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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1976

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Array UBC rally today
UBC students, faculty and staff have an opportunity today to join
the tens of thousands protesting Insurance Corporation of B.C. rate
increases at a noon rally in the Instructional Resources Centre
lecture hall 2.
The event features NDP MLA Dennis Cocke as the main speaker.
Cocke, mentioned as possible successor to Dave Barrett as leader
of the provincial NDP party, was a member of the ICBC board of
directors until shortly after the Social Credit party assumed
power in December.
Like the previous rate increase protests — at the University of
Victoria Friday and at the Pacific National Exhibition Agrodome
Sunday — it is aimed at the extremely high increase in insurance
premiums established by the Socred cabinet.
Hardest hit is the classification many UBC students fall under:
single, male drivers less than 25 years old and owning their own
cars. These under-25s face premium increases of 250 to 350 per cent
for the same coverage.
The event is co-sponsored by two campus groups, the Alma
Mater Society — representing all UBC students — and the Committee for a Democratic University.
THE UBY
vVol. LVH, No. 47
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,
Massive bloc voting
puts 2 gears on board
By HEATHER WALKER
Remember the elections last
Wednesday for student members
on the board of governors?
Well, the results are finally out.
A long wait, but it took a while to
undo all those envelopes.
Incumbent board member Rick
Murray, engineering 4, and Basil
Peters, engineering 3, won with 901
and 719 votes respectively.
6ther results were: Dave
Theessen, commerce 4, 666 votes;
Herb Dhaliwal, commerce 4, 454;
Dave Van Blarcom, arts 4, 453;
Geoffrey Webb, grad studies 4, 258;
Monica Jones, arts 3, 200; and
Bonnie Geddes, arts 1.
Murray said in an interview
Monday he hoped his victory
"indicated»more students agreed
with mypoint of view."
"I don't believe in change for the
sake of change," he said. "I guess
if there's any such thing as a status
quo candidate, which is how I was
described in The Ubyssey, I come
pretty close to that."
Murray said his main concerns
were in the areas of "physical
development of the campus and
recreational facilities."
"There are 85 acres of parking
lots on this campus and that's just
nonsense," he said.
Murray proposed multi-level
parking lots on the north end of
campus as an alternative to the
current situation.
"They would be built in the
parking lot on the north side of
SUB, in Fraser lot, and the hospital
lot to the south of Wesbrook," he
said.
"I envisage them in five levels,
with three submerged (sic)."
Murray admitted the proposed
parking lots would cost an
estimated $5,000 a stall — "that's
See page 8: MORE
Maritime occupation gets
Canadian student support
FREDERICTON (CUP) —
Student unions across Canada are
rallying to support 600 University
of Moncton students in their week-
long occupation of a government
building here.
The francophone students have
vowed to continue the occupation
until the provincial government
agrees to improvements in the
student aid program, including
reduction of the loan ceiling to $900
from $1,800, and increases in living
allowances.
The same demands were flatly
refused by Conservative premier
Richard Hatfield when 500
anglophone students demonstrated
outside the provincial legislature
two weeks ago.
Hatfield has handed the same
refusal to the U of M students,
claiming the government must cut
back all programs, including
education, as a measure of
restraint.
In New Brunswick, student
unions are holding emergency
meetings to decide whether they
should send money to support the
occupation where students have
been surviving on one hot meal a
day from local church halls.
The Dalhousie University
student union has pledged $200 and
other campuses may send both
money and people.
The Ontario Federation of
Students has sent $1,000 to help
continue the occupation and the
chairman, a field worker and an
executive member of the OFS are
travelling here to lend their support. The OFS hopes to raise a
further $1,000 for the occupation.
And as far west as Saskatchewan
the University of Regina student
union will hold a special meeting to
vote funds for the U of M students.
In Quebec, the University of
Montreal student union and
several Quebec community college
student councils have committed
funds to the occupation.
The students are occupying the
lobby of the building, directly
below the offices of premier
Hatfield.
There has been little support,
however, from the students of the
University of New Brunswick.
Observers say this is partly due to
the conservative politics and
history of UNB; as well as the
inexperience of the UNB student
leadership in alterting students to
what is going on.
The occupying students are
reported to be in high spirits and
are passing the time reading,
singing and discussing. The
organization has been described as
excellent, with strike centres set
up, a courier service between
See page 5: EVENT
PROTEST MOTORCADE stretches two miles through downtown Victoria Friday as University of^ctoria
students wind their way to legislature buildings to demonstrate their opposition to Social Credit
government's Insurance Corporation of B.C. rate increases.
Af two ICBC protests
Socreds absent
Pleas to cut back huge Insurance Corporation of
B.C. rates increases continue to fall on deaf ears as
the Social Credit < government ignored massive
protest rallies Friday and Sunday.
The increases average 139 per cent and will be as
high as 300 per cent for drivers under 25 years of age.
Hundreds of University of Victoria students formed
a two-mile long car calvacade to the provincial
legislature Friday and 10,000 people jammed the
Agrodome in Vancouver Sunday.
No Socred representatives showed up at the
Agrodome protest, which Pat McGeer, minister
responsible for ICBC, has termed "just an event."
And McGeer, who is also education minister, sent
only his executive assistant, Jim Bennett, to field
questions from the crowd of angry UVic students and
citizens of Victoria.
Cars, . trucks, jeeps, vans and motorcycles
displaying anti-Socred signs ignored traffic lights and
honked their horns as the motorcade wound its way
through downtown Victoria.
After surrounding the legislature with their parked
vehicles, the protesters gathered on the front steps
and demanded to see McGeer.
Bennett was booed and shouted down when he told
the crowd he could only refer their questions to
McGeer, who was attending an ICBC board of
directors meeting in Vancouver.
A telegram from premier Bill Bennett read at
Sunday's protest rally said "prior commitments
made it impossible to attend the rally," but that he
would be prepared to meet with the group sponsoring
the rally to "discuss proposals."
The telegram received a loud response of
"bullshit!" from a member of the audience.
The Vancouver rally, sponsored jointly by the B.C.
Federation of Labor and The Concerned Citizens
Association, was also attended by members of the
labor movement and three political parties.
Progressive Conservative leader Scott Wallace,
who labelled the rate increase as "harsh and inconsiderate," called for a full-scale debate in the
house to decide to what extent the increases are
justified.
' 'An interim raise should be applied now until we as
the opposition have seen all the facts and figures,"
Wallace said.
He also said it is "absolutely irresponsible" no
government official showed up to face the crowd.
Liberal party leader Gordon Gibson said it is not
too late to make a change in the rates and suggested a
30 per cent increase, which would be financed by a 15
per cent gas surtax.
"People are being penalized for their age and
where they live," Gibson said. "Young drivers'
See page 2: ICBC
7c:.B.C. pbotls^
NEW ADDITION to this truck gives owner's opinion of Pat McGeer, minister resr^nsibl^'foMn'suranc?
Corporation of B.C. Protestor, on way to ICBC rally in Vancouver Sunday, is undoubtedly more upset bv
addition to his insurance rates - up to 300 per cent if he is under 25. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   February  3,   1976
ICBC vote demanded
From page 1
premiums should be  related  to
their driving records and not their
age.  The territorial   discounts
should be continued."
The, crowd gave a boisterous
ovation to the NDP representative,
Dennis Cocke, MLA for New
Westminster and former director
of ICBC, after he suggested the
deficit should be paid by gas tax
revenues.
