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The Ubyssey Feb 23, 1967

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Array Have an
ice pick,
Vol. XLVII, No. 50
WE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  THURSDAY,   FEBRUARY 23,   1967 °4^»"
224-3916
MALE ACTOR
— chris Make photo
before  chopping
Faculty advocates
student senators
UBC faculty association has called for
student representation  on the senate.
A special committee of the association
Tuesday recommended four students be
named to the senate. The senate, which has
70 members, decides academic matters.
Simon Fraser Academy recently appointed three students to its much smaller senate.
The committee refused to release the full
text of their report which was sent to president John Macdonald who agreed Wednesday with the proposal.
But he felt the representatives should
be grad students.
"I feel they are in a better position to
make objective judgements on senate matters rather than students who are in the
middle of their university education."
But the Alma Mater Society, which in
a recent brief also called for students on
the senate, disagrees.
"The grad students may have greater
maturity,"    said    AMS   President    Peter
Braund Wednesday. "Yet many have graduated from other universities and are not
aware of UBC activities."
"I do not think these students can serve
the university community effectively."
"All the AMS is concerned about is to
have the personnel chosen be the best qualified for the job."
The undergrads have earned the responsibility of serving on the senate, according
to Braund. He cited the work done by the
students  on  various  ancillary   committees.
"These students have shown responsibility on these committee," he said. "The library questionnaire—the most comprehensive library survey in Canada—was student
inspired.
Braund saw student representatives on
the Senate as a step to getting representatives on the board of governors.
"It will take hard work and persuasion
to get student representatives on the board.
"This is a step in the right direction."
PARENTS TOLD 'FACTS'
You can't conceal the "facts" about
university life from your parents anymore.
Director of information services Ralph
iDaly this year has been sending copies of
UBC Reports to all parents "to tell them
what's really happening out here.
"This is an expansion of our information services," said Daly.
Total circulation of UBC Reports is
now 50,000 compared with 35,000 last year.
£§&?§__&__$ :*:':^§9K>W£-ft$$!
It is sent to faculty, alumni, grads, stu- §
dents' parents, newspapers, MLA's, MP's, I
and anyone interested in UBC. In addition, |;
10,000 are distributed on campus. §
The  printing   and   handling   costs   for §!
eight issues a year of eight pages each is |
$1,300 an issue. |
Daly said the additional cost of widen- §
ing the  circulation to include parents is 11
only sixteen cents a year for each parent. ft
RCMP have interviews
with student leaders
Big phalli nipped
before first show
Male actors in Aritophanes* sex play Lysistrata had their
phalli chopped Sunday night in a pre-opening dress rehearsal.
The incident took place in the Freddy Wood Theatre where
the play opened Tuesday.
Director Donald Soule emphatically denied rumors the
devices were censored out of the play.
"Instead of being ludicrous, the phalli restricted their
movements and were too awkward," said Soule.
He decided the play would be better without them. The
phalli were costumes which exaggerated the actors' genitals.
"Revisions were made only to make the play better, not
because it was obscene."
Phalli were used in the fertility plays of ancient Greece.
They were to have been used in the UBC production in keeping
with the original Greek idea.
Cast members said a select audience of professors viewed
Sunday's performance and advised Soule the phalli were
"crude".
The de-penalized version continues until Saturday.
OTTAWA (CUP) —- For 15 years the
RCMP have conducted annual interviews
with leaders of Canada's largest student
organization, but hasn't yet offered money
in exchange for information gained.
This was revealed Tuesday at an Ottawa
press conference by Canadian Union of Students president Doug Ward, in the wake of
controversy stemming from United States
Central Intelligence Agency intrusion into
U.S. youth organizations.
"I am disturbed at the approach the
RCMP uses — seeking interviews on a
personal basis with people who are obviously selected for the positions they hold,"
Ward said in a prepared statement.
"It is entirely possible that youth leaders are being used to provide information
in a manner quite contrary to the knowledge or wishes of the people who elected
them," Ward told newsmen.
CUS raised the issue Monday by asking
prime minister Pearson "to protest strongly
the covert intrusion of the CIA" into CUS
affairs, and to provide "assurance that the
RCMP is not engaged in any similar operations."
Asked why CUS made the demands,
Ward replied:
"My prime concern is that students can
become involved in a network of information over which they have no future control."
In 1965 and 1966, CUS received twin
$1,500 payments from the Foundation of
Youth and Student affairs, an alleged CIA
front organization.
The money went toward financing two
student conferences, Ward explained, and
at no time did FYSA or the CIA attempt
to influence the course those meetings took.
Ward described as "friendly" an interview last summer with an RCMP official
held at CUS headquarters. A request from
Ward that the talk be "considered public
and non-confidential" was met by the
RCMP.
"In addition to expressing interest in
receiving information on the traditional
topic, Eastern European student politics,
the officer mentioned that he was particularly interested in knowing about subversion in Canada.
"I refused to involve myself or the union in such activities," Ward said. "Since
then there has been no further communication from the RCMP."
Reporters zeroed in on other possible
CIA payments to CUS, but Ward maintained
that except for the two FYSA grants, there
was only an indirect grant from FYSA to
World Assembly of Youth to CUS for travel to a number of international student
conferences.
"I do not know to what extent our experience has been duplicated around the
country," he said, "but I should hope that
it will come clear in the next few days."
Ward expressed dissatisfaction with the
prime minister's refusal Monday to protest
To Page 3
See: WUS Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23,  1967
"■'.''"I"1 "J jpw
'*      •   X  *      .     *
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Honored Bob    1 Stubble jumpers advise
-•c "  '"   .* -*
,; *
^ Bob Cruise, former 1965 AMS vices' president and 1967 presidential candi-
sf date was awarded a certificate of appreciation by B.C.'s three universities
Wednesday.
The honor was bestowed in recogni-.
tion of his many contributions to the
welfare of the province's institutions.
"We all try in our own little humble
way to help the university. This really
makes a guy feel he's appreciated," said
Cruise.
"I was shocked, disturbed, and delighted, but my only real comment is
'No comment'," he said.
While running in the 1967 election.
Cruise supported a strike next fall if
fees are raised.
The certificate was signed by UBC
president John Macdonald, Simon
Fraser president Patrick McTaggart-
Cowan, UVic president Malcolm Taylor,
and Cyrus McLean and Allan McGavin,
co-chairmen of the three universities
capital fund.
-X-.A-&;,
—kurt hilger photo
GOLDURNED APPARITION won't come off
the window says Ralph Spatula. Actually
this  floating   head   in  Buchanan   just
wanted his glasses washed.
POT PETITION
Petitions continue but this time students
a ad the public will be called on to ask the
government to review marijuana legislation.
The latest petition, circulated by the
November 11 committee, asks for a formal
federal enquiry into current narcotic legislation concerning marijuana.
It asks the government to declare that
"present legislation is unrealistic and falsely
conceived in the light of medical and psychological evidence."
When the petition collects 100,000 signatures, it will foe forwarded to A. J. Mac-
Eachern, federal minister of health and
welfare. It is being circulated across Canada.
Burned up?
PlANGO PANGO (staff) — A horde of
hairy blue phallicated blorgs today steeped
and burned 49 bales of tea to celebrate the
yearly sacrifice to their king. Observers in
this island capital's town square noted that
the king was deeply moved by the tribute.
"Eeeyoweee." he screeched.
Scienceman McPhee on
anti-most-things platform
By KRIS EMMOTT
Quit the AMS, disenfranchise women,
abolish Saturday classes, lounge in the chemistry building and send medicine to North
Vietnam.
These are the campaign promises of Mike
McPhee, candidate for science undergrad
society president.
McPhee wants to withdraw from the AMS
and start a student union for sciencemen.
Fees would be a mere $3.
"It's not fair to tell us we have to belong
to the AMS," said McPhee.
"It's an infringement on our rights. We
should be able to withdraw if we want to —
all we have to do is issue our own library
cards."
Asked about AMS fixed expenses such
as special events, academic seminars and
WUS, McPhee replied:
"We want to junk the student union
building. We can provide just about all that
SUB offers — potential lounge and study
space, and plenty of activities."
McPhee also plans to provide many AMS
services, including a twice-weekly newspaper in The Ubyssey's style.
He vows to change the SUS constitution
to ban science-women from voting in SUS
elections.
"The participation of females in science
activities has been pathetic," McPhee said.
He admitted the science paper Black
Plague may have offended sciencewomen.
"If it bothers them, they should come to
work on it and improve it." McPhee said.
McPhee's campaign statement says he
will send medical aid to North Vietnam
citizens.
"This clause is mostly just for identifica-
ation — so everyone will know which McPhee it is," said the candidate.
"Everybody knows I have this slightly
leftist point of view about Vietnam.
"My other views are all quite conservative; almost like von Thadden's."
