his side, even doing a
little of his work for him. With smart pacing and
cutting a few verses from songs, he managed a full
two-hour program.
He keeps the pace brisk, with small lulls when he
explains to the audience the background of a certain
song, or he tosses in a broadly-phrased thought to get
the audience thinking and get his wind back.
' 'Sometimes, if we want to climb up Jacob's ladder,
we have to clamp down on the rungs. Get a good grip
or "
After nearly 40 years of playing to some of the most
varied kinds of audiences, it is in these lulls that
Seeger picks the brain of the audience he has that
night; gets their reactions.
In return for the attention the audience has given
him, he changes the tone of his comments on society,
and the songs he will play.
He identifies the groups from the background of his
own life.
For instance, up to and until his graduation from
high school, Seeger had a very privileged upbringing.
His father was Charles Seeger, a noted folk
musicologist who taught at Harvard University. Pete
attended an early version of the "open school,"
working on independent assignments, and editing one
of the school newspapers.
But at the opportunity to attend Harvard University, Seeger decided he would rather study folk music
first-hand. The only way to do this was to go out into
the world of the dirty '30s: hobo jungles, joining the
union whenever he could get a job, and dirt-poor
farmers.
Seeger said, "I never did as much bumming around
as people think I have." But he picked up tunes from
the people who did most of the suffering. "Pretty Boy
Floyd," which idealizes the Depression era bank
robber as a Robin Hood stealing from the rich and
giving to the poor, dust-bowl farmers, was played at
the UBC concert.
In those days, Seeger played his music at union
halls for a five dollar fee, whatever feU'into his hat, or
for his board.
In the '50s and '60s, when he played with the folk
group the Weavers, folk music grew in popularity,
and his audience broadened to include coffee houses
in Greenwich Village and Carnegie Hall, singing
slightly tamer versions of the same songs.
This exposure brought Seeger to the attention of the
House Un-American Activities Committee, which
tried to pin the labels of "Communist" and "subversive" to his banjo.
He refused to answer their questions and was
brought to trial for contempt of Congress. Asked to
speakon his own behalf, he said, "For over 20 years I
have been singing folk songs of the American people
and people of other lands to people everywhere. I am
proud that I have never refused to sing for any group
of people because I might disagree with some of the
, opinions held by some of them."
In the '60s, at the height of his popularity, he
travelled the world, picking up songs as he went.
His greatest response from an audience, however,
came through television. Asked to play a song for the
Smothers Brothers Show, the CBS network balked at
Seeger's choice, "Waist Deep in the Big Muddy."
It was 1968, during President Lyndon Johnson's
escalation of the Vietnam War, and Seeger wrote the
song about a Second World War captain who orders
his men to cross an obviously dangerous stretch of a
river. CBS particularly disliked the last two verses.
The attempt to censor the song created an uproar,
and the network backed down.
When the song was aired, Seeger received a large
positive response from many — the most widely
varied audience he had ever appeared before.
The broader the audience, and the greater the
chance of bringing some message across, the more
Seeger likes it.
But rather than force a message, he will underplay
it.
Seeger's current cause is ecology. Here, he admits
to the audience, "I'm not as optimistic as I used to be
that we can solve this pollution problem. They tell us
that pollution is slowing down. But I don't think we're
any closer to solving the problem."
But rather than pursue this any farther, he starts
singing a humorous song about the problem called
"Garbage." The refrain of the song is the word
"garbage" rasped out over and over as if the man is
drowning in the stuff.
The audience at UBC was not the sort that would
catch on to Seeger's guttier protest songs. Audience
requests included his easier-going songs, "If I Had a
Hammer," the African song of the lion, "Wimoweh,"
the child's story about a monster, "Abi Yoyo," and
the Quebec ballad, "Un Canadien Errant."
He also improvised a couple of songs to traditional
melodies, on the spot, just to show the audience how
easy it is to do it.
"You can make up these songs for your own enjoyment," he said. "I'm not saying it's easy to make
a song that's good. But most folk songs started this
way."
Seeger's best songs have always been in between
the strong protests and the lighter-weight ballads. He
has a quiet belief there is room for every political
opinion, right and left, every difference in culture,
and every personality and emotion in individuals.
Introducing a song from North Vietnam, Seeger
said, "Some people think I believe in one world and
all that. But I don't. I believe in borders."
For Seeger, there is room for disagreement in the
world, but we have to make that room. Seeger used
words from Ecclesiastes when he wrote the music for
"Turn! Turn! Turn!"
After the concert, he let himself be steered into a
"rap group" off stage. Looking physically and
emotionally drained, Seeger's enthusiasm bounded
back part way 10 minutes into the discussion of his
current activities.
Sailing his sloop The Clearwater up and down the
Hudson River in New York to make the public aware
of water pollution, Seeger said, "When we are sailing
from town to town along the Hudson, thousands of
people come out to welcome us. But at this one town
we are always welcomed by John Birchers. They yell
that we're commies and cut off our moorings. They
wave their little flags and are half drunk."
He also said, "Sometime if I got a chance, I'd like to
come back here and sail. The coast is beautiful."
Asked about the current music scene, Seeger said,
"If they like music, I wish people wouldn't give up on
it so easily. If they're not on the air these people think
they've failed. There's more to it. I mean, some of
these people won't be satisfied 'till they're hooked up
to play the globe."
Seeger is cpntinuously enthusiastic about his
causes, despite the fact he is a man who likes privacy.
One student asked Seeger if he liked being famous
and the reaction was very strong: "Oh God no, I don't
like being famous. There's never enough time for
yourself or your family. There's always letters to
answer."
It's too bad that for all the effort put into his
discussion of his current activities offstage, that half
the time it is a one-sided conversation.
