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The Ubyssey Jan 10, 1978

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Array Women plan Godiva picket
The Alma Mater Society
women's committee is picketing
the engineers' Lady Godiva ride
today as part of its campaign
against the sexist attitudes
displayed during Engineering
Week.
The protest comes in the wake of
an attack on the women's office at
SUB 130 Monday morning in which
magazine photographs of nude
women were taped to the walls,
committee posters were stolen and
masking tape was strung
throughout the room.
RCMP and Vancouver city
police, who are investigating the
break-in, said the door to the office
was jimmied open and there is
little chance the vandals will be
caught. Damage is estimated at
$100.
Sheila Lidwill, spokeswoman for
the women's committee, said
Monday she was shocked and
disappointed when she heard of the
break-in.
"I didn't think anyone would
want to descend to this level," she
said.
Lidwill said the women's committee was not laying the blame on
any specific group. She said a
member of the engineering undergraduate society phoned  the
In wake of attack on SUB office
women's office to deny any involvement by- the EUS in the
break-in.
Women's committee members
noticed shortly after they
discovered the break-in that
posters put up around campus
protesting the Godiva ride, in
which a nude woman is paraded
around on a horse, have all been
ripped down.
Dean of women Margaret Fulton
also voiced strong disapproval of
the break-in, and of the activities of
Engineering Week.
"I was appalled when I arrived
on campus in 1974-75 with
Engineering Week," Fulton said.
"I protested against the Lady
Godiva ride and the Red Rag
myself at that" time, but I don't
know what we can do until the
attitudes of both men and women
towards this kind of behavior
change."
"The young men who take part in
these activities are socially
illiterate. I'm sure it is only a
minimum number who perpetuate
this insult, but it is an insult, not
only to women but to mature
thinking."
"There seems to be two courses
of action in regards to this
behavior — waiting long enough
and let it die a natural death or
take positive action against it."
Fulton said applied science dean
Liam Finn, UBC president Doug
Kenny and Erich Vogt, vice
president of student and faculty
affairs, should take some action.
But Kenny, who last year
denounced the engineers for the
vandalism and the discrimination
against women that took place
during engineering week, said he
plans no concrete action to combat
the actions of the gears.
"The students in Applied Science
have shown much more caution in
their antics. It's not as bad as it
was two years ago. We can only try
to persuade them."
Kenny said the break-in was
"regrettable and deplorable," but
added that "until we know who it
is, I really can't make any
statements."
Finn and Vogt are out of town.
The women's committee have
planned   a   number   of   actions,
aimed mainly at the Lady Godiva
ride and the Red Rag, to protest
the sexist attitudes these activities
display.
At a meeting Monday, the
committee discussed plans to
confiscate copies of the Red Rag
and send them to various ethnic
organizations and the Professional
Engineers Council.
The committee plans to lay
charges if possible against the
individuals responsible for
producing the Red Rag.
The committee will also put
forward a motion at the student
representative assembly Monday
recommending the SRA publicly
censure the Godiva ride and the
Red Rag as sexist.
THE UBYSSEY
English profs
criticize test
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By HEATHER CONN
English professors are highly
dissatisfied with the Christmas
English 100 exam, failed by about
40 per cent of the students who
wrote it.
"I haven't come across any profs
who liked it," a highly placed
source in the English department
said Monday. "It was a very bad
exam altogether."
The excerpt of Northrop Frye
went far beyond first-year standards and was not appropriate for
freshmen, the source said.
"It was much too difficult. The
exam was not written in good
English and the passage was
overblown and overcomplex," he
said.
"The questions were ambiguous
and did not relate to the passage."
The kind of writing used on the
exam should be the language of
good journalism, he said. "We
must get clear our criteria and
expectations," he said.
The exam standards have not
gone up and the failure rate is in
the 40 per cent range, English 100
chairman Andrew Parkin said.
Last year the failure rate on the
exam was 37 per cent.
No exact figure has been given
for this year's failure rate since
appeal procedures are still in
progress. A higher percentage of
students in arts one passed the
exam than students in other
English 100 classes.
The exam is a "crude way of
trying to improve the standard of
writing," English professor Roger
Seamon said Monday.
The exam is done in haste and
written in a high-pressure, panic
situation, he added.
"The purpose of the exam is
simply to produce a certain
number of failures."
Seamon said the exam should be
abolished. The most "nit-picking"
methods are used to separate the
student's writing from the thought
process, he said.
"The grading is so incredibly
erratic," said arts one professor
Marvin Lazerson.
He said the criteria used to grade
the exam are questionable and a
variety of different standards are
used.
Those of Lazerson's students
who failed the exam wrote very
strong interpretative essays with
grammatical errors, he said.
Lazerson suggested the exams of
passing students might have been
grammatically correct, but
mediocre.
"It is very hard to separate the
two things," he said.
But Parkin defended the exam,
saying it was a "fair test and in line
with first-year English standards."
"Most people who have done any
thinking at all should have known
something about the exam's essay
topics," he said.
The topics were What Do You
Think Is Meant By The Sense of
Community? and Are There Ways
in Which Man Can Control His
Destiny?
—eraig heale photo
VANCOUVER POLICE department photographer aims camera at vandalized walls of Alma Mater Society
women's office in SUB 130 Monday. Vandals jimmied open door of office and plastered hundreds of
magazine pictures of naked women on walls in an apparent reprisal for women's committee's denunciation of
the engineer's Lady Godiva ride. Committee will picket ride today on grounds it is sexist.
Manpower centre proposed for SUB
UBC's student services placement office
will be replaced by a Canada Manpower office on campus as soon as a final agreement
between Manpower, UBC and the Alma
Mater Society has been reached, a Manpower
officer said Monday.
Richard Cruchley, manager of Manpower's
professional and executive division, said
negotiations for the office, which would be
located in the SUB basement pinball room,
are in the agreement-in-principle stage and
the office should open by May 1.
But the AMS has some doubts about
Manpower's ability to provide adequate
student placement services.
"Maybe it's more advantageous to bring
Manpower in but we're not sure," Dave Jiles,
AMS director of services, said Monday.
Jiles said the UBC administration wants a
Manpower office on campus so it can
eliminate the expense of operating its own
student placement office.
"Basically the Manpower office is being
brought in as a money saver," he said.
The AMS is concerned with the quality of
service Manpower will be able to offer
students, said Jiles. Manpower managers will
usually stay in a position for about two years
before moving on, he said, and such a short
period of time may not be sufficient for a
manager to understand the UBC situation.
"What we're going to be seeing is a person
coming in for two years making contacts and
then moving on," Jiles said.
Under the agreement Manpower would
provide the office staff and furniture, and
UBC would allocate rent-free space for the
office. The AMS and UBC administration
must still come to terms on how the pinball
room would be rented out to UBC for the
Manpower office.
Cruchley said Manpower has not had any
complaints about the quality or consistency of
service at other campus Manpower offices.
"It hasn't really proved to be a particular
problem on other campuses," he said. Simon
Fraser University and the B.C. Institute of
Technology have both had Manpower offices
for several years, Cruchley said.
Campus Manpower managers usually stay
in their positions for about three to four years,
he said. n
Cruchley said a selection panel consisting
of himself, metro Vancouver Manpower
director Darcy Rezac and Pacific region
Manpower director  Gordon Hubley,  UBC
student services director Dick Shirran and
Jiles, have chosen Raymond Chew to be the
UBC Manpower office manager.
Manpower is very interested in establishing
an office at UBC, despite the expense, said
Cruchley.
"We have an interest in career employment, being involved in a situation where
you can provide meaningful counselling. You
can provide a better level of service to
national corporations (with a Manpower
office).