McPhee wants to boycott all Saturday
morning classes if the administration schedules them next year.
Almost every first-year scienceman has
Saturday classes this year.
Only other candidate so far is Harry
Clare, science 3, president of the student
Social Credit club.
SASKATOON (CUP)—The president of the University of
Saskatchewan told student councillors last week he could see
no reason for students not participating on some faculty council
committees.
Speaking at a recent council meeting, J. W. T. Spinks
commented on a brief which asked for more student participation in university government.
The brief suggested that all faculty council meetings be
open to students, that minutes of council committee meetings
be available to students, and that they be allowed to participate actively on any committees of mutual interest to themselves and faculty.
Although Dr. Spinks had previously said he opposed open
faculty council meetings, he told students he could think of no
objection to them serving on committees dealing with food
services, the library, visiting lecturers and other matters of
student-faculty concern.
"Students would be extremely useful on a curriculum
planning committee. This could likely be the most useful area
for such committees," he said.
Asked if he would support the brief when it is presented
to the faculty council, the university president said: "I will
support the idea of having students on some committees. On
the matter of having students at council meetings I will try to
be an objective chairman."
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r ""Vwte Thursday, February 23,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
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■*K"       IF*?
—kurt hilger photo
JOHN B. MACDONALD . .  . presides at birthday party
SUS GIVES   BASH
Leaders feted at lunch
By MELODY FLIPP
Ubyssey Birthday Reporter
The halls of the faculty club were honored Wednesday with the presence of UBC
president John Macdonald and sundry
guests who celebrated his forty-ninth birthday.
The science undergraduate society, which
has recently entered the social scene in the
Point Grey area, and the dean (himself) of
science, V. J. Okulitch, had the party for
their president.
About 20 dignitaries attended with
honor.
The menu included as the main course:
water-cress soup, breasted broiled chicken,
broccoli and sweet potatoes.
The guests stood in added hunger as
they watched Macdonald cut their desert,
a large birthday cake with dozens of glimmering sparklers flashing in the dimly
lit room.
The president was dressed possibly in a
dark purply-blue suit with mauve tie
around his neck. He was hardly seen for
the bright lights behind his seat.
President of the SUS Frank Flynn poured. He wore his bright blue and black sci-
enceman's sweater. He seemed delighted
from all reports coming from the banquet.
He was heard to say that this would be
the last birthday party the SUS would hold.
"Macdonald will be gone from here next
year," said Flynn.
"As a consequence we would like to
keep it as informal as possible."
This was hinted as the reason for the
informal sparkling cake and elaborate meal.
Also present at the party were members
of the SUS executive and several members
of the UBC faculty.
Honorary scienceman, Dr. Nathan Divinsky was also present.
Last year's SUS presented Macdonald
with a colorful science sweater and an
honorary membership in the undergraduate
society.
The president was obviously overwhelmed and was unavailable for comment. The
whole function without a doubt was a grand
success  and   everybody   seemed  pleased.
FROM
PAGE 1
WUS  head  is 'surprised'
formally the CIA's "covert intrusion" into
CUS affairs.
"I don't believe it (Pearson's statement)
is very satisfactory."
The general secretary of WUS (Canada)
expressed surprise Tuesday that CUS offi-
\ials were not aware they were dealing in
1965 and 1966 with a possible CIA front.
"To my personal knowledge it was common gossip among some of the officers of
CUS two or three years ago," said Douglas
Mayer in Port Arthur.
Mayer was commenting on a denial by
the CUS that it accepted $3,000 during the
two years from FYSA with the knowledge
the organization was connected with the
CIA.
"I don't know how much money was involved but it would be several thousand
dollars."
"I know one person I can be absolutely
certain knew or suspected that it was coming from CIA," he said.
Mayer refused, however, to name any
CUS officials he suspects were aware of the
alleged CIA-FYSA affiliation.
"If CUS remains quiet, then I am not
going to speak," he said.
CIA funds partly financed the 1962
International Student Conference (IFC) at
Laval University in Quebec City, said
Mayer.
Dramatists wanted
The UBC Alumni Association will again
sponsor their Original One-Act Play Festival for  budding student playwrights.
The Festival, conducted through the cooperation of the department of creative
writing and theatre, was initiated last year
to encourage  new  playwrights.
Plays chosen by the judges will toe produced by the department of theatre.
Entry forms can be obtained from the
department of creative writing, Bu. 171,
the department of theatre, Freddy Wood
207, or from the Alumni Association Brock
Ext.  252.
Deadline for submitting scripts is March
20. 1967.
Tenders readied
UBC's Student Union Building will begin Friday to take
shape as a reality rather than a much discussed idea.
The tenders for construction of SUB will open Friday at
4:45 p.m.
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson expects the tender to be
about $4.6 million.
'        AMS now has $700,000 in the bank.
Asked about financing the remainder, Hudson said: "It's
always been understood that the AMS was going to borrow
money. Ninety per cent of the people who build have no
money in the bank."
All students are invited to Friday's opening in council
chambers.
COMMITTEE MEETS
A new student-faculty committee on mathematics will hold
an open meeting Friday at noon in Math. 202 to hear student
opinion on math courses and any problems in the math department.
The committee, formed last term by the science undergraduate society, has so far discussed faculty office hours,
course" planning and whether mathematics should be taught
as a tool or an art in itself.
The committee says that while it is willing to receive constructive criticism of lecturing techniques, it wants to make
it clear it cannot act as a Star Chamber for disciplining professors.
The committee would also like to hear suggestions regarding counselling, examinations, and assignments.
Music pres elected
A second-year music student has been elected music
president for  1967-8.
Wes Foster will be the first president when the faculty
is unified in the new music building scheduled for completion
this fall. He will also be the first third year president music
has elected.
In order for him, and opponent Val Zuker, also second
year, to be eligible, the music students association passed a
special waiver on a clause of its constitution.
joys of journalism
— one  of a  series
You tod can be a newspapermen and enjoy culturally revolting pleasures like this ad.
You can also:
• learn to write news stories
• and headlines
• and lay out pages
• and meet printers
• or even take pictures
• or simply type stuff
No experience necessary. All we require is ribaldry,
knowledge of rudimentary grammar, and urge to learn.
And besides printing three newspapers a week, The
Ubyssey has parties, tries to become relevant, fights
injustice in the university community and plays at
other sundry or illegal things.
Try it.  Only 15 issues left to end of term.
And next year, a whole new 66 issues.
Editor Kelsey teaches assistant city editor
Kris Emmott how to slander student council.
North  Brock basement;
noon: Mon., Wed., and Thurs. WE UBYSSEY
Some  Fresh Candidates   for the University Presidency Race :
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loe. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1967
Think and do
The willful abdication of the four major campus
political clubs from political activity mirrors the larger
— and more excruciating — elimination of ideology from
Canadian politics.
These clubs, whose leaders usually go on to play
roles in their senior bodies, were once a vital force
in student affairs. Now they're a meaningless discussion
fotum at Open House.
The sole action of the Liberals, New Democrats,
Tories and Socreds this year was to mass behind Liberal
Shaun Sullivan in his bid for AMS president. Thus, at
a blow, ideology disappeared and blurred into a faceless
mass kindly described as liberalism and more correctly
as me-tooism.
When so-called political discussion in an ideological
vacuum replaces political action, that discussion is worse
than useless — it indicates a total lack of conviction
by the mouthers of wotrds and platforms, and a cabbage
unwillingness to act as one speaks.
Provincially and nationally, it has long been a cliche
to notice that the Liberals and Conservatives are
indistinguishable but for personalities — nothing at all
in Canadian life changes when the federal government
changes.
The big fraud is the New Democratic Party, rising
on the popularity polls by selling its politics to the
ragpicker.
Once, it provided a socialist alternative to Canadian
capitalism. The tiny squeak it made when six B.C.
labor leaders were jailed for violating an ex parte injunction at Lenkurt Electric indicates it would play
the same dirty games the British Labor Party played
With last summer's striking seamen.
Where was the NDP on campus when the radical
left was proposing a boycott to make the fee point ?
Where were both the Liberals and the NDP when
the Victoria march was screaming at Les Peterson ?
As the campus moves imperceptibly, slightly leftward, poised for a rush back to the right, what are the
Tories pushing besides Dalton Camp ?
Serious students quietly clamor for educational
reform in their various departments — where are all
four parties? If any had an ideology with meaning for
the individual party member, each would have some
proposal or attack to offer.
But the common view pushed by members of said
clubs favors rump politics over activist politics, because
it's dignified  and hell, what can you do, anyway ?
We suggest all four merge, into the UBC Chowder
and Marching Society, and drop the pretense of being
political. Then, at least, they'd be unified in theory and
practise.