Seeger's commitment to improving the quality of
life is emphasized by how much university students
have forgotten about speaking out on issues as was
done in the '60s and early '70s.
When he tried to speak about a program he is
working on called Sports for the People, he noted it
would be the easiest thing in the world if they "put
down a little blacktop here and there to encourage
people to come out of their homes."
But response by the group surrounding him was
dull.
It is easier these days for Seeger to work on
bringing music to the people.
Audiences are not any easier for an artist who
brings himself and his instruments on stage and
nothing else.
The Who sell out their rock and roll concerts at $10
per ticket top price. For an encore, they destroy
several thousand dollars worth of electronic equipment. How can Seeger compete with that?
It was lucky the concert occurred. Seeger is
reducing the number of play dates that require longer
distances. The Lutheran Campus Centre Coffee
House managed to convince him to play a single date
in Vancouver on his way to Alaska. He is not expected
to be back in the Northwest for a while.
The Coffee House had virtually no experience in
handling a concert of this size. In the past they had
handled only special events of local talent. When they
 ___ .. ■_•     -j.      —matt king photo
SEEGER . .. audience on his side
went to the AMS office of James
Conrad for advice on handling
publicity, Conrad first looked
through his musicians directory to
see if Seeger was listed among the
Who's Who.
Dan O'Brien, of the Coffee
House, said, "Conrad gave us the
impression that because Seeger
wasn't in the directory, he must be
an unknown, and wouldn't draw
anybody. This scared us a bit.
What did we know about Seeger's
current popularity?
"But we asked him (Conrad) for
a budget and what he gave us was
expenses of $400 for radio, $320 for
The Ubyssey, and $150 for
posters."
But how much did the Coffee
House actually spend for
publicity?
"100, mostly for news releases.
Most of the newspapers printed
them for their events calendars."
How much money did the Coffee
House make on the concert?
"More than we know what to do
with. We're discussing where the
money should go."
What did Conrad have to say
when all the tickets were sold out?
"He came straight back to us
and asked us if it was possible for
us to get Seeger to play a date with
Ario Guthrie (who will appear soon
as the War Memorial Gym)."
The topper is that the Seeger
concert put on by the Coffee House
was far better organized and less
rowdy than Conrad's Joan Baez
and Sha Na Na concerts.
Hopefully organizers and
audiences for the simple,
sometimes profound type of music
Seeger plays will always be
around.
Even when Seeger is gone.
ARTS UNDERGRADS
Notice of
Election & Nomination
Election for Arts Executive and Representatives to
Student Representative Assembly.
President
Treasurer
Vice-President
Secretary
The Elected President is automatically elected to the
SRA and is considered the first representative.
Arts Rep 2
Arts Rep 3
Arts Rep 4
Arts Rep 5
Arts Rep 6
Nominations for the above positions open as of
Thursday, Jan. 22, 1976 and will be received no later
than 1:00 p.m. Feb. 4, 1976 at Buchanan 107 by the
Returning Officer.
Election rules and regulations, as well as nomination
forms, will be available at Buchanan 107 on Tuesday
27th, 12:30- 1:30.
THE ELECTION WILL BE HELD
ON TUESDAY FEB. 11, 1976
Friday, January 23,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 dramadramadramad
MacBeth
By DAVID MORTON
In the QE Playhouse's
production of Shakespeare's
MacBeth, the play begins when you
walk into the theatre to find your
seats. The lighting is unusually
low. The dark and ominous set,
open to the seated audience'
creates the mood for the play. The
stage is slanted towards the
audience evoking a feeling of
disharmony. There are huge
/•orrttonted     ir—     -♦a?r as*«s
mticbetn
Shakespeare
directed by Christaper Newton
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse,
until February 2.
spiralling    uyw'Uiua,     and     uisup-
pearing behind the ruination. Ten
string screens are placed about the
stage, adding an aspect of
surreality. The entire stage is
stark and unreal, like a nightmare.
The nightmare begins with the
three witches writhing and
slithering over each other. They
chant their famous opening lines in
chilling voices, "When shall we
three meet again, In thunder,
lightning or rain?" They invoke
evil and prepare the audience for
hellish goings-on. Their dreamlike
presense hovers about the stage,
even when they are gone.
A scene which never fails to hold
the attention of the audience, is the
molesting of the doting Lady
MacDuff, and her innocent young
child. The soldiers prod them with
sharp twisted hooks, and toss the
young boy from person to person.
A particularly effective piece of
stage craft is the cauldron scene,
with the witches. A hole in the
stage is opened, out of which
smoke, illuminated by a firey
orange light, bubbles furiously.
The three Weird Sisters twist out of
the Hell-like pit, and begin their
supernatural ritual. "Double,
double, toil and trouble; Fire burn,
and cauldron bubble ... "A
pervasive bubbling sound fills the
theatre. It strongly sets the scene
for MacBeth's final meeting with
the witches.
Christopher Newton directs this
famous Shakespeare tragedy. It is
the story of a courageous soldier
whose ambition and imagination
lead him into evil. By committing
several murders intending to
become the iniquitious tyrrant of
the Scottish throne. MacBeth is
pushed over the brink and into the
Bottomless Pit of madness. His life
becomes a nightmare.
Kenneth Welsh plays the tragic
hero. His initial appearance on
stage is almost unimpressive. He is
said to be powerful and courageous
by others, but exhibits none of this
himself. Instead, MacBeth is like a
starry eyed teenager, full of
dreams and expectations for the
new world. It is not until his lovely,
but dominating wife, Lady MacBeth, persuades him to kill Duncan, that the insanity begins. One
murder follows another in order to
protect himself from inevitable
disaster. Life becomes absurd.