"It (UBC) is also a major university," he
said.
The Manpower office would have a staff of
five, Cruchley said, consisting of manager
Chew, two counselors and two clerical
workers. The budget for the office has not
been decided upon yet, he said.
One of the counselors will be Cam Craik,
currently a student services counselor,
Cruchley said. If there is any difference in the
salary Craik will be paid by Manpower and
that he now receives from the university it
will be up to UBC to cover the difference, he
said.
Shirran said he hopes Manpower will be
able to provide a consistent placement service to UBC students. Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1978
In contract dispute
Engineers threaten strike
UBC steam engineers will walk
off the job if mediation talks between the International Union of
Operating Engineers and the
university administration fail, the
union business manager said
Monday.
Bill Kadey said "as far as I am
concerned Tuesday will be the final
mediation meeting. If they (the
university   administration)   don't
UBC prof Kane
to face charges
of fraud, theft
UBC animal science professor
Julius Kane will-appear in court
Thursday, charged with four
counts of theft, two of fraud and
one of attempted fraud.
The charges allege Kane' improperly employed two assistants
to work on his private business
enterprises and Kane allegedly
used money from his $15,000
National Research Council grant
for personal matters.
Kane is also accused of using
$400 worth of UBC computer
services for private purposes and
he allegedly used funds intended
for research to buy $400 worth of
tools.
Kane was suspended without pay
by the university from May 1 to
July 31, 1977. He recently lost an
appeal against the UBC board of
governors to quash the suspension.
Kane charged in the B.C.
supreme court that the presence of
administration president Doug
Kenny on the appeal board influenced the board's decision.
meet our demands I'll call them
out and put up a picket," he said.
The two sides meet today with
provincial labor mediator Ed
Simms to negotiate the 1978 contract.
The union, representing 26
campus steam engineers, rejected
an earlier offer of a four per cent
wage increase and have demanded
a 7.6 per cent increase, or parity
with other campus tradesmen.
Kadey said the union needs a 7.6
per cent wage increase, or $156 per
month, in order to catch up to the
wages of other campus tradesmen.
"We need a 7.6 per cent increase
to put us back in the posture we
enjoyed before AIB."
Before the Anti-Inflation Board
guidelines were imposed the
engineers' wages were never $30
more or $30 less per month than
other campus trades' wages,
Kadey said.
The union has been forced to
accept  the   minimum   allowable
wage increases over the three
years of AIB wage guidelines
because his union consists exclusively of tradesmen, he said.
The Canadian Union of Public
Employees, which consists of
unskilled workers and tradesmen,
got a total wage package settlement of eight per cent during the
first year of wage controls.
But that allowed an 11 per cent
increase for tradesmen and six and
seven per cent increases for the
unskilled workers, he said.
"We've got a fairly good
argument to let AIB let us have
more than four per cent, but we
can't approach AIB about exceeding the four per cent bench
mark until the university gives us
more than four percent."
AIB guidelines aren't stringent,
Kadey said, they only ask that
unions bargain within the spirit of
the program.
University spokesman Al Hunter
declined to comment on the dispute
or Tuesday's mediation session.
FREESEE
Sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Women
With the support of The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation
AMERICA
A PERSONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES
PART II
JAN. 11 - FEB. 22
EVERY WEDNESDAY - 12:35 p.m.
SUB  AUDITORIUM FREE
All Students, Faculty and Staff are invited.
run
WEEKEND
REVIEW
SEMINARS
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Jan. 11th (WEDNESDAY)
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Admission Free!
First meeting after demonstration
U.B.C. Shito-Ryu Itosukai
WORLD UNIVERSITY SER VICE
ANNOUNCES
that applications for the
1978 Summer Study Seminars to:
Senegal  Canadian North
are available from International House or from West Mall Annex
Rm. 137.
Applications for United Nations Volunteers are also available.
For information call Grant McRadu 732-5079 or Luz Piedranita
689-8178.
We can improve
your test score:
Recent statistics indicate that an average improvement of
75-100 points results from conscientious preparation. We
specialize in training students for the LSAT with our 200
page copyrighted curriculum and seminar-sized weekend
classes (max. 25 students). Registrations are now being
accepted for our final course during the 1977-78 academic
year.      Why not give us a call?
Law Board Review Centre
800-663-3381
Guarantee: Repeat course at our expense if you are
not satisfied with your LSAT score.
«
>»
Dean off Women's Office
Career Orientation
for Women
PANEL DISCUSSION
by
UBC WOMEN GRADUATES
AND FRIENDS
WOMEN IN THE MEDIA
Thursday, January 12, 1978, 12:30 -
2:00 p.m. Buchanan Building Room 102
PANEL PARTICIPANTS
Jan O'Brien,
The Province
Linda Hossie,
Vancouver Sun
Ann Petrie,
CBC Radio "Three's Company"
Judy Piercy,
CBC TV "Hourglass"
Kay Smith,
CBC TV Producer
PANEL MODERATOR:
Maryke Gilmore, Assistant to the
Dean of Women, Career Counsellor
■ Your education opens the door to a challenging career as -
AN
THE CANADIAN FORCES
The Canadian Armed Forces is a complex organization,
utilizing the most up-to-date engineering, social science
and corporate business management techniques in order
to carry out the wide variety of tasks which face
today's military.
To accomplish these tasks, and to operate
a broad spectrum of highly sophisticated
equipment, specialists, professionals and
qualified technicians are required. The
Canadian Armed Forces thus offers many
opportunities to those university or
institute of technology graduates who are
interested in a challenging and rewarding
career.
Major benefits include: an excellent salary
with progressive increments, pension plan,
minimum four weeks leave, free medical
and dental care, and an opportunity to
receive specialized training and take
post-graduate courses.
Applicant normally must be
under 26 years of age for an
operational career and under
35 for other careers.
Challenging career opportunities
individuals include the following
Sciences (General,
specialized, Mathematics,
Physics)
Engineering (All fields)
Accounting
Data processing
Biology
Chemistry
Physiotherapy
Dietetics/Home Economics
Social Sciences
Education
Psychology
for qualilied
fields:
Physical Education
Commerce
Medicine
Dentistry
Architecture
Law
Arts
Social Work
Pharmacy
Nursing
Business and
personnel
administration
For further information write
or visit the Canadian Forees
Recruiting Centre at
547 Seymour St.. Vancouver
or phone 666-3136'. Tuesday, January 10, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
Torture widespread — Amnesty
By GREG EDWARDS
Torture and other violations of
the United Nations bill of rights are
practised in two-thirds of UN
member coiintries, said an Amnesty International spokeswoman
Friday.
Maggie Bierne, of the
organization's international
secretariat, said torture can never
be justified to extract information
even when dealing with terrorists.
"No government is allowed to
abrogate one's right not to be
tortured," she told a group of
listeners in SUB.
"We have research that tells us
that information can be gotten by
torture, but it will not necessarily
be the truth.
"Often the tortured person will
give information that he thinks his
torturers want, so torture cannot
be justified even for those who
plant bombs and so on," said
Bierne.
"Torture methods vary immensely; some are fairly simple
and unsophisticated; some are
sophisticated and it's obvious that
much thought has been given to
how to best break down the victim's resistance; how to cause the
most pain," she said.
In many instances simple sensory deprivation is the torture
used.
Another method is sleep torture.
The victim is kept awake for up to
17 days causing immense physical
and nervous strain.
Some victims, who are obviously
not insane, but politically active,
are committed to psychiatric
asylums, Bierne said.