Ontology soup
Wednesday, like all days, UBC scintillated with
events of ominous portent. Meanwhile, perhaps 15,000
students rushed to the campus. Nearly all ate lunch,
some went to class, some studied. At evening, most went
home again.
Maple Leaves
WiMM
Tt's a new bfrVh control
device Udom, it's called
TrgnoataW!
I have
always been
able to onjamze
youngsters.
Just recently
for example--
Sts A step down
but At 72  you
can't BE choosey
"B.C.IS  A  MICE
PEACEFUL PLACE,
ArJP J^ST ACROSS
THE BOARDER LIES
THt   SACRED
Father-Lamd.
o   o   o
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I'll q'we   the
students
anything
they want.
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Where  were  you
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I felt I had to comment on
a letter to the editor from
Michael bavidson <Feb. 14)
because it exemplifies a prevalent attitude among many
university students.
He criticizes those who
protest events "alien to their
own personal lives," such as
napalming Vietnamese, while
ignoring problems on their
own home front such as "the
treatment of Indians" and
the state of our educational
system.
How is he so sure such protestors are not actively concerned about their own country? For instance, last weekend the Canadian Indian
Youth Council held a sym-
pdsium at UBC in which an
Indian movement in B.C. was
initiated. The leaders who
spoke said, among other
things: "Non-Indian youth,
support us in our quest for
self - determination." Many
wierdie - beardie student protestors were there. Where
were you, Mr. Davidson?
Second, those who are concerned with international issues such as American intervention in Vietnam see them
akin to problems at home.
The Indian situation in Canada, French Canadian separatism, our educational system, labor union strikes,
Watts riots, Selma, bombing
in Vietnam, the invasion of
Cuba and the Dominican Republic: all have in common
the   suppression   of   equality
and self-determination for the
people involved.
The letter asked a number
of questions which displayed
a lack of research and knowledge. For instance: "Why is
it that American agressors
always invite more criticism
than communist ones?" One
may reply, how can a man
be termed an agressor within his own country?
The letter asks: "Why do
the charitable attempts of
Mardi Gras draw criticism
from this faction?"
First, Mardi Gras in not a
"charitable attempt" but a
huge attempt to have fun
with charity tacked on for
justification.
There is nothing wrong
with having fun (if that is
what Mardi Gras is) as long
as the funmakers also partake of things meaningful to
society. And, how meaningful
a private charity,  really?
People who sound the old
cry, "Let's clean up our own
backyard first" are not likely
to be found cleaning the backyard. More likely they will
toe found revelling in "charitable attempts" such as Mardi
Gras, while rationalizing their
ignorance of, and isolation
from, the basic problems of
society.
ANNE   JAMIESON
arts 4
Worthless  vote
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am against the presence
of U.S. and allied forces in
South Vietnam and voted accordingly on  the  first  ques
tion  of last  week's Vietnam
referendum.
But I am also against
North Vietnamese forces being there.
Why did the question not
ask if I support the withdrawal of all foreign troops
from South Vietnam?
As it was, the vote seems
to have been set up merely
to play on my anti-war feelings and elicit a disapproval
of the U.S.
Which makes the question
worthless.
AVO   ERISALU
arts IV
Collective  zeroes
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I have a few criticisms of
the political forum on this
campus.
The same old crap keeps
on coming up in the campaigns. We have candidates
being    in    for   equalization
TO PAGE 5
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City       _  . _   . Danny Stoffman
News   -_    Al Birnie
Photo _          Powell Hargrave
Page Friday .     Claudia Gwinn
Sports   _ _ Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus Kris Emmott
Ass't News Al Donald
Ass't City              - .   .    _.     Tom Morris
CUP          Bert Hill
News: Margaret Ladbury, Charlotte Haire, Peter Shapiro, Val
Thom, Norman Gidney, Kathi
Harkness, Telex, Val Zuker, Julian Martin, Ed Forrest.
Poto:  Kurt Hilger, Chris Blake.
No shows were Lin Tse-hsu,
Sun Tat Sen, Wang Ming (pilgrimage to Yenan), Kwame (bullet-proof) Nkrumah, the dialectic
banana, Martin Heidegger, Edmund Husserl, Kautsky and the
Japanese imperialists. Thursday, February 23, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE   LETTERS
grants or reducing fees or
looking into co-op housing or
for students on senate or being for or against strikes. I'd
like to inform all past, present and future politicians
that I too am for these things.
The difference between us
is that I speak in private and
you speak in public. In the
final analysis we are equal
because both our actions result in the same thing — absolutely nothing.
I don't give a damn what
you are for; I want to know
what you are going to do and
how. I have never yet been
told this in any campaign.
But, on the other hand, nothing has ever been done.
Tent-ins and marches, as
much as the instigators like
to pat themselves on the back
claiming success, never have
—and until the consciousness
of the whole society changes—
never will accomplish anything.
The general process involved in being a student politician   is   this:   you   campaign
and win on general (very general) promises. You get organized, by now it's March,
excuses come, it's too late to
initiate anything. Come September, you're too involved in
the bureaucracy; dances, apple drive, tripe. This finally
finishes in January but now
it's too late to do anything because your term is ending too
fast and you don't know who
is next in line.
Oh well, at least now
you're well known, popular,
and ready for a better political post. Next year the cycle
repeats and everybody is happily apathetic until the Yanks
blow us all to hell.
Now, to the kings — council. Everybody bow down and
worship. If you are ever bored on a Monday night go and
listen to council. It costs
nothing. And if Peter recognizes you, you can even participate. No matter what happens it's a great entertainment.
For five years now (or
even more) there has been a
fight to get students on the
senate. Any ordinary person
would like to start the fight
at the bottom and nicely ask
senate if students could sit.
Then give them hell. But
council doesn't see it that
way. It hasn't as yet asked
senate for student seats. Don't
ask why, because as Peter
said, nobody knows.
There are constructive political acts that can be undertaken by students. All
you have to do is be a little
ingenious. I and a few others
have found some things but
we aren't known by 17,000
students, are we? That is very
bad because it matters not
what you do but how many
people recognize it was you
doing  it.   Right,   fellas?
GWC
Vote   em  out
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I favor holding the line on
fees; there certainly should
be no need to increase them
in this province. But I cannot
agree that the methods contemplated by the student government or its opposition are
at all worthy of serious consideration.
Strikes, marches, briefs,
etc., etc., are entirely without effect on hard-nosed governments, and what governments are not? I have an alternate suggestion.
To make any impression at
all on governments, one must
hit where they feel it most:
in the polling booth.
I suggest a petition be circulated among the student
body, to be signed and forwarded to Victoria, worded
thus:
"We, the undersigned, solemnly swear to oppose the
candidates of the Social
Credit party at the next
election if student tuition
fees are increased during
the term of office of the
vote because of age, we
swear to vote against the
Social Credit party at the
first election in which we
may vote."
Perhaps 17,000 (?) such
pledges from UBC and a few
thousand more from other
B.C. educational institutions
will have the desired affect.
MR. MOUSE
Bumbershoots ...
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Several weeks ago I
noticed a letter asking if free
bicycles could be provided
for transportation between
classes.
I have a similar request.
Could not the lost and found
donate its store of umbrellas
to the students on rainy days?
Suitable racks could be
built in all the buildings and
students would leave the umbrellas there. They could be
marked in some special way
such as "Stolen from the
AMS" in bright red.
I'm sure if enough students
are interested an umbrella
committee could be formed.
The AMS would welcome
such student participation in
council.
It's just what this university needs.
EMMALINE
SWEETBOTTOM.
ed. 7
Ban  table hogs
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Ever notice how many students wander around the library looking for a place to
sit and study? And ever notice how many study places
are vacant, save for a few
papers or a book, while the
owner is on the other side of
the campus?
Why should there toe any
'reserved' study places in the
library? Sit down and shove
those books aside you say?
This only leads to ownership
arguments when the original
seat-warmer returns and demands his place.
Wouldn't it be simpler for
the library to ban the reserving of study areas?
Then, when the wandering
student finds a sea of deserted chairs, yet book-filled
table-tops all he need do is deposit the books in a container
provided by the library for
banbreaking books. And who
knows, if the library staff
wakes up and tries this, you
might even find a study place
during final exams.
WANDERING   STUDENT
SFA  happenings
Editor,   The   Ubyssey:
It doesn't take long to drive
to Simon Fraser. Things happen there and we never hear
about them even after they
happen.
How about a straight, short
information column on what
is about to happen there? —r
special lecturers, plays, and
so forth. This total lack of
information seems unnecessary.
DON   RATCLIFFE.
arts 2
SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Announces nominations  open for positions on council
President
1st Vice-President
2nd Vice-President —
AMS representative
Treasurer
Secretary
Public  Relations Officer
Sports Rep.
Women's. Rep.
3  Executive Members
Nominations are open and can be turned in to Science Secretary Claire
Lapham or Box 73 in Brock.   Nominations close March 1  at 4 p.m.