Her mad scene is a dramatic
highpoint of the production. She
approaches the edge of the stage,
her devastated beauty lighted
eerily by a candle. She stares insanely into the audience,
pleading." . . . come, come, give
me your hand! What's done cannot
be undone!"
Tom Wood, now a Veteran of the
QE troupe, plays the character of
Malcolm. Wood's small stature
allows for the dull and unimpressive qualities of the role to be
brought out visually. He plays his
part well. Terence Kelly played
equally well the role of MacDuff.
The role of MacBeth is a
demanding  one,   which   requires
much discipline in order to bring
out MacBeth's gradual disintegration. Kenneth Welsh succeeds
quite well in doing this.
The role of Lady MacBeth can be
too easily portrayed as a cold
blooded virago, who is alone
responsible for her husband's
downfall. But the text demands a
hint of humanity as well. Patricia
Gage fulfills the role extremely
well. The coldness is there at first,
but, realizing her mistake in
provoking MacBeth, she begins to
decay also. The tragedy is her's, as
well as MacBeth's.
Although the play is an unexciting production of MacBeth, it
does have its dramatic moments.
The rich blood and hand imagery is
brought to startling reality when
MacBeth and his wife have completed Duncan's murder. They
return with their arms and hands
dripping with fresh blood.
Banquo's ghost appears with his
eyes gruesomely poked out, and
blood running freely from them.
And MacBeth pronounces
cynically, "It will have blood, they
say: blood will have blood."
The play concludes with
Malcolm's uninspiring ascent to
the throne. MacBeth's head is
carried in on the end of spear, and
set on fire. The nightmare ends.
If the play had its weeknesses, it
was all worthwhile to hear Kenneth
Welsh cry out, "And all our
yesterdays have lighted fools/The
way to dusty death. Out, out, brief
candle!"
a future
you'll
probably
d Gbco)^ §pmx^] Grip® (§Q®g
an R rated, rather kinky tale of survival
LQ/Jaf p^'A BOY AND HIS DOG'„.„,,,,, DON JOHNSON • SUSANNE BENTON „„ ALVY MOORE
l.,.,,^,,,,,,.,,,^^, JASON ROBARDSlc„-s,arring HELENE WINSTON and CHARLES McGRAW
Produced by ALVY MOORE • Written for the screen and Directed by LQ JONES "
Based.on the award winning novella by HARLAN ELLISON /^HBBHfflWfc
Music by TIM MclNTIRE and JAIME MENDOZA-NAVA • Terhnirr,!™* .S-L.V .__* V.
• Technicolor®
NO ONE ADMITTED AFTER PERFORMANCE STARTS
IT MAS TO BE SEEN FROIVI THE BEGINNING !
STARTS FRIDAY, JAN. 23
685 9822
denman at barclay
Warning: some
nudity and brutal violence.—R.
W. McDonald,
B.C. Dir.
Restricted.
7:30, 9:30
Sat.,  Sun.,  2:00,
7:30, 9:30
Qfeat
director
Series
jan 23 to      DUNBAR THEATRE
FEB.  12th DUNBAft AT MTH   H4-72S2
FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT S
and JlM *>
ENGLISH SUt>7   3Q
/UL-ES
BLOWS
9<30
JANUARY 30th to FEBRUARY 5(h
AKIRA KUROSAWA'S
'Academy Award Winner
"RASHOMOW"
ENGLISH SUB-TITLES
IAN CARMICHAEL PE If R lUSHING DIANA DORS MARGARE1 LEIGHTON DONALD PLEASENCE
MATURE: Warning, could frighten
soma children.
-R. McDonald, B.C. Director
SHOWS AT: 12:30, 2:25, 4:20, 6:15, 8:05,
Sunday: 2:25, 4:20, 6:15, 8:05, 10
10
Odeon
881   GRANVILLt
082-7468
THE MOST INCREDIBLE I
Heaven help us all when
[j^^^&&9*
Very disturbing scenes
of horror.
—R. McDonald, B.C. Director
Saturday Shows at:
12:20, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10
Sunday: 2:20, 4, 6, 8, 10
Monday
through
Friday at
8 - 10
Coronet
85!   GRANVILLE
6156121
J£mvHind«i
ECHNICOLOR ® PANAVISION ® A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
ture—Frightening
_ Fire Scenes
I R. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
12:15, 2:25, 4:50,
7:10.  9:35
Vogoe
< GRANVILLE
685-5434
KINUGASA'S
,?,my Award
Winner
"GATE of HELL
FEBRUARY
6-12
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"WILD STRAWBERRIES"
"THE SEVENTH I
SEAL"
ENGUSHSUB^TITL^
Gene    Madeline    Marty
Wilder i     Kahn     Feldman
,,toS
GENERAL — Parents
Occasional Coarse
Language.
R. McDonald, B.C. Director
Mat. Sat.
Sun. — 2 P.M.
Eves.
7:30, 9:30
CAMBIE at  ISth
876.2747
ONE OF THE YEARS 10 BEST - Vincent Canby. N.Y. Times
"SWEPT AWAY BY AN UNUSUAL DESTINY
IN THE BLUE SEA OF AUGUST"
/   ffiUj.lljljJfcCrude Language "tItlES ' V3tSlt_lJ
Throughout.
. -R. McDonald,
B.C. Dir.
ENGLISH
TITLES
Shows:
7:30. 9:30
224-3730 9
4375 W. 10th
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1976 dramadramadramadramadramadramadramadramad
Frank diary redone
By MERRILEE ROBSON
It could easily have been
maudlin. "The Diary of Anne
Frank" is a true and tragic story of
the war, and for most of us WWII is
little more than a source of true,
tragic stories or bold stories of
adventure. The play could have
been too pathetic, or too removed
by history for our empathy. But it
was not.
The Diary of Anne Frank.