"Often it's not just the politically
dissident who are jailed. Others
are tortured because they are
related to political activists."
Bierne said children are often
forced to watch their parents being
tortured and then parents are
forced to watch while their
children are tortured.
"So mental anguish, as well as
CHILEAN STUDENT is searched and questioned on streets of Santiago. Harassment, persecution,
imprisonment and torture of opponents of Chile's brutal military dictatorship have become routine part of
national life. According to Amnesty International, two-thirds of United Nations members practice torture
and other violations of UN bill of rights against dissidents.
Backlash against liberal ed
producing standardization
By SUE VOHANKA
Canadian University Press
Education reporter
Although it's clear that the 1960s and the era of
liberalized education are behind us, it's not yet
evident how far education policies will rebound
during the 1970s.
But one thing seems obvious — governments and
administrators are increasingly looking toward
standardizing education.
Across the country, administrators, politicians
and editorial writers — armed with results of
proficiency and achievement tests at universities
and colleges — are demanding a return to the basics
of reading, writing and arithmetic.
And it's becoming clear that the proficiency test
results, which at some campuses show high
"failure" rates, will be used to justify the imposition of more profound, long-term tools to
standardize education.
In some areas, universities may resurrect the
stringent admissions tests which were withdrawn
during the late 1960s and early 1970s when research
demonstrated that the tes^s were unreliable indicators of a student's likely success in post-
secondary education. Instead, they tended to screen
students on the basis of their social background.
Some provinces, like B.C. and Quebec, are
making that resurrection unnecessary by returning
to more uniform curricula and more rigid testing at
the elementary and secondary levels.
In Quebec, a recently-released green paper on
elementary and secondary education calls for a reassessment of the social sciences; a rediscovery of
homework, Latin, discipline and exams; a common
compulsory curriculum, and a longer school year.
The green paper, to go through a year of consultation, claims this "back to basics" approach to
education is needed to correct the evils of
liberalized education.
It describes the comprehensive high school as "a
dehumanizing milieu (which) has become an empty
box of courses without sufficient structure. It
promotes the expression of a new 'lax' culture, often
ending in social marginality."
V
And B.C. in the past year has seen a strong "back
to basics" movement successfully introduce a
standardized, core curriculum in schools, over the
protests of many teachers who fought to retain their
say in course content and structure.
In Ontario, the education ministry will soon
decide between two reports which deal with the
effectiveness of evaluation and testing methods in
Ontario.
One report, prepared for the Council of Ontario
Universities (COU), recommends that the
province's secondary schools adopt "a core
curriculum with a greater degree of standardization of content," that province-wide testing
of student achievement begin, and that test results
be made available to the universities.
The report adds: "However, if all of tliis does not
transpire, the committee recommends that Ontario
universities collectively develop and use
examinations for university entrance."
The other report, prepared for the ministry by a
work group of seven Ontario Teachers' Federation
appointees and six ministry appointees, shies away
from the extensive use of standardized tests in
elementary and secondary education.
The work group terms standardized testing
"merely one component of a total evaluation
process at both local and provincial levels. Unfortunately, its use as the sole or major determinant
of student performance for rendering accountability to the public has been overpublicized."
Regardless of which report the Ontario education
ministry accepts, the result will be standardization
—either co-ordinated by the ministry in elementary
and secondary school curricula and tests, or by
universities in the form of admission tests.
Standardized education and testing are being
presented as beneficial to students.
The Quebec green paper on elementary and
secondary education suggests that the liberalization
of education has caused students; to become
alienated, and is responsible for "an absence of a
sense of belonging, the difficulty of establishing
personal relationships. ..."
See   page   8:   ACCESS
physical anguish is used," she
said.
"It's difficult to understand how
anyone can arrive at the position of
torturing someone else. Often, they
are . political fanatics, who
genuinely believe their country is
being invaded by spies," Bierne
said.
"In other instances, which seem
almost inconceivable, at least to
me, the torturers consider torture
just like a job. Clocking in at nine,
and clocking out at five.
"Many have explained they have
received orders, and it would be
dangerous for them to countermand those orders," she said.
Amnesty International, which
won the Nobel Peace prize in
December, 1977 was begun in 1961
by a London lawyer, Peter Benen-
son, who organized a letter campaign after reading about two
Portuguese who were jailed for
toasting to liberty, Bierne said.
"Benenson was disturbed that
people could be jailed for such
minor political opposition so he
wrote a letter of protest to the
Portuguese embassy," said
Bierne.
He also wrote a newspaper article appealing to people to react to
news stories of political prisoners
by writing letters to embassies,
governments and generating local
publicity.
"People did just that and found
that this action was effective;
prisoners were being released so
the group grew to what it is today,"
she said.
"It's obvious we have to take a
longer term action because from
research done with prisoners of the
Second World War, it has been
learned that the psychological
scars from political imprisonment
are not short term.
"Some people will leave prison
and lead essentially normal lives
only to relive their prison experiences years after.
So it is necessary to learn how to
rehabilitate these people, Bierne
said.
Amnesty also has research
projects to study the international
aspects of torture such as the
exchange of information and
torture techniques.
"When we do have names of
alleged torturers we trace their
travels and contacts to see if we
can gather information about them
and their methods," Bierne said.
Bierne said that like any other
interest group Amnesty International is not always well
received.
"Certainly we often find people
are apathetic about our cause but if
we can show people that their
political leaders are torturing
prisoners in the name of their
societies, we believe these people
will react and say that they don't
want human beings tortured in
their names."
"People have criticized us and
pointed to the Plyusch case, (a
Russian dissident freed in 1977),
and said we can only succeed with
well-known personalities.
But Amnesty strives through its
letters, telegrams and local
publicity to make all cases
prominent, she said.
In Plyusch's case we made the
point that he was obviously not a
psychiatric case, so we asked the
Russians: "Why do you have him
inside your mental asylum?" she
said.
Amnesty International is funded
entirely through membership fees,
Bierne said.
"We have strict rules about
where we accept our money from.
We don't take any government
money and set a maximum of five
per cent of our total funding from
any one source," Bierne said.
Tel union picket
blocks SFU road
By KATHY FORD
Picketers from the Telecommunication Workers Union
blocked access to Simon Fraser
University Monday, causing a
minor disruption of campus activities.
The line was set up at Gaglardi
Way at Curtis to stop supervisors
going to SFU to empty pay
telephones. The picket line is the
latest in a series of such actions
which started when B.C. Tel locked
out union members early in
November.
B.C. Hydro bus drivers honored
the picket line, leaving their
passengers at the bottom of
Gaglardi Way, resulting in a walk
of about two kilometres for people
choosing to cross the line and
continue to SFU-
But most people honored the line,
New Westminster strike zone
director Don Bremner said
Monday.
"We got an excellent response
with only a few people going in," he
said.
"The response was good from
the students and excellent from
B.C. Hydro. A lot of students
phoned the strike headquarters to
find out what it was all about."
Burnaby zone director Ed Perry
said the picketers arrived at 5 a.m.
"That's when those sneaks (B.C.
Tel supervisors) try to empty the
phones," he said.
"There'll probably be a bloody
injunction tomorrow (to prevent
further picketing of SFU) but we
won't have to go there again."
SFU information officer Ken
Mennell said the picket line caused
only minor disruption. The
cafeteria services closed until noon
when   the   line   was   lifted   and
unionized cafeteria workers came
on campus.
Many students and faculty were
late for class but nothing was
cancelled.
"It (the picket) didn't cause too
many  problems,"   Mennell  said.
A May conciliation report
recommended B.C. Tel set up a
study of contracting out, the major
issue involved in the dispute. The
report suggested such a study be
conducted over a period of from 12
to 18 months by a committee with
labor and management representatives and a neutral chairperson.