*.
A six-point resolution was passed
at the Vancouver rally calling for a
rollback of the insurance premium
rates to not more than 20 per cent
over the 1975-76 premiums with the
remaining ICBC expenses to be
paid by gasoline or other tax
revenues.
NDP MLA Charles Barber
sarcastically told the Victoria
protesters they were being unkind
to the cabinet when they chanted,
"We want the Socreds out."
"They (the Socreds) have real
trouble understanding," he said
sincerely. "If you were a
millionaire's son, you'd have
trouble understanding, too."
Barber called the increases
"unwise, unfair and unnecessary,"
and told the crowd to keep making
noise until the government "gets
the message."
Wallace accused the Socred
administration of being "hasty and
heartless" and predicted this was
"only the first boot in the rear end"
for the people of B.C.
UVic student president Clayton
Shold said he saw no reason why
cheap government insurance can't
work in B.C. when it is working in
Saskatchewan.
He also accused the Socreds of
eliminating  the only real  alter
native to car travel after promised
bus fare increases by B.C. Hydro
are implemented.
Asked by a member of the crowd
why the government didn't stay
within the 10 per cent federal price
control ceiling (as it tried to do by
rolling back B.C. teachers' salary
increases recently), Bennett
claimed the controls do not require
a corporation, government or
private, to lose money.
Demonstrators challenged what
they called the myth of an NDP
deficit, claiming the Socreds were
using the initial capital costs of the
corporation to make the NDP look
bad.
Bennett agreed to pass on an
obviously well-supported demand
to put the ICBC question to a
referendum.
A number of speakers pointed to
the obvious discrimination the
increases represent for young
people, old people and poor people.
"It is only the people in business
who can afford these rates," one
demonstrator said.
Several people used the opportunity to give a political "I-told-
you-so" to those who had voted
Socred in the Dec. 11 provincial
election. Barber cited such a
person, a truck driver, who now
had to sell his truck because he
couldn't afford the new rates.
When the crowd broke up several
hours later, it was to chants of
"We'll be back." "This was only a
dress rehearsal," said Robert
Hazard, one of the organizers.
"The big performance is coming.
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TRAVEL
Rm. 100P S.U.B.
Organized by students at the
University of Victoria, the
motorcade left the Student Union
Building thereat noon. On the way,
students from Camosan College
and several high schools joined.
Pedestrians and other drivers
reacted positively to the motorcade, giving peace signs or raised
fists in salute and. shouting encouragement.
An obviously ^aged VW bug sporting two-tone' primer paint and
lacking a rear bumper carried a
sign reading: "Does this look like a
rich man's car?"
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Collins hits tenure procedure
By RALPH MAURER
A professor denied tenure at
UBC says teaching ability isn't
being given enough priority — by
students.
Fine arts prof Brad Collins said
in an interview Friday teaching is
downplayed in tenure decisions.
But he said it is not just the fault of
faculty tenure committees
members, but of students who are
unwilling to stand up and scream
when they get lousy teachers.
"The blame lies with teachers
but also lies with students," he
said. "There is a certain unwillingness on their part to stand
up and scream when the quality of
education is suspect."
And Collins gave advice on how
to stand up and scream: "By
complaining to heads (of departments). Write a letter to the head.
Write a letter to the dean. The
deans hate to receive these letters.
"If (the letters) pile up against
one teacher then it doesn't matter
a damn what (his or her
colleagues) think of him as an
academic," he said.
The popular Collins was denied
tenure, he said, not because of
teaching inability but because of
his academic record. He does not
have his doctorate.
While several tenured fine arts
profs do not have Ph.D.s, Collins
said, the department is now
beginning to take itself more
seriously and wants to grant postgraduate degrees itself.
Collins said a department offering post-graduate degrees
couldn't afford to give tenure to a
prof not qualified to do postgraduate teaching.
When students in Collins' fine
arts 171 class heard of Collins'
dismissal they circulated a protest
petition, which gathered about 100
signatures.
But Collins isn't bitter about his
dismissal.
"Teaching gets the short shrift
(in tenure decisions) because it's
hard to quantify, because
historically this has been the
case," he said.
"Teaching is considered. It's not
fair to say it's not. But in the long
run a bit more consideration
should be given to undergraduate
teaching.'"
Decisions on whether or not profs
should get tenure are made by the
tenured profs in each department.
They rely on course evaluations —
in which profs are rated on a scale
of one to five on different areas —
for an idea of what kind of teacher
a prof is. Collins said these are
never very reliable.
He said he thinks many students
don't take themselves, their
courses or the course evaluations
seriously.
Consequently, what a course
evaluation says about a prof
doesn't necessarily reflect that
prof's teaching ability or inability,
he said.
"Sure,       tenure       demands
Five senators elected
with 2,199 votes cast
The results of last week's
election of student representatives
to UBC's senate were finally announced Monday — five days after
the election last Wednesday.
Winning candidates in the
election of five full-time students to
serve one-year terms on senate
were:
Dick Byl, law 1, (949 votes);
Brian Higgins, law 1, (923
votes);
Keith Gagne, applied science 3,
(790);
David MacKinnon, arts 3, (716);
Bill Black, applied science 3, (710).
And the losers as listed by the
registrar's office were:
Peter Fairey, commerce 2,
(671);
BernarcJ Bischoff, philosophy
grad student, (620);
Bev Crowe, arts 3, (552);
Lorelee Parker, arts 2, (373);
Christie Jung, arts 3, (354);
Dave Jiles, arts 2, (349);
Joanne Clifton, arts 2, (236);
Trevor Jones, arts 2, (228).
Of 2,199 bajlots cast, 100 were in
unidentified envelopes and were
not counted. Voting regulations
dictated that voters identify
themselves on envelopes containing ballots, so their full-time
student status could be verified.
scrutiny," he said. "I think
students demand scrutiny too.
Many are here for all the wrong
reasons.
"Each person who is out here
should examine their reasons for
being here."
He said many students are out
here to learn, to expand their
consciousness.
"But even people out here for the
wrong reasons benefit from
(university education)," Collins
said. "I don't want to discourage
that. But they should think about
it."
"Teachers won't get away with
being lousy teachers if students
won't let them. I don't see the point
of throwing the blame on the
tenure committees," he said.
Collins said if students themselves demanded higher standards
of teaching, faculty tenure committees would have to consider it
as more important.
He said getting students on these
tenure committees is basically the
wrong approach.
"It would be a helpful gesture,
but ultimately a useless gesture.
"If students have representation
on the tenure committees they will
get the feeling that these student
reps are taking care of them, and
then take no further action," he
said.
The best approach, he said, is to
write to the dean of your faculty
about your prof. If he or she is a
good teacher, say so; if he or she is
not, say that; and of course, give
reasons for your opinions.
"What we have to talk about is
the grass roots and by that I mean
students who give a damn about
education."
Collins suggested that if a prof
knows students are going to write
about his or her teaching ability to
the faculty dean, he or she will be a
much better teacher.
"But there's no way we're gonna
knock ourselves out for a bunch of
apathetic people," he said.
"Apathetic people don't deserve
it."
There were also 76 spoiled,
ballots, a spokesman for the
registrar's office said.
Another 11 envelopes were not
opened because voters were not
full-time students and thus not
eligible to vote.
Also elected to senate last
Wednesday were representatives
from the faculties of law and applied science.
