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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1973

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Array Limits women's input
NDP caucus defeats itself
By JEAN CLARKE and
LINDA HOSSIE
The recently-formed NDP
caucus committee on legislation
for women has partially defeated
itself by limiting input deadlines,
Vancouver women's groups agreed
Monday.
Lack of time and the vagueness
of the government press release
are cited by most women's groups
as the main fault of the committee
organization.
The committee, chaired by MLA
Rosemary Brown (Vancouver -
Burrard), sent out the release Oct.
22. The first meeting with women's
groups was held Monday.
"The time allowed (for women to
prepare briefs) is extraordinarily
short," women's studies professor
Dorothy Smith said Monday.
"I have every respect for
Rosemary Brown and if she supports (the committee) that counts
with me but it really isn't good
enough."
Many women objected to the
number of men on the committee.
Besides Brown and MLA Karen
Sanford (Comox), committee
members are MLAs Alf Nunwiler
(Fort George), Gerry Anderson
(Kamloops)   and   Hartley   Dent
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LV., No. 21
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 1973
48      228-2301
"iB&TE&L
*;« K
HALLOWEEN'S A-COMING as any respectable pumpkin will tell
you. So now's the time to start making all sorts of trick-or-treat type
things for all the neat little kids coming to your door. That means
—peter cummings photo
popcorn balls, caramel crunchies and candied applies rather than all
that store-bought icky stuff. Enough to load up all the bags until they
(almost) break. Halloween's so wonderful, enjoy it.
(Skeena), assistant speaker of the
house.
"I think women need to take
charge of changing things that
refer to women. The constituency
is women so the representatives
should be women," women's
studies professor Annette Kolodny
said.
"I think that in a caucus of the
political party at that level it's
unrealistic to expect an all-woman
group but the majority should be
women," Smith said.
"The new committee doesn't
take into account the fact that
groups like the status of women
council have done nothing but
present briefs over the last few
years," said Hilda Thomas,
English professor and member of
the NDP women's committee.
Thomas said so many areas need
legislation pertaining to women
that "a department that can
concentrate on women's needs
must be established."
The caucus committee might
serve a useful function in
demonstrating the need for a
women's ministry, she said.
Status of Women Council ombudsperson Gene Errington said
she had never before seen a
commission set up so vaguely.
She said problems with the
committee's program were lack of
time, terms of reference, money
and provisions for hearings in
other parts of the province than
Vancouver.
"We've sent briefs in to the
government ever since they came
into office. So do we send (the
committee) the old briefs or
what?" she asked.
Women's action group member
Mary Kasper said her group's brief
will centre on women in the
university.
"Basically we will say what has
already been said in the status of
women report," she said.
"We're going to speak as if all
things are priorities."
Brown has pushed in the
legislature for government insurance for women left financially
insecure by divorce, desertion or
death of their husbands and for
financial aid for women taking
vocational training and retraining
programs.
She has also reiterated the need
for a women's ministry expressed
by the NDP women's committee.
See page 2: SANFORD
^--v.^'-;'-
\yf <*#&>■>        -t° ■.
AMS to follow classics in showing porno
By ARNIE BANHAM
The Alma Mater Society plans to screen
the American pornographic film, Deep
Throat, as soon as the classics department
releases the film, The Ubyssey learned
Monday.
It is expected the film will be shown in the
new Pit Nov. 31.
AMS president Brian Loomes said
Monday the society is prepared to show the
film, a probing analysis of American
sexuality, to test Canadian pornographic
laws.
"People like myself have had it up to here
with bourgeois law which stops people from
seeing what they want," said Loomes, indicating his neck.
"Besides the way (AMS treasurer John)
Wilson's budget is set up, we could use the
money we'll take in," he said.
Pit patrons will pay $3 a head or $5 a
couple to get in when the film is shown.
The film has been banned in Bellingham,
Wash., the nearest American porn centre,
since the U.S. supreme court ruled local
authorities can decide on the showing and
distribution of films and literature.
The Ubyssey also learned campus RCMP
stopped a showing of the film Saturday night
in the classics department wing of the
Buchanan building.
At least five  graduate  students  were
CLASSICS GRAD STUDENT,
acting up in washroom
arrested. No professors were arrested and
the film was not seized.
A department spokesman said Monday
only quick action by some senior profs saved
the film. The spokesman said a physical
plant janitor called in the police because
grad students "were acting up" in the
faculty washroom.
He said Saturday's screening was not the
first time UBC profs had seen the film.
The board of governors had a special
showing in the board room in the old administration building Sept. 31 after some
urban affairs profs sponsored the film in the
faculty club's social suite.
Board members were unavailable for
comment Monday and information officer
Jim Banham refused to comment.
"I'll have to clear that with the boss," he
said, referring to administration president
Walter Gage.
Registrar Jack Parnall, a normally
boring person, said Monday he attended the
faculty club showing.
He said he thought the film was entertaining and that students deserve a
chance to see it.
"After all this is a university campus," he
said. "We should allow a 1,000 ideas to
flourish out here.
"I don't know what all the fuss is about.
Robert Lovelace is one of my favorite
cavalier poets," Parnall said.
"I wasn't aware Linda wrote poetry," arts
dean Doug Kenny told The Ubyssey.