The union voted to accept this
but management refused.
Mennell said that soon after the
lockout occurred, the university
administration delegated one
person to deal with B.C. Tel.
"He will only call in a repair
service if there is a complete
emergency," Mennell said.
He said union members who
refused to cross Monday morning's
picket line will not be reprimanded
but will likely not be paid for the
work time they missed.
At UBC, information officer Al
Hunter said the university does not
have a position on the strike but no
installations or moving of
telephone equipment will be
carried out for the duration of the
strike lockout.
B.C. Federation of Telephone
Workers business agent Donna
Alexander said that if supervisors
attempt to empty pay telephones at
UBC pickets will go up. She said
that because there have been no
pickets at UBC the pay telephones
likely have not been emptied
recently.
Similar flying pickets have also
disrupted B.C. Ferries and some
post offices. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1978
Stunts grotesque, sickening
To anyone who saw the
insides of the women's office
in SUB yesterday morning,
the scene was a bad dream, a
totally grotesque and disgusting dream.
Hundreds of photographs
of naked women from
so-called men's magazines
stared down from the walls,
and the leaflets and posters
which usually graced the
walls and shelves of the
office were strewn across the
floor.
The engineering undergraduate society is not taking
responsibility for the
debacle, but it is quite possible that a group of gears
celebrating the first day of
Engineering Week were behind the latest and most blatant attack against progressive
women on campus. If some
other group was behind this
sacking, then a very grotes-.
que joke has been played on
the gears and on women.
The Ubyssey has opposed
the employment of disciplinary powers of the
administration because of
possible misuse.
But breaking into an
office, and destroying and
defacing its contents is clearly a crime. The condition the
office was left in was an
abomination to almost everyone on campus, regardless of
their views on the activities
of the  Alma Mater Society
women's committee.
The vandalism is much
more disturbing than the
gears' activities of two years
ago, which drew a stiff verbal
reprimand from administration president Doug
Kenny, or the silencing of
South African MP Harry
Schwarz, which Kenny dealt
with in an unfortunate manner.
Kenny must move swiftly
and take strong action against all those responsible. The
women's committee plans to
lay charges against the
hooligans, and we hope
police investigations prove
successful.
Why did this happen? Perhaps   because   the   women's
committee dared to publicly
protest the barbaric Lady
Godiva ride and the racist,
sexist content of the Red
Rag. These two 'institutions'
run counter to what is supposed the basic principle
behind any university — the
advancement of knowledge
and tolerance for all humankind.
Restriction     of     these
How would you feel if I told you it was my sister on the horse?
activities come under the
question of freedom of
speech and expression.
Yesterday's sacking shows
how little regard some students have for those rights.
Perhaps the gears' two
cherished institutions should
be dealt with in a similar
manner.
Whether or not gears were
responsible for yesterday's
vandalism, the mentality behind the action bears a
striking similarity to that
behind the ride and the Red
Rag. Students, and the
administration, must curb recurrences of all three events.
We trust that many intelligent engineers are unhappy
with the Engineering Week's
activities, and we know that
they and many other students are ashamed of what
happened yesterday.
Disciplinary or legal
action will not heal the
wound. Students must support the women's committee
in its effort to halt the Lady
Godiva ride and the sexist,
racist content in the Red
Rag.
Such support for the
committee will be a
repudiation of moronic
actions and traditions, and
will prove that UBC students
support the advancement of
humanity.
Letters
Godiva ride upsets DeMarco
disappointing to see that the   is   false,   why   encourage   mis-    necessarv to these activities
r
It is disappointing to see that the
engineering undergraduate society
has again this year organized a
Lady Godiva ride.
The argument in favor of continuing the tradition is that it is not
meant to be taken seriously, and is
therefore harmless. Well, I don't
blame those who take it seriously. I
say that the act of publicly
parading a nude female before a
predominantly male horde of
excited engineers is not harmless.
Here are some reasons:
It offends some people. Maybe
you're not offended, but is it wrong
to have some consideration for
those who are?
It gives engineers a bad
reputation. Even if the reputation
is false, why encourage misconceptions?
It helps to perpetuate the male
domination of the engineering
profession, because it associates
the profession with males (horny
males, moreover) and it may intimidate prospective female entrants to file faculty.
No matter how enlightened we
may all think we are, everyone
watching or participating in the
spectacle gets a little bit of training
in a bad habit — i.e. the wrong way
for the sexes to behave toward
each other.
As an engineering student, I
have always enjoyed activities
which promote a sense of community in the faculty. However, I
don't think that a sexist theme is
necessary to these activities. Even
supposing, given the utmost optimism, that the Lady Godiva ride
is only a relic of discarded attitudes, I think it is time to bury the
relic. (There will never be a
shortage of reminders of what
sexism was like.)
I challenge the imagination of
engineering students to create an
event in place of the Godiva ride
that will reflect the changes in
attitude that are occurring — and
maybe even lead the way a little
bit.
John DeMarco
AMS president
e
A snobby club, by Georgi
"How much wood could a woodcock cock if a Woodcock could cock
wood?" What e'er the answer be, George Woodcock has done tenfold.
I truly hope that I'm not in error by assuming that he was in fact
referring to other club members (Nov. 29) when he stated in The
Ubyssey, that a "thinking man's stream of consciousness should
remain uninterrupted."
I do, however, agree with 'ol' George' that I would not appreciate
"low-brows" in my club. I certainly hope that he satisfies my desires
by staying in his club.
Probably the most original and profound statement that George has
said is, "mind you, some of my best friends are students." I'm sure
that any ardent Dr. Suess fan got a chuckle out of that.
If George is an indication of what the Faculty Club has to offer, I can
assure George that I do not fancy the honor of having a drink at the
Snob Hill Social Club.
Peter Chant     Dave Tannar
 commerce science^
Thank Christ for Christmas rush
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 10, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Chris Gainor
"If It's Monday, It must be Rome," snored Mike (Iliad) Bocking as he
fell asleep on Verne McDonald's Latin shoulders. Classic jet lag
Interspersed a non-pasta meal at the White Tower crumbling ruins, as Chris
(Caesar) Gainor shovelled tasty morsels of non-partisan pizza Into his
cavernous trap. The Roman colosseum was nothing for Kathy Ford and
Bill Tieleman, who left the Italian would-bes Vicki Booth, Heather Conn,
Greg Edwards and Craig Heale to conquer new lands. Brad Felton,
fingering his olive wreath, told the guy with the Grecian nose, Marcus Gee,
he was In the wrong country. In his brown hand-knit toga, Steve Howard
dreamed of a Homer with red sideburns as Carl Vesterback flung his
cannelonl at the crowd. Verne McDonald swung his golden locks In the
maiden's faces and smiled sweetly.
Curse the damned two-way, see-through, double-
mirrored glass door. Elusive as an invisible wall it
hovers off in the distance with me caught in a pack of
raving madmen.
I'm in Brownian motion as I bounce randomly from
one human atom to the next, excusing myself
profusely in a totally ridiculous manner considering
the circumstances. Excitement, panic and confusion
have reached a fever pitch on this, the day before
Christmas.
It's either in, trying to get out or out, trying to get
in, I can't recall which. I do know that moments ago I
avoided being trampled by a herd of biting, scratching women as they attacked a discount rack with a
ferocity seldom seen outside of the jungles of
Manhattan.
Like birds of prey, the customers swoop down upon
their victims, ripping and tearing at toys, clothing,
household items etc. Vultures waiting impatiently on
the sidelines for their turn to pick up a piece of the
action.