In the law faculty incumbent
Gordon Funt was re-elected with
241 votes. The' defeated candidate,
William Clarke, polled 82 votes.
In applied science, John
Swainson polled 181 votes to defeat
Bill Low, who had 139 votes.
All other student faculty reps to
senate were elected by acclamation.
The elected students will sit on
the newly-constituted Student Representation Assembly as well as on
senate.
The SRA will replace the current
Alma Mater Society council, and
will consist of student reps to the
board of governors, senate and
undergraduate societies.
The SRA will begin functioning
March 5, when the recently approved new AMS constitution goes
into effect.
SOFT TOUCH for Peter Cummings, commerce 2, is backrub courtesy of
enjoyed experience, then whipped next door to do some bleeding for Red
—f stop fitzgerald photo
nurse in SUB. Cummings obviously
Cross blood drive.
Calgary board deaf to students
CALGARY (Staff) - The
University of Calgary board of
governors voted Monday to raise
tuition fees 25 per cent despite a
demonstration by 900 students
Friday to oppose the increase.
The board also voted to limit
next year's enrolment increase to
five per cent, effectively barring
up to 800 students from entering
the university next year.
Reacting to the board decision,
the University of Lethbridge
student union has called for a
province-wide student march on
the provincial legislature.
An identical decision by the
Lethbridge board to raise tuition
fees 25 per cent has led the U of L
Constitution leaves out ombudsperson,
but Van Blarcom suggests changes
Where does the student ombudsperson fit into the new Alma
Mater Society constitution?
Nowhere, according to AMS
vice-president Dave Van Blarcom,
the author of the new constitution.
"To tell you the truth there really
isn't one," Van Blarcom said
Monday.
But he said that a constitutional
revision may soon be introduced,
providing for an ombudsperson in
the new constitution, which
becomes effective March 5.
When the constitution was being
rewritten, it was believed the job of
the student ombudsperson could be
handled by Speakeasy and by
student reps on the board of
governors and senate, Van Blarcom said.
Previous ombudspersons had
done little in the job, he added.
Van Blarcom said he changed his
mind after meeting with current
ombudsperson Moe Sihota, social
work 3, who was elected in the fall.
Sihota has been unexpectedly
busy in the job, Van Blarcom said,
and has demonstrated the need for
a student ombudsperson.
"It shouldn't be necessary in
theory, but in practice it is," he
said.
The new ombudsperson will
likely be appointed by the Student
Representative Assembly, which
will replace AMS council under the
new constitution, he said.
The SRA will consist of student
representatives on UBC's senate
and board of governors, as well as
elected representatives of undergraduate societies.
Sihota said Monday he was not
sure when he was elected that the
ombudsperson position was
necessary.
But he said, "Speakeasy could
not handle the load I'm getting.
"We found you need an ombudsperson — if he's prepared to
put some time into it."
student union to call for a march on
the provincial legislature by
Alberta's post-secondary students.
Both tuition hikes came in
response to the 11 per cent ceiling
on educational spending announced by the Alberta Conservative government in late
.October. The ceiling is forcing
Alberta post-secondary institutions
to either cut back programs or find
money from other sources, such as
increased tuition fees.
Friday's demonstration at the U
of C student union building was
organized by the student committee for educational quality
(SCEQ), but no administration
figures attended to explain why
higher tuition fees are needed.
SCEQ member Noel Jantzie
denounced the 25 per cent hike in
an interview shortly after the
board's decision Monday.
"We feel the limit on enrolment
and the tuition fee increases can
only adversely affect the chances
of lower- and middle-income
students to obtain a university
education."
"We fully support the University
of Lethbridge student union's call
for a province-wide march,"
Jantzie said.
The U of C board decision
Monday came after the board
postponed voting on increased
tuition two weeks ago at the
request of student board members
Dave Wolf and John Savary. Wolf
said he had heard no good reason
for raising tuition from the
university administration.
Wolf and the U of C student
legislative    council    made    a
presentation to the board before
the tuition vote, stating:
• the 11 per cent educational
spending ceiling is unrealistic;
• funding for Alberta universities is unequal;
• the tution increase does not
adhere to the federal government's
wage and price controls;
• the tuition increase will place
poorer students in a financial bind;
• the provincial student aid
program is insufficient.
Wolf recommended all possible
alternatives for funds be investigated and all methods of
economy be considered before the
board makes a decision to increase
tuition fees.
Calgary administration
president William Cochrane has
blamed the "unrealistic and
unreasonable" educational
spending ceiling for the tuition fee
increase. Cochrane has called the
ceiling unfair because it is applied
equally to all Alberta post-
secondary institutions though they
are growing at different rates.
Though the Calgary students
have expressed their anger at the
tuition increases the student union
has taken little action to oppose the
increase. The student union
president recently said he will do
nothing to fight the increases.
And the University of Lethbridge
student union president has said he
has received no support from the U
of C student union for a protest
march on the legislature, though
the University of Alberta student
union, in Edmonton, has pledged
its support. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  3,   1976
Tenure tales and you
2
Tenure tales, or part two of the
Great Tenure Debate.
Less than two weeks ago (Jan. 23)
The Ubyssey ran a brief editorial
introduction to the concept of
tenure and the lack of student input
into tenure decisions.
Now we can look at the whole
question in more concrete terms
since details of the year's first tenure
tale have surfaced.
Brad Collins, a popular fine arts
prof, has been denied tenure on
primarily academic grounds. Instead
of clamming up like most fired profs
do, Collins criticized students for not
being vocal enough about their
teachers (see page 3).
Collins wants students to call a
spade a spade and a turkey a turkey.
Fine. It would work if that kind of
organized grassroots action came
about on its own. But it usually
doesn't so other alternatives must be
sought.
Generally, there is a tremendous
amount of secrecy surrounding the
process of tenure granting, which
was discussed in Friday's Ubyssey.
Most first- and second-year students
are baffled enough by the UBC
system itself to be aware of issues
like tenure and writing critical letters
about their profs.
No, we must find a way to get
around    the    secrecy   and   involve
newer  students   in   the   process of -
hiring faculty for this university.
Friday's tenure story outlined
two levels at which information is
gathered about a prof and decisions
are made about his or her future at
UBC. The first stage, known as the
tenure committee (usually three
people), gathers all sorts of
information about the candidate,
including research, published
material and teaching ability.
This information is funnelled into
the advisory committee which
includes all tenured professors whose
rank is equal to or above that of the
candidate. This committee makes the
initial decision to either grant or
withhold tenure based upon the data
gathered.
From there the decision is
considered by the department head,
the faculty dean, the university
tenure committee and is eventually
rubber stamped by the board of
governors.
At no level is student input
guaranteed. A series of guidelines for
contract negotiations between the
faculty       association       and       the
administration only provides that
students "may" be consulted.
As Collins and other profs
contacted point out, student input is
usually limited to those hastily-filled
out questionnaires which get handed
out toward the end of a course.
There is some question as to their
reliability and it is doubtful they
carry much weight with the advisory
committees.
Hence the net effect of student
input into tenure decisions is
virtually nil. As we pointed out
before, students are the best judge of
a prof's ability to teach, and teaching
ability is at least as important as
academic excellence.
Contrary to Collins' belief that
student representation on tenure
committees is a "useless gesture"
The Ubyssey proposes the following
alternative:
At the beginning of every
academic year, department heads
should supply to the various
undergraduate societies a list of
those profs being considered for
tenure.
