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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1971

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Array Backboard blast ends season
The War Memorial Gymnasium shook
early Saturday morning as a glass backboard
shattered, sending glass slivers thoughout the
walls and floor of the gym.
At about 3 a.m., two janitors cleaning the
gym coffee shop were disturbed by a loud
noise. They walked into the main gym area
to find the floor impregnated with glass
particles spewn from the west backboard
which apparently exploded by itself.
Except for the janitors, the gym was
deserted.
Athletic director Buz Phillips said repairs
should take no longer than a week, but
expressed little concern about the time
needed as "there are no more basketball
games this season."
He cited the main damage to the gym as a
one-foot-by-two-inch   gash   in   the   gym's
floor and minor scratches to the surrounding
floor area and walls.
Phillips said such explosions have
occurred in other gyms using the glass
backboards but added that UBC will continue
to use them until some fault can actually be
found.
A spokesman for physical plant said
another glass backboard was removed from
the gym and returned to the manufacturers
who are attempting to find out why the
explosion occurred.
Foul play is not suspected and the
spokesman merely called the explosion a
"glass failure."
He said he did not know how long it
would be before the manufacturer's findings
are released, and added that neither
backboard would be replaced before they
are.
Vol. Ill, No. 36
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 1971        «^^>48       228-2305
Jericho road due
to start this month
By SANDY KASS
The first phase of the Jericho
Road is scheduled to get under
way before the end of the month.
The phase - a 34-foot road
connector between Marine Drive
and Point Grey Road - has been
cited by Vancouver parks board
chairman Sandy Robertson as the
only step necessary for the next
six or seven years.
"If people don't want a
freeway along Jericho Beach, they
don't    have    to    have    one,"
/Money promised
for student jobs
Glass backboard explodes.
By MIKE SASGES
The provincial and federal
governments have promised to
provide money to hire 1,800 B.C.
students this summer.
"The provincial government
has promised $ 15 million for 600
summer jobs and the federal
government will throw in money
for 1,200 jobs," Bob Smith told
The Ubyssey Monday.
Smith, Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer-elect, AMS
president Tony Hodge and AMS
vice-president John Scott Mitchell
met Feb. 5 with provincial
ministers of health and welfare,
Ralph Loffmark, recreation, Eric
Kiernans, and lands and forests,
Ray Williston.
Smith said that the 600 jobs
will be with Kiernans' department.
The students will work at Cypress
Bowl, Seymour mountain,
Alouette Park and Manning Park.
The Cypress project is for
commuters, only and will be open
to Vancouver area residents.
Seymour project is a camp-in job.
The federal government was to
be used for reforestation, but the
planting season is over and
students will work in the
provincial parks, Smith said.
Both Smith and Hodge are
worried about the lack of jobs
for women.
"We want women to apply,"
Smith said. "The idea of these
being traditionally jobs for men
has got to end."
to page 8: see JOBS
Robertson said Friday in an
interview with The Ubyssey.
Early in February city engineer
Ran Martin released plans for
construction of a six-lane arterial
highway along the same route as
the connector.
The six-lane roadway,
scheduled to have been built two
lanes at a time over the next three
years, sparked severe criticism
from area residents who protested
the influx of traffic the roadway
would bring.
The "connector," as the road is
now being called, will have two
driving lanes, a parking lane on
the south side, curbs and lighting,
Robertson said.
It will be subsidized jointly by
the federal and municipal
governments.
Robertson said the main
objective for construction of the
road would be to afford the city's
residents and tourists a scenic
drive connecting Stanley Park
with city's beaches as far as
Musqueum Park.
He said the parks board and
city council made a deal about a
year ago to buy all the
privately-owned waterfront land
between Kitsilano Beach and
Jericho as properties become
available.
"One day all of Vancouver's
waterfront will belong to the
public," Robertson said.
He added that his board had
made    no    further    plans    for
recreational development of the
to page 8: see KITES
University investments total $30 million
UBC broke?
This question, continually asked by those concerned
about the university's financial plight immediately after
the annual release of the provincial budget, can be
answered with an emphatic "No!"
Currently UBC has about $30 million sitting
comfortably in its endowment fund.
Just exactly how much UBC actually has in its
endowment funds and where the money is. invested
remains a mystery, or more precisely, a closely-guarded
administration secret.
One man who has been trying to find out is student
senator Art Smolensky.
Smolensky attempted on several occasions to obtain
information on the fund from UBC bursar William White.
On each occasion he was politely refused.
When these verbal inquiries met with no success,
Smolensky began to churn out letters to White, mailing
additional copies to assorted university heavies.
Each time, his letters contained the same request: "I
would like a copy of the most up-to-date list of
investments held in the UBC endowment fund, detailing
the numbers of shares, bonds and/or dollar amounts held
in each corporation."
Smolensky pointed out that failure to disclose the
financial transactions of the university would amount to a
stand against a portion of the Universities Act which is
quite explicit on the subject. (Section 50).
Expressing his frustration, he wrote to White: "I
consider your refusal of my request somewhat
objectionable and not quite understandable. Secrecy of
this sort often leads to a great deal of friction between the
administration and both students and faculty. This
friction only leads to greater suspicion, hostility, and in
the end political action."
White, in his replies, always stressed the financial
difficulties of the distribution of the university's
investment portfolio.
to page 8: see BELL Page 2
Tuesday, March 2, 1971
Bennett dam on Peace
causes death of a delta
By JIM TAYLOR
EDMONTON (CUP) - The
Peace-Athabasca Delta is turning into
muskeg because of the Bennett Dam.
Ecological effect of the dam was the
subject of a students' union teach-in at the
University of Alberta last week.
Speakers for the forum were professor
Roland Harrison from the faculty of law,
Dr. W. M. Schultz from the department of
agricultural economics, and Tony Belcourt
of the Metis Association of Alberta.
The session began with a film called The
Death of a Delta showing the
environmental havoc created in the delta
by the interference with the annual spring
flooding of the Peace River by the
Bennett Dam.
Before the dam was built, the annual
spring flooding of the Peace River caused
the river to overflow its banks and fill the
delta with sufficient water to flood it
through the summer and fall, until the next
spring.
Now, the Bennett Dam which holds
back the spring flood waters and the delta,
depending on a new flood each year for its
water, is drying up. Over a vast area water
levels have dropped from several feet to a
few inches and dry environment plants are
beginning to invade the delta.
This drying up of the delta has caused a.
great decrease in fish and wildlife. Some
1,500 Fort Chipewyan Indians, dependent
on fishing, hunting and trapping, have had
their livelihood taken from them by the
tremendous decrease of wildlife in the
delta.
Within The Death of a Delta was shown
another film called More Power to Us. A
pro-dam propaganda film by B.C. Hydro. It
dealt with the grandeur of the engineering
feat, its cost, and the power output of the
dam. The film hailed the dam as a great
progressive venture by the B.C.
government.
At the conclusion of the film the
speakers formed a panel chaired by Bill
Avison, director of Varsity Guest Weekend
at the U. of A.
Dr. Schultz said, "Many people think
this film is nothing more than a scare story.
I wish it were so."
The delta is part of Wood Buffalo
National Park which contains the largest
buffalo herd in Canada and also provides a
nesting ground for the almost extinct
whooping crane.
"If the delta is allowed to 'run
permanently dry, all this will will be lost,
and for what?" asked Dr. Schultz.
"Every Canadian who is a symbolic
owner of the national parks should feel
deprived," he said.
Roland Harrison spoke on the problem
from a legal perspective.
"There are two problems here," he
said, "How did it happen, and how should
the residents of Fort Chipewyan be
compensated."
All that was required for the building of
the dam was a license under the B.C. Water
Act. An application for a license is sent to
the comptroller of water rights who has the
option of holding a hearing^ before the
license is granted.
Opposition to the license can only come
from a riparian owner (someone who owns
land through which the river passes).
There are three serious defects in the
ease of obtaining a license, professor
Harrison said:
• Objectors to the license are
restricted;
• The hearing is at the discretion of
the comptroller of water rights; and
• There is no consideration of public
interest.
The only federal authority comes from
the Navigable Waters Protection Act, but
the B.C. government said this act did not
apply to the Bennett Dam.
Except for this act there is no federal
power dealing with water resources in the
British North American Act.
"However, the federal parliament could
step in and force them (B.C. Hydro) to
allow enough water for navigation
downstream," he said.
On the matter of compensating the Fort
Chipewyan Indians he said, "No matter
how much money is given to the Indians it
will be an inadequate compensation for
taking away their way of life. There are
some things that money just cannot buy."
The Fort Chipewyan residents have
three claims to compensation:
• Negligence — conduct which
produces foreseeable harm;
• Nuisance; and
• Riparian rights — maintenance of
the quality of the water.
To make the claims, a person must be in
standing (he must prove that he personally
had suffered more than the public at large).
He must also prove that the damage was
caused by B.C. Hydro.
The Indians' weakest position is the cost
and time of the action. The estimated cost
of the action is $25,000 and it will be at
least two years before ti could be finalized,
Harrison said.
Whatever the results of the claim action,
it will provide inadequate compensation
for the loss of a way of life, he said, but it
will be an important indication of how
future development in the north will be
accomplished.
Tony Belcourt of the Metis Association
of Alberta said the recent trend has been
toward the population of the north. "This
trend will be reversed if the northen
environment is reduced to marshes," he
said.
The Indians at Fort Chipewyan were
able to earn a good livelihood although it
was hard work, he said. "With the
destruction of the Peace-Athabasca Delta
most have been forced to go on welfare.
"The Indians are willing to change.
They will plant gardens and raise buffalo
from the park for meat."
He said when this plan was presented to
the government they said, "we have a
policy concerning wildlife and if we let you
have any buffalo we'll have to make some
changes.
The government has jurisdiction over all
animals in the park from buffalo to rabbits,
he said.
He appealed for support for the Indians
of Fort Chipewyan.