In a rare moment of stillness, I find myself face to
face with a teenage girl trying on absurd bra sizes
(two for $5), while a mother across the aisle stuffs her
kids into shirts and pullovers (by one, get second one
free). She reads the prices out loud, rationalizing
impending purchases with "it'll fit him next year."
Ah yes, Christmas. What a glorious season. Without
it we might not have those super-special pre-
Christmas, Christmas and after-Christmas sales
which brighten the smiles of shoppers and
storeowners everywhere. And of course the kids.
What would they do without a tree in the living
room smothered with popcorn, lights, cranberries,
tinsel and other assorted odds and ends? Where
would the piles of disposable plastico-metallic wind-
up wonder toys be laid to rest by Santa, were it not for
the reserved space under a dying tree in every
household?
Yes Christmas, the old shot in the arm which gets
you through the year in staggering financial shape,
but causes a redistribution of happiness which leaves
us all looking forward to its arrival year after year.
When, may I ask, would the mental, physical,
spiritual, if not economic recovery be made if it were
not for that Godsend — Christmas?
So, even as I curse the damned two-way, see-
through, double-mirrored glass doors eluding me in
the distance, and can't seem to recall whether I was
in, trying to get out or out, trying to get in. ... I try to
be thankful and whisper in wonder, "thank you dear
God, for Jesus."
Francois Melese D'Hospital Tuesday, January 10, 1978
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
Women of the world, unite!
By JANET MacKAY
The opposite of Women's Week is
Engineering Week. That sounds
peculiar. But both weeks are
misleadingly named.
Women's Week is not a
celebration of womanhood in the
same way in which Mother's Day is
a celebration of motherhood.
Rather it represents an attempt by
a small (too small) group of
women on campus to promote
androgyny. The concept of an
androgynous woman cannot be
separated from that of an androgynous man. 'Let women be
equal' entails 'let men be equal.'
Engineering week is not now a
celebration of the power, creativity
and wit of engineers, although no
doubt that is what it was originally
intended to be. Male engineers
have accepted two false equations.
First, they equated power,
creativity, and wit with
masculinity. Then they equated
masculinity with the domination
human goals. The stupidity of the
first equation which is accepted by
the planners of Engineering Week
should be particularly obvious to
engineering students when they
attempt to apply it to those of their
number who happen to be female.
The second equation (to be
masculine is to dominate women)
is even more pernicious than the
first. Without the core of primitive
erotic energy that is in each of us,
we would be no more than
sophisticated computers existing
in a valueless physical world.
It is the cohesive force of our
erotic energy that brings into being
the rich and intricate pattern of
human society, and it is this same
erotic energy that compels each of
us to act in and on the social world.
Each individual's erotic energy
is channelled through his or her
sexuality so that it is experienced
as male energy or female energy.
But when male energy is equated
with dominance and female energy
perspectives
and oppression of women. Thus it
seems reasonable to them to
demonstrate their pride in their
faculty by writing articles and
performing rituals expressive of
female degradation.
Engineering Week has become a
vehicle for the presentation of
images which serve the function of
locking people yet more securely
into traditional, stultifying and dehumanizing sex roles. The
organizers of Engineering Week in
its present form are the natural
ideological enemies of those who
are working for the creation of an
androgynous society.
The positive characteristics that
engineers wish their faculty to represent are, of course, characteristics that any sane human
being would wish to incorporate.
They are not the exclusive
property of one sex.
Women too strive for mental and
emotional agility, hope to be able
to envision enrichment of the
human condition, and desire to be
effective in shaping society so that
it will incarnate their visions.
Some women — unfortunately,
not many at this point in time —
feel that becoming engineers will
assist   them   in   obtaining   these
Janet Mackay is a graduate
student in philosophy. Perspective* ts open to oil member* of
the   UBC   community.
=J.=Jr=Ji=ii=li^Jr=*a
^pii=ii=Jrai=JgIg77arSr,=Jl=]i=li=J,=]r=
with passivity, the raw original
erotic power to which we all have
access is being perverted for
political ends.
As a result of the widespread
belief in the correctness of these
equivalences, it has become
shockingly normal for the flow of
emotion in male-female
relationships to have a nasty undercurrent of sadism and
masochism. Carried to an extreme, this belief makes men
brutal and insensitive, and woman
self-destructive and ineffective. It
saps both sexes of their full
humanity.
Every year, when the few indignant letters come in to The
Ubyssey from women who have
seen the Lady Godiva ride or the
Red Rag, engineers pat women on
the head and tell us to take these
things 'in the spirit in which they
were intended.' They are probably
sincere. Their purpose in dumping
on us is not to cause women
discomfort but to glorify
engineers, and so they can't understand why women should be
such poor sports as to object.
Until now, women have been
good sports. In general, they have
indicated their disapproval only by
ignoring the ride, and not reading
the rag. Such passive resistance is
a fitting response for those who
have accepted the traditional
female role. But every child knows
p   Candia Taverna
SPECIALIZING IN
228-9512 ™ssr  228-9513
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FAST FREE DELIVERY - 4510 W. 10th Ave.
:i
Q
a
Q
I
HILLEL HOUSE
Schedule of Weekly Events
Mondays, 12:30-1:30
Seminar on the Jewish Family
Tuesdays, 12:30-1:30
Israeli Dancing
Wednesdays, 12:30-2:00
Shefa Vegetarian Lunch
Coffee and Herbal Tea available daily
Watch for announcements of special events.
SILLY GEAR . . . gets well-deserved boot(s)
that passive resistance is the worst
possible strategy for dealing with
bullying — passivity actually
encourages it.
The Lady Godiva ride is an
annual event in this educational
institution. It is semi-officially
sanctioned, for although it is
technically illegal, and everyone
knows approximately when it is to
occur, participants are never
prosecuted. It is a piece of street
theatre that must require a substantial expenditure of time and
money each year by the
engineering undergraduate
society.
We must stop being duped by the
suggestion that it is an unimportant publicity stunt that should
not be taken seriously.
Suppose the engineers chose to
glorify themselves by putting on a
yearly pageant triumphantly
depicting white men's domination
of other races as exemplified by
the exploitation of Chinese
laborers in the construction of the
CPR? Would we be inclined to view
such a pageant as a harmless
prank? No, overt racism, unlike
sexism, is no longer socially acceptable.
It has become unacceptable
because its victims stopped
silently suffering its effects, and
started fighting it.
... The engineers' traditional Red
Rag and Lady Godiva ride are
t.,,*- personally insulting to every
woman. They are socially
damaging because they serve as
propaganda for the outmoded and
deadening sex role-playing that co-
opts the erotic energy of both men
and women. This energy should be
liberated so that new social forms
can evolve or be created — forms
to make life not only more comfortable, but also more ecstatic for
us all.
Women and men: If the
engineers once again produce the
Red Rag and the Lady Godiva ride
in their usual offensive forms,
don't just ignore them. Destroy
copies of the Red Rag whenever
you get the chance.
If you see the Lady Godiva ride,
support your sister on that horse by
accompanying her. Heckle the.
engineers. Carry pickets telling
them what you think of their
pageant. Fight back!
Dal Grauer Memorial lectures
THE DYNAMICS
OF
CANADIAN UNITY'
Economist Albert Breton and his sociologist brother Raymond, bilingual professors
from the University of Toronto with a background of teaching and research in Qiebec,
are this year's Dal Grauer Memorial Lecturers at the University of B.C: They will give
three talks, all dealing with various aspects of Canadian unity. All three are open to the
public, and the lectures are free.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 8:15 P.M.