An advisory committee should be
formed with an equal number of
faculty and students to make the
tenure decision based on the
gathered information. Since it is
always claimed that academics and
teaching   are   given   equal   weight,
having both students and faculty in
equal numbers will ensure it.
Now those student reps should
realize they have a tremendous responsibility. They would have to investigate and come to meetings with
each case thoroughly researched.
One way of getting this research is
for the undergraduate societies to
conduct detailed teacher evaluations
of those profs being considered for
tenure. This might include an
extensive questionnaire and
interviews with the prof's students.
With this kind of input, we'd not
only be guaranteed good academics
but good teachers as well. This way
seems fairest to all.
■THE UBYSSI
Letters
Protest
ICBC
An open letter to B.C. premier
Bill Bennett.
So the "honorable" Pat McGeer,
minister responsible for ICBC, has
spoken again. In his latest
statement the "honorable"
minister makes reference to the
"NDP pigeons." One wonders
whether he is referring to:
1. New Democrat. MLA's.
2. NDP initiated programs as a
whole.
3. Only ICBC.
4. the passenger pigeon.
5. all of the above.
Showing considerable resilience
and alacrity the honorable
minister has succeeded in accomplishing the near impossible:
he now appears to have opened his
mouth wide enough to accommodate his other foot.
Bolstered by such achievements,
who knows what ideas he might
attach himself to next. (Perhaps in
his capacity as dinosaur of
education he will see fit to return
the beloved strap to the public
schools.)
However, such sterling performances rarely go unrecognized
(Vander Shovel take note!) which
brings us to the point of this letter.
Bennett, the explanation given
for high insurance rates for underage single males is that this
particular group is statistically
high risk.
Your government was elected on
a platform of free enterprise — a
return to the "good life" so to
speak. Authority concerning
education to be handed down to
individual school boards, private
ownership of land and private
initiative in business were all
major issues in your campaign in
the last election.
In short your party's policy was
one of recognition of the citizens of
this province; as individuals; as
opposed to NDP statistical blanket.
Why then, Mr. Premier, has the
\-:-V- -
cabinet, in this instance,
repudiated this basic underlying
policy in your government's
election platform.
We have no control over the date
of our birth, or our sex and if we
married tomorrow it is unlikely
that either of us would be sub-
m umstv
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
All right, we're convinced. After last week's disgusting display of
grossness, it's time for a tasteful masthead. Dave Wilkinson drank coffee all
day, but that's not particularly tasteful. Paisely Woodward was in a sour
mood, and little Ralphie Maurer was rather saccharin. Gregg Thompson
munched away at frogs' legs, but it was definitely escargots for Gary Coull.
Doug Rushton preferred octopus, but had to settle for leftover pheasant
from Nancy Southam's lunch. Marcus Gee ordered Quiche Lorraine, to a
chorus of "Lorraine who?" from characteristically tasteless Avtar Baines,
Doug Field, Jean Randall and Sue Vohanka. Anne Wallace doctored up
some Scotch broth, as Bob Rayfield gobbled up the spam. "That's
tasteless," yelled Heather Walker, Doug Todd and Matt King. .Oh well.
Chris Gainor insisted on a submarine, as Derryl Mogg chewed at his roast
wild duck. Matt King had smoked oysters, but Tom Barnes decided to eat
the White Spot. And no one mentioned rats the whole time.
stantially better drivers than we
are today.
Also, Mr. Premier, we have little
control over the antics of other
members of our age group when
they are operating their own
vehicles. Wake up Mr. Premier
and pull your nose out of the
balance sheet.
We individuals are not statistics
and we resent being treated as
such.
In closing we would like to make
one observation — only in a
democratic society could we have
a situation where an elected
government could introduce
legislation making it financially
impossible for many citizens to use
their own motor vehicles, while at
the same time the millionaire
leader of this same government
has at his disposal an automobile
paid for, in part, by the taxes of
those same citizens.
Robin Gill
applied science 2
Joe Uyesugi
applied science 2 Tuesday,  February 3,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Guerilla leader says
Guns will gain freedom
By GREGG THOMPSON
Political freedom and independence for blacks in white-
ruled Rhodesia can only be gained
through armed confrontation, a
guerrilla leader active in the
struggle said Friday.
Michael Mawema, national
organizing secretary and central
committee member of Zimbabwe
African National Union, said the
process of liberation is not open to
negotiation.
"This is not a theoretical war in
which we are engaged, it is a
violent and bloody war.
"We will not sacrifice or
negotiate our independence," he
said.
Mawema was speaking to about
150 people in SUB ballroom as part
of a 19-city fund-raising tour
sponsored on campus by the
Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist) and the Alma
Mater Society.
Mawema said the armed
struggle is being directed at the
"collection of evil forces" brought
to Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) with the
first British colonizers.
He said colonialism, imperialism
and racism represent forces which
attempt to undermine the
Africans' faith in themselves and
their cultural heritage.
"Our people were never found
wanting, and despite the forces of
colonialism, imperialism and
racism our culture survived," he
said.
"We have never fallen short in
claiming our personality, although
systems of negation in education,
religion, sociology and anthropology have attempted to
reduce us to a begging people,"
Mawema said.
"But we have chosen not to go
down on our knees singing hymns.
We shall be our own liberators in
spite of what forces oppose us," he
said.
ZANU was established in
August, 1963 when Rhodesia was
still a British crown colony.
With independence imminent in
1965, and fearing black majority
rule under a British-inspired
constitution, Ian Smith led a
minority of 250,000 whites in an
illegal unilateral declaration of
independence from Great Britain.
The move left Rhodesia's 5.7
million blacks without any form of
political and social representation
and today blacks are allowed only
six seats in the 66-seat representative assembly.
Event filmed
From page 1
Moncton      and      Fredericton
operating smoothly, and even film
and tape units being present to
record events.
Discipline has not been a
problem since the students have
set up their own internal security
in the occupation area and no
confrontations with the RCMP or
local police are expected.
Mawema said ZANU is "committed to the complete destruction
of all traces of capitalism" in
Rhodesia.
He said the ZANU struggle is
directed not specifically against
white people, but against their
institutions.
"But we may come across
certain groups, and those groups
will be destroyed with those-institutions," he said.
Mawema also lashed out. at
multinational corporations who
"descend to destroy the heritage of
the Zimbabwe people."
Mawema cited the ineffectiveness of United Nations
economic and political sanctions
against Rhodesia as examples of
international compliance with the
Smith regime.
"The Rhodesian dollar is the
strongest currency in Africa,"
Mawema claimed.
"It's even stronger than the
South African rand, despite the
United Nations sanctions.
"This is a conspiracy which is
not a small exercise. It is a conspiracy which arises from without
the African continent," he said.
Mawema said outside forces are
working to divide the Rhodesian
liberation movement as they are
doing to the various guerrilla
organizations currently fighting in
Angola.
"Who divided African unity at
the Organization of African Unity
conference three weeks ago?" he
asked. (Held in Addis Ababa, the
organization was unsuccessful in
attempts to negotiate an end to the
Angola conflict.)
In response to a question linking
ZANU forces to Soviet Russia,
Mawema said: "ZANU is not part
of any superpower structure, and
we will fight against any superpower structure."
Mawema added that since its
inception in 1963 ZANU has had no
relations with the USSR.
Mawema told listeners of the repressive nature of the Smith
regime, where thousands of people
are imprisoned in jails and concentration camps while thousands
of others remain in exile abroad.