Pick up eligibility form- from AMS office Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23,   1967
"-.'...'■'^Wiji
■-.■*-»■
— al harvey photo
SINGING THE PRAISES of arts Undergraduate Society presidential candidate Stan Persky,
these guitar and banjo wielding minstrels trolled around the campus Wednesday. Arts
US elections are  set for Monday.
High school graduates
wanted for CUSO work
By PAT LUMPKIN
Help wanted: university students with a
skill that will help some underdeveloped
country close the gap between dependence
and independence.
Canadian University Services Overseas
sends volunteers to countries who are striving to become fully independent members
of the world community, but don't have the
financial resources of their own to do it.
Anyone with post-secondary training can
apply for a two-year term of service in
Africa, Latin America, Asia or the West
Indies.
Last year's biggest-ever contingent of 365
volunteers ibrought the number of Canadian
workers abroad to 570.
Almost 30 per cent have no university
degrees. All that is required is possession
of some specialized skill.
Many volunteers are teachers, nurses or
other medical workers, but assignments are
open for youth workers, fishery and game
reserve personnel, foresters, mechanics and
so on.
Volunteers live and are paid at the same
level as a native counterpart in the community. This may mean living in comparatively primitive surroundings.
Salary conditions vary from country to
country. Through terminal grants and allowances, all volunteers in a given country are
under similar conditions of service regardless
of age, profession or experience.
Volunteers do not expect to make or save
much money, but they should have approxi
mately $500 at the end of two years.
Local CUSO offices on university campuses across Canada match volunteers to
requests from abroad.
"There is no stereotyped volunteer," said
Peter Ramsay, UBC CUSO chairman.
"Questions are posed by an assessment
committee so that the applicant will deselect
himself if he isn't sure he's fit for the job."
Evaluation and application forms are sent
to the national office for final decision.
Once the committee-has matched the ▼oJj»
unteer to the job, a dossier is sent to the
requesting country.
Preferences of host countries must be
met. Political science graduates may not be
wanted for fear of political unrest.
Volunteers go through a five-week orientation course-immediately prior to departure.
They receive training relevant to the area
in which they will serve.
Return volunteers, students from destination areas and professors give political, geographic and historical training, and, if necessary, teach the language of the area workers
will serve in.
Trainees are taught to be sensitive to
others and to acquire a knowledge and skills
helpful for effective human relations.
This program is designed to help them
adapt to customs and attitudes different from
their own.
Health problems peculiar to their area
are pointed out and methods of coping with
these problems are outlined.
The Royal Canadian Air Force flies the
volunteers to their assignments.
Visit plan gets the nod
EDMONTON (CUP) — The University of Alberta's proposed high school visitation program received an affirmative
nod and a generous grant from the provincial deputy youth
minister last week.
"Everything" included a $7,800 grant to finance the project.
The project will send two student researchers into four
high schools to determine why only 50 per cent of Alberta
matriculants are going on to higher education.
It is to operate independently as a students' union committee. The only outside government and university controls
will be approval formalities.
"This project will be different from those before in that
instead of going out to preach our sermon, we will get facts
and find the problems," said council representative Dale
Enarson.
FILM   SOCIETY   PRESENTS
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
PRvru
I u i un
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
at 12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30
AUDITORIUM - 50c
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
COMMITTEE CHAIRMANSHIPS
Applications are now being received for Chairmen of
the following Committees:
Canadian Union of Students Committee
Canadian University Service Overseas Committee
Frosh Orientation Committee
High School Conference Committee
Homecoming Committee
Intramurals Committee
Special Events Committee
World University Service Committee
Academic Activities Committee (applicants for this
Chairmanship must submit a proposed program
for 1967-68 with approximate costs)
COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Applications   are now being  received  for Committee
members for the following Joint A.M.S.-Administration
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Book Store Committee
Library Committee
.   Parking and Traffic Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reason for applying,
and, where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility
forms are available from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock)
and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
LETTERS OF APPLICATION AND ELIGIBILITY
FORMS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE SECRETARY, BOX 54, BROCK HALL BY MARCH 3rd. 1967.
AMS-FACULTY STUDY GROUP
COORDINATOR
Applications are invited for co-ordinator of a joint
A.MdS.-Faculty study group investigating the financial
and sociological barriers to higher education. Experience in survey analysis, sociology, and/or economics helpful, but not mandatory. Applications to
Assistant-Treasurer, Box 53, Brock Hall.
OTHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Applications are now being received for:
College Shop Manager
Ubyssey Editor
Student Union Building Chairman Thursday, February 23,  T967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  7
COUNCIL JOLLIES
BY KRIS EMMOTT
Council is backwater
"They hilariated when I hyperspaced
for Earth," said Harmish.
" 'Nobody Earthwards,' they snickerly
advised. 'Is backwater of galaxy,' they scorn-
heaped."
"Gee, Harmish, why'd you come?" I
asked.
"Words trip to our ears along the interstellar love wave," said Harmish in his
psychedelic English.
"We know you love alienated ones. Love
thy alienated neighbour, cry ink blots in
Ubyssey and other love messengers. And
who is more alien than outspacer Harmish?"
"True," I admitted, "but why come to
the AMS council meetings? Is backwater of
backwater."
"Answer to query," said Harmish. "AMS
is most alienated of all life-forms. Note six
Earthlings clustered like Pleiades at one
end of large council table. All these people
are dead."
"Very perceptive," I commented. "But
what about the new president, Shaun Sullivan? I can't tell if he's alive or not.
"Take his first AMS meeting. Insults
flew. Yelling filled the air. Sullivan leaned
back, watched without moving or speaking,
and contributed not one bureaucratic puff
to the discussion."
"Homewise planet has an aphorism,"
said Harmish.  "To avoid saying stupidity,
say nothing."
"It's a small universe," I replied. "Sullivan won campaigned on one promise —
not to say "strike".
"Then why did he win?" asked Harmish.
"I have a theory. Sullivan, you will
note, is a very handsome lifeform. You will
also note that most of the other councillors
and the last few AMS presidents are all
very pretty people."
Harmish interrupted, "The incumbent
resembles a certain small, furry animal, beloved for its antics, that antics in my home
forests."
"Just what I've been saying all along,"
I said. "So I think most elections are won
on the pretty-face vote. Nurse Allison Rice.
Architect Jack Redenback. Forester Mike
Sywulych. Surf god Mike Sanders. All beautiful people. All totally irrelevant. Not an
opinion in the lot.
"Alas for my poor university, which
elects handsome people who don't actually
say anything. Alas for the big country to the
south, which does the same thing on a huge
scale."
"Poor, poor university," Harmis wept.
"Poor, poor, poor southern neighbour."
We sobbed quietly.
"Oh well," I brightened. "Maybe we
can get Gabor Mate in on the pretty-face
backlash."
PAINTING  ATTRACTS  POLICE
By NORMAN GIDNEY
Stan Persky's poster painters turned a
rout into victory Monday noon in the auditorium cafeteria.
Persky, arts 1, is running for president
of the arts undergraduate society.
He and several friends were painting abstract "vote for Persky" posters "when the
us out, said Persky.
The painters then took paint, brushes
and posters on to the road in front of the
cafeteria and finished their work.
Asked about the poster painters, cafeteria dietician Mrs. Connie Bell said "Oh,
the paint dribblers you mean?"
"I had given them 25 minutes to finish
their signs and then I asked them to leave,
quite politely, three times.
Since they wouldn't leave Mrs. Bell felt
she "had to go outside for more authority."
Meanwhile   AUS   president   George
Roberts and Persky claim that the Blue
Guard is deliberately trying to stop the
AUS elections.
The charges come from complaints by
Roberts and Persky that some of the returning officers have attempted to postpone the
election procedure by four days.
Some of the officers are members of
the conservative Blue Guard.
Roberts said the argument is over a
clause in the AUS constitution which says
all presidential candidates must be at least
arts three.
"The AMS and the AUS have interpreted this to mean 'entering third year'." he
said.
All candidates for president, Persky,
Linda McKim and Ron Haxby, will be in
third year next term.
"However nominations closed Monday
and the election will be held Feb. 27"
Roberts said.
Pearson fills hot seat
for university liberals
OTTAWA (CUP) — Prime
minister Pearson engaged in
a "hot seat" encounter with
200 students attending the
Canadian University Liberal
Federation convention here.
The students enthusiastically applauded his endorsement of guaranteed incomes
listened respectfully to a statement on Vietnam and showed
no emotion over his view of
the monarchy in Canada.
The prime minister said he
wants the United States to
stop its ibombing of North
Vietnam, but isn't convinced
a bombing pause will bring
peace.
He also said he doesn't feel
making Canada a republic is
a good idea at the present
time.