'Language, Region, and The Struggle for Institutional Dominance in Canada.'
THURSDAY,, JANUARY 12, 12:30 P.M.
'The Temper of Conflict Between Canada's Charter Groups'.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 14. 8:15 P.M.
'Dynamics of Contemporary Canada: Relations Between Quebec and The Rest of
Canada.'
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1978
Hot flashes
UBC jumps on
Unify wagon
UBC is jumping on the Canadian Unity bandwagon this month
with a series of public lectures by
two Saskatchewan-born bilingual
brothers from the University of
Toronto.
Albert Breton, an economist,
and Raymond Breton, a sociologist, will give their first talk at
8:15   p.m.   today   on   Language,
Religion and the Struggle for In-
stutitonal Dominance.
On Thursday at noon the
bubbly brothers will speak on the
Temper of the Conflict between
Canada's Charter Groups.
Their final talk, at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday is titled Dynamics of
Contemporary Canada; Relations
Between Quebec and the Rest of
Canada.
All three lectures are free and
will take place in IRC 2.
Pols on the run
Student politicians are again
off and running for the annual
election of student reps to the
board of-governors and senate.
Candidates for the graduate
studen+s' senate seat and board
hopefuls will be speaking at an
all-candidates meeting in the
Garden Room of the Graduate
Student Centre today at noon.
All grad students are urged to
attend.
Tween classes
(new
6:30
TODAY
CH'NESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon. SUB 212A.
UBC-JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Those   who   applied   for   the   1978
summer  exchange   program  should
phone Guy at 732-5125.
MY JONG-KUNG FU CLUB
Registration     and     practice
members   welcome),   4:30 to
p.m., SUB party room.
REC UBC
Beginners   and    Intermediate   yoga
classes,   4:30   p.m.,   War   Memorial
Gym 213.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 130.
WEDNESDAY
CVC
Organizational meeting for those
Interested In a ski trip, noon, SUB
215.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-In, noon, SUB 130.
SAILING CLUB
General membership meeting with
Information about the dance and
films of heavy weather Laser sailing
and the Whltbread Round-the-world
Race, noon, SUB 205.
UBC-JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Those who applied for the 1978
summer exchange program should
phone Guy at 732-5125.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Free film series America, noon, SUb
auditorium.
RECREATION UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
General      meeting,      noon,      RUS
lounge.
VOC
General    meeting   and   slide   show,
noon, Chem 250.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Organizational meeting for Whistler
ski trip, noon, SUB 215.
NEWMAN CENTRE
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
PLACE VANIER RESIDENCE
Bear garden, 8 p.m. to 1*30 a.m..
Place Vanier ballroom.
THURSDAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Joan Lew speaks on the missionary
challenge, noon, SUB 207-209.
SUS VOLLEYBALL
Organizational volleyball practice
and sign up for sciencemen Intramural teams, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.,
War Memorial Gym.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-In, noon, SUB 1301.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY    ,
Dr. Lowe speaks on orthodontics,
noon, I RC 1.
NDP CLUB
Aid. Mike Harcourt for area representation, noon, SUB 212.
DEAN OF WOMEN
Panel discussion on Women In the
Media, noon, Bu. 102.
SFFen
Meeting for SF writers and artists,
bring work or be there, noon, SUB
212A.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's  drop-In,  noon, SUB 130.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's  drop-In,   noon,  SUB  130.
Squeezed
HAVING HASSLES?
Come and see the A.M.S.
Ombudsperson   Pam Sherwood
SUB lOOA 12:30-2:30 M-F or 228-4846
GRAD CLASS OF 78
GENERAL MEETING
Thursday, January 12th, 1978
12:30
HEBB THEATRE
GRADS   OF    '78,    YOUR   VOTES   ARE   REQUIRED   ON   THE    FOLLOWING
RESOLUTION:
That $4.00 be allotted to each department and/or faculty per graduating student to be used for
composite pictures and/or for the funding of a grad function.
The allotment of funds is to be by application. The applications must specify
1) What the money will be used for,
2) Amount required,
3) In the case of composite pictures, submit photographers name, and
4) in the case of a grad function, submit date, place and details.
Deadline for the applications is January 27th, 1978.
There will also be a discussion of the criteria for the allocation
of Grad Class Funds for gifts and projects.
Submitted by
MARIA KRAVJANSKI,
Public Relations Officer,
Grad Class Council
THE JOHN M. BUCHANAN MEMORIAL FUND
TO SUPPORT STUDENT PROJECTS AT UBC
AMOUNT OF AWARD - Approximately $6,000 will be awarded this year by
the selection committee to one or  more projects to be completed in the
12-month period following April 1, 197S.
PURPOSE OF THE AWARD — To assist student projects closely related to
the academic programs of the faculty  in  which the students are enrolled.
Projects by groups or individuals are eligible, including special projects arising
from academic programs, student conferences, athletic events, etc., but not
including thesis projects.
APPLICATIONS — Details regarding applications for the award are available
from  the  office  of  Dr.   E. W.  Vogt, President's Office,  Main  Mall  North
Adminstration Building, Campus. Deadline for applications is Feb. 1, 1978.
PAYMENT OF FEES
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL
SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO
REMIND STUDENTS THAT THE
Second Installment is Due On Or Before
FRIDAY, JANUARY 13, 1978
* * * FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE * * •
DEUS EX MACHINA
The
Transfiguration of Jesus Son of Joseph
Written and Directed
by Donald Soule
JANUARY 13-21
(Previews January 11 and 12)
8:00 P.M.
Student Tickets: $2.50
BOX OFFICE   *   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *
Room 207
*    *
Support Your Campus Theatre
*    •
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES;   Campus - 3 Hues, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $2,50; additional fines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1WS
5 — Coming Events
FREESE: AMERICA, starting Jan. 11th,
even' Wed., 12:35 p.m. SUb Aud. Free
film series.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
RACQUET SALE — Wide choice for
squash, badminton, racquetball and
tennis, at exceptional prices. Reasonable rates for stringing. Phone 733-
1612 or visit Community Sports at
3616 West 4th Ave.
20 — Housing
FREE — Large bright sleeping room
for responsible studious studen*-, male
preferred, vicinity 25th and Granville.
No cooking. Phone 224-6090.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
35 —Lost
LOST — Ladies Bulova watch. White
strap, rectangular face. Phone 263-
9261. Reward offered.
GLASSES LOST Wed. aft., Angus 226.
Please phone Andy 224-9706. In black
case. Needed desperately.
50 — Rentals
SINGLE & DOUBLE rooms avail, in
Kappa Sigma Fraternity House. If
interested contact Sid at 224-9679 or
224-5334.
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
DO   YOU    HAVE   TALENT?   Why   not
show your stuff at the Booshow. Register Monday, Pit Coffee House, 11:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. Show time 7:00 p.m.,
Monday.
WOODY ALLEN isn't funny, he's
dramatic in Subfilms' weekend presentation,  "The Front" (only 75c).
60 — Tutoring
FRENCH     LANGUAGE    tutoring.    See
Daphne at 732-0900.
85 — Typing
TYPING ESSAYS THESIS from legible
copy. Fast efficient service. English,
French,   Spanish.   324-9414.
TYPING SERVICES. Reasonable rates.
Call Liz after 6:00 p.m. 732-3690.
EXCELLENT  TYPING, IBM   Selectric,
days, 228-2731.
90 - Wanted
SUBJECTS
to   participate   in   an   experimental
preventive dental program. Instruction, toothbrush, and floss provided.