Mawema himself has spent more
than six years in Rhodesian
prisons.
ZANU operates as a guerrilla
force under the "umbrella"
organization of the African
National Council.
Mawema compared the over-all
structure of the ANC with the
Palestine Liberation Organization,
where several groups operate
under one united command.
However, the ANC has had
difficulty maintaining unity and
has been subject to factional splits
over the methods of dealing with
the Smith government.
After years of common
existence, ZANU and the Zimbabwe African Peoples' Union
have only recently joined their
armies in the field.
The resulting United Zimbabwe
Army now operates in northern
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Rhodesia, south of- the Zambezi
river and Victoria Falls. The
southern sections of the country —
those areas bordering on South
Africa — are relatively free of
guerrilla activity, he said.
In 1967, South Africa sent 5,000
policemen into Rhodesia ostensibly
to protect against terrorists who
were making their way through
Rhodesia into the Republic.
The police were withdrawn last
year as a part of South Africa
Prime Minister John Vorster's
policy of detente with black Africa.
Mawema was asked to
distinguish between the positions
of ZANU and UNITA, one of three
factions fighting a civil war in
Angola.
In that war, UNITA has been
closely associated with, if not
allied to, white South African
military forces also fighting there.
Mawema said ZANU operates on
a one-to-one relationship with
UNITA, as with other friends
throughout the world.
"We don't worry about their
(UNITA's) other relationships.
What they do outside of their
dealings with us is their political
right," he said.
"I don't have to fight the
ideological war in Angola, or seek
to make comments on the
problems there."
Mawema said the purpose of the
current ZANU tour is to provide
funds for food, clothing, medical
supplies and the legal defense of
political prisoners in Rhodesia. He
made no mention in his 20-minute
speech of the source of funds for
guns, munitions and other war
materiel.
"We ask you only to give us those
things we do not have," he said.
"In the spirit of proletarian
internationalism will you not join
us?" he asked.
In addition to a collection taken
from the audience, ZANU picked
up a $100 cheque from the AMS and
a $50 contribution from the Arts
Undergraduate Society.
HELP YOURSELF
TO HIGHER GRADES
LARGEST SELECTION IN B.C. OF
* COLES NOTES
100 Titles
* MONARCH NOTES
300 Titles
*SCHAUMS OUTLINES
60 Titles
♦COLLEGE NOTES
50 titles
All available from
—matt king photo
WEIRD CREATURES entertaining students in conversation pit
Monday were really actors from Whitestone Theatre company, which
comes from Berkeley, Calif. They'll be around campus until Friday.
NDU fate in March
The future of Notre Dame
University in Nelson will be
decided by mid-March, Universities Council chairman William
Armstrong said Monday.
Armstrong made the statement
after education minister Pat
McGeer announced last week that
he would ask Armstrong to make a
recommendation on NDU's future.
The troubled university will
come under full control of the
Universities Council April 1,
McGeer said.
The council will meet Feb. 19 and
again in mid-March before making
a recommendation to McGeer, who
will make the final decision on the
fate of NDU, Armstrong said.
Armstrong refused to speculate
on what the recommendation will
be.
He said the decision will be made
with existing information — no new
input will be sought before the
decision is made.
"They have made most of the
input they need to make," Arm
strong  said,   referring   to   NDU
students and staff.
Deputy education minister,
Walter Hardwick, who reported on
NDU last summer to the council
and recommended that it become a
powerless satellite of B.C.'s three
major universities, will have a part
in the decision, Armstrong said.
Hardwick's recommendation
met with a storm of protest from
NDU students and staff, which
forced then-education minister
Eileen Dailly to reconsider the
future of NDU.
Dailly decided in mid-November
that NDU would become the core of
B.C.'s fourth public university,
which would have campuses
throughout the interior.
A month later, the Social Credit
government came to power and the
issue was reopened for discussion.
Hardwick, former director of
UBC's centre of continuing
education, was appointed new
deputy education minister shortly
after the Socred victory.
SCIENCE STUDENTS
THIS   IS   TO   NOTIFY   ALL   SCIENCE   STUDENTS   THAT
NOMINATIONS   FOR   THE   S.U.S.   EXECUTIVE  ARE  NOW
BEING ACCEPTED.
THE EXECUTIVE POSITIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS:
President
Vice-President
4 AMS Reps
Treasurer
Academic Co-ordinator
Athletic Co-ordinator
Public Relations Officer
Publications Office
Secretary
NOMINATIONS FOR THE ABOVE POSITIONS, ACCOMPANIED WITH
THE  SIGNATURE OF AT LEAST 10 SCIENCE STUDENTS. MUST BE
HANDED IN NO LATER THAN FRIDAY FEBRUARY 6 TO BOX 178
SUB.
ELECTIONS,  IF  THERE ARE ANY, WILL BE HELD WEDNESDAY
FEBRUARY 11. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   February  3,   1976
Donors
disappearing
People at UBC aren't bleeding
as much this year as they did last
year.
And that isn't a good thing for
people in hospital who need the
blood collected by the Red Cross.
Blood donor clinics are being
held all this week, in SUB
207-209 and in the education
building   lounge,   on   the   main
Hot flashes
floor. Anyone can bleed between
9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. at either
location.
And remember that forestry
students have donated 10 cases of
the brown liquid to the
undergraduate society, or staff
union that gives the most blood
per capita.
As of Monday, the Nursing
Undergrad Society is well on its
way to winning the brownies,
followed by the foresters.
Arfsies
Page Friday, The Ubyssey's
weekly arts and review
supplement, will be publishing its
annual creative arts issue in March
and will be accepting stories,
poems, photos and graphics from
students until March 1.
Submissions from any UBC
students are invited.
Bring or send them to Page
Friday at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241 K.
Tween classes
TODAY
UBC LIBERALS
General    meeting,   elections,   noon,
SUB 215.
HAMSOC VE7UBC
General   meeting, noon, Brock ext.
358.
PRO-LIFE SOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
ECKANKAR
Discussion group, tiger's fang, noon,
SUB 105B.
AQUA SOC
Marine   identification   course,   free
for   all   Aqua   Soc   members,   7:30
p.m., IRC 4.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP '
Regular meeting cancelled, instead,
Leighton   Ford  speaks  at  noon,  at
SUB ballroom.
AMS
ICBC   rate   protest,   Dennis   Cocke
speaks, noon, IRC 2.
GAY PEOPLE
Women's  drop-in,   noon, SUB 230.
ANXIETY
Leighton Ford orvcauses of anxiety,
• noon, SUB ballroom.
DORM REPS
Joyous celebration,  Leighton Ford,
8 p.m., Place Vanier Shrum lounge.
STREET THEATRE
Whitestone Theatre Company from
Berkeley,    Calif,    performs   around
campus, until Friday.
JOYOUS CELEBRATION
The   group   from   Seattle   performs
this    week,    11:30   a.m.    and   1:30
p.m., SUB conversation pit.
WEDNESDAY
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Dance      class,      7:30-9:30      p.m.,
armories 208.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Free    film,    The   Ascent    of   Man,
noon, SUB auditorium.
VOC
General meeting, slide show, noon,
Angus 104.
STUDENT WIVES' ASSOC.
Stretch and sew fashion show, wine
and   cheese,    8   p.m.,   Cecil   Green
Park.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
Canadian   poet   Lloyd  Abbey reads
from his work, noon, Bu. 202.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 200.
PSYCH STUDENTS ASSOC.