The students laughed at his
answer to the question, "Do
you intend to retire of your
own free will in the near future?"
'1 hope that when I retire
it will be of my own free
will," the 69-year-old prime
minister said.
He said he feels the Liberal government has completed building the foundations of social security, and
now has to attack the problems of housing and urban
and   rural   development.
"Perhaps the next big stage
in social security as such,"
he said, "is the establishment
fo a guaranteed minimum income for everyone. Out of
the affluent society, we're going to have to do that some
day."
But the job ahead will be
difficult, he predicted, and
new forms of federal-provincial co-operation will have to
be worked out first.
Engineers lower charges
for clearing up by $600
The engineering undergraduate society has dickered
a buildings and grounds bill down to $400 from $1,000
in the engineering week aftermath.
EUS president Eric Newell said Wednesday the
bill is to cover costs of cleaning up toilet paper and red
paint splashed around the campus Feb. 5 by some members of his faculty.
Newell said, "The vandalism was done by a few
vandals, and was not an EUS event." Negotiations with
the university will continue.
DON CRAWFORD
Tues., Feb. 28, 12:30
Brock Hall — 35c
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THE LIBERAL  CLUB  PRESENTS
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CO-ORDINATOR OF COMMITTEES
HOUSE OF  COMMONS, OTTAWA
Speaking on
THE COMMITTEE SYSTEM
How It Is Challenging Parliament
A  must for  all  political  science  students  and these  interested in  politics
BU 214
FRIDAY-NOON
Upinette pUcidly points
io for porcelain pig-
UpinetU, now miles
/font pabsvilte,, teams
a Sad lesion in tfe
reliability <f6oth
fnecdanical and
economic devices.
lapinefte now &tows
ttie security of money
in tfe6an£anbfer
own} personal cnetjues-
"*■»-_
ItHe* iisaster strikes,
your friendly Sank is
as close, as yourctepte
Soak.uMaiita.
proBleMfrrtfuskto...
t Jr___rt_f_k?-
^A/N1V^
Hie painless adveriisaneHt~
did we ever tell yea
tfte Story of how
lapinette came to
deal wit-H. the
campusSanf: in tlie
first place ?
Well, once upon a titnej
lappy used to .keep
Iter cash, in a pig.now
litis pig was a
porcelain--pig. you
l&now the Type: Wftd
o£ acceptable in an
aestHetic way. ttUr nob
overly active oirikwfee
one day, whilst' lxppy
was dragfacinrf a
cliap TVith. 'her- Honda..
«liet>rolce a sprocket-.
tiow, sprockets aa-en't
■hard to.find. -but lap
-had left liet* pig m
lier pad.
ever try, to cash, a
one-rue drawn-on, a
p-^gybanfe?
vtsdidnfi to class, <3he
passed tite Campus&mZ
which, was near tlie
campus, naturally.
why not ? site mused
beuuttsedly.
loAat service!'few Gihd?
She was delftfMned.
said Iter very own
personal clie^uing
accou-nt c-Iuscpzeta-ik/t
but even our tank,
can't tlunlo o£
everything.
she brake another.
Sprocket- draAradiMS;
yesterday. ^^        "
hutlier clceduebcolo
was sa-ff and sound
in the pig<
fanfcofmontreal
"*     , "aaapitalphae''
camfusbank hr&nch
fa, tot adminitftraticm. bitlldiiuf
g-^-t»ei*«onTman2££»r   G Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23,   1967
Laurentian
potheads
probed
SUDBURY (CUP) — RCMP
are investigating a campus
newspaper report that at least
20 Laurentian University students are smoking marijuana
and that half the 1,200 students there have tried it at one
time or another.
Pierre Belanger, editor of
the Lambda's French section,
said in an article last week
most of the marijuana comes
from Toronto.
The report indicated it's
sold in bags sufficient for 10
cigarettes at $5, or by the cigarette for $1.
University president Stanley Mullins has ordered an immediate investigation into the
report, but says he is convinced there is less use of drugs
at Laurentian than "by students on campus at any other
Canadian or American university."
Laurentian students say they
can buy marijuana from contacts at the University of Toronto or in Yorkville.
The campus newspaper editor said he has tape recordings
to support statements made in
his  article.
—kurt hilger photo
YOUNG ACTOR in play Lysistrata shows his displeasure
at snoopy Ubyssey photographer with distinct sign of
annoyance. Play runs until Saturday night at Freddie
Wood Theatre. Student admission is 75 cents.
TEACHERS BLAMED
Loss of respect
causes unrest
NEW DELHI   (UNS)  —  Loss of  respect  for  Indian
universities' heads was cited by the lower house of parliament here as the cause of recent student unrest.
C. Mathur, of the ruling
H.
party, expressed concern over
the erosion of the authority of
university vice-chancellors. He
held government appointment
policy responsible for the erosion.
"Men who do not posses the
requisite moral and mental
calibre were appointed vice-
chancellors," he said.
"As a result they did not
command respect for government authority."
Another member of parliament alleged instances where
vice-chancellors had been op-
pointed for caste and political
reasons in preference to those
who expressed themselves
freely and who, the government thought, were not likely
to ibe amenable to its own designs.
"How could students be expected to respect and obey
slaves?"  he  said.
As a remedy, Mathur wanted either the union education
ministry or the university
grants commission to compile
a list of suitable names from
which vice - chancellors could
be chosen.
. N.    G.    Ranga,    Swantanta
party leader, said student unrest was a "barometer" of
widespread discontent with
government economic policies.
He also referred to increasing government interference
in university affairs, citing Os-
mania University, whose constitution had been amended
despite strong opposition.
Another member of the ruling party deplored lack of
government spending.
"Ill-paid teachers produce
discontented students, and if
the situation will improve teachers should find a proper
place in society."
K. K. Khadilker, of the
Congress party, held the lack
of general standard of leadership to be responsible for student revolt.
"Leadership has been unable to provide the student
community with an ideal to
strive for," he said, drawing
attention to the atmosphere of
disorder prevailing in parliament itself.
"If this is the example set
before the student community
by the leaders, it is natural
for the students to accept it
as a norm."
DON CRAWFORD
Tues., Feb. 28, 12:30
Brock Hall — 35c
S   K  I
FILM   SOCIETY   PRESENTS
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
noviru
lui
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
at 12:30-3:30-6:00-8:30
AUDITORIUM - 50c
PRINCE GEORGE
SCHOOL DISTRICT
Written enquiries are invited from qualified teachers and
those who expect to obtain their qualifications during the
present academic year.
If you are interested in teaching in this dynamic and rapidly growing centre of British Columbia write for full details
concerning available positions, working conditions, salary
and fringe benefits.
Interview appointments will be arranged on March 13th
and 14th in Vancouver.
Write to: District Superintendent, School District No. 57
1891 Sixth Avenue
Prince George, B.C.
_>v <rJjiamoncl with L^onhden
ence
Special 10% Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
IIIUtAMi*
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK ROYAL
ImA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT
Opportunities for employment  in  summer  training  programs
will  be  offered  in  the following  areas:
ENGINEERING -
Logging,  Pulp     Paper  Manufacturing, Wood  Products Manufacturing
FORESTRY -
Logging,  Forestry
General Summer Employment will be considered for students
in any faculty who are willing to put in a summer's work.
INTERVIEWS are being held on campus Februany 20th to March 3rd.   Please register at your Student
Placement Office. Thursday, February 23,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
—kurt hilger photo
EXAMS MUST BE approaching as more and more students foresake the balmy spring
rain and seek  the  bright  lights of the  library reading   room.
Deposed UC president
clarifies his policies
BY CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Clarke Kerr is angry about his dismissal
from the presidency of one of the largest
universities in the United States — angry
about the political interference that it represented, appalled at the anti-intellectualism
in California which allowed the interference
to occur.
But mostly he is saddened and disillusioned toy the "politics of confrontation" on the
Berkeley campus, by student activists' refusal to accept his promise of good faith
as genuine.
"I believe that rational discussion and
persuasion are the ways to deal with problems, particularly within a university," Kerr
said in an interview during a meeting of
education writers last week.
"When the Sather Gate incident occurred
(initiating the demonstrations of 1964), I was
absolutely unwilling to let the police in without talking first. But I couldn't overrule the
chancellor (Edward Strong) and I was unable to persuade him privately to change his
mind.
"That was a great mistake. Roger Heyns,
current Berkeley chancellor, spent one and a
half years showing his good faith, but the
students didn't even wait for him to come
back to town before they held a sit-in this
Dec. (over a Marine Corps recruiting table).
It was a bitter disappointment."
Kerr attributes the chronic tension on
the Berkeley campus to the style of the New
Left.
"Many of the grievances of students are
real, but their choice of tactics is counterproductive. When you've fought all the battles for academic freedom that I've fought,
you don't need confrontation politics.