Dramatization by F. Goodrich and
A. Hackett at Studio 58, Langara
Campus.
The play tells the story of two
Jewish families during the war.
They are hiding from the Nazis in
the attic of an Amsterdam office
building. The action takes place
during 1-1/2 years of the war but it
does not concentrate on problems
particular to that time.
Rather,   it   deals   with   the
relationships between the people.
Anne fights with her mother, is
jealous of her sister and falls in
love with Peter, the son of the
family they are living with. Anne
and Peter's relationship can
remind you of your own first love.
Anne dresses up on one side of the
attic for a date with Peter on the
other side. The similarity of their
situation to one's own makes the
dissimilarities more shocking.
The Franks and the Van Daans
are always squabbling over things
that seem petty. But this constant
irritability serves to impress upon
you the'tension inherent in their
situation more than any show of
heroic stoicism could. Among all
these domestic quarrels lies the
constantf ear of being found. As the
show progresses you begin to feel
that fear.
Studio 58's production of "The
Diary of Anne Frank", at Langara
campus is directed by Kathryn
Shaw. Shaw successfully directed
"The Prime df Miss Jean Brodie"
last year at Langara.
Gayle Pelman, as Anne, gives a
suitably adolescent performance.
Michael Kelly is a most lovable
Mr. Frank. Pamela Harris is
equally convincing as Mrs. Frank,
a "good woman" who has difficulty
expressing her feelings.
It is fairly noticeable however
that Mr. and Mrs. Van Daan (Mark
Acheson and Eva Kroll) remain
plump in spite of all the talk of
deprivation. It is made plain that
Mr. Van Daan takes more than his
share of the food but it seems
unlikely that it would be enough to
sustain his weight. The others
manage to make their hunger
more believable. »
Another character, Mr. Dussell,
joins the two families after they
have been in hiding for a while. He
has always thought of himself as
Dutch and is greatly surprised to
find that his Jewish origins suddenly separate him from the rest of
By ANNE WALLACE
Two plays opened this week at
campus theatres. Currently
playing at Freddy Wood is Scapino,
a take-off from Moliere. Take off is
right, right into the wonderful
realm of Monty Python. Wayne
Robson is great in the lead role, a
master of the one-liner. The other
characters, from the brassy Italian
hooker to the loud American
tourist, add to the hilarious
comedy. Great entertainment at $2
(student price) a ticket. Showtime
is 8 p.m. and the play will run until
Monday.
Picnic opened Wednesday at the
Dorothy Somerset Studio, master
of fine arts thesis production
directed by Ian Fenwick. This play
is in a much more serious vein than
Scapino, set in a mid-western town
in the 1950s. The story is good
though it does become slightly
melodramatic in areas where the
acting is weak. Barbara McColl
shines in her role as "the old maid
school teacher", adding a touch of
DIARY . .. squabbling over the petty.
Sinhing Maru plays
By GREG STRONG
The Komagata   Maru   Incident
, could have had enormous potential
as a contemporary social drama,
but instead it is a weak play with
empty rhetoric.
The Komagata Maru Incident is
actually based on an event that
occurred in  Vancouver  in   1914,
The Komagata Maru Incident
Written by Sharon Pollock
Performed by the New Company
At the Vancouver  East Cultural
Centre
Until January 31
when a Japanese freighter attempted to land with some immigrating East Indian Sikhs. The
result was two months of bitter
interracial tension and violence
culminated by government
corruption and deceit at all levels.
This forgotten incident from our
past is especially relevant to
Vancouver in 1976, where racial
hatred and typecasting of any non-
white group is still strongly
maintained.
Sharon Pollock, a Vancouver
playwright was commissioned to
write The Komagata Incident for
the Playhouse affiliate, the "New
Company."
Her play, is over-ambitious in its
dramatic focus. Pollock attempted
to show both the event and its
impact on Vancouver.
The play centres on both the
character of Mr. Hopkinson, an
East Indian interpreter in the
Department of Immigration, and a
portrayal of the events as seen by
one passenger on the Komagata
Maru.
Pollock used an abstract
character, a Master of
Ceremonies, or sideshow barker to
introduce the play, to narrate and
support it. This same MC becomes
a parody of authority and often
interjects and elaborates on details
of the "incident!"
The stage design reflects this
tripartite focus. The main level, a
brothel, was sparsely filled with
decaying Victorian furnishings.
The adjacent upper level of the
stage was meant to be the deck of
the Komagata Maru and it was
fenced from the lower stage.
These elements did not combine
into a cohesive theatre. The MC's
characterization merely broke the
continuity of the play, providing
the audience with historical data
regarding the incident. This information was often irrelevant to
the drama, the "gross tonnage" of
the Komagata Maru being just one
example.
The central character of
Hopkinson, with his real desires
and loyalties was undefined. The
inner conflict between his loyalty
to the Department of Immigration
and his awareness of his own
origins remained only a brief
sketch.
The one passenger on the
Komagata Maru, who represented
the 356 immigrants, seemed to
have had the sole purpose of offering an isolated and alternate
opinion to that of the other
characters.
Alan Stratton played the MC, but
was unable to capture the gripping
style of either a sideshow barker,
or an old-time vaudevillian who
would have held and sustained the
attention of the audience as was
necessary to this part.
Hopkinson's mistress, Evy, was
well played by Heather Brechin.
She was marred only by her stiff,
unrealistic portrayal of a drunk.
It was Richard Fowler though,
as Hopkinson, who gave the play
its power. His: interpretation of
Hopkinson gave a completeness
and realism that was unmatched
by any of the other characters.
Fowler imparted this character
with a sense of dignity and even
tragic irony.
The Komagata Maru Incident
was a blunt statement about
history, and the dialogue tended
toward explanation and indirect
account.