General  meeting, noon, Angus 223.
CCCM
Meeting,   8  p.m., Lutheran campus
centre chapel.
EL CIRCULO SPANISH CLUB
Dr.   I.   M.   Bartreli  talks  on  Spain,
present    and    future,    in    English,
noon, Bu. 202.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting,  noon,  see sign posted on
door of SUB 206 for location.
ANXIETY
Leighton Ford on how to cope with
anxiety, noon, SUB ballroom.
DORM RAPS
Joyous Celebration sings, Neil
Graham leads discussion, 8 p.m.,
Gage conversation pit.
Jazz at UBC
LIONS GATE
JAZZBAND
UBC Graduate Centre
Friday & Saturday,
Feb. 6, 7.
9:00'til 1:00.
Admission $2.00,
Refreshments.
Traditional Jazz Music
for dancing and listening.
Everybody Welcome!
THURSDAY
' UBC BALTIC ASSOC.
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Seminar, lesbians and employment,
guest   speaker   is  Sheilagh   Day   of
Human    Rights   Commission,    7:30
p.m., SUB 230.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Weekly     fellowship     meeting,     all
welcome,     7:30     p.m.,     Lutheran
campus centre lounge.
PRE-DENTALSOC
Dr. M. I. Vanry disccusses dentistry,
noon, I RC 1.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Beginners ballet class, 3:30-5 p.m.,
SUB auditorium stage.
UBC GAY PEOPLE
Weekly meeting, noon, SUB 224.
LIBRARY
English student Carolyn Borsman
reads from her work, noon,
Sedgewick library orientation room,
lower level.
ANXIETY
Leighton Ford presents an
alternative to anxiety, noon, SUB
ballroom.
DORM RAPS
Joyous Celebration, Charlie
Johnson, 8 p.m., Totem Park
ballroom.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dr. I. M. I. Szaz talks, film,
Sexuality and Communication,
noon, SUB 212.
WHY LIVE A LIFE
WITHOUT MEANING?
Too many of us are in places
we don't want to be. Doing things
we really don't want to be doing.
Sometimes, it's because we can't
think of anything better to do—but
that's no way to live.
Since you have only one life to
live, you might as well live it .with
joy . . . with a feeling of satisfaction.and accomplishment . . . and
the knowledge that you are giving,
not taking. Why not decide to live
for the best ... for a great purpose
. . . for something bigger than you
are?
If you want to change the direction of your life, you might investigate the Paulist way of living.
The Paulists are a small group of
Catholic priests dedicated to preach-
THE
Missionaries to Canada anti the U.S.
ing the Gospel of Christ to the
North American people. For over
100 years the Paulists have done this
through the communication arts-
books, publications, television and
radio—on college campuses, in parishes, in missions in North America,
in downtown centers, in working
with young and old. Because we arc
flexible, wc continually pioneer new-
approaches. To do this we need
dedicated, innovative men to carry
on our work.
To find out what road God has
chosen us to walk is one of the most
important tasks of our life.
Which road will be yours?
For more information on the
Paulists, fill out the coupon and
mail tod^y.
 1
L
muusis
Mail to:
Rev. Frank DeSiano, C.S.P.,
Room 1)237
PAULIST FATHERS
415 West 59th Street
New York, N.Y. 10019
U.S.A.
Name.
Address-
City	
Province —
College
attending-
-Zip-
-Class of-
:_i
GRADUATING THIS YEAR?
The Bank of Montreal has career opportunities for
individuals interested in Administration, Credit and
General Management Careers. Our comprehensive
training programmes offer job satisfaction, a variety of
promotional opportunities and fully competitive salaries
and benefits.
For your convenience, there is an "Open House" to
discuss these opportunities.
If you are planning your future now, please plan to
attend our
"OPEN  HOUSE"
Wednesday, Feb. 4, 1976
4:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M.
at our
First Bank Tower
595 Burrard St.
20th Floor
Have a coffee and ...
LET'S    TALK
BANKING!
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
^
m.'- -M,
rd
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
THS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional tines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Off ice, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
A GENERAL Grad Class Meeting will
be held Thurs., Feb. 5, 12:30 p.m.
in   Hebb   Theatre.
FREE FOR AQUA Soc members:
Marine Identification Course starting
Feb. 3 at 7:30 p m. in I.R.C.4; includes a series of fantastic underwater    slides.
COME ON OVER to the "Rotating"
Coffeehouse — Feb. 7th (Saturday),
St. Chads, 23rd and Trafalgar (six
blocks west of Arbutus). Featuring
"the  Country Rock Group".
POWELL RIVER TRIP FREE! International Students, February 13-17.
Deadline February 6, 1976. Register
International   House,   228-5021.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
HELP or ICBC will own me. 73 Meteor
Rideau 4 dr. ht. 350-V8., auto., P.S.,
P.B., radio—excellent in and out.
$2275. 879-4752.
CALL     GEOFF     RICHMOND    for    top
quality imported motoring accesories
—discounts available. 263-5859 (9:00-
5:00)  or 879-8348 (after 6:00 p.m.)
'69 CHEV IMPALA 2 dr. ht. 327-V8,
automatic, 53,000, immaculate, $1275.
879-4752.
20 — Housing
FEMALE preferred, non-smoker student required to live in. $75.00 per
month. Room and board plus three
evenings babysitting for two boys
aged 7 and 11. 261-0746 after 5:00
p.m.
AVAILABLE SOON AT U.B.C. — Stu-
dent Family Housing — two one
bedroom suites Acadia Park and two
one bedroom huts Acadia Camp.
Priorities   in   effect.   Phone   228-4413.
50 — Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to rent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5021.
PROFESSIONAL Recording Studio for
rent. $12/hr. including technician
and     tape. For    information    call
Richard Saxton or Ralph Bedford at
228-3017.
65 — Scandals
CHINESE NEW YEAR DANCE tonight!
Featuring "Reflections" and a new
band from UBC. Grad Centre 9-1
a.m. Admission $2.00. Come and celebrate.
THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD
(that punk) in SUB Aud this Thurs.-
Sun. 7:00; Fri.-Sat. 7:00 & 9:30. Bring
75c, AMS card, shotgun (to give air
to your comments).
70 — Services
25 — Instruction
GUITAR LESSONS: Classic Folk
Theory. Beginner and Intermediate
levels. Phone Barry Cole. 731-8076.
30 - Jobs
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE required
by stereo and electronic components
firm. Part time work on^ attractive
commission basis. Growth/ potential.
876-8215 anytime.
EARN $3.00 for a Fast hour in a
Psychology Experiment. Sign up
Thursday, Feb. 5 at 12:30, Henry Angus Room 13 in Basement.
35 — Lost
TIMEX WA?CH, gold with brown strap
vicinity Frederick Wood Theatre.
Please call Isla, 731-8877.
40 — Messages
LISTEN    TO    THE    CRY    OP    THE
aborted children. Their cry is no.
Their cry is a cry of terror. Heed
their cry.
GIRLS, let me whisk you to the Engineers' Ball in my T-bird machine.
Call Frank M. 224-6879.
EXPERIENCED MATH TUTOR will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basis. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
PERMANENT HAIR REMOVAL by elee-
trolysis. Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6860.
Joan Calvin.
CUSTOM CABINETRY & woodworking.
Renovations, additions, new contraction done anywhere. Guranteed work,
free   estimates.   689-3384.