"You have to understand that the New
Left has no power, but it has triggered off
the New Right in California, which does
have power."
Kerr's reaction to the New Left is not
simple.
At the same time that he is repulsed toy
their style, he admits respect for the intellectual accomplishments and articulateness
o- individuals.
"We have been neglecting the undergraduates, and that trend needs to be pushed
back," Kerr declared.
"Excessive pressure increases competition
that is too great for students to bear, and
excessive specialization means that students
have no chance to see society as a totality."
Kerr responds to these problems by calling for wholly new structures rather than
reform of the old systems in higher education.
"There is a new generation of students,
who want to govern their own lives, and who
do not look upon the campus as isolated from
society. We'll be very* proud of this generation," he said.
The former president has a strong reputation for being a civil libertarian. In 1964 he
received the Alexander Mieklejohn academic
freedom award from the American Association of University Professors.
His record during the loyalty path battle
in California stands strongly in defense of
faculty rights.
When Kerr became chancellor of Berkeley, controversial speakers were barred from
campus; the university is now open to all
speakers.
Kerr has no doubt that he has strongly
benefitted the University of California during his tenure. His refusal to resign, thus
forcing the board of regents to take responsibility for the move, was made out of deep
conviction.
"Since I became chancellor of Berkeley,
I have lived on borrowed time," he said, and
seemed fully confident that although that
time was up, it had been well spent.
Students  march,
to battle subway
MONTREAL   (CUP)   —
About   150   McGill   and   Sir
George   Williams   University
students   marched   recently
on a Montreal  subway  station.
They were protesting the
absence of special student
rates in Montreal public
transportation facilities. A
spokesman later called their
orderly demonstration "successful".
The campaign, which began after a 10-cent boost in
ticket prices to 30 cents, is
supported by student gov-,
ernments at both universities.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23,   1967
8_5_M^_.--- ->.,-,/■;. tta&Mm
;____'L-    ■".■■*-'■ I *«»*«. w*»
BUILDING AND GROUNDS workmen make like God around the campus with their
instant grass, getting the university ready for its influx of visitors during Open House
celebrations March 3 and 4.
UBC COSTS LOWEST
SURVEY FINDS
Rents up across Canada
By DON SELLAR
CUP Staff Writer
From Vancouver to Halifax, students are
being hit in the pocketbook by a general
rent increase in university-sponsored housing
facilities.
Spiralling food costs, increasing wages
and higher operating costs are being blamed
for the rent hikes — which average about
10 per cent across the board.
As residence administrators pore over
columns of red-inked figures these days and
submit estimates for next year's operations,
they seem to be reaching the same, inescapable conclusion:
Rents must go up.
Housing directors contacted at several
Canadian universities during the past week
— perhaps fearful of angry student reaction
to rent hikes — refused to reveal what new
fee schedules they will recommend to their
particular board of governors.
More than one would say only that he
intends to recommend rent "adjustments"
for next year. And in university budgets
these days, "adjustments" is a good synonym
for "increases".
Already, increases for next year have
been announced or rumored at the universities of B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, United College, Queen's, Carleton, Ottawa, Waterloo, Saint Mary's and Mount
Allison.
In Ottawa, the Canadian Union of Students secretariat is keeping a watchful,
activist eye on current developments, hoping
to assist local student governments in combatting the increases.
As CUS vice-president Dave Young puts
it, residence students are the easiest to
mobilize in any campaign, mainly because
they live in close association with one another and are thus easy to gather together.
Student reaction thus far to the prospect
or threat of room and board increases has
ibeen predictable, with the usual programs
of protest and weighty briefs to provincial
governments or boards of governors being
the order of the day.
The current CUS Ontario regional newsletter reports student efforts to obtain" clear
statements" from universities about next
year's residence fees have been unsuccessful.
The newsletter says rent rises appear
"virtually certain at Queen's and Carleton,
while at Ottawa there is even some talk of
closing down existing residences because of
lack of operating funds." It also criticizes
the Ontario government for failing to state
its position on university housing.
Meanwhile, across the country, the inevitable rumors of rent hikes and some announcements are circulating freely.
At Edmonton about 1,500 residence-
dwellers doomed to pay $8 more per month
for room and board in September, are preparing to demonstrate to back up their demands for a hold-the-line policy on rents.
At Kingston, Queen's University students
are still trying to stave off a rent increase
by employing a slightly different approach.
Male residents there voted last week to
cut down on their maid, and janitorial services. This move is expected to save them
each $30 to $40 per academic year.
A survey of 35 residence rent schedules
obtained from the [Dominion Bureau of
Statistics in Ottawa shows an average room-
and-board rate of about $695 per academic
year.
As of last fall, UBC rates were the lowest
in Canada, with a floor of $475 per academic
year and a ceiling of $630. University of
Ottawa residence fees are listed as the highest in Canada ($800-1,000), but this is attributed largely to the fact that meals aren't
provided in university facilities.
Following are 1966-67 DBS figures for
university-operated residences in Canada.
NEWFOUNDLAND: Memorial ($600).
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND: St. Dunstan's ($485).
NEW BRUNSWICK: U of Moncton ($650-
700); Mount Allison ($665); U of New Brunswick ($700-750); Saint Thomas ($600).
NOVA SCOTIA: Acadia ($725); Dalhousie
($683-733); Mt. St. Vincent ($700); St. Francis
Xavier ($690); St. Mary's ($730).
QUEBEC: Bishop's ($650-750); McGill
($725-970).
ONTARIO: Carleton ($751-791); Guelph
($700); Lakehead ($675-725); McMaster
($775); U of Ottawa ($800-1,000); Queen's
($690-869); Laurentian ($750); U of Toronto
($680-750); Trent ($750); U of Waterloo
($700-800); Waterloo Lutheran ($745); U of
Western Ontario ($775-885); U of Windsor
($800); York University ($815).
MANITOBA: U of Manitoba ($538-665).
SASKATCHEWAN: U of Saskatchewan
($5196-650).
ALBERTA: U of Alberta ($615-675); U of
Calgary ($575-630).
BRITISH COLUMBIA: UBC ($475-630);
Notre Dame U ($5S6); SFA ($640); UVic
$(595-630).
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15. 1967
TUESDAYS   —
12:45 -
2:45 p.m.*
WEDNESDAYS —
2:00 -
7:30 -
3:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS   —
3:00 -
7:30 -
5:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.**
SATURDAYS   —
3:00 -
7:30 -
5:00 p.m.»*
9:30 pan.
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 -
2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
•Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
♦♦Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings     —   Students .50     Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
'CAREERS IN PHARMACY'
"field  with   a  future"
SPEAKER - FILM - TOUR
FACULTY OF PHARMACY
in
Geo. Cunningham  Bldg.,  Room   171
TODAY-12:30 NOON
COME & SEE WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
Education Committee of the
Pharmaceutical Association of B.C.
410 Dominion Bank Building,
207 West Hastings St., Vancouver 3,  B.C.
Announcement
to
UBC STUDENTS
The Northern Miner, the foremost authority
on Canada's Mining industry now extends to
students a special yearly subscription rate.
This weekly mining newspaper published continuously since 1915 has the largest mining
circulation in the world. It is a valuable
source of information for the man, engaged
in, investing in or selling to, the mining industry of Canada.
Start reading The Northern Miner each week
— become acquainted with what's happening
as it happens in Canada's fast changing, ever
expanding mining industry.
Take advantage of this special student offer.
Complete the coupon below and return this ad.
^elRottbetn Miner*
77 RIVER STREET      —      TORONTO 2,  ONTARIO
Please send me one year's subscription to The
Northern Miner at the student subscription rate of
$5.00.    Remittance enclosed.
Name.
Address —	
City   	
University Attending .
Faculty..	
Zone     Province...
..Year of Graduation.. Thursday, February 23, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page II
ACTION VS APATHY
Boyle's beefs, boasts
Sports wanting publicity in The Ubyssey
have been requested throughout the year to
let us know of their activities, or at least inform
us when and where they may be contacted.
No effort has been made this year by the UBC
Thunderbird volleyball team to promote its
sport. We suggest that teams appoint a PRO
man for this purpose. Now a team member
has come out of hiding. We hope he stays out
in the open for he is justified in being proud
of his team. Robert Boyle speaks:
On Feb. 13 the UBC volleyball Thunderbirds returned from Calgary where they won
the Western Canadian Championship, defeating teams from the universities of Calgary,
Regina, Edmonton, and Winnipeg.
Although they were the only victorious
Thunderbird team over the weekend, there
was little mention of the victory in The
Ubyssey — this is true to form.
(ed. UBC wrestlers, JV basketball team,
Thunderette field hockey and volleyball teams,
were also victorious over the weekend in
question.)
Even the Sun and Province, whose sports
coverage is notoriously poor and inaccurate,
carried in their muddled way a better report
that the university paper.