Please call:
224-3563
after 6
99 — Miscellaneous
"ATTENTION" — All tennis instructors with homes between Halifax and
Vancouver with populations supporting an active tennis community. If
you are experienced and especially if
you are certified you could earn $350
a week or more next summer. Many
instructors are needed. Write Tennis
Unity, 318 Johnson Street, Kingston,
Ontario, K7L-1Y7 Include any details
about yourself, including name, local
address, summer address, experience,
certifications (if any), photo, age,
your course at school, what locations
you've taught at, the structure of
employment (hired by community-
club, private club, or Parks and
Recreation Department).
This is a one time ad. Cut it out
and show your teaching friends, write
us immediately as much planning is
required. It could be the most important letter you have ever written.
P.S. Last year our average instructor made $365 per week!!!
SKI WHISTLER
Rent cabin day/week.  732-0174 eves. Tuesday, January 10, 1978
TH
UBYSSEY
Page 7
SPOR TS
Puck 'Birds
dump Dinos
ByBRADFELTON
In their first league games in the
new year, the hockey 'Birds, still
warm from five exhibition games
over the Christmas break, swept
two games from the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs.
The two wins, 7-4 Friday and 6-2
on Saturday, lifted UBC into
second place in the Canada West
University Athletic Association,
two points ahead of Calgary but
still 10 behind the unbeaten
University of Alberta Golden
Bears.
Calgary was able to skate with
the 'Birds during the evenly-played
first period of Friday's game, but
lost its spark during the second
period.
"I think that our team got
perhaps a little worn down in the
third period," said Calgary coach
Jock
shorts
UBC's basketball teams made
the mistake of returning to action
on the weekend, losing every game
played to Calgary in the Alberta
city. The Dinosaur men's team
swept the Thunderbirds 94-62 and
81-62 Friday and Saturday, and the
DimWTobYTtwoTffSm the Thunderettes 57-34 and 60-52. Well, at
least you know what to expect.
Happy New Year.
Gord Cowan. "We haven't played
since early December."
UBC coach Bert Halliwell said
the earlier exhibition games, from
which the 'Birds emerged 3-1-1,
helped keep the team in condition
for the second half of the league
schedule.
The first period ended 2-2, the
Dinos leading twice on goals by
Bob Irvine and Jerry Bancks. Both
came on long passes, from the fast
break with the 'Birds trapped up-
ice.
Ross Cory and Derek Williams
replied for the 'Birds, beating
goalie Terry Kryczka. Cory's goal
resulted from a lone rink-long rush
by the smooth-skating forward,
while Williams deflected a shot by
Dick Jellina.
UBC adjusted its defence in a
close-checking second period to
shut down Calgary's attempts at
the long pass. The only goal was
scored by UBC's Rob Jordan on a
slapshot from the right face-off
circle.
In the third, Calgary sagged
even more as Lane Lavik, Sean
Boyd, Jim Stuart and John Dzus
notched scores for the 'Birds, while
Jerry Orban and Irvine answered
for the Dinos.
In the second game the UBC
lineup was beefed up by the return
of Tom Blaney and Ted Fostey, two
regulars who have been out with
separated shoulders. Blaney
scored a pair, including the
eventual game-winner, and Fostey
got an assist.
—craig heale photo
LUNGING LANE LAVIK of hockey 'Birds hits deck in front of Calgary goalie Jerry Farwell while Paul
Blaney (3) takes charge and Russ Hall looks on. But UBC controlled over-all play in 6-2 win Saturday night,
completing doublheader sweep.
UBC goalie Ron Patterson was a
standout, treating 600 fans to a
spectacular display as he turned
back countless drives to backstop
the 'Birds to the win.
UBC led 2-0 after the first period
on goals by Frank Gorrings and
John Dzus, but Calgary came on
strong in the second, tying the
game on a pair of Jerry Orban
tallies. But UBC then went ahead
to stay on goals by Blaney, Sam
Bowman and Lavik:.
Blaney got the only marker of
the third, tipping a Sam Bowman
slapshot while Calgary's Bob Irvine was sitting out a five-minute
major for slashing Cory on the
upper arm.
"Maybe he was just frustrated,"
said Cory, holding an ice pack to
his arm. "I don't remember
anything special happening."
Cowan didn't think the major
was deserved.
"Irvine definitely deserved a
two-minute penalty," he said.
UBC coach Bert Halliwell said he
was impressed that UBC was able
to contain the Calgary attack after
two defencemen were hurt and the
Dinos had battled back to tie the
score.
"We had two defencemen get
hurt in the first period, John
Jordan  and  Doug   Tottenham,"
said Halliwell. "I had to put John
Duzzy (forward John Dzus) on
defence and we were down to four
defencemen."
"I was really proud of the way
we came back after that."
In exhibition action over the
holidays, UBC lost 6-4 to the Richmond Intermediates just before
exams.
"We were in a pre-exam slump,"
explained Halliwell.
UBC also tied the North Shore
Intermediates 6-6, and beat the
Trail Smoke Eaters 6-3, the Nelson
Maple Leafs 6-4 and the Pacific
Junior All-Stars 5-2.
It's not all bleak thpugh. The
forces of cynicism took a heavy
beating when it was learned that
the plucky Thunderette volleyball
team won its own tournament
Saturday at War Memorial Gym,
turning back the famous Vancouver Chimos 2-1. Information to
the effect that the UBC team
dressed up high school juniors in
Chimo uniforms is merely
scurrilous rumor. Any time you
win your own tournament, you're
good enough for us.
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2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
EVENT
(3) Basketball
(2) Hockey
Volleyball
(4) Bowling
(5) 3 on 3 Basketball
(1) Curling Bonspiel
Wrestling
(5) Badminton Tournament
(5) "Under six foot"
Tournament (five men)
(4) Snooker Tournament
Rugby Tournament
(4) 8-ball Tournament
Track & Field
Championships
Nitobe Basketball
Tournament
Man's Intramural Program
Schedule of events 1977-70
DEADLINE
DATE
Friday
Jan. 6
Friday
Jan. 6
Friday
Jan. 13
Friday
Jan. 13
Friday
Jan. 27
Friday
Jan. 27
Friday
Feb. 3
Friday
Feb. 3
Fri.
Feb. 10
(SUB Games Rn
Friday
Feb. 17
Friday
Feb. 24
(SUB Games Rr
ACTIVITY
DATE
Jan. 18-March. 9
Jan. 19-March 9
Jan. 26-March 2
Jan. 26-March 2
Saturday & Sunday
Jan. 28 & 29
Saturday
Feb. 11
Thursday
Feb. 2
Saturday & Sunday
Feb. 4 & 5
Saturday & Sunday
Feb. 11 & 12
Saturday & Sunday
Feb. 11 & 12
Saturday
March 4
Saturday & Sunday
Thursday
March 2
Monday-Thursday
March 6-9
TYPE OF
COMPETITION
Leagues
Leagues'
Leagues
Leagues
Double Elim.
Bonspiel
Double Elim.
Double Elim.
Double Elim.
Double Elim.
Double Elim.
Double Elim.
Heats & finals
Single Elim.
TIME
Noon &
evening
Tues & Thurs.     TWSC
evenings
Mon., Wed.,
Thurs. evenings
Tues., Wed.,
FACILITY
Memorial Gym
Gyms A&B
SUB Lanes
Thurs. 7:30-10:30 p.m.