After the speakers' addresses, a question
period was opened. The panel was asked
what could be done to reverse the
deterioration. Dr. Schultz said that at a
recent conference on the question it was
suggested that it could be feasible to build
more dams downstream to bring up the
water level in the delta.
Another member of the audience
suggested that the Indians should seriously
consider blowing up the dam. Belcourt said
he was opposed to that suggestion and to
red power groups who advocate such
actions.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just One Block from Campus
in the Village
WE SERVE AUTHENTIC
CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
Eat In - Take Out
Open Every Day
4:30-11:00 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.       224-6121
In the Village
KTOrSJeVl S&dewT Tn»*wiicflr+ i-tftO*
9BV
T8« <p**T *SR.T5fe Wf&KJo(l
Introducing an unbelievable new product:
Student-Railpass.
(Would you believe two whole months of
unlimited rail travel throughout thirteen
European countries * for a modest $125?)
Our brand-new Student-Railpass gives you all
that Second Class rail travel on the over 100,000 mile
railroad systems of Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France,
Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal,
Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. You'll discover that
there's very little second class about Second Class. You
can sleep in a Couchette for only $4.50 a night, and eat
in inexpensive cafeteria-type Dining Cars.
If you haven't got two months, or you prefer the
luxury of First Class, there's our regular Eurailpass. The
three week Eurailpass costs $110, one month $140, two
months $200, three months $230. But remember—you
can't get Student-Railpass or Eurailpass in Europe. You
must buy one before you leave, so see your Travel Agent.
Meanwhile, send in the coupon below for your free
Student-Railpass or Eurailpass folder.
Prices quoted in U.S. Dollars.
O I UlrkN l"I%MILi MOO The way to see Europe without feeling like a tourist.
*Eurailpass is valid in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Holland, Italy, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal, Spain,
Sweden and Switzerland.
Eurailpass, Box 2168, Toronto 1, Ontario.
Please send me your free Eurailpass folder with railroad map. □   Or your free Student-Railpass folder order form. □ Tuesday, March 2, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Thieving con artist
reaches a\\~time low
By LESLIE PLOMMER
Ubyssey Appointments Editor
Next year's Ubyssey editor emerged Friday from the
unlikely squalor of a SUB cafeteria anteroom.
Leslie Plommer, arts 4, said later she feels her election as
editor for the academic year 1971-72 was a direct result of
well-placed financial payoffs.
"I feel my election as editor was a direct result of
well-placed financial payoffs," Plommer said.
"I also lent people a lot of cigarettes over the year and that
probably had something to do with the final decision."
At press time, Mayor Tom Campbell was available for
comment.
"Just keep her out of my office, that's all I ask," he said.
"The last time she was here she stole a gold fountain pen
given to me by the Vancouver Landlords Alliance."
Premier W. A. C. (Cece) Bennett said he will call a special
cabinet meeting today to discuss Plommer's election.
"The people of this province should realize they're dealing
with one of the most infamous con artists I've ever come across,"
he said.
"First that woman encouraged kindergarten children to
drill holes in my dams.
"Then she brazenly unloaded a lot of barbed wire on my
poor, unsuspecting boys."
Former Flyways Minister Phil Gaglardi said: "UBC is going
to hell in a handbasket.
"This woman drinks beer and smokes cigarettes and reads
novels on Sunday. Where will it all end?"
Election ruling
faces opposition
By MIKE SASGES
The cause of ex-Alma Mater Society
president-elect Hanson Lau is gathering momentum.
"There is quite a lot of sympathy for Hanson's
position," AMS science rep Adrian Belshaw told
The Ubyssey Monday.
Lau was the AMS president-elect until
Thursday, when the student court voided the
presidential election due to irregularities.
Lau was the only person on the new executive
who did not belong to the human government
collective.
Belshaw said that he was the behind-the-scenes
man who was gathering support on council to
oppose the student court decision.
"When the motion comes before council on
Wednesday to ratify the court's decision, I will
oppose it," he said.
Belshaw plans to enter further evidence in
support of Lau for council's perusal.
When asked whether council would allow such
action, he said, "They would be mad not to.
"I am gambling that those people who
sympathize will forget council's prerogative and
vote against the motion and not abstain."
Belshaw said the Lau, present AMS
co-ordinator is expected to abstain from the vote.
The presidential election on March 10 will be a
rematch between Lau and Steve Garrod of the
human government slate.
Garrod believes it essential that the president
belong to the human government collective because
of the influence that would go with that office.
"I feel that since the students have already
elected seven members of our collective, they will
want someone who can work with these people,"
Garrod said Monday.
Lau feels that with his experience in the AMS
he will be more realistic in his approach to AMS
projects.
The human government now has a man on the
arts undergraduate society. Colin Portnuff, arts 2
was elected by acclamation.
A human government slate is also running five
people for the five AMS arts reps, they are Hattie
Aitken, Kathy Carney, Laurie Farquhar, incumbent
Brian Sproule and Mike Goodman.
John Sproule and Michael Robinson, an
incumbent and a former Lau slate candidate for
vice-president are independent.
Czech will speak
on state, culture
Czechoslovakian author Josef Skvorecky will
speak on contemporary Czeckoslavakia, the state
and culture today at noon in Bu. 102.
Skvorecky is at present writer-in-residence at
University of Toronto and his book, The Cowards,
has just appeared in English translation.
Rat race for fun and profit:
student lottery at Regina
REGINA (CUP) - Everybody
talks about the "rat race" but
until now no one has done
anything about it. Not only are
students at the University of
Saskatchewan, Regina campus,
doing something about it, they are
involved in a rat race of their own.
Members of the fine arts
society at Regina's campus are
conducting the first annual
rat-race sweepstakes to be held
July 10. Ten tickets will be drawn
for the ten rats that make it
through preliminaries to the final
race.
The person holding the ticket
on the winning rat will receive
$750 or 15 per cent of the gross
receipts from ticket sales up to
$15,000, whichever is greater.
Second prize is $150 or three
per cent of the gross up to
$3,000, and third prize is $101 or
two per cent of the gross up to
$2,000. A lawyer and a chartered
accounting firm are looking after
the receipts.
The society has been granted a
license from the attorney-general's
office and it is the first student
lottery sweepstakes in the
province. Tickets will be available
throughout the province at
various outlets.
Regina campus principal, Dr.
John Archer, is fully supporting
the project.
Proceeds will provide a
scholarship fund for students
wishing to study the fine arts at
Regina campus, award
grants-in-aid to student artists and
establish an art activities centre in
Regina.
Rat-race headquarters are
located in the fine arts building on
the College Avenue campus in
Regina.
i SAib Keep ON TRUCK!*'...
New television approach seen
in Ontario higher education
TORONTO (CUP) - A new kind of university
for Ontario is being planned that would integrate
television and other technology with traditional
teaching methods into "a systems approach to
higher learning."
The concept is outlined in a report on television
and technology in university teaching, prepared for
the Committee on University Affairs (CUA) and the
Committee of Presidents of Universities of Ontario
(CPUO).
The new style university would have a central
headquarter somewhere in the province with a
president and a senior faculty and administration
located there. Students would attend full-time at
regional "learning centres" across the province. The
University would be self-governing and have the
power to grant degrees.
A main theme of the report, written by Bernard
Trotter of Queen's University, is that television has
little future in university education if is treated as a
separate technique.
The report advocates, instead, a completely
new method in which basic instruction would be in
the form of a package made up of television, audio
and printed materials prepared by inter-disciplinary
teams.
Students would view the packaged material at
the regional centres. Professor-tutors would be
available at the centres to guide their work.
The preparation of material by Coursega-Teams
is probably the most radical feature of the plan
since it breaks down the traditional "personal"
relationship between student and teachers.
It also means that the professor has to forego
some of his individual status and reputation in order
to work as part of a team.
The report favors creating the new university as
a separate entity, mainly because Trotter does not
believe that the traditional university system could
be adapted fast enough to cover the student
explosion over the next decade.
One of the major selling points of the concept
is cost, but general estimates are in the area of half
the cost of traditional universities, with half the
capital investment.
The report is to receive detailed consideration
by both the CUA and CPUO in the next three
months.
Bicycle thieves at work
If you are planning to cycle to UBC in the spring you should be
prepared to walk the long distance home.
Sergeant Greenman of the University RCMP detachment said
Monday that 12 bikes were reported stolen in February, while only two
were recovered.
Ten-speeds appear to be the preferred bikes for thieves. Seven out
of the 12 stolen were ten-speeds three were three-speeds and only two
standard speeds.
Sergeant Green said the number of thefts is about average for this
time of year but will increase as summer approaches. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1971
Iff UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C.
Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
Founding member. Pacific Student Press. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union
Building. Editor, 228-2301; city editor, 228-2305; news editor,
228-2307; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising
228-3977.
MARCH 2, 1971
The Jericho plan
Latest word from the Vancouver Parks Board is
that construction of a "connecting road", first stage in
the construction of the proposed six-lane highway at
Jericho, is about to begin.
Translated, that means the proposed development
of Jericho that has only recently come to public
attention is virtually a fait accompli despite increasing
protest.
When the federal government first agreed to turn
the land of the Jericho army base over to the city, there
was all kinds of talk about its value as a parkland.
We should have known at the time it would never
happen that way.
We should have known enough about the kind of
mind predominating on city council and the parks board
to know we would never see the development of the
area as parkland for the general public good.
The way they see it, what good is land if there is
no money to be made on it?
So, we see plans for a six-lane road through
Jericho. Private developers are jumping in to make a fast
buck building townhouses and, of course, when the
townhouses arrive, a shopping centre is sure to follow.
Of course, there will still be some parkland left,
but the parks board isn't going to let that discourage
them.
One of the most talked about plans is for a
Coney-Island style amusement park development, which
is still in the plans despite parks board denials to pacify
the public.
Just think, in a few years we can have the PNE
animal show all-year round. We'll all be able to "step
right up and win a kewpie doll" any time we feel
so-inclined.