A short report of this tournament would
be indicative of both volleyball and its
relationship to UBC.
The team, consisting of only ten players,
plus manager, left the evening of Feb. 8 for
Calgary by CPR day coach. After spending
a sleepless and nauseous trip of 17 hours, the
team representing UBC arrived at its destination.
Food over this 17 hour interval consisted
of soft drinks, candy bars, etc. — not much
of a diet for athletes. But a large, substantial
meal was out of the question. Each player
had received only eight dollars to buy food
for the next four days. If the team had gone
by air, as is the practise with other Thunderbird teams, the additional cost would not
have even allowed money for food, and
would have required the players to pay the
balance of the fare.
It was a long tournament, the team playing as much as seven hours both Fri. and
Sat. I think you will grant that the players
drew on more than the one adequate meal
that finances allowed, to win the championship. They were rewarded with another 17
hour trip back home, now very tired and
without money for food.
Now perhaps you feel this is not really
the best way to treat a team representing
your university — but do they deserve to be
treated any better?
Last year this Thundenbird team won the
Canadian-American Championship, the Western Canadian Championship, and the Junior
Men's Canadian Championship.
The best Junior player in Canada was
Ken Witzke from UBC. The Canadian Men's
All Star team drew Bob Vosfourgh from the
same Thunderbird team.
On Feb. 16 the 12 man B.C. volleyball
team left for the Quebec Winter Games —
six of these players are from the Birds. I
think this UBC team deserves a little better
treatment.
(ed. Even the UBC Athletic Office seemed
ignorant of this. The team returned with a gold
medal.)
The University of Victoria, one third our
size, has granted their team an operating
budget of $2,500 while the victorious Birds
were pinching pennies on a budget of under
$1,000.
When travelling to Seattle or Victoria for
the Can-Am series, the players pay either
for the transportation or for the meals. A
UBC team that has more than a good chance
of winning the Canadian Men's Championship, from which the 1967 Pan-Am team will
be picked, cannot even afford the price of an
entry form.
It is interesting to note that volleyball
is more of an international sport than basketball or football. This is a statistical fact.
With a hard driven ball travelling close to
100 miles an hour, the sport lacks nothing
in speed or agility. Those fortunate enough
to have attended the exhibition games given
by the World Champion Russian Men's team
and the U.S. National team can testify to the
superb athletes who play the sport.
There is a great future in store for the
UBC volleyball team. Despite the fact that
the Birds do not have a coach from the university, the team receives excellent guidance
from Eric Lessman, an elementary school
teacher, but former volleyball player of more
than adequate talent.
This Varsity team, whose entire starting
line up consists of Juniors only, could conceivably play together for another three or
four years.
Last year the team was given added instruction by both the Russian and American
teams, who, realizing the potential of the
young university team, gave the Birds priv-
ate instruction clinics. As recently as two
months ago, Val Keller, coach of the U.S.
National team, instructed the Birds in another four days of volleyball.
In March again the team travels to Calgary for the Canadian Collegiate Championship. If they win, (there is more than a good
chance for they defeated the strongest Eastern team in the Canadian Junior Championship last year), the Thunderbirds will represent Canada in an international meet in
Tokyo this July.
The team is proud to present UBC in any
tournament, and you can be sure that besides
Canadian teams knowing of UBC's virtues,
international teams will hear of them too.
But it is unfortunate that the team members
must become evasive when the topic of student, faculty, and student paper support
arises.
How about a few cheers for the volleyball
Birds.
Mates try to match Calladine;
ski to second spot in PNW contest
The Thunderbird ski team placed second
in the Pacific Northwest Collegiate Ski
Championships held at Crystal Mt., last
weekend.
The UBC men came behind the University of Washington, and ahead of Stanford
University. Pacific Lutheran and Puget
Sound placed fourth and fifth, UBC placed
second in all team events except the downhill, where they dropped to third spot after
some spills on the bumpy course.
In the Nordic events, Tom Jenkin took a
surprising third place finish in the jumping
to win a bronze medal.
In the 10 km. cross-country Jan Atlung
was edged out of first place by 11 seconds,
and won the silver medal.
In the Winter Games, in addition to Bob
Calladine's slalom vistory, Rolf Pederson
placed seventh in the cross-country with a
very good time against the National Senior
Team. Dave Turner was later disqualified
after posting the fourth best time in the
slalom event.
Complete Thunderbird results in the meet:
Gymnasts' fine form fails
The UBC gymnastics team had to settle for second place
in two recent meets although there were some fine individual
performances.
Feb. 16 in Everett they were beaten 129 points to 122.9.
In the Feb. 18 contest held at Memorial gym the UBC squad
lost 159.75 to 139.9 to Eastern Washington. Bill Mackie was
second best overall individually with 46.8 points and Peter
Prince had a good routine on the rings.
This weekend the gymnasts compete with University of
Alberta at Edmonton.
Lead bellies ?
SHEEP GROIN (staff) Sports history was made here Sunday when the Sheep Groin Celestials defeated the Moose Toe
Socialites by 1.3 seconds in the thirteenth annual Main Street
diamond swallowing tournament.
Downhill:
Jumping:
8—Vittery
1:53.0
3—Jenkin
114.9
9—Shaak
1:54.8
5—Ramsay
108.9
15—Peskett
2:09.6
6—Peskett
96.0
16—Jenkin
2:10.1
7—Shaak
78.5
18—Foubister
2:15.4
Slalom:
Cross-country:
6—Shaak
2:05.5
2—Atlung
40:26
7—Jenkin
2:06.4
5—Ramsay
45:28
10—Foubister
2:10.8
6—Jenkin
50:58
11—Vittery
2:18.6
9—Shaak
53:43
13—<Ramsay
2:22.6
20—Atlung
3:02.6
Alpine combined:
Ski Melstert
5—Shaak
(15)
3—Shaak
(31)
7—Vittery
(19)
4—Jenkin
(32)
9—Jenkin
(23)
12—Foubister
(28)
the Canadian and Western Canadian Championships in March.
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
lew frame can do wonders
for the disposition.
Hab,Qplto&mL\
1701 W. Broadway
731-3021
Hycroft  Med.  QMg,
3195 Granville
733-8772
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
ALL THESE METALS
ARE AVAILABLE  AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR .. . 685-2271 Page  12
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Thriller shocks minds
FILM SOC
Film   Soc   presents   Psycho
today     in     the     auditorium,
12:30,  3:30, 6 p.m. and 8:30.
Admission  50 cents.
THEATRE  DEPT.
Lysistrata toy Aristophanes,
today,   noon>   Freddie   Wood.
Admission 75  cents.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Meeting today, noon, Newman   lounge.  Nominations
close.
PRE-MED
Microscope display and criticism today, 12:30 to 2:30,
histology lab, med block B.
PSYCH CLUB
Meeting   and   film   today,
noon, Ang. 207.
ARTS US
Candidates for arts offices
Arctic Circle
provides set
for new study
SASKATOON (CUP)—The
University of Saskatchewan
will celebrate Canada's centennial this summer by offering the first university classes
ever given within the Arctic
Circle.
Dr. Carlyle King, dean of
summer sessions, says the
class will be an on-the-spot
study of Canada's aboriginal
inhabitants,  the Eskimos.
"So far as we know," he
said, "this will be the first
time a university class for
credit has been given within
the rim of the Arctic."
The class, to run from July
8 to Aug. 10, is being offered
in co-operation with Canada's
northern affairs department
and the university's institute
of northern studies.
All     the     hilarious    "Peanuts"
Gang   by   Schultz   —   on   top-
quality,   colourful   Sweatshirts.
Price:   $4.88   Each
Arty Size
ITIillcrs
655 Granville Street.
47 West Hastings Street.
Vancouver, B.C.
622 Columbia Street
New Westminster, B.C.
meet, today, noon, arts office.
SCM
Rev.   Willard  Heinrich   discusses Swedenborg,  today,
noon, Brock ext. 350.
CRICKET  CLUB
Meeting today, noon, chem.
250.
NISEI VARSITY
Meeting   today,   noon,   Bu.
205.
PIPEBAND
Parade,  tonight  7:30,  armory.
VCF
Christian   and   Jewish   understanding seminar today,
noon, Bu. 2233.
ATC
Beginners bed and board,
a four week course in marriage guidance begins today,
7:30 p.m., with This Man and
This Woman, the physical aspects of marriage. ATS Students Centre, 6050 Chancellor
Blvd. Speakers Dr. H. Rue-
bsaat and Dr. A. Waldie.
UBYSSEY
Reporters, photographers, filers, typists welcomed with open arms. See us
anytime in north Brock Basement.
JUDO
The Judo club would like
to   purchase   one   uchi-mata.
Must   be   in   good   condition.
Contact Bruce Harwood.