10:00-6:30 Memorial Gym
All day TWSC
Weigh-in 7:30     Memorial Gym
Rules Clinic 8:00
Preliminary Bout
Start 8:30
10:00-6:30
10:00-6:30
10:00-6:30
10:00-6:30
10:00-6:30
Gyms A&B
Memorial Gym
S.U.B. Games
Room
Thunderbird Park
SUB Games
Room
12:45 p.m. Harry Logan Track
As scheduled       Memorial Gym
1. Entry fee is $8.00 with $4.00 refund upon completion of obligations to the tournament.
2. Entry fee is $50.00 per team per term. No refund.
3. $5.00 entry fee per team refundable when obligation to program is fulfilled.
4. Participants pay for their own games and shoes (Bowling).
5. Participants must sign up individually on a tournament draw sheet outside the Intramural Office in the week prior to the deadline date.
For individual sports there is a $3.00 registration fee with a $2.00 refund upon completion of obligations to the tournament. Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 10, 1978
Access ignored by new trend
From   page   3
And the Council of Ontario
Universities report says a major
reason it advocates standardized,
province-wide tests is concern
about how fairly students are
treated when they apply for admission to university.
The COU report talks about "the
vexing question of comparability
of grades reported by different
schools, and of grades in different
subjects in the same schools. For
example, does a 60 per cent or an 80
per cent in physics in school A
mean the same in school B, and
does a 60 per cent or an 80 per cent
in physics mean approximately the
same as a 60 per cent or an 80 per
cent in English?"
The report adds that the degree
to which secondary schools yary in
marks given for "comparable"
performance is substantial enough
to affect whether a student is accepted into some post-secondary
institutions, and whether a student
is awarded a scholarship.
The report neglects to mention
the obvious financial implications
of a strict core curriculum and
standardized tests.
In a time of education cutbacks,
governments are no doubt attracted to standardized education,
which could allow teachers to
spend less time trying to cater to
students' individual needs and development, and therefore allow
governments to reduce costs by
increasing pupil-teacher ratios.
The whole concept of limiting
education to those who "achieve"
in some measurable way is a
reflection of those same education
cutbacks.
It was not so long ago that the
crux of government reports lay
with education's usefulness as a
social tool, to grant equal opportunity to students despite their
social origins.
Universal accessibility was the
keyword, and the concept of
achievement testing was discarded
both on its ineffectiveness and on
philosophical grounds.
Today, the need for individualized instruction and
evaluation is ignored by standardized  tests.   As   the   Ontario
education ministry work group
report points out:
"In assessing student
achievement, it is understood that
no set of objectives is equally valid
for all students in a group, and that
each student progresses at his own
rate.
"Furthermore, while a particular objective may be valid, it is
possible that it cannot be either
measured        or recorded
statistically. And even when that
objective is measurable, there are
individual student needs which
must be taken into account."
Yet, in Ontario, proficiency and
achievement tests are being used
in an attempt to measure and
record some skills that are
probably impossible to measure
statistically.
What's more, the results of such
"experimental" tests are being
used to justify demands for increasingly standardized, structured education and evaluation.
In the fall of 1975, the COU began
an experimental achievement
testing program among some first-
year students at Brock, McMaster,
Queen's and Waterloo universities.
It showed that the mean score for
Big or Small Jobs
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students writing the English
proficiency tests was 40.1, compared to a mean score of 41.9
among a national sample of grade
12 and 13 students who wrote the
test several years earlier.
The COU continued its testing
program in the fall of 1976 among
first-year students at McMaster
and Carleton universities and the
University of Toronto's Erindale
College.
It is likely that whatever the
Ontario government decided
regarding standardized testing or
curriculum will have an impact on
other provinces.
But neither the COU report nor
the ministry work group report
offer palatable solutions —
whichever path the government
decides to follow will involve some
degree^ of standardization of
education.
And although that may make the
job of teachers and administrators
and university admissions officers
easier, it's not going to help
students' individual needs or do
anything to improve accessibility
to post-secondary education.
BACKTOSKOOL
r
"\
Women's Intramural Program
Schedule of Events 1977-78
EVENT
Basketball
Ice Hockey
Volleyball
Floor Hockey
(1) Badminton
(2) Curling
Squash &
Racquetball
DEADLINE
DATE
ACTIVITY
DATE
TYPE OF
COMPETITION
TIME
FACILITY
Wednesday
Jan. 18
Monday-Tuesday
Jan. 23-29
Leagues
12:30-
1:15
Mem. Gym
Friday
Jan. 13
Thursdays
Jan. 19
Leagues
7:45-
10:00
TWSC
Friday
Jan. 20
Tuesdays
Jan. 24-Feb. 28
Leagues
7:30-
9:30
Mem.Gym
Friday
Jan. 27
Wednesdays
Feb. 1-March 1
Leagues
7:00-
10:00
Gym E
Friday
Jan. 27
Wednesdays
Feb. 1-March 1
Double
Elimination
4:30-
6:30
Gym A
Friday
Jan. 27
Saturday
Feb. 4
Bonspiel
Instruction:
9:30-10 a.m.
Bonspiel:
10-6:30 p.m.
TWSC
Friday
Feb. 24
Tuesday-Thursday
Feb. 28-March 2
Double
Elimination
4:30-
8:30
TWSC
1. Sign up on draw sheet set up in the week prior to the deadline date.
2. Charge of $8.00 per team — $4.00 refunded after completion of obligation to the tournament.
Intramural Eligibility Regulations are on file in the Intramural Office.
Co-Rec Intramural Program
Schedule of Events 1977-78
EVENT
Volleyball
(1) Bowling & Pizza Nite
(2) Ski Trip to Whistler
Curling
Skate Nite
(3) Ski Trip to
to Cypress Bowl
(4) Cross Country Ski
(Hollyburn)
(5) Roller Skating
Volleyball
(6) Spring Football
Volleyball
DEADLINE
DATE
Drop-in
Tuesday
Jan. 17
Wednesday
Jan. 25
Friday
Jan. 27
Drop-in
Wednesday
Feb. 8
Wednesday
Feb. 8
Wednesday
Feb. 8
Drop-in
Friday
March 3
Drop-in
ACTIVITY
DATE
Thursdays
Jan. 12,19
Friday
Jan. 20
Saturday
Jan. 28
Sunday
Feb. 5
Tuesday
Jan. 31
Saturday
Feb. 11
Saturday
Feb. 11
Friday
Feb. 10
Thursdays
Feb. 9,16
Wednesday-Friday
March 8-10
Thursdays
March 2, 9, 16
COMPETITION
TIME
FACILITY
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
7:00-9:00 p.m.
SUB Games
Room
Leave at 6:00 a.m.
Return at 6:30 p.m.
Departure: SUB
(Bank of Montreal)
Instruction:
9:30-10:00 a.m.
Bonspiel:
10a.m.-6:30p.m
TWSC
8:30-10:45 p.m.
TWSC Rink
Leave at 7:30 p.m.
Return at 5 p.m.
Departure: SUB
(Bank of Montreal)
Leave at 7:30 a.m.
Return at 5 p.m.
Departure: SUB
(Bank of Montreal)
Leave at 7 p.m.
Return at 10:30 p.m.
Departure: SUB
(Bank of Montreal)
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
12:35
Mclnnes Field
(Memorial Gym Field)
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Memorial Gym
1. Entry fee of $2.50 per person covers cost of lanes and pizzas. Shoes are participants' responsibility.
2. Charge for transportation only is $6.00. Lift and rental charges are the responsibiibility of the participant.
3. Cost $4.50 per skier for transportation. Rent skis privately (not at Cypress Bowl). Lift tickets are responsibility of participants.
4_ Cost $4.50 per skier for transportation only. Rental of shoes and skis are responsibility of participant.
5. Cost $2.50 per person for transportation, rental of skates and admission.
6, Flag Football. 4 men and 4 women make a team, QB must be a woman.

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