We don't recall very many people saying they
wanted that kind of commercialism on Vancouver's
beachfront, but a few chamber of commerce mentalities
in high places have decided it would be a good idea.
"Won't it be great to have a Coney Island just like
they have in New York. That'll show'em how much
little old Vancouver is growing. And just think of the
tourist trade it will bring in."
Oh, yes. The Jericho master plan also calls for a
marina. With motorboats buzzing around and the
necessary gas station to service them, it will certainly do
a lot for one of the best beaches in town.
Faced with public opposition to the whole plan,
have the parks board and city council altered their
plans? Of course not, they've just become strangely
silent over the whole thing, hoping the controversy will
blow over and eventually allow them to continue with
their plan.
The thought of developing a park that people can
use in peace without subsidizing some form of
commercial blemish doesn't appeal to them.
It doesn't bother them that a six-lane highway and
an amusement park are perhaps among the most insane
ideas they have ever hatched.
There is money to be made and people to make it-
that's all that matters to them.
Editor: Nate Smith
 Maurice Bridge
City     Ginny Gait
Jan O'Brien
Wire John Andersen
Managing     Bruce Curtis
Sports  Keith Dunbar
Ass't News    Jennifer Jordan
Leslie Plommer
Photo   ..    David Enns
David Bowerman
Page Friday Tim Wilson
Wall, podner, the stage pulled into
town with Jim Davies on one end of
the  reins and Thorn Wescott on the
other. Seems Mike Sasges had lost the
wheels. Kathy Carney and David
Schmidt asked "What held it up," and
Paul Knox said "Bandits." 'Twas
Josephine Margolis, Sandy Kass, and
Nate Smith — the notorious Gefilte
Gang! Brett Garrett and Darryl Tan had
pictures, though, so Marshall McCune
rounded up a posse.
Well sir, with Ken Lassesen, Judy -
McLeod and Jennifer Alley in the
posse, and Jinny Ladner as their scout,
you can see why they never caught
them. Last I heard, Steve Millard was
still trying to head 'em off at the
locker room and the Marshall was still
drowning his sorrows — not to mention
his posse.
'Yes, Quasimodo, I'm certain you'd be allowed to dangle in the elevator shafts on weekends."
LETTERS
Peace Arch
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The front page article on the
NDP-sponsored anti-pollution
demonstration at the Peace Arch
which appeared in The Ubyssey of
Feb. 16 could well have been
written by a tired old demoralized
radical of some forgotten era. But
it wasn't. It was written by Dick
Betts (a tired young demoralized
radical of the present era?). The
article is described as "an
analysis" of the NDP
demonstration. In fact, it is an
inaccurate description with a few
off-hand and destructive
comments. It certainly does not
approach the level of analysis.
First, even the big-business
daily (press reported the
demonstration was attended by
4,000 people - not the 1,000 that
Betts reported.
Betts tells us that the speakers
"droned on", that they were "ten
different politicians and ecotypes
saying the same thing". To this he
favorably counterposes the
"drums and tribal dancing" of the
Yippies. Why? Not because the
Yippies have any useful
alternative analysis, tactics or
program to that of the NDP -
Betts himself tells us they do not.
Look at the article again. There is
no reason. Betts simply reflects
his own tiredness.
Because the NDP speakers
didn't develop something Betts
calls "a comprehensive analysis"
(why didn't he provide one in his
article?) nor any "creative
extra-parliamentary moves to stop
the onslaught of U.S. business
interests in Canada and in the rest
of the world" (I have never yet
heard any of these demoralized
critics suggest the magical tactics
that will meet their own utterly
fantastic criteria of stopping U.S.
imperialism in a single blow).
Betts, after his own tired fashion
preferred to turn away from the
political event of the day towards
the entertainment of the Yippies.
That's not analysis - it's a
cop-out.
Any    analysis    of   that
demonstration must start from
some facts.
Four thousand people
responded to a hastily organized
demonstration sponsored by the
NDP on the initiative of some of
its Waffle members. That is a fact.
The NDP, to my knowledge, has
never actually initiated a
demonstration before under its
own name. The NDP is a mass
political instrument based on
organized labor — the most
conscious sector of the working
class in this country. That is a
fact. Put it together and you have
an event of some importance. The
NDP, Canada's mass labor party,
organized a mass demonstration
against a clear act of social
irresponsibility by capitalism. In
spite of any weaknesses in the
demonstration, that alone is cause
for rejoicing by anyone seriously
interested in building an
independent socialist Canada.
Of course the demonstration
didn't defeat U.S. imperialism. It
will take a mass social revolution
to accomplish that. But it did
mobilize 4,000 people under the
banners of the working class
political party. If you have the all
or nothing approach of sectarians
like Betts you will conclude that
this is not only useless, it's
negative. Time and energy were
wasted that could have been spent
on some abstract "revolution".
What this point of view doesn't
understand is that the social
revolution unfolds before our
eyes. It develops first in the old
familiar forms (like the trade
unions and the NDP and anti-war
committees and women's
liberation groups and defense
committees for victimized
comrades such as those in
Montreal). The revolution is in
process and every new step gives
us higher ground from which to
carry the battle. Betts, the purist,
can't seem to bear the thought of
his idealized "creative
extra-parliamentary moves" and
"comprehensive analysis" being
besmirched by the actual
real-world processes of struggle
which involve the massive (and,
yes, reformist) working class
organizations — the trade unions
and the NDP.
For a revolutionary socialist,
however, the real world and the
actual struggle are the stuff of life,
the forces that pose the
possibilities for socialist education
and action and point the road
ahead — not by some
pre-conceived formulas and
dogmas, not through some illusive
"creative extra-parliamentary
tactics" but as Marx pointed out
in the "Manifesto" and Lenin in
"Left Wing Communism: An
Infantile Disorder" through the
processes of living struggle in
whatever mundane form that
takes. "Creative tactics" are worth
nothing at all outside this context.
The NDP has made an important
first step. Let all of us urge them
onward and help the struggle to
unfold towards a free and socialist
Canada.
JOAN CAMPANA
President, UBC Young Socialists
Ombudswoman-elect
Wo doctors
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
During the series of ice hockey
matches between UBC and
Calgary on the weekend, the
services of a doctor were required
on two occasions, once for a
player and once for a spectator.
Over the public address system,
the time keeper asked if there was
a doctor in the house. Considering
the rather physical nature of this
sport, I had assumed that a doctor
would have been in attendance for
every game.
Very rarely do I feel motivated
to write, but, on this occasion, I
thought that the situation was
sufficiently disturbing to warrant
some attention from your
newspaper. While the authorities
may feel that they have no
responsibility for the welfare of
spectators, they most certainly do
have a responsibility towards the
players themselves.
JAMES HOGG Tuesday, March 2, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Survey shows ecology courses inadequate
By BOB BLUMAN
highly
UBC's    program    of   ecology   courses   is
inadequate, according to a recent student survey.
The independently-conducted survey showed that
over 60 per cent of the 1,400 students surveyed would
want to take an ecology course for credit and over 40 per
cent would be interested in a non-credit course.
Ecology courses of a general introductory nature are
now desperately needed to fulfill these student desires.
Such courses should be provided for students at all
levels, with different courses oriented toward various student
interests. One course could have scientific basis another
one could have a social outlook and a third could stress
planning and structure.
Ecology courses presently offered at UBC are limited
in scope. Although many courses such as Biology 101 and
Geography 102 interrelate some concept of ecology with
the basic course material, only about five or six courses at
UBC are strictly on ecology. These courses include
Biology 321-322, Zoology 401, Biology 311, Geography
315-316, and Sociology 356.
Of these courses, only Biology 311 should or can be
taken without and prerequistes and is suggested only for
third and fourth year Arts students. Unfortunately, the
course is only Vh units and together with its partner,
Biology 310 (Heredity), offers no credit in the life
sciences.
This eliminates the interest of a large number of
students in the course. There are no real ecology courses
as electives for interested science students in any year
(except in the specific field of ecology) and arts students
have no possible ecology course choices in their first two
years.
How sincere and interested are students in ecology
courses? It seems likely that interest in an ecology course
and actually taking an ecology course can be two different
matters. However, the fact that almost 30 per cent of
those who answered this questionnaire are in favour of a
compulsory ecology course for all UBC students should
signify a reasonable amount of honest concern and
sincerity among students.
A remarkable number of student comments were
written on the questionnaire. They ranged from "Ecology
Survey resu
Its
Have you ever taken a
YES
NO
NO
UBC course relating to
ANSWER
ecology?
11.9%
88.1%
0.0
Would you be interested
in taking an ecology course
for credit?
61.5
24.9
13.6
Would you be interested
in taking an ecology course
for no credit?
42.8
28.3
28.9
Are you aware of an
ecology course you could
take now?
15.2
84.6
0.2
Do you consider ecology
courses relevant?
93.2
3.5
3.3
Would you be
interested in an ecology
lecture series?
76.8
16.8
6.4
Do you think ecology
courses should be compulsory
Elementary school?
60.5
26.5
13.0
High school?
79.5
15.8
5.7
University?
28.5
55.1
16.4
Are you in favor of
an expanded UBC ecology
program?
79.3
6.6
14.1
courses are desperately needed" to "there is no room for
ecology in our moral society."
Many students expressed concern about the quality
and emphasis of new courses. Other students emphasized
the need for new ecology courses and a series of
well-publicized ecology lectures.
Still other students stated opposition to any
compulsory courses and felt incapable of answering
whether or not expansion of UBC's ecology program
should occur. (However, lack of knowledge of UBC's
ecology course program may mean it isn't large enough.)
A surprising number of students indicated that they didn't
know what ecology is."
Student responses showed the great majority feel
ecology education belongs mainly in the high school. In
high school, ecology could be taught as part of science,
biology, social studies, or guidance. Students at high
school are mature enough to grasp some of the meaningful
concepts of ecology that would benefit the individual and
society in future years.