The play never really looked at
the prejudice that it set out to
examine. Instead playwright
Pollock reverted to the very stock
cliches of that prejudice, rather
than revealing its nature by a
careful development of characters
and their interactions.
The Komagata Maru Incident
could have been the relevant social
statement that it intends, if the
focus of Pollock had been limited to
the conflicts among the immigrants aboard the Komagata
Maru or by considerably more
development of Hopkinson's inner
dilemma.
his countrymen. He knows nothing
of Jewish tradition. His experience
makes this separation of one part
of society even more impossible to
understand.
The action of the drama is interspersed with tape recorded
excerpts from Anne's diary. These
expressions of her naivety, her
emotional growth and her ambitions are incredibly moving,
considering her actual destiny.
The play runs from January 19-
31.
*
*
*
levity to the .situation. As does
Sidonie Bolle. Her portrayal of the
younger girl with the beautiful
older sister is acted out very
convincingly. This production,
playing until Jan. 24, starts at 8:00
and costs $1.50.
The Coffee House, held every
Friday night at the Lutheran
Campus Centre, offers a pleasant
evening's entertainment. This
week it features a poetry reading
and folk music by Denise Larsen.
The atmosphere is relaxing and
mellow and makes for a good
meeting place. Feel free to bring a
chess or backgammon game. The
Coffee House opens at 8:00 and
runs until 12:30. There is a cover
charge of $2.00.
For those with rowdier tastes,
various bump and grind events are
happening. Totem Park
Residences hold their annual
Greaser Night on Saturday. All you
guys and dolls can jive your feet off
to the music of Solid State. Prices
are $2 with a residence carcKand $3
without. Dancing starts at 9 pjm.
Those infamous Aggies are
having their annual Farmers
Frolic this Saturday. Starting at
8:30 in the SUB ballroom, two
bands, Frank McCormick and
Homegrown will play tunes to
stomp to. A hayseed's delight for
only $2.00 a head.
Starting next week, Cinema West
collective will be running two
special films of Hamlet. The
classic, starring Lawrence Olivier
is being shown next Thursday at 2
p.m. and Friday at 12:30. The more
modern version^ will be shown
Monday, Feb. 2 at 12:30 p.m. and
Tuesday, Feb. 3 at 12:30 p.m. All
shows are in the SUB Auditorium
and cost 75c.
Page Friday publishes its annual
Creative Arts issue in March and
we will be accepting short stories,
poems, graphics and photographs
from student artists. All material
must be received by March l and
will be returned if accompanied by
self-addressed stamped envelopes.
Friday/January 23, 1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 Freddy Wood's Scapino set anew
By TED COLLINS
If you intend to see the Frederic
Wood's production of Scapino,
don't expect Moliere. The play has
been updated, if not modernized, to
1962, and the script has been intensively and frantically
renovated. All that appears to have
been retained of Moliere is his
heavily contrived plotting, a
somewhat dubious carryover. The
dialogue is contemporary gauche
with an Italian accent, and the
jokes are well aged.
The action of Scapino occurs on a
street in Naples, a set replete with
an outdoor cafe, competing whorehouses, a  wharf,  painted water,
balconies, a wall fountain, and
dangling laundry. Make no
mistake. There is no part of the set
that remains unused by the end of
the play. In fact, perhaps feeling
A review of Scapino
At the Freddy Wood
Til January 24
confined by the limitations of the
stage, the actors sometimes move
out into the audience.
This is not a production notable
for its subtlety, either in the
dialogue or in the acting. The
dialogue is rife with sexual innuendoes, double-talk, and incongruities, but it tends  on  the
whole to be too obvious to be
clever. Without proper timing, the
humor of the play would be
negligible.
The acting style is broad and
exaggerated, sometimes to excess,
with the particular example of
Sharon Romero as a movie star.
Thankfully, hers is a small part.
Another offender is Camille Mitchell who is often in her role of
Giacinta quite plainly and selfconsciously declaiming, and who
has done considerably better in
other productions.
The best job of acting is by
Wayne Robson in the title role,
whose timing is precise, his
gestures       meaningful,        his
movements interesting and, in the
context of what is happening
around him, his delivery is almost
restrained. Derek Keurvorst as
Geronte, a mean and miserly
landowner, also has his bright
moments.
The production of Scapino is
marred, I think, by the revival of
jokes that do not stand in need of
revival. The old "walk this way"
routine is repeated, conjuring up
memories of endless television
variety show blackouts. There is
the supposedly hilarious showdown
between two prostitutes, which is
not even necessary to the script.
Once in a while, a line would turn
up which had the whole audience
groaning.
To be frank, Scapino was not my
cup of tea. Its slapstick is closer to
the vaudeville or Jerry Lewis
tradition than to Chaplin or Woody
Allen. But to be fair, the actors did
succeed in establishing a good ,
rapport with the audience and
most of the people did seem to go
home well-satisfied with the
evening's entertainment. I was not
particularly pleased, but it's
largely a matter of taste.
Cinema
From PF2
laugh,   never  mind   his  sardonic
humor.
March 29 — the Marx Bros.
Duck Soup
Perhaps the best of Marx Bros,
films, Duck Soup seeks to lampoon
government and democracy.
Grandiose political ceremonies,
governmental bodies, international diplomacy, the law
courts and war are all reduced to
utter absurdity.
Animal Crackers is the second
part of this zany double bill.
CONTEMPORARY FRENCH
CINEMA SERIES
Jan. 26 — Tout Va Bien — Goddard
& Gorin
This Goddard film, typical of the
later Goddard genre, examines the
social effects that the traumatic
events of May 1968 in France had
upon the marriage of a leftist
couple. Yves Montand plays the
husband, a serious film maker who
has fallen into the hackdom rut of
television commercials. Jane
Fonda plays the wife whose
decision to quit her job as an
American reporter represents her
first step toward liberation.