WEDDING PHOTOGRAHPY profession-
ally done. Call Kinzer Photo 681-0315
daily.  873-5959 evenings.
80 — Tutoring
BOGGLED MINDS ft WISDOM HEADS:
Call the Tutorial Center, 228-4557
anytime or see Ian at Speak-Easy,
12:30-2:30 p.m. $1 to register (refundable).
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-S317.
90 - Wanted
1st YEAR STUDENT needs help in
writing term papers of 10 pages.
Anyone knowledgeable in Economics,
Pol.Sc, Anthro., Eng., Hist. & Psych.
Please write stating subject, phone
number, remuneration expected, etc.
Old papers helpful. Write only F.
Clarkin, No- 5, 833 E. Broadway,
Van.  VSF  1Y2.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Tuesday, February 3,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Rugby 'Birds dump B.C. Reps
By TOM BARNES
A solid game by the jjack combined with a good defensive
showing of the rugby 'Birds's
backfield to move UBC to a 12-10
upset over the B.C. Reps Sunday.
As the game was a warmup for
the Reps  upcoming tour of  the
United Kingdom, the rules were
altered slightly. The game was
divided into five 20-minute periods
and during the first three periods
UBC was given the scrums, then
lineouts, then both.
This handicap was more than
equalled by the fact UBC had four
players, second row Dave Eburne,
second row Ro Hindson, fly half
John Billingsley and fullback
Robbie Greig playing for the Reps,
although Hindson saw time with
both teams.
UBC coach Donn Spence also had
to use reserves to fill in for wing
Basketball 'Birds drop two games
to league-leading Calgary Dinos
By AVTAR BAINS
The 'Birds basketball team took
it on the chin last weekend in
Calgary as they lost two games to
the league leading Dinosaurs.
Calgary centre Tom Bishop led
the way for the Dinosaurs, hitting
for 28 points in a 68-49 -victory on
Friday, and on Saturday night he
hit for another 16 points in a 71-48
thrashing of the 'Birds.
The whole Calgary squad came
out physically and mentally tough
as they forced UBC to make an
atrocious total of 53 turnovers in
the two games. This is something
the 'Birds must quickly remedy if
they wish to compete successfully
in the league.
Two of the only bright spots for
the 'Birds was the continued good
play of Jan Bohn and Mike McKay.
Bohn hit for 21 points and grabbed
16 rebounds on Saturday night as
he seemed to be the only 'Bird able
to penetrate the stiff Calgary
defense.
McKay, despite the annoyance of
a twisted knee, came up with solid
performances both nights, but the
team cannot rely on just these two
players to carry them to victory
Puck 'Birds split two
The Thunderbird hockey team
attempted to move up in the
standings at the expense of the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs in
two games Friday and Saturday.
The game on Friday was a
complete disaster for the 'Birds.
Calgary, which currently holds
first place, completely dominated
the game.
UBC was consistently beaten to
the puck and Calgary was quick to
capitalize on UBC's mistakes. This
was particularly evident on UBC's
penalty killing, which was marred
by poor puck control and sloppy
passing.
The Dinosaurs were all over
UBC in the first period and kept
UBC from scoring. Calgary socred
its first goal on a powerplay when
UBC failed to clear the puck from
its own end.
The 'Birds' forechecking improved in the second period, but
they were beaten by faster skaters.
Calgary scored its second goal in
this period, even though UBC
outshot them 6-5.
The third period saw some great
chances by UBC on goal but
Calgary's hard checking seemed to
be the 'Birds' downfall. Calgary
won the game 2-0.
On Saturday, the 'Birds looked
like a completely different team.
UBC took quick command of the
game and scored the first goal.
They went on to outclass Calgary
in every department and by the
end of the third period it was 3-0 for
the 'Birds. Wayne Hendry was
strong on defense for the 'Birds.
UBC's passing was excellent and
the team's forechecking and back-
checking was the deciding factor in
the game.
In the third period, the Dinosaurs
pulled their goalie with the score at
4-3 for the 'Birds. UBC wrapped the
game up with a great empty net
goal by Keith Tindle.
C.U.S.O.
WORK OVERSEAS
FOR 2 YEARS
Engineers
Teachers
Agriculturalists
Health Officers
Technologists
Business Consultants
Recruiting Officers from Ottawa will visit UBC Campus
on Monday 9th and Tuesday 10th February.
TALK TO *THEM AT:
McMillan Building Lobby all day Monday and most of
Tuesday.
Education Building Lobby Monday and Tuesday. We
invite ail graduates in Education, Arts and Science,
Health Sciences, Home Economics and Business to visit
us there.
Civil Engineering Building Lobby — all day Tuesday.
* Also available to answer questions at INFORMATION
NIGHT on Tuesday 10th, 7:30 at International House -
Upper Lounge.
against teams of the calibre of
Calgary.
Calgary improved its record to
13-1 while the 'Birds are now
playing .500 ball with a record of 7-
7. Victoria won its two weekend
games and are now four points up
on the 'Birds.
The stage is set for this weekend,
when the 'Birds face the Victoria
Vikings. It's do or die time for the
'Birds as they must defeat the
second-place Vikings to achieve a
playoff spot. The games are at the
War Memorial Gym this Friday
and Saturday night. Tip-off time is
8:30 p.m.
In women's action, the Thunderettes split games in Calgary. On
Friday night they lost in overtime
61-58 and on Saturday they came
back to bomb the Calgary team 66-
30.
forward Paul Watson, hook Larry
Chung and prop Frank Carson.
Don Carson and Peter Bull, both
replacements up from the UBC
second team, came up with good
games. Flyhalf Garry Hirayama
also came through as expected, at
times leaving the more experienced B.C. backfielders
completely bewildered.
UBC scrum half Preston Wiley
opened the scoring with a penalty
goal. Bull added to the lead with a
good try coming off a Wiley kick.
The little scrum half converted
that try then added another
penalty goal to round out the
scoring.
The Reps points came off two
tries. The first was set up by an
inspired Spence MacTavish run
with Ken Wilkie finishing off the
play. Barry Leigh ended the
game's scoring with a converted
try.
UBC showed off its depth
throughout the game. The younger
scrum of the 'Birds played well as
a team and covered the field better
than the Reps.
The backfield played well, but at
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Residents 'of this tiny island
kingdom reacted with outrage
today to the behavior of visiting
Canadian arch-duchess Margaret
Truedough.
Truedough allegedly refused to
kiss the feet of her husband, Biere
Truedough.
times the passing was less than
exemplary. Left wing Rob Jenkins
enjoyed a fine kicking game and
led several offensive thrusts deep
into B.C. territory.
The dimunitive Wiley also came
up with a fine game, as he
demonstrated an ability to run the
ball as well as pass it.
The 'Birds' next game will be
this Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium when they meet the
Vancouver Reps in a MacKechnie
Cup game. A victory is crucial if
UBC is going to retain the cup,
symbolic of rugby supremacy in
the province.
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS USING SUB
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5th
There will be a meeting in SUB Room 206 to explain the
NEW SUB MANAGEMENT
COMMITTEE POLICY
The policy sets out the guidelines for:
Room Booking: Dances, Parties, Meetings, etc.
Office Allocation
Club Facilities: Filmsoc, Photosoc, etc.
Students   groups   using   space   in   SUB   are   urged   to   send
representatives.
NADINE MCDONNELL
AMS Co-ordinator
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shape up to the
latest look!
APPOINTMENT
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3644 WEST
4th AVE.