Many students feel ecology education should become
a part of the already compulsory courses in elementary
school. At this primary stage of learning, significant
ecological impressions could be formed in the student's
mind that would forever enhance his outlook on the
interrelationship of nature and society.
At the university level, ecology should become a
more specific discipline, but must also remain an integral
part of all fields of study. Programs such as engineering,
law, physics, anthropology, geography, commerce and
chemistry should require students to obtain an ecological
understanding pertinent to the field.
New ecology courses are needed immediately at UBC.
The university should feel obligated to provide the
relevant ecology courses students want to take.
Bob Bluman is a second-year science student who
conducted the survey on ecology courses in November.
MORE LETTERS
Bureaucracy
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The bumbling AMS
bureaucracy has me burning with
rage and frustration - so you
must  be my outlet.
On December 6, 1970 I
contracted with the Dental
undergrad society to supply the
band for the DUS ball. At this
time I asked that payment be
made on the night of the ball.
Come the week of the job (Jan.
30) and I was suddenly inundated
with requests for a requisition and
other bureaucratic nonsense. This
was duly sorted out but payment
was not made on the night of the
job. Indeed, it has not been made
at this present date.
There has been complete
silence from the red tape office,
despite visits, protestations and
phone calls. On phoning recently I
discovered that the buck had
finally settled on one Stuart
Bruce, whose excuse was that the
wrong official of the DUS had
signed the contract all those 10
weeks ago. I wonder if they would
ever have bothered to tell me?
I told him I would come and
give him the contract copies to
sign or whatever and arrived half
an hour later at noon to find that
he had gone to lunch and would
be back at 3, maybe. Hence, my
rage.
The sad thing is that one
member of my band has hit
financial disaster because the
money has not come through in
the normal time.
This letter, of course, will have
little effect, but perhaps it may
cause a tremor_ in the teeny brains
of the incompetent red tape
spewers.
DOUGLAS GRAHAM
Homosexuals
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I am a homosexual and I am
proud of it. I found Jim Davies'
shaggy dog story that ended,
"Thay, you're even thweeter
looking than the latht one" in
extremely poor taste.
Queer jokes only help to
reinforce the incorrect stereotype
PIMPLES
Ugly skin blemishes on face or body,
Eczema, Pimples, Red Scaly Itching
Skin and Athlete's Foot are quickly
relieved by NIXODERM. Antiseptic
action heals, helps make skin softer,
smoother, clearer. Ask your druggist
for NIXODERM ointment and soap.
Help clean, clear and revitalize your
skin. Look better fast.
image of us limp-wristed, lisping
hairdressers who arrange flowers
for a hobby, read romantic poetry
and are active in the women's
liberation movement.
If Mr. Davies is so sure this
stereotype is correct, I dare him
to meet all 6 foot 3 of me in a
dark alley some night. And should
I bash his "brains" out, I won't be
doing it with my purse.
ROEDY GREEN
Computer Science
RED CROSS SERUM CLINIC
THIS THURS. — MARCH 4
10-4        SUB 205
•
All Donors Welcome
Fan mail
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
How dare the bumbling idiots
of our present Alma Mater
Society executive attempt at
firing you, one of the few people
on this campus who can present
the issues the way they are and
isn't afraid of having an opinion.
I challenge the bureaucratic
know-it-alls to examine their own
relevance.
 RAYMOND WINCHESTER
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681-1825 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1971
Behind the Mo
I
.n the inevitable colonial-minded
comparison, the trial was billed as a sequel
to that of the Chicago Seven.
Its principals were quickly dubbed the
Montreal Five, or in the press, simply "Les
Cinq".
That it never quite lived up to its
advance billing was due largely to the fact
that judge Roger Ouimet is not Julius
Hoffman. He is enough of a political
strategist to know when to cut his losses.
Both Ouimet and the five staged their
parts in the trial carefully. Moves were
made almost exclusively for the benefit of
the galleries — the audience in the
courtroom and the thousands more who
read about the trial in the newspapers. And
in the two weeks until Ouimet quashed the
charges against them, the galleries were
clearly on the side of the accused.
It was this public sympathy for the five
that led Ouimet, in the trial's most
dramatic moment, to expel the public from
the courtroom on the fifth day of the
proceedings. There had been no disorderly
demonstrations, but the gallery, which
ranged in size from fifty people to well
over a hundred, consisted primarily of
friends and sympathizers of the accused,
along with some who merely wanted to see
what was going on.
It made an appreciative audience for the
five, applauding their attacks on the judge,
laughing at Michel Chartrand's earthy
jokes.
M
.any of the spectators had also
taken to visiting the prisoner's dock to
talk with the accused during recesses. But
on the morning of Friday, February 5,
special crown prosecutor Gabriel Lapointe
decided to object to this practice.
Chartrand was on his feet immediately,
asking: "Would you be, by any chance, a
police officer? No lousy guy like you is
going to tell me what to do!"
At this point Ouimet decided to adjourn
for lunch.
After lunch, Ouimet announced that he
was upholding the crown's request, but
Co-accused Pierre Vallieres objected to the
decision, arguing that it would be denying
his right to a full defence not to allow him
to speak to people who might be able to
help him. He added that the crown had
made its request with the sole purpose of
"giving shit to the accused."
Judge Ouimet commented that the
word "shit" was not a "parliamentary
word", setting Vallieres up for the retort
that "be that as it may, prime minister
Trudeau said it to the Lapalme drivers —
and be that as it may, he gives shit to all
Quebecois."
It was at this point that Ouimet
expelled the public, and with his
unexpected move turned the orderly court
into chaos. Some of the spectators left,
others remained in their seats, • and the
policemen in the room were soon
reinforced by a detachment of about
twenty more, whereupon the court was
forcibly cleared.
In the midst of all this, one of the
policemen announced that the court was
adjourned until Monday morning.
Although many of the lawyers, reporters,
and accused who remained were a bit taken
aback at the spectacle of a policeman
adjourning the court, it was obvious that
he meant business. They began to leave,
among them Jacques Larue-Langlois, the
only one of the five who was .free on bail.
But some of the reporters who had not
yet left noticed the crown prosecutors
were reassembling at their table. Then
Ouimet returned to his bench. Everyone
else except for fifteen reporters and
thirteen policemen was denied admission
to the courtroom.
w
WW hen the court reconvened Ouimet said he had the decision to
expel the public during the lunch break. He
had been doing some thinking, he said, and
he thought it would be impossible to
preserve order and dignity in the court
with the kind of audience that had been
present.
Chartrand replied that "a trial without
the public is a dirty trial."
"If you proceed without the public,
you're going to lose me as an accused," he
proclaimed.
Ouimet said that he would indeed
proceed without the public. Chartrand
promptly gathered up his papers and went
back to his cell, followed by his three
co-accused (Larue-Langlois had not
returned). Then Ouimet, with no other
choice, adjourned until Monday.
That was one side of Roger Ouimet, and
it was one that was seen frequently:
Ouimet sentencing Chartrand to a year for
contempt of court; Ouimet's remarks to
the jury in the case of the young Come
Leblanc, in which he cited passages from
books by Che Guevara and Carlos
Marighela found at the home of the
Cormier brothers, friends of the accused, as
evidence that Leblanc was a member of the
Front de Liberation du Quebec. (He added
gratuitously, that jurors were not bound to
take account of his remarks on questions
of fact, only on questions of law); Ouimet
turning down request after request by the
five, and refusing to withdraw from their
case.
But he had another side as well. Roger
Ouimet is a man of considerable legal and
political skill. And in the five he had found
worthy adversaries. If the trial sometimes
resembled a theatre piece, if it sometimes
resembled a gigantic press conference for
the five, it also sometimes resembled a
debate. On the very first day, Ouimet and
Vallieres launched into a thirty-minute
discussion of the judge's background in
politics.
Was it not true, Vallieres wanted to
know, that Ouimet had been active in the
Liberal party for many years, even running
as a candidate in a provincial election,
before being appointed a judge? Was it not
true that he had made public statements
explicitly opposing the independence of
Quebec?
Yes, Ouimet admitted, it was true. But
he did not think that having been a
member of a political party should
disqualify someone from being a judge.
And he did not see anything wrong in using
By Last Tuesday, March 2, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
ttreal theatrics
in
his position to do his bit foi the promotion
of Canadian unity. As a judge, he said, he
interpreted the laws impartially. Vallieres
insisted on the political nature of the
charge, seditious conspiracy, that had
brought the five before the courts. Ouimet
insisted on his ability to be impartial.
Y
.ou will see how impartial I can be,"
he told the accused a few days later when
he refused their request that he withdraw
from their case.
He may have been hinting even then at
the action he eventually took to end the
trial. It would not be out of character for
Ouimet to have planned it that way along.
In quashing the charges he was also getting
himself out of a difficult legal situation, for
behind the theatrics, the five had presented
impeccable legal arguments.
They had both logic and precedent on
their side.
In a long presentation, co-accused
Charles Gagnon argued that a charge had to
fulfill two critieria: It had to give the
nature of the specific crime of which the
defendant was accused and it had to
contain the necessary details so that the
defendant could know what precise action
of his was being talked about.
He said the charge against the five, that
they had "taken part in a seditious
conspiracy between January 1, 1968, and
October 16, 1970, in advocating the use of
force for a governmental change in Canada
and more specifically in Quebec," did not
meet these criteria.
"We don't know what we conspired to
do, or where and when we conspired to do
it. Are we accused of having conspired to
form an army, to carry out a coup d'etat in
Quebec City, in Toronto, or in Ottawa, to
foment a riot? The charge doesn't say, we
don't know, and the crown doesn't seem to
know," Gagnon said.
Jin his judgment, Ouimet substantially
agreed with Gagnon. He cited a 1936
conspiracy case that had been thrown out
because the charges weren't specific
enough.