AQUA  SOC
Sign   up   for   May   3   ling
hunting dive.
WAA
Nominations for president,
vice-president, and secretary
open Friday, close March 6.
Nomination forms available
at WAD office.
INTERNATIONALISTS
Two   Tanzanian   grad   stu
dents in political science discuss Democracy in the One
Party State, and Neocolonialism, Friday, 8 p.m., Fort
Camp men's lounge.
HAMSOC
Seminar,   Friday,   pH   and
electronic activity.
ALPHA OMEGA
Rally and party Saturday
night, Little Mountain, 6:30.
Meeting for open house Monday, noon  Bu. 223.
EXCEEDINGLY
FAST  DELIVERY
THE FRIAR ...  is inn
4423 W.  10th  Ave.
Immunization Clinics
Regular Immunization Clinics are
held at the Health Service, Room
114,  Wesbrook Building.
every Tuesday and Wednesday
from 2-4 p.m.
Students requiring immunization for
international travel certificates this
summer are advisecf to start their
immunization   programme   now.
Hubtrman
Educational
Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
Public School, High School,
University Subjects
Morris  Huberman,
Educational  Consultant
Knowledge and Success
through Learnlnc Power
215S W. 12th Av*., Vancouver
For Appointment, Phone
732-5535       263-4808
PERSPECTIVES
The Thea Koerner Memorial Lectures
PROFESSOR J. MAX PATRICK
Graduate School, New York  University
HER INFINITE VARIETY: CLEOPATRA
THROUGH THE AGES
Friday, February 24, 1967
12:30 p.m. - Education 100
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST: TUES. 5:30 P.M., WOMEN'S
gym. Beige wallet — AMS card,
etc.   Phone   738-2756.
BROWN SUEDE. COAT, PULL
length, taken from outside BiSc.
3001.   Phone  Kathy,   922-7991.	
LOST: LARGE TRANSISTOR
with brown handle and leather
backing. At noon, Feb. 9 Bu. 104.
Phone   987-0157.	
WOULD WHOEVER LIFTED
the cart-era from Sedgewick
Thursday please return the film?
Mail to Publications Office, Brock
Hall.
FOUND: - LADY'S RING IN EDU-
cation Gym on Monday. Claim in
Publications   Office,   Brock   Hall.
FOUND: Pr. of black leather gloves
in C lot on the 13th. Claim at
Publications   Office,   Brock   Hall.
FOUND: BLACK BINDER - FULL
of notes in East Mall Annex last
week. Claim: Publications Office,
Brock   Hall.
Coming Dances
12A
THE   DANCE   WITH   A
DIFFERENCE!
(It's not in the Armouries.)
Swing this Sat. nite to the "turn-
on" sound of the STAGS In Brock
Hall,   9:00-12:30.   $1.25   per  person.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.	
SCIENTI FIC   TRANSLATIONS
from  Russian,  German or French;
B.    Portier,   Dept.   of   Metallurgy,
_228-2676.	
BASKETBALL: FRIDAY, 8:30,
War Memorial Gym. U. of Alberta (Calgary) vs. UBC. See
Boss-Jock Basketball at half
time, featuring CKLG Radio Disc
Jockeys  and  UBC  Cheerleaders.	
1ST ANNUAL STEEL CUP~HOCK-
ey game and dance. S.F.U. vs.
U.B.C.-P.E. Game 5:45 Tues.,
Feb. 28, T'Bird ice arena. Dance
Brock Lounge after, 8-12. Tick-
ets at noon. Gym $.75.	
SCIENCE ELECTIONS."-ALL POS~
itions open. Nominations close
March 1st at 4 p.m. Elections
March  8th.
Transportation
14
ONE DRIVER WANTED FOR
Capilano Highlands car pool. 988-
0566.
Travel Opportunities
16
AUTOMOTIVE   8c   MARINE
Automobiles  For Sale
21
MUST SELL 1965 AUSTIN 1100.
Excellent cond., radio, 1967 plates.
Phone   Art,   evenings,   RE   3-8672.
'49 DODGE CPE., GREAT SHAPE,
runs well. New rear seal, battery,
much more. Phone Don, Rm. 19,
224-9853.
1958 VOLKSWAGEN. NEW:
Brakes, tires, radio, battery,
plates. Excellent running gear.
Offers? John(K). Room 207, 224-
9049.
1953 CHEV. SEDAN. CITY TEST-
ED.   Good  condition,   $100.   AM  6-
•5% CHEV. BELAIR. SOUND OON-
dition. City tested. Best offer.
987-1319.   '67   plates.
Bodywork, Glass
23
UNDERWATER    BODY    REPAIRS.
Psycho    special.    Auditorium
Thurs.,   Feb.   23,   12:30,   3:30,   6:00,
8:30,   50c.
0732.
Beauty Salons
31
YOUNG GENTLEMEN'S COIF-
feurs. See our two campus models; Monsieurs Willie and Max.
Phone 681-5650. Special rates for
blondes.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39-A
SEE THE BODY IN THE BASE-
ment.   Thurs.,   Feb.   23.    Auditori-
BIRD. HAPPY VALENTINE'S
Day and thanks for sharing a
great weekend. Ich. Liebe Dlch.
BEARD.
DEAR JOHN: THE DARKEST
hour is just before dawn. Happy
21st.   Love   from   your   L.C.B.
JOCKUS BELLIES UP TO THE
bathroom sink while Magor's
Mother marvels. Bwaa. Spring
'67.	
SECHELT IS A MIGHTY FINE
spot. If you're married or if you're
not. Ottawa should be fun too.
But what are you going to do
that's new?
DESIRING TO MAKE MONEY—
Musicians, singers entertainers,
groups. Phone 688-3012. Have a
resume  & photo if possible.
Scandals
39A
FULLY EQUIPPED VOLKSWA-
gen Service Depot. Lowest rates
on any type of repair work. Talk
to Hans at Auto Henneken 263-
8121 or drop in to 8914 Oak St. at
Marine  Drive.
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granvill»  St. 263-4630
GOOD, EXPERIENCED TYPIST,
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
TYPING THESIS AT MY HOME.
Speed: 65 wpm. Contact after 5
p.m.   at   255-8853.    Call   Rosie.	
WILL    TYPE    THESIS,    REASON-
able   rates,   929-2757.	
FAST,    ACCURATE   TYPING,    321-
2298:	
TYPING — 25c Single Page; legible
handwriting.    Call   after   10   a.m.
738-6829.	
ESSAYS,    THESES    EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone   733-7819.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
LIFEGUARDS — HEAD GUARD
City of Kamloops refer to placement   office.
PSYCHIATRIST PLEASE: FOR
consultation during psycho.
Thurs., Feb. 23, Auditorium, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30,   50c.
102nd CUB PACK DESPERATELY
need an assistant cub master.
Contact Mr. Stan Stewart 224-
3782  or Mrs.  Harris  224-7555.
Music
63
FENDER BASSMAN AMP. STU-
dent can't maintain payments.
Excellent condition. Only $396 owing.  Phone Pete 224-5958 (eves).
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts.  736-6923.
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science,. Engineering. $3/hr. Minimum 5 lessons. 876-1859.
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
Special Classes
65
Instruction Wanted
66
TUTOR WANTED FOR GRADE
eleven math student. $3.00 per
hour.    Ph.   433-9485.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle   Drive-in
at Rear of Store
SKI BOOTS MENS 8%. GOOD
cond. Must sell!! Dirk RE 6-5157.
After  6  p.m.
ITS SPRING! FOR SALE: GOLF
clubs and bag. Good clubs, excellent condition. Phone 736-0669
evenings.	
HEAD COMP. G.S. 215 CM. ONE
year old. Look Nevada harness.
Head poles, 54 in. Phone FA 5-
7025.
READY TO PAINT DESKS:
Single Pedestal — $10.95. Double
Pedestal — $18.95. Hoover's Furniture. 8286 Ontario (Just off Marine). Free delivery in city, 228-
8146.
RENTALS  8c  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
tl
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE ONLY,
vicinity 10th Avenue and Crown
Street.     MU   4-6736   or   224-0956.
ROOM & BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 W. 6th, phone
224-4866.	
ONE SLEEPING ROOM — NOT
basement male or staff. CA 4-
1754.
ROOM FOR MALE PRIV. SHOW-
er, entrance. 5 minute walk from
campus.  Call 224-0088.
Room & Board
82
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 6:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
FOR RENT—2-B.R. HOUSE. MAR.
1 to May 15. Ideal for couple and
child.  263-8979,  evenings.	
TWO GIRLS TO" SHARE FULLY
furnished and equipped modern
two bdrm. apt. Located 70th at
Oak. Available May 1st. Contact
Brenda   327-7541.   After   5:00  p.m.
Unfurn. Houses 8c Apts.
84

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