Al! — Yoji Kuri
One of the world's leading
animators sees the man-woman
relationship as a bitter struggle in
which the man is the underdog.
Rainbow is the final short on this
film bill.
Feb. 9 — Chloe In the Afternoon —
Eric Rohmer
This film by Eric Rohmer is the
humorous story of Frederic, a man
who is happily married but is
distressed by the fact that he is no
longer capable of flirting with
women. He feels that marriage
cloisters and closes him in and so
he wants to escape. All around
there are an abundance of women
just waiting to offer him the anticipations and excitement of first
love.
Meanwhile, Chloe, a past intimate from Frederic's life,
returns to Paris from America
where she had been living with an
artist. Since she was not a
possessive woman, Fredric did not
feel that the security of his
marriage would be threatened by
seeing Chloe.
Frederic then decides to start
seeing Chloe on afternoons when he
finds that the casual relationship
which he has with her allows him to
experience a freedom and excitement that he had never felt
with his marriage. His affections
grow for Chloe and he finds that he
wants to sleep with her, quite the
opposite to the original relationship he wanted.
La Jetee — Chris Marker
La Jetee has been described as
"an interrupted journey through
space-time." It tells of a man who
is projected on successful journeys
through time to the past and the
future. The base point for these
projections is just after World War
III when everything we know has
been destroyed and all the survivors have moved underground.
Strange German-speaking torturers devote themselves to
terrifying experiments, searching
for a human guinea pig to send on
time journeys that may enable
them to escape their radioactive
impasse.
Striptease — Zagreb
An animated joke in which a
striptease turns out to be
something else.
Feb. 23 — Claude — Dan
McLaughlin
A small animated boy is constantly ridiculed by his conformist,
cliche-ridden parents in this film
on the communication gap.
"Claude, can't you do anything
right?" they scold. He finally takes
his revenge in a sardonic surprise
ending.
La Bonne Annee — Claude
Lelouche
Is a fine film of a jewel thief and
the woman who falls in love with
him despite his prison sentence.
Is It Always Right To Be Right?
rounds out this triple bill. All films
have English subtitles.
Mar. 8 — Enter Hamlet —
Mogubgub
In this three-minute short by
Fred Mogubgub, pop art finds its
most exuberant expression in this
fusillade of images. With
questionable relevance each word
of Hamlet's soliloquy is given its
own picture.
Two English Girls and
The Continent — Francois
Trufault
Francois Trufault's film is a film
full of beauty, comic discretion and
in the end sadness. It is a story of
two English sisters who go to
Europe around the time before
World War I and fall in love with
the same Frenchman. The film
covers seven years of the trio's life
together and is full of many bright
but short scenes. This is one of
Trufault's better films and worth
seeing.
Notice
PF publishes its annual Creative
Arts issue in March and we will be
accepting short stories, poems,
graphics and photographs from
student artists. AU material must
be received by March 1st and will
be returned if accompanied by self-
addressed stamped envelopes.
ECKANKAR
Path of Total Awareness
"The sun that never sets is
visible only to the naked soul
and my music is audible to the
spiritual ears only."
Paul Twitchell,
The Tiger's Fang
Shaw of Time is the program
short.
Mar.   22   —   Stavisky   —   Alain
Resnais
Alain Resnais who directed this
gangster film is better known for
his films like Je t'aime, Je t'aime,
Hiroshima Mon Amour and Last
Year at Marienbad. Stavisky is
less well known than his others but
in the Resnais style, if you are a
Resnais fan.
The Fat and The Lean —
Roman Polanski
This film confirms Roman
Polanski's position as the most
brilliant of the young directors and
also demonstrates his considerable
talents as an actor. It is a fable in
the manner of Brecht, in which a
slave dreams of wider horizons.
Last Two Weeks
"The New Breed"
This Weekend
"Gavin Walker Quartet"
—— ■ COMING EVENTS
Monday — January 26 I n the Backroom — January 26
"Roy Ayers Ubiquity"        "Sweeney Todd"
Two Nights Only
"Tower of Power"
Advance Tickets Now On Sale
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752 THURLOW
RESERVATIONS
683-7306
VOTE CHRISTIE JUNG!
- Quality Education
- Better Transportation
- More Financial Aid
- More employment of
U.B.C. Grads, Students
- Support for B.C.S.F.
DON'T SAY NO TO JUNGl
Vote CHRISTIE JUNG For Student Senator
CLASSICAL RECORD SALE
$
3
99
per disc
Angel
ENTIRE ANGEL CATALOGUE ON SALE!
Save on the World's Greatest Composers
• BEETHOVEN
• J. STRAUSS, JR.
• BELLINI
• STRAVINSKY
m BERLIOZ
• TCHAIKOVSKY
• GILBERT & SULLIVAN
• VERDI
• MASCAGNI
• WAGNER
• MOZART
• BACH
• PUCCINI
• BRAHMS
• RACHMANINOFF
• SCHUBERT
• RIMSKY-KORSAKOV
• and many
• ROSSINI
many more!
sound
556 SeymOUr St., 682-61 44       Open Thursday & Friday Until 9 p.
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 23, 1976 rnuuy,  January  ^o,   ly/o
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Wrestling 'Birds in tough meets
By BOB RAYFIELD
The Thunderbird wrestling team
will be going against the three
toughest teams on its schedule.
On Friday they face the teams
from Oregon College and
Sacramento State in Oregon.
Although Oregon and Sacramento
are colleges of 6,000 students, both
have excellent wrestling  teams.
Coach Laycoe will be using the
same lineup on Friday that he used
against the Puget Sound Loggers.