Thus, he had several choices. He could
amend the charges, or he could adjourn the
court. However, he didn't think it would
be possible, "even with a feverish effort of
the imagination," to correct the weakness
in the charges. Therefore, he was quashing
them.
In so doing, he was acting in accordance
with political as well as legal reality. But
for all his skill, Ouimet had come off
second best. Gagnon's quiet legal
arguments, Vallieres' insults, Chartrand's
ribald interventions had all had their effect.
(Chartrand repeatedly complained of the
"torture" inflicted on him in keeping him
away from his wife for four months.)
"It's all right for them," he would say,
pointing to his fellow accused, "they're
young men. But I don't have much time
left."
After Ouimet's decision, the five
remained in their cells for a few days (all
five still face charges of membership in the
FLQ and Vallieres is also charged with
uttering seditious words).
Then Chartrand and Robert Lemieux
were granted bail. Chartrand told reporters
that "the first thing I'm going to do is
make love."
In another turnabout, Ouimet denied
bail to Vallieres and Gagnon, citing the
need to "protect the public."
With that out of the way, the five were
off the front pages, temporarily at least,
for the first time in weeks.
The trial of the five was highly
extraordinary, but it was part of a curious
pattern that has begun to emerge.
I
n 1966, Vallieres, Gagnon, and others
had been arrested and charged with
murder, armed robbery, and other crimes
arising out of their participation in the
FLQ of the day. The principal evidence
against them was the alleged confession of
one Serge Demers.
On the witness stand, Demers denied
large parts of the confession, maintaining
that he had made it under duress. As a
result, he was charged with nineteen counts
of perjury. Thirteen of the perjury charges
were dropped at Demers' preliminary
hearing in February, 1970.
In February, 1971, the crown decided
not to proceed with the other six.
At the same time, the crown dropped
the charges against Richard Bouchoux, also
accused of 1966 FLQ activity. Rumors
circulated that the 1966 charges against
Vallieres and Gagnon would be dropped as
well. They had already been acquitted on
several charges and were awaiting appeal on
others.
In the fall of 1969, Remi Paul, justice
minister in the Union Nationale
government of Quebec, discovered the
sedition clause in the criminal code and
decided to use it against the people he
considered politically dangerous. A year
and a half later, none of Paul's sedition
charges has been proved.
In the fall of 1970, the provincial
police, under the protection of the War
Measures Act, supplied the government
with several hundred political prisoners.
The government played its part by bringing
charges against some of them, and letting
the others go.
But when the prisoners actually came to
trial, the charges turned out to be almost
comically weak.
Nineteen-year-old Robert Langvin was
accused of seditious libel on the basis of a
copybook to which he had confided his.
adolescent dreams. Twenty-two-year-old.
Come Leblanc was alleged to be a member
of the FLQ because he was unemployed,
because he wore a red, white and green
patriote tie, and because he often discussed
politics.
And when it came to the seditious
conspiracy charges against the five, Roger
Ouimet preferred the crown not even
attempt to present a proof.
The trial of the five, like the trial of
Paul Rose, has been another demonstration
of the fact that the best way to become a
hero in Quebec is to defy the courts. It is
hardly surprising that the prestige of the
legal system is at such a low ebb.
>st Staff Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1971
Bell, MB, Alcan in UBC portfolio
Stock holdings as of Jan. 8 included:
Bell Telephones    $262,000
Simpsons   223,000
RCA     101,000
General Motors     272,000
MacMillan Bloedel    237,000
Imperial Oil    271,000
Phillips Pet  124,000
Alcan  328,000
Total stock holdings as of the above date amounted to
$6,740,000.
In addition to these investments, there is currently $7 million in
the University's pension fund for faculty and staff members.
Since he gave up on attempting to find out exact data on UBC's
investments, Smolensky has made a motion to Senate to, in essence,
buy only Canadian stocks and rid its portfolio of foreign holdings.
from page One
In a letter dated January 8, White wrote: "... my concern in
respect to indiscriminate circulation of the investment portfolio of the
university is one of cost inn terms of use of materials, facilities and staff
time."
Smolensky quashed this objection, telling White that UBC's
information office could handle the matter easily and failing that, that
The Ubyssey had consented to print the portfolio in one of its editions.
However, these helpful suggestions led to the same final answer —
up-to-date copies of the fund's intricacies would not be made available.
Oddly enough, copies of the university's investment portfolio are
circulated freely to all of the major stock brokerage firms in the city.
"I don't know what the university has to hide," Smolensky told
The Ubyssey Monday.
"However," he added, "it just could be that there is a large
portfolio of non-Canadian stocks that they don't want to talk about."
This could possibly be the case, for as of March 31, 1970,
university records show holdings of slightly less than three-quarters of a
million dollars worth of American stocks including: General Motors
($272,000), Phillips Petroleum ($125,000), RCA ($102,000), American
Can $116,000) and Bendix ($103,000).
As of January 8, a superficial investigation of the endowment
fund showed about $26 million in UBC's coffers. Of this,
approximately $19 million was in bonds and $7 million in capital
stocks.
Significant bond holdings included $2.4 million is various
provincial issues, $3.9 million in provincial government guarantees such
as B.C. Hydro and Alberta Government Telephones, $1.1 million in
Government of Canada bonds, $1,725,000 in B.C. municipal bonds,
$1.2 million in school, hospital, and water district bonds, and $500,000
in International Bank holdings.
Corporate bonds represented a significant percentage of the bond
portfolio, including such diverse holdings as $1.5 million in the Alma
Mater Society to $125,000 in Gulf Oil bond issues.
Jobs for all students
from page One
"Another problem with this
project is the student from last
year who, because of the poor
economic situation last summer,
dropped out of school and is not
now a student and cannot apply
for these jobs," Hodge said.
Loffmark, in a letter to Hodge
and other B.C. student society
presidents two weeks ago wanted
to   know   the   feeling   of   the
students in B.C. on government
hiring of students and asked
Hodge and others to come to
Victoria.
Hodge said that applications
for summer jobs will be accepted
by the university placement
office.
Bring kites, lunches to protest
from page One
old national defense site, as it is
still unknown how many of the
present buildings will be cleared
away by the federal government
or how long the clearance will
take.
A one-day peace festival on
Locarno Park Extension has been
planned for Sunday by a group of
people protesting the destruction
of that park when road
construction begins.
Group spokesman Barbara
Reich urges all people concerned
about the destruction of the park
to come out at noon with picnic
lunches and kites.
She said a tape recording of
Granville Street traffic
overdubbed with sounds of waves
crashing   at   the   beach   will   be
played as a simulation of the
noises area residents will hear
when the road is completed.
The group hopes to have Sun
columnist Bob Hunter, former
Society for Pollution and
Environmental Control president
UBC prof Robin Harger ana
Georgia Straight columnist and
ecologist Irvin Stowe as guest
speakers.
The festival preceeds by one
day a meeting of the parks board
at which Locarno Park Extension
will be signed over to the city.
The signing over of the park to
the city is necessary before the
city can authorize destruction of
it for the building of Jericho
Road.
However, Robertson said the
city will be gaining 4.6 acres of
park land by the building of the
road.
The 3.8 acre park will be
destroyed by the construction of
the road and subsequent rezoning
to townhouses and garden
apartments.
However, the nine houses
adjoining the park at the 4400
block of Marine Drive and
Belmont Street will be destroyed
for the construction of an 8.4 acre
man-made park, in keeping with
the parks board regulation that
every square mile of residential
land have at least one
neighborhood park for the area
residents' use.
"Losing 3.8 acres to gain 8.4 is
pretty sound mathematics to me,"
Robertson said.
LOW FARE FLIGHT
TO LONDON, ' ENGLAND
Departing Vancouver June 26,1971
Returning Vancouver August 13,1971
:* A LIMITED NUMBER OF SEATS AVAILABLE    »
FOR UBC FACULTY AND STUDENTS
S (and immediate family) :£
Cost: $306.00 return
IF INTERESTED CONTACT:
Education-Extension Programs,
UBC Center for Continuing Education,
Chancellor Boulevard, Campus. 228-2181
or
Worldwide International Travel,
University Boulevard. 224-4391
*Air Canada flight has been arranged in conjunction with several
credit courses to be located in England and on the Continent,
Summer, 1971.
APPLY RI<|HT AWAY
HILLELPRESENTS
ERWIN
J0SPE
One of that small handful of musicians
who can speak as well as make music.
Dean of the School of Fine Arts,
University of Judaism, he is a brilliant
pianist and conductor and an authority
on Jewish music. He brings his serious
concerns a touch of humor and a unique
gift for communicating the joy of music.
In a recital lecture on:
FOLK MUSIC
as a mirror of Jewish history
•
Thursday, March   4
12:30 p.m.
in SUB Ballroom
Open to all students without charge
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
HAPPENING
Wed. 12:35-1 p.m.
Noon
David Lloyd & Roger Gosselin
sketching and painting in the
lounge, followed by The Supper in
the Chapel.
"JESUS, THE GREAT MEEK"
■I
Life's a
picnic
for some
They're always ready for fun.
And somehow, fun just seems to
happen wherever they are. People love to be where they are too.
How about you? Can you enjoy yourself with others any day
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can help.
Internally worn Tampax tampons can help keep you feeling fresh and comfortable, right
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Easy, to use too, even the first
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The silken-smooth container-
applicator makes insertion comfortable and correct. And once
properly in place, Tampax tampons can't be felt. So there's
nothing to remind you, or your
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BARRIE.   ONTARIO Tuesday, March 2, -1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
fixin1   to
By THOM WESCOTT
PART SIXTEEN
One year to the day after I went into the Marine
Corps the lieutenant said to me, "Go find Sergeant
Kneeland, we're going out on an operation in half an
hour."
I found Sergeant Kneeland sitting in his shorts by the
river, washing his socks. When 1 told him about the
operation all he said was something about being glad he
wouldn't have to clean up the office that afternoon after
all.