AT ALMA
PRESENT.FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES PRESENT-FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES PRESENT •FRATERNITIES & SORORITIES
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DANCING TO
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FEB. 6th
7:00 - 12:30
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TICKETS AVAILABLE
AMS TICKET OFFICE
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Full Facilities
SHIIIHOHOS ? S3IIINH3±VH3.1N3S3Hd S3UIH0H0S <S S31IINH31VHJ .J.N3S3H<i S3IIIHOHOS ? S3IIlNH3IVH3..IN3S3}Id Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  3,   1976
Student senator says:
Watch administration
By DOUG TODD
Students should act as watchdogs at every level of university
administration, according to new
student senator Hans Buys.
Buys, forestry 2, was'acclaimed
last week as the forestry student
representative to senate.
"People get away with what they
can, but people change if
someone's watching them," he
said. "Students should act as
watchdogs."
Buys compared student representation to workers' representation in a company. "Just like a
worker's situation, there should be
watchdogs," he said.
Buys also said he wants to get
more information directly to
students, although he admitted
that he himself is uninformed. He
said he will work at becoming
more informed.
"My term begins in April, but I'll
start going to meetings now. I've
been reading over senate meeting
minutes to get informed."
He said that as forestry representative he wants, "to keep
forestry students completely informed, and carry feedback back
More student input sought
' From page 1
$5,000 a car" — and that they could
not pay for themselves.
"The government will have to
accept the fact that they are
necessary on a campus of this size,
and be willing to help pay for
them."
Murray agreed that academic
buildings should take precedence
over recreational facilities at a
university, but said recreational
facilities at UBC have been
"neglected for too long."
"Here are 3,500 students living in
residence out here and it's our responsibility to provide them with
recreational facilities.
"There's a long tradition here of
students helping to pay for
recreational buildings on this
campus. I don't think this is
anything for the university to be
proud of, but it's something for the
students to be proud of. When a
building is needed here and the
government has been unwilling to
pay for it, the students have accepted the responsibility."
Murray said he is in favor of
improved student input on
promotion and tenure committees,
but did not expect this to come
about by direct student representation on the committees.
"I've never been either a great
promoter or detractor of student
representation on these committees, but I think Svend
Robinson's disclosure of confidential documents has substantially reduced-the chance of
that happening," he said.
Robinson, a former student
board member, recently released
to the Vancouver Sun documents
detailing professor's salaries and
increases.
Student input in tenure decisions
should come in the form of more
standardized course evaluation
forms and a guarantee that these
forms would be used in evaluating
a prof, Murray said.
Murray, who said in a Jan. 26 all-
candidates' meeting that he
wanted to "regulate" The
Ubyssey, said Monday he thought
/
many students did not think The
Ubyssey was doing its job.
"I would like to talk with people
who are upset and ask them what
they don't like.
Murray said The Ubyssey should
be more representative of student
opinion.
"It should be more intuned with
the student body, or what is it for? "
he asked.
"People look at it to see what's
going on on campus, not to have it
criticize their values," he said.
However, he admitted that a
newspaper should "be critical, of
events it covers, but said such
criticism should be constructive.
"Every other word in The
Ubyssey is negative," he said.
"There's lots of positive things you
could say about the university."
"There have been innumerable
stories about the pool since 1971,
for example, but at no point any
good, positive press," he said.
"We have put out four-page
flyers about what's happening, and
that shouldn't be necessary for any
project."
The pool committees' latest flyer
was an appeal for students to
knock on doors asking the community to support the pool.
Alma Mater Society vice-
president Dave Van Blarcom said
Monday he thought he and running
mate Dave Theessen lost the
election because of the strong voter
turnout by engineering students.
"Four hundred engineers out of a
total of 800 people voted, and there
weren't enough votes from places
like arts to break the block."
Van Blarcom also said his
support of the strike by library and
clerical workers might have
contributed to his defeat.
"Those who won campaigned on
strikebreaking and censorship of
the press," he said.
Murray ' agreed with Van
Blarcom that supporting the
strikers had hurt him in the
election.
"He helped walk picket lines and
tried to prevent students from
coming to the university to write
their exams," he said.	
Summer Language
Programmes
French/Italian/Latin/English
offered in Toronto:
French, English, Italian and Latin—Augustan
civilization courses
offered in Saint-Pierre et Miquelon:
French language courses
Bursaries, funded by the Department of the Secretary of
State, government of Canada, are available in connection with the French and English language courses.
enquiries:.
University of Toronto
School of Continuing Studies
158 St. George Street, Toronto M5S2V8
(416) 928-2400
to senate." He said he is "prepared
to talk in front of class, and have
discussions after."
Buys is also running for vice-
president of the Forestry Undergrad Society. He s.aid he will get
information out through letters if
he gets on the society's executive.
When asked about his views on
tenure, Buys said he only learned
about the tenure situation last
week,, when he read in The
Ubyssey that Brad Collins, a
popular fine arts professor, had
been denied tenure.
"We could put ourselves in a bind
if we sign him up for life," he said.
He said tenure serves the same
function as job security in a union,
and added, "it's to be expected
here as well."
Buys said he doesn't think entrance exams are needed at UBC.
"Right now high school marks are
criteria. We should use what we've
got. They're about the best we've
got right now — anything else
would require a lot of change."
What about exams to test
general competency?
"That shouldn't be beyond any
high school student. Every high
school student should be able to
write clearly and concisely by the
time they are out of high school.
"In high school, there is more
contact between student and
teacher so the teachers should
know when a student has to do
better."
Buys said he is worried that UBC
professors are too lenient with
students because "profs cater to
students by tailoring exams and
cutting corners."
When asked about his views on
the recent Association of
University and College Employees
strike, he said that he "doesn't
like" strikes.
Buys added he is idealistic about
strikes and wished they "didn't
have to happen."
"People get paid for what they
know. You would stifle free enterprise if you make faculty and
administration salaries too close to
those of a glorified flunky.
"Administration and faculty
work long hours — they can't do
that without incentive," he said.
Buys called incentive "perk." He
said that "perk" could be given to
administrators by providing
allowances. "So what if they spend
$10 on hockey tickets, they're
probably being put to good use."
. Buys has been at UBC six years.
He said he is "ambitious'! and
after university "he would take
any interesting path."
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
A General Grad
Class Meeting will be
held Thurs. Feb. 5
12:30 p.m.
in Hebb Theatre.
SOFT    LENSES
$13950
HARD
CONTACTS
$5950
FRAMES
as low as
$5-95
Glass lenses
2
Locations'
Van.-N.West/
Eye Examinations Arranged'
For Information & Appointments"
PUBLIC
CONTACT LENS CENTRE
1557 W. Broadway, Vancouver - 732-3636
552 Columbia St., New Westr. - 525-2818
start at
$y.00
per lens
Arts Undergrads
NOTICE OF
NOMINATION CLOSURE
Feb. 4th 1976
Nominations will be closed for the Arts Undergraduate
Society executive including—
PRESIDENT
TREASURER
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
ARTS REPS (5)
Tomorrow at 1:00 p.m. forms will be received at Buch.
107 by the returning officer.
The election will be held on Tuesday Feb. 11, 1976.
ARTS UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
ALL
CANDIDATES
MEETING
THURSDAY 12:30-2:30 BUCH 104
Nominations will be received at Buch 107 by
the Returning Officer. Nominations close today at 12:30.

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