Wrestlers Barry Lam, Mike and
George Richey, Clark Davis, Rob
Hansen and Kyle Raymond should
do well for UBC. Bob Laycoe hopes
to win at least four out of five
matches in each of Friday's meets.
Laycoe's main concern is that the
matches will prepare his wrestlers
for the tough competition they will
meet in the Western Conference
and Canadian championships.
On Saturday the 'Birds face the
Multnomah Athletic Club at
Corvallis. This team will prove to
be difficult for the 'Birds because
of their experience.
The Multnomah Club has a world
heavyweight champion on the
team and two current NCAA
middleweight champions as well.
Laycoe does not expect to win
many of the matches against this
team but they will be important
because the UBC freshman will
gain experience from the meet.
V'ball 'Birds hit road
By MARK LEPITRE
The Thunderbird volleyball team
is off on its most important road
trip of the season today.
The 'Birds take on all but one of
their Canada West opponents
during the three-day excursion.
They travel to Edmonton, Calgary
and Lethbridge and if they win all
three matches they will have the
Canada West league all but
wrapped up.
. Edmonton will be the only new
team the 'Birds have to play. In
previous action the 'Birds have
utterly destroyed Calgary and
Lethbridge in home games. In the
two matches the 'Birds won all the
games and did not give up enough
points to have lost even one game.
Edmonton has a small, quick
team this year but they are lacking
in experience. They are mostly
rookies while the 'Birds are all
veterans.  Size and experience
could be a major factor in the
match and UBC definitely has an
edge in these departments.
Next weekend UBC students will
be treated to some excellent
volleyball action as the Thunderbirds take on the University of
Southern California Trojans Jan.
31 at 8:30 p.m.
Skiing 'Birds take second
The UBC men's and women's ski
teams took second place in an
invitational ski meet at Crystal
Mountain, Washington, about 70
miles from Seattle, last weekend.
The meet was sponsored by the
Pacific Lutheran University and
included both downhill and crosscountry events.
The men's team "received outstanding performances from Stu
Harrison, who took first in the
giant slalom, and Ron Ozanne
taking the combined honors.
Anne Cairns took second in the
slalom and giant slalom for the
women's team.
In cross-country, usually UBC's
weakest area, Fred Cook placed
fifth.
There are nine teams in the
conference, and all are American
except UBC and University of
Victoria.
UBC's next competition is at
Hyak, Washington, this weekend.
The team has a good chance of
winning the meet and improving
their record.
C.U.S.O. Informafion Night
Education: Science and English Teachers
Tuesday, January 27, 7:30 p.m.
Rooms 402-404, International House
No admission charge
All welcome
U.B.C. GATE
BARBERS
Internationally Trained »^^m
Hairstylists ~'^^Lf
Open Tues. - Sat. ^^^»
9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. -^
4605 W. 10th AVE.
• ■I
228-9345
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
HURRY,  HURRY,  HURRY
WHILE THEY LAST
BIRD CALLS
PICK UP YOUR COPY TODAY
AT
THE BOOKSTORE, THUNDERBIRD SHOP
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RM. 241 S.U.B.
or INFORMATION DESK S.U.B.
Don't let your
hair get out
of line
Keep it in place
with RK Men's Spray.
APPOINTMENT
SERVICE
731-4191
3644 WEST
4th AVE.
AT ALMA
If UBC wins both matches this
weekend the team will have a
recordof six wins and five losses in
the dual meet standings.
A full contingent will be going
down to Oregon this weekend so
there will be 10 men entered in
each meet. With all the potential
the team has, UBC should come
back to Vancouver with valuable
experience and some victories.
Next week the 'Birds wrestle at
War Memorial Gym against
Pacific Lutheran University. The
'Birds should do well against this
team as they will be wrestling
freestyle which is the 'Birds'
strong point.
upset Pegasus
The Thunderbird soccer team
defeated first, place Pegasus in
B.C. first division competiton last
Sunday.
The 2-1 win, in Kinsmen Park on
the North Shore, gave the fifth
place 'Birds 10 points in the
standings. Pegasus has 16 points.
The score at half time was 1-1,
with Craig Campbell scoring for U
the 'Birds. Terry Thompson scored
in the second half to give the 'Birds
a 2-1 victory.
In the previous match between
the two teams Pegasus handed
UBC an easy 4-0 loss.
Paradise for the Orientalists
SOPHIA BOOKSTORE
A unique bookstore featuring
BOOKS ON THE FAR EAST & JAPAN
both in English & Japanese
• Arts         • Business            • Cookery • Education
• Japanese Language Texts              • Judo • Karate
• Literature               • Travel              • Yoga- • Zen
Also Pocketbooks & Magazines
725 Nelson at Granville     684-4032
Civil Engineering
Grads!
WANTED:
Resident Highway Engineers
Alberta Transportation is currently recruiting for the above positions. If
you are graduating with a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering and want to be
involved in the construction of main highways throughout the Province
of Alberta, we would like to talk to you.
For further information contact your Student Placement Office by
February 3, 1976.
YOUR FUTURE IS HERE.
Liberia
GOVERNMENT OF ALBERTA
OUR WELL STOCKED SHOP
Has The Right Selection
Just For YOU!
SKIS: Rossignol,   Dynamic,   Fischer,  Hexcel,  Kneissl,
Dynastar, Blizzard, Atomic.
BOOTS: Le  Trappeur,   Nordica,  Hanson, Kastinger,
Dolomite, Tyrol.
SKI FASHIONS: Bogner,   Fulsap,   Mossant,   Head,
Feller, Nancy Greene, K-Way, Dolomite.
7, OFF
TO U.B.C.
STUDENTS
336 W. Pender St.
681-2004 or 681-8423
Open Friday until 9 p.m.