We got back to the office just in time to stick two
meals of C-rations in our packs, grab our rifles and head
out on the road. It was just going to be a day and half
long and we didn't expect to meet any action, so they
told me save weight and only carry five magazines, which
was ninety shots.
When we got back I would be carrying thirty loaded
magazines, twice that amount of ammunition unloaded
and twenty hand grenades.
The whole thing was being done because the colonel,
who had been with us for four months and was leaving the
next week or so had never commanded a unit in the field.
He wanted some battletime in his record book before he
went back to a permanent desk job in Washington, or
more likely Kansas City.
We were going to walk about eight miles down the
road, bomb a hill and then walk over it and look for
bodies. There were only one or two reports of enemy
activity in that area. I think I faked them one day when
there was nothing to report in the daily briefing.
We walked all afternoon, sometimes along the road
and sometimes wandering through huge stretches of rice
paddies. We stopped as soon as it got dark and camped
that night beside a deserted concrete farmhouse. It was
the most beautiful night I can remember spending in Viet
Nam.
The next morning we got up at sunrise and an hour
later walked another half mile down the road to where we
were going to sit and watch the planes bomb the hill.
Since I was acting as intelligence clerk I sat down with the
command group beside the road and had a leisurely
second breakfast from the scraps of the last two meals.
After I finished breakfast the lieutenant decided it
wasn't too good having a lot of people sitting around
doing nothing. He was right. If the colonel hadn't been so
excited making sure the artillery he had called in at the
last minute didn't shoot down the planes who were
supposed to be there, he would have had us picking up
paper or practicing close order drill.
Anyway, the lieutnant decided it would be a good
idea if I ran off and played cowboys and Indians or
whatever with the rest of the intelligence section on the
hill behind us. We walked over the top of the hill and
spent a pleasant morning talking with the villagers on the
other side.
After the whole thing was over all we had got was
about 15 per cent of our own men collapsed from heat
because the colonel had pushed his companies too hard.
When the helicopters came in to bring us another
day's worth of rations and take out our heat casualties
they mentioned that the Army, who had a sector about
seven miles down the road, was in trouble. Our colonel
voluntered us to help out.
It turned out that that battle, the battle of Que Son,
was about the worst fighting in the northern quarter of
Viet Nam for the whole year. I remember reading later
that the photographer who took the picture of the Saigon
police chief shooting the Viet Cong suspect died when his
helicopter crashed about five miles from us.
One of the beautiful things about the human mind is
its ability to forget. I could never remember how the next
four days went from one to the other, just snatches here
and there.
Lying in the bottom of the valley while the army base
and Viet Cong mortar crew fought a duel over our heads
— waking up at five in the morning with enemy grenades
going off twenty yards away while twenty-two Marine
Corps officers lay scared stiff - throwing grenades
through the trees only to have them bounce back ten feet
in front of the rock you're hiding behind.
Invisible men fifteen yards away shooting at you
while you hide behind a tuft of grass - jets dropping
napalm on the invisible men from tree-top level — napalm
splashing around your tuft of grass.
Men carrying chunks of meat back on ponchos to
send back to parents and wives — a boot, blown open by a
mortar, that landed six inches away.
When they counted it up later there were 60 men
dead, about 200 wounded for life and sent back home and
enough minor wounds and heat casualties to bring the
total up to half our battalion. ^^ ^ ^^^^
T-Bird stadium's roof is crumbling
The Thunderbird Winter Sports
Center addition will get a new
roof, eventually.
In January, faults were
discovered in four of the 11 cross
beams covering the No. 2 ice rink,
and the arena was closed. Because
no beams over No. 1 rink showed
cracks, it was hoped that it could
soon be re-opened.
But a test was made to
determine whether the rest' of
the beams were also faulty. One
of the cross beams over No. 1 rink
was weighted down, under an
architect's supervision, and it
subsequently cracked.
"Because of this test, we have
to consider all the beams as not
being suitable," Neville Smith,
maintenance supervisor of
Physical Plant, said.
"We are expecting a report
investigating the cause of the
beam failures very soon," Smith
said.
When the report is received,
the roof will be redesigned.
"We    can    either    build    a
supplementary support structure
"or  we  can  build  a whole new
roof," Smith said.
The   beam   failure   will   also
involve a lengthy process to
determine financial responsibility
for the re-roofing and also for the
present loss of revenue, estimated
at about $500 per day.
"I hope the roof goes on while
the ' finances are worked out,"
Stan Floyd, Winter Sports Center
general manager said.
The old rink is presently being
used 24 hours a day, seven days a
week.
"We even have a waiting list for
the wee small hours in the
morning," Floyd said.
"We have had to set priorities
according to the number of
students participating."
"The Thunderbirds are given
first priority, then public skating,
because of the high number of
students participating.
Once construction is started,
the roof can be put on in a hurry.
The process leading up to actual
construction, however, may take
a long time.
•EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY-
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
Existing abortion laws
'hardly satisfy anyone'
OTTAWA (CUP) - Canada's abortion laws are for the rich. Poor
women are forced to continue unwanted pregnancies.
Senator William Bendickson told the senate Wednesday
(Feb. 24) that, under the complexities of the law, it is almost a miracle
when a woman can manoeuvre herself into a legal abortion during the
first three months of pregnancy, the only period when it is considered
safe (or legal).
Changes in the Criminal Code abortion section two years ago
provide that a hospital committee of doctors, may, on the
recommendation of the woman's doctor and psychiatrist, grant
permission for a legal abortion if her health is in danger.
Speaking during a debate on the report of the Royal Commission
on the Status of Women, which recommends abortion on demand, the
Liberal Ontario senator said the existing law hardly satisfied anyone.
It has created false hopes and left doctors in the dark about the
intentions of the government, he said.
Tiansar Crafts
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4m. avenue
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
HAPPENING
Wed. 12:35-1 p.m.
Noon
David Lloyd & Roger Gosselin
sketching and painting in the
lounge, followed by The Supper in
the Chapel.
"JESUS, THE GREAT MEEK"
New York
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
Single and Double-Breasted
Tuxedos and Dinner Jackets
Black and Colored
Flare or Straight Pants
Up-to-Date Accessories
SPECIAL  STUDENT RATES
224-0034    4397 W. 10th
FREESEE!
Thurs. March 4, 12:30 p.m. "Ladies and Gentlemen ...
Mr. Leonard Cohen."
Thurs. March 11,12:30 p.m. "Occupation."
McGill students protest to have more say in who teaches
them.
Wed. March 24,12:30 p.m. "This Land."
Nishga  Indians of Northern  B.C. led by  Frank Calder,
M.L.A., challenge the white man.
(Sponsored by the Dean of Women's Office)
FREE!
SUB AUDITORIUM
COME IN TODAY
Do You Know Ml ihe Answers
INCOME TAX
Chance* ore that yen still hove COMPLETE fll
doubts  even  after  dropping A
yaw return  id the  mailbox. RETURNS
You can erase these doubts
with  a  trip  to yoor  ntorby
HOCK office. This year, be
confident.
GUARANTEE j
We guarantee accurate preparation of every tax return. If
we make any errors that cost you any penalty or inttrest,
we will pay the penalty or interest.	
HR
LTD.
(CANADA) LTD.
Canada's Largest Tax Service
With Over 5000 Offices in North America
3171 WEST BROADWAY
3716 OAK ST
3519 E HASTINGS
 c
6395 FRASER
1685 DAVIE ST
3397 KINGSWAY
WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M. SAT. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.-327-0461
I NO APPOINTMENTS NECESSARY'! Page   10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1971
TUESDAY
CUSQ
Meeting in International House 402 at
7:30  p.m.
PSYCH   CLUB
Meeting in Angus 24 at noon
PROGRAM   IN   COMPARATIVE
LITERATURE
Speaker Josef Skvorecky, "Contemporary Czechoslovakia", Buch 102 at
noon
'tween
classes
CANOE  CLUB
Meeting in SUB 117 at noon
ZEN   CENTRE
Meeting at 8 p.m. in Buch 100
WOMEN'S   LIBERATION   ALLIANCE
Mteeting at 7:30 p.m.   at 1776 Alberni
Street
PREGNANCY
LAB. TEST
PORTE'S
UPTOWN PHARMACY
Granville at 14th Tel.: 738-3107
CAMPUS   CRUSADE   FOR   CHRIST
"A    Christian   View    of   Ecology"    in
Buch Lounge at 8 p.m.
NEWMAN   CLUB
Meeting in SUB 115 at noon
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Safety   Seminar   in   Clubs   Lounge
Tuesday to Friday at 7:30 p.m.
SAILING   CLUB
Film "Admiral's Cup" in Buch 104 at
noon
FINE  ARTS GALLERY
Loech Collection opens at 10:30-5 p.m.
PRE-MED   SOC
Meeting in Wesb 201 at noon
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT  WIVES
Meeting for next year exec, at 8 p.m.
in Cecil Green Park
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Meeting in Sub 115 at noon
T-BIRD  WARGAMERS
Wed. & Thur. in Sub 119 at noon
THURSDAY
UBC   LIBERALS
Meeting in SUB 115 at noon
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Meeting in SUB 111 at noon
CAMPUS   CRUSADE   FOR   CHRIST
"One Way Club" at noon in SUB 117
DEAN   OF   WOMEN'S   OFFICE
Film "Ladies and Gentlemen . . . Mr.
Leonard Cohen" in SUB Auditorium
at   noon, free
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Meeting in SUB 207-209 at noon
NFTU
Meeting in Buch 202 at noon
FILM SOC
Meeting in Old Auditorium at noon
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Film  "Billion  Dollar Brain"  in  Buch
104 at noon and 7:30
PRE-MED   SOC
Meeting in front of Wesb 100 for field
trip  to St. Paul's at noon
FRIDAY
CAMPUS CHORAL GROUPS
Meeting to hear Doukhobour Group In
SUB Aud. at noon
VARSITY   CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Dramatic Presentation in SUB Clubs
Lounge at noon
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Meeting in SUB 101B  at noon
MISCELLANEOUS
LEGAL AID
Mon..  Wed.
at noon
Fri.,  in  SUB 228  & 232
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
Meeting in Buch 232 at noon
PATIft
EAT IN .TAKEOUT* DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
. Anglican United Campus Ministry
Simulation Game in Urban Life
Celebrate - Unwind
Friday Eve. through Sunday noon
March 12-14
Camp Capilano (in Capilano Canyon Park)
contact Peter Fribley - 224-4193 or
Lutheran Centre - 224-1614
Sd&
arsity Sports
4510 W. 10 Ave.   C6l"ltr6   Ltd.     224-6414
ANNOUNCES THEIR
SECOND ANNUAL STOCK CLEARANCE
SALE
Clearance on
SKIS
Wood
Metal
Fibreglas
Gresvig
Rossignol
Atomic
Ski Boots
Le Trappeur
Heschung
La Dolomite
Ski Jackets from 12.95        Ski Pants from 76.95
Savings on Gloves—Mitts—Touques—Goggles etc.
Also Reduced
Hungarian Training Shoes — Ice Skates — Hockey Equipment — Golf Clubs
Golf Balls — Badminton Racquets — Tennis Racquets and More!
Open 9-6 and till 9 p.m. Thursday and Friday
ALL SALES FINAL
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, ! day $1.00; 2 days $1.75.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before
publication.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost ft Found
13
$25    REWARRD    FOR    INFORMA-
tion    leading-    to    return    of    wall
plaque   stolen   from   5780   Toronto
Road.   Ph.  224-9841.
Rides ft Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
FREE VACATION-STAY PLAN
USA  -  Canada  -  Europe  -  etc.
"FOR   STUDENTS   ONLY"
Discover how qualified, responsible
people are saving hundreds of $$$$$
while widening their vacation
worlds. Details on request. Write:
Student Vacation Registry, Box 73,
Station 'N' Toronto 14, Ontario.
T-BIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Dirt Meet, March 7 at 12:30 on
field between T-Bird Stadium and
Marine Drive. Dirt bikes and
street sramblers welcome. 50c
entry fee. Spectators welcome.
STUDENT DOUKHOBOUR
CHOIR
From Castlegar
At  SUB  AUDITORIUM,  12:30
FRI.,  MARCH  5
Prugram: Folksongs and Hymns
In Russian and English
Travel Opportunities
16
INTERNATIONAL   CHARTERS
687-2855 224-0087 687-1244
List of 1971 return 1-way & relative flights U.K., Continent, India,
Africa,  Hong Kong.
106—709 Dunsmuir St., Van.  1,  B.C.
SUMMER WORK IN SWISS ALPS
for room & board. Kitchen & farm
help. (M & F). 266-5246 for details.
TRAVELLING OVERSEAS ON A
BUDGET?
Then visit your Youth Hostels information desk which is open every
Wednesday from 12:30-1:30 p.m. opposite the information desk in the
Students Union Building.
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway
Vancouver 9,  B.C. Tel.  738-3128
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 HEALEY 3000 H.T.-O.D. GOOD
condition, new wheels, 224-4278.
Offers?
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—-Parts
23
Motorcycles
25
1969 NORTON COMMANDO 750,
extended 12", frame painted, Triumph pipes, 2500 mi. Phone Larry,
731-9792. Immaculate.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Day Care ft Baby Sitting    32A
Photography
34
Scandals
37
Typewriters ft Repairs 39
Typing
40
NORTH VANCOUVER. WILL
type your thesis or manuscript.
Experienced — reasonable rates.
Phone  988-5420.
RETIRED PUBLISHER WILL
edit and correct manuscripts, essays, etc. Reasonable rate, 228-
8259.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Reas. rates. 10:00
a.m. to 9:00 p.m., phone 738-6829.
Quick service on short essays.
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED ESSAY AND
thesis typist. Electric typewriter.
Mrs.   Ann  Treacy.   738-8794.	
— AMS TYPING SERVICE —
30c  per   page   with   1   day   service.
12:30   -  1:30   in   SUB  Co-ordinator's
office weekdays,  879-0095.  Evenings
and weekends.
 — SEE US FIRST! —
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, thesis. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.	
EXP. TYPIST WITH THESIS,
will type my home. No hand written essays please. Vic. P.N.E.
Phone Rosie at 255-8853.	
TYPING—ESSAYS, THESIS, ETC.
Phone Mrs. Brown, 732-0047.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION -
al Typing Service. IBM Selectric
— Days, Evenings, Weekends.
Phone 228-9304 — 30c per page.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
! .'GO FISHING THIS SPRING!! GET
"How to get jobs on Fishing Boats
and Deep-sea Freighters in B.C."
Send $2 to Ken Erickson, 1053-A
Barclay St., Van. 5. Satisfaction
or money back.
INSTRUCTION ft SCHOOLS
Instruction Wanted
61
Music Instruction
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
WILL TUTOR MATH 100 & 101,
day, evening, or Sat. Reasonable
rates. Phone 733-3544—10 a.m. to
3 p.m.	
FRENCH TUTORING, TRANSLA-
tion into French, experienced
Parisian teacher. 682-3517. Alain
Neumand  (804),  1949 Barclay St.
GERMAN TUTORING: CONVER-
sation & Grammar, by qualified
ex-University Teacher, Native-
Speaker, Group & Quantity Dis-
counts.   Eves.:   731-0156.	
AVOID PRE-EXAM PANIC. GET
help now. UBC Tutoring Centre
has qualified tutors in over 50
subject areas.Register at SUB
100B, 228-4583, 12-2 p.m. daily.
$3.00/hour.	
NEED HELP IN FRENCH CON-
versation? I also do bilingual typing (French) and translations.
Contact: Danielle Schmid. Tel. 253-
8075.	
MATH TUTOR — B.Sc. (MATH)
will tutor at reasonable rates.
Phone in  p.m.,  685-8713.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FISCHER SKIS; MEN'S BOOTS —
10; lady's boots — 10%; lady's
skipants—size 14. Mary—228-2404,
9-4.  Mon. - Fri.
BIRD CALLS
Your Student Telephone Directory
NOW HALF PRICE - 50c
at the Bookstore, Thunderbird Shop
and AMS Publications Office
RESERVE AUCTION
Damaged chairs. Inspect SUB Room
236. Bids close noon, March 15.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MALE STUDENT, COSY ROOM.
Sep. entrance, share bathroom $45
mpnth. 3945 Puget, Vancouver,
733-0462.	
ROOM IN PRIVATE HOUSE. KIT-
chen privileges. Non smoker. 872-
5895.
Room ft Board
12
Furnished Apts.
83
ROOM FOR RENT IN COOPERA-
tive Apartment. Single or couple.
$40 mo. plus utilities. Phone 732-
0481.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. ft Unfurn.      86
FEMALE GRAD STUDENT
wishes same to share cozy furnished house immediately. Near
campus, $65. 228-9504.	
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY —
private room sharing house with
three others, 2652 W 3rd Ave.
Phone 732-0454. Tuesday, March 2, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Birds win two-advance to finals
Winners on Friday
By STEVE MILLARD
The University of B.C. Thunderbirds
took the opening game in the best-of-three
Western Canada Collegiate semi-final
trouncing the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs 9-1 Friday at Thunderbird
Arena.
Barry Wilcox and Doug Buchanan paced
the 'Birds with two goals and two assists,
while Bob MacAneely added two goals and
an assist. Laurie Vanzella, Norm Park and
Brian Debasio managed singles.
Frank Richardson scored for Calgary.
UBC led 2-1 after the first period, but
only through the excellent goal-tending of
Ian Wilkie. He made 13 saves, many of
them great, to keep the Dinosaurs off the
score-board until the 18-minute mark.
Thunderbirds blew the game wide open
with five goals in the second period, even
though Rich Longpre missed connecting on
a rarely awarded penalty shot.
...losers Saturday
University of Calgary Dinosaurs took
advantage of defensive errors by the
University of B.C. Thunderbirds to force a
third game in the best-of-three Western
Canada Collegiate semi-finals.
The Dinosaurs posted a 4-3 win
Saturday at Thunderbird Arena.
A standing-room crowd of 1,600 saw
Frank Richardson, Terry Brown, Barry
Sawchuck and Bob Toner score for
Calgary. Tom Williamson, Rob Trenaman
and Norm Park replied for UBC.
Ian Wilkie stood out in goal for the
losers. He had no chance on the shots that
beat him.
Cheap penalties hurt the 'Birds also.
...finalists Sunday
You can't blame the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs if they refuse to believe
that Bob MacAneely played hockey
Sunday with a cast protecting a cracked
bone in one arm.
Despite his handicap, the University of
B.C. Thunderbird centre fired three goals
and added three assists as the 'Birds beat
the Dinnies 7-4 Sunday at Thunderbird
Arena.
UBC wins the best-of-three Western
Canada Collegiate semi-final series 2-1 and
advances to the league final in Winnipeg
next weekend against the University of
Manitoba.
Although the injury took most of the
power away from his shot and didn't allow
him to take face-offs, MacAneely didn't
lose any of what 'Bird coach Bob
Hindmarch calls, "MacAneely's
tremendous puck sense,"
MacAneely's first goal tied the score 1-1
in the first period. Using the Calgary
defence as a screen, he manoeuvred in
front of the net and floated a 20-foot shot
to score.
His other two goals were tips-ins of
shots from the point - a specialty that
helped the centre win the league scoring
title.
MacAneely also set up goals by Barry
Wilcox, Norm Park and Doug Buchanan.
Tom Williamson notched UBC's other
goal.
Hindmarch had praise for the defensive
work turned in by his scoring star and
linemates Doug Buhr and Park.