FREE PARKING AT REAR OF STORE rage i 'J.
rnaay, January zo, iy/o
More sports
Hoop 'Birds home
By AV TAR BAINS
The basketball 'Birds have a pair
of crucial games this weekend as
they tackle the University of
Alberta Golden Bears.
The 'Birds will be attempting to
break their third place tie with the
Bears and enhance their hopes for
a play-off spot.
In order to do that the 'Birds will
have to control Alberta's high
scoring forward, Doug Baker. If
Baker gets too much time to shoot
he'll burn them all night long.
UBC forwards Mike (Mungo)
McKay and Jan Bohn will have to
PANGO PANGO (UNS) ~
United Snakes presidential candidate George Papoon swept
ihrough this tiny island kingdom
for a quick seven-day break from
Ihe hectic campoon trail back
home.
Papoon was met at the Pango
I'ango International Airport by a
handful of Armenians shouting
'Papoon for President" and "Not
Insane!"
be mentally and physically ready
to cope with Alberta's usual vicious
assault on the boards.
The bench strength of both clubs
may be a determining factor in the
games this weekend, and it seems
that UBC has an edge in this
department, with the improved
play of Bill Berzins, Ed Lewin and
Dave Kerzinger.
The 'Birds are in the midst of a
four game winning streak and
Coach Peter Mullins is looking for
a good performance from his ball
club this weekend.
So, for some excitement Friday
and Saturday night come and see
the Thunderbirds play the
University of Alberta <Jolden
Bears. Tip-off time each evening is
8:30. Both games are preceded by
Thunderette games.
Canada West league standings:
GP W L Pts
Calgary
10 9   1 18
Victoria
10 7   3 14
UBC
10 5   5 10
Alberta
10 5   5 10
Leth.
10 4   6   8
Sask.
10 0 10   0
Cricketers meet
The annual general meeting of
the UBC Cricket Club will be held
at the president's home at 1816
Western Parkway, Vancouver,
next Monday.
Anyone wishing to join the club,
especially new members, should
show up at the meeting.
Anyone who can not make the
meeting or would like more information should contact Dr.
Michael Gerry at 224-2464 or 263-
9236. Or they can also contact
Brinsley Stewart at 733-9037. The
meeting begins at 7:45 p.m.
(  Wfc SAVED ITS
Itfg-'teV.
All it needed was
/ A LITTLE lA/ATEft AN'
(    SOME UMN'CARE'
}r~^d
Tim
CHAH6t WE FLOWCR TO A KKSOH ...
1UEN ' WATCH • TO "BU3O0'... AHO YOU
HAVt TNC ftEO CROSS SXOKf IH A HOTSHOL.
®wm mumwooo ©am mm
YOUR CLINIC
U.B.C.
S.U.B. BUILDING
Upstairs, Rooms 207, 209, 211
MONDAY, JAN. 26th THRU FEBRUARY 6th, 1976
9:30 - 4:30 p.m. (continuous)
SKI CROSS COUNTRY
Sales and Rentals
m.miM^. <S§r:m
AMXsi;/\ ,mr
Ski schools
Ski tours
Film nights
Wax clinics
Phone for
further info!
CHAKI.KX
''"^T^Ml^^
the Great Escape
1790 West Georgia St. 687-1113
School District No. 57
Prince George
Serving the residents of British Columbia's
largest and fastest growing interior
community, has opening as of September,
1976, for -
TEACHERS
and
ADMINISTRATORS
covering a broad range of the
educational curriculum.
These positions, both in the City of Prince George and in
the surrounding communities of Mackenzie, McBride and
Valemount offer the new graduate the challenge and the
opportunity of becoming involved immediately, within the
educational framework of this growing interior region.
Situated in the heart of British Columbia's forest industry,
these openings offer not only rewarding professional careers,
but also provide an environment conducive to diverse
outdoor recreation. Prince George is the centre of some of
the world's finest big game hunting and trout fishing areas.
Housing has expanded to meet the new demands, and
property taxes in the City of Prince George and surrounding
areas are amongst the lowest in the Province.
If you have a "desire to take part in the growth and
development of north central British Columbia, and would
like to learn more about these positions, you are invited to
call Mrs. J. Chose of the Teacher Employment Service, B.C.
School Trustees Association, 1095 Howe Street, Vancouver,
B.C. - Telephone 682-2881.
Appointments will be arranged with the recruiting staff of
School District No. 57 Prince George, who will be in
Vancouver on January 28, 29 and 30.
Central Administration Office,
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 57,
1891 - 6th Avenue,
Prince George, B.C.
V2M 1L7
SPEAKER
SALE
tiijNaca A-25
The top-rated Dynaco A-25 speaker now on
sale    at    outstanding    savings.
Sugg, list $104.50
eh L'16
Now   JBL's   most   popular   speaker   at   a
definitely    affordable    price!
Sugg, list $186.00
SALE
$
66
00
$
SALE
119
95
>
This week at A&B Sound, ALL our loudspeakers
are on sale eft super discount prices.
UP TO Vz OFF LIST!
LIST SALE
EPI 90 $129.95 $ 89.95
Altec 887 $119.00 $ 84.95
ESS Evaluator    $430.00 $365.00
Marantz 4G    $ 87.50 $ 59.95
Marantz 5G    $139.95 $99.95
Yamaha NS410    $74.95 $ 49.95
LIST
Cerwin Vega 211 R $395.95
Mcintosh MLIC    $495.00
Altec 879A $386.00
Fairfax FX-100    $169.99
Dynapo A-35 $149.50
KLH 23 $210.00
SALE
$269.95
$349.95
$299.95
$129.95
$ 93.00
$149.95
4 SOUND ROOMS LOADED WITH SAYINGS!
sound
556 SeymOUr St., 682-6144        Open Thursday & Friday Until 9 p.

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