"They kept the Richardson line (Frank
and Steve, with Bob Toner) in check all
game." Frank especially was subdued
Sunday. The Dinnie scoring leader usually
waves his stick in the opposition's faces
and generally is a pain in the ass. But
messing with Buhr is a different matter.
Last week in Calgary, Frank speared Buhr
to touch off a benches-emptying brawl.
Ian Wilkie continued his hot play in the
UBC nets. He stopped two breakaways and
made several great saves on deflections.
DOUG BUCHANAN
... 2 goals with 2 assists
Defenceman Laurie Vanzella played his
best game of the season for the 'Birds
Sunday. He picked up three assists to go
with a strong checking game.
But the whole team played well. The
only thing they could be faulted on is the
bad habit of picking up cheap penalties.
So now it's off to Winnipeg and the
finals ... something the 'Birds haven't
reached since Father Bauer had the nucleus
of the Canadian National team at UBC.
Hoop Birds fail in title bid
SPOR TS
It was a losing weekend for the
University of B.C. Thunderbird
basketball team. They were
playing in the Western Canada
Intercollegiate Athletic
Association finals, but came out
losers all round.
After having to fight a home
court advantage held by their
rivals, the Manitoba Bisons, they
also discovered that they had to
fight the prairie officiating as well.
Birds were defeated at both.
On Friday night the
Thunderbirds were beaten by a
75-66 score. Manitoba's Bob
Town led all scorers with 28
points, while Ross Wedlake and
Angus Burr added 15 a piece.
For the Birds Jack Hoy was the
top scorer with 23. He was
followed by Derek Sankey, who
notched 18.
Saturday's   game   was   much
Intramurals
Position's Available for Men's Intramurals — applications are now being
accepted for the following positions in
the Men's Intramural Executive: Director, Assistant director, Referee-in-chief,
Assistant referee-in-chief, and Publicity
Director. Written applications stating
position sought, year, course work, and
qualifications should be directed to the
following before March 5, 1971:
Mr. N. KorchLnsky
School of PE and Recreation
War Memorial Gym
UBC
1 Mile  Walk—the  results  are   as follows:  Per AmUe, Forestry;  BUI Dision,
Union; Jack Davis, Forestry.
closer. UBC held a 32-28 half-time
lead, but it was quickly chopped
down by the Bisons.
With only three minutes
remaining, the Bisons had
established a 65-56 lead and the
Birds were in foul trouble.
High man for the Bisons was
Ross Wedlake, who scored 19
points. Angus Burr added 15.
The Thunderbirds were led by
Terry MacKay, who scored 21
points. Sankey added 13 more. It
was the last games for these two
players in a UBC uniform.
The officiating, however,
appeared to play a large part in
the Saturday game. There were 38
fouls called against UBC as
compared to only 12 against the
Bisons. The referees usually
practiced the policy that a bad
call against one team deserved at
least as bad a call against the
other.
Thunderbird coach Peter
Mullins refused to make a
comment on the officials, but
added that Manitoba "put the ball
in the basket better than we did".
The Manitoba coach, however,
had more to say about the
referees than did Mullins.
According to Jack Lewis, the
officiating "was the same as it was
in B.C. last year".
Aside from the fouls, Mullins
did not feel that his team played
as well as could be expected. Star
guard Ron Thorsen did not
exactly play up to his usual
standard. Averaging 22 points
through the regular season, he
managed only 21 points in both
games combined.
Although it was a shorter
season than perhaps expected, the
fans can still remember the Birds
as winners — by virtue of their
defeat of SFU.
SKI MOVIE
Old Auditorium
"Lunch Hours" Thursday,     "Not The
March 4th and 11th ErStnJu!!»
TICKETS: THUNDERBIRD SHOP OR DOOR        The   BCSt
WINNERS OF THE ANNUAL Anglican Theological College
Curling Bonspiel wa^the rink skipped by Charlie Fox (upper
right). Below him is his lead, Jane Gallie, while Doug Eaton was
the second and Barb Bullock the third.
DAL GRAUER MEMORIAL LECTURE
SIR ISAIAH BERLIN
Sir Isaiah Berlin, president of Wolfson College at Oxford
University, will give the second of two Dal Grauer Memorial
Lectures at UBC tonight in the Totem Park Residences at 8:15
P.M. His topic will be "Russian Obsession with History and
Historicism." Sir Isaiah, who formerly held one of the world's
most prestigious academic posts at Oxford, is particularly
well-known for his studies in Russian political and intellectual
history. His lectures have been described as "rapid, vivid,
torrential cascades of rich, spontaneous, tumbling images and
ideas." There is no admission charge for the lecture.
4
W
The University ot British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
OEDIPUS THE KING
BY SOPHOCLES
Adapted and Directed by Donald Soule
MARCH 15-27
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
Thursday, March 18 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
Monday, March 22 - 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, March 25 - Matinee 12:30 p.m.
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207
SUPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
%N
y Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 2, 1971
Mick Jagger and The Rolling Stones in New York, from the film Gimme Shelter.
Gimme shelter
It is easy to see why the Rolling Stones called their
documentary of their tour of the U.S. and the Altamont
Free Festival Gimme Shelter. After watching the horror
show that was Altamont, you really feel the need for
some shelter.
The film is done in a flashback technique, with
scenes from the Stones' New York concert, shots of
them in their hotel room, and at a recording studio,
interspersed with the footage taken at Altamont. The
result of the technique is to create a surreal atmosphere.
The quality of the photography itself is fantastic,
and in some places really quite beautiful, especially the
film from Altamont. The Maysle brothers, who did the
photography, managed to capture incredible
photographic psychological studies of some of the
people at Altamont.
Gimme Shelter is a documentary of a nightmare.The
savage music of the Stones, the brutal behaviour of the
Hell's Angels who for some truly idiotic reason were
hired for $500 dollars worth of beer to guard the stage
and overall, the insane murmuring of three hundred
thousand drunk stoned freaks blend together to create a
pinnacle of paranoia.
The film is definitely one of the most interesting to
play here in a long while. It is much more realistic than
the fairytale that was Woodstock. 'GimmeShelter is
much more a documentary of the thing, the Altamont
Free Festival, than a slick presentation of the rock stars
who played there.
As always, Jagger is an animal on stage. I saw him a
couple of times when he was here in Vancouver, and he
hadn't changed. He incites his audience, sometimes
purposely, with the sexual sensuality that is so much a
part of him.
Towards the end of the Altamont show, I don't
think Jagger was trying to incite the crowd, but the
intense savagery inherent in his singing style is so much a
part of his performance that he just couldn't turn it off.
The savage music of the Stones was more than
matched by the bikers. The Angels get terrifically heavy
handed in their dealings with the audience at Altamont.
Even though it wasn't any more their fault than that of
the organizers who set the stage only a few feet from the
ground, the Angels really made a mess of things. Even
before the Stones played, during one of the constant
fights that broke out, the lead guitarist-of the Jefferson
Airplane got hammered by one of the Angels.
The style of the film is so surreal, that you can
almost believe that the whole thing is fictional, a
nightmare fantasy dreamed up by some very weird
person, but the constant flashbacks from the films of
Altamont to Jagger watching himself on a film viewer
force the fantasy into reality.
The climax of the film is the death of the black who
had kicked one of the Angels' bikes. He appears out of
the corner of the screen carrying a gun, then whirls
around into the crowd with two Angels running after
him, but in a moment, one of them is on his back,
stabbing him with a long knife. It is so quick that you
are inclined to think it is fantasy, but the film flips to
Jagger watching the clip in the studio, and it is run back.
The man is dead, stabbed four times, then kicked to
death by a group of Angels in front of three hundred
thousand people.
Gimme Shelter is a frightening film. Throughout the
concert, the gathering itself is stressed as the most
important aspect of Altamont. As Jagger says part way
through the film, it's just an excuse for everyone to get
together, have fun and get balled.
Through the violence, the paranoia and the hate,
Altamont emerges as a horror festival. Babies were born
there, four people died there, others made love, some
got stoned and one got murdered. There are no
protective buffers between the audience and their life, it
was all there right in front of them.
This time, The Rolling Stones commanded a
performance, and three hundred thousand people
obliged them, in a way that is so ugly that you may wish
that you never saw the film.
At the end, the Stones, scrambling, take shelter in a
helicopter and bust out of there as fast as they can. If
you go to see the film, you'll know why.
-TIM WILSON
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
HAPPENING
Wed. 12:35-1 p.m.
Noon
David Lloyd & Roger Gosselin
sketching and painting in the
lounge, followed by The Supper in
the Chapel.
"JESUS, THE GREAT MEEK"
SUZUKI
VARSITY CYCLES
STUDENT DISCOUNTS
10% OFF ACCESSORIES
5% OFF 10 SPEEDS
(with AMS card)
4357 W. 10th
224-1034
RESERVE AUCTION
Damaged Chairs. Inspect
SUB Room 236. Bids close
noon, March 15
SAVE UP TO 50%
over    1000   New   and
Used
Standard Portable and Electric
TYPEWRITERS
Adders, Calculators, etc. at the
World's 1st Office
Equipment Supermarket
Absolutely the largest selection and
lowest prices in Canada.
Expert Repairs
Trades Welcome
STUDENT RENTALS
LOW RATES
WE DELIVER & PICK-UP
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
458 W Broadway - 879-0631
Open Daily inc. Saturday—9-6
Friday 9-9
Lots of Free Parking
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTDr   ~
Hot Delicious Tasty Pizzas
- 22 DIFFERENT FLAVORS -
FREE DELIVERY - Right to Your Door
Phone 224-1720  -  224-6336
HOURS: 4 p.m. to 3 a.m. - Weekends 4 p.m. to 4 a.m.
4450 West 10th Ave. - Just outside the Gates
MISS JAIRUS
by de Ghelderode
(An M.A. Thesis Production)
Directed by Larry Lillo
March 3-6 — 8:30 p.m.
UBC - SOMERSET STUDIO
Student Tickets - $1.00
RESERVATIONS: ROOM 207
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE

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