"But I do know this is a tough, realistic,
uncompromising film that shoots straight
from the hip," Kenny said.
' 'The main thrust of our argument in favor
of showing it on campus is our definite need
for such an uplifting film," he said, pointing
to his abdomen.
Craig Williams, engineering undergraduate society president, said he will
support a motion at the next AMS council
meeting to censure the AMS for not clearing
the film with the engineers.
"Traditionally, the engineers have always
dictated taste and redeeming social value on
campus," he said. "We should have had first
whack at it."
Chemistry head Charles McDowell,
currently totally unknown, refused to
comment on what he described as "a sordid
mess".
"But I do not intend to remain close'
mouthed for much longer," he said.
Student senator Svend Robinson said he
was planning to set up a senate committee to
investigate the allegedly indecent content of
the film.
Tickets go on sale today in SUB 283 from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Students can also phone for reservations at
either 228-2121 or 228-3973.
<^* Ssi£ ■ Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1973
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
While this may not be a popular
view, I was somewhat aghast that
student's council passed a motion
supporting an initial $2 million
subsidy of the bookstore expansion
and an additional $50,000 a year to
subsidize administrative costs.
Sympathetically, I am sure,
council thought this would mean a
reduction in the price of textbooks
next year or at least no substantial
increase.
Subsequently bookstore
manager Bob Smith stated that
even with the yearly supplement
no decrease in prices would occur.
Which brings us really to the crux
of the matter — the bookstore is
run on an inefficient basis.
Now someone has to pay for this
inefficiency and council rightly
took the viewpoint that it should be
the administration.
But where does the university
get its money? About 20 per cent
comes from student fees and about
80 per cent from government
sources. The New Democratic
Party has shown itself to not be any
more predisposed towards
universities than its Social Credit
predecessors (for different reasons
however). That means that any
new money for the university will
come from an expansion of that 20
per cent — the student pocket.
The simple effect of a major
grant to any of the university's
ancillary services is that it will
hasten the day when university
fees will be increased.
(There hasn't been a fee increase
since 1966, yet the cost of living in
that period has risen 37 per cent in
Vancouver. Assurances from
various administration types
aside, it will only be a short time
before the board of governors will
be considering higher entrance
fees.)
A subsidy is bad in two ways.
First, it glosses over the inefficiency in the bookstore by
ignoring it. Instead of acquiring a
profitable or at least a break-even
mix of textbooks and other books
the administration would be
subsidizing   the   management
Sanford
opposes
ministry
From page 1
Sanford has publicly opposed
Brown's suggestions for a women's
ministry and for a greater ratio of
women on boards and agencies.
Sanford does not disagree with
the sentiment behind the
suggestions but feels that "attitudes can't be legislated," she
said earlier this year.
Answering the complaints about
vagueness and lack of time Brown
said: "We're vague too. We
haven't worked out times and
places. We want to start putting
ideas together and we're rushed
for time."
She explained committee
members want the report ready for
the spring session.
"We could easily have drawn up
a list of the priorities ourselves but
we wanted the women of the
province to tell us what they
wanted and to be able to deal with
us directly,," Brown said.
The caucus committee will
report its findings to the government caucus, Brown said.
Errington said she is afraid the
lack of preparation time given the
women's groups will lead to
government accusations that the
groups don't have their priorities
and objectives straight.
"For the written briefs the
deadline is very flexible. I too am
concerned about the lack of time,"
3rown said.
inability of those responsible for
the bookstore.
Second, it sets a bad precedent
for other ancillary departments.
Instead of requiring that they
break even and charge people
according to the services they use,
higher and higher fees will be
levied on all students to help pay
for those people who buy a lot of
books, eat SUB food or live in
residence.
One suggestion is that these
services should be tendered out to
private concerns annually and
possibly make them responsible to
the AMS rather than the administration.
But the real cause for this
problem, though, is the university's phoney baloney accounting
methods which constantly show the
university ancillary Services in
debt, yet somehow they manage to
survive.
Let's take a new food services
location. The university borrows
money (usually from itself) to pay
for the addition.
Let's say it costs $1 million.
Typically they amortized this
loan over 10 to 12 years at say nine
per cent interest, yet in the past
they have borrowed this money
from a bank (usually the Bank of
Montreal) over a 20 or 25 year
period. This is the normal period
for all commercial and residential
mortgages. Just to keep things
simple let's say the net profit
before deducting the mortgage
payments is $125,000 a year.
With a 20-year mortgage at 9 per
cent the yearly payments would
only amount to about $107,000 thus
showing a net profit each year of
$18,000.
With a 10-year mortgage at 9 per
cent the yearly payments would
amount to about $151,000 showing a
net loss each year of $26,000. Voila,
we have manufactured a good
story to tell the students and even
confuse a few of the university
middle management.
Bob Smith, however, should
know better.
*   *   *
Because of an editing error in the
last Exposure column Gene
Errington was improperly labelled
the former superintendent of
schools. In fact she is replacing on
senate, Robert Sharp, former
superintendent of schools, who was
also a government appointee to the
senate.
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„y
X,
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
May 31, 1973
1. Student Union Building Art Collection:
The art collection owned by The Afma Mater Society and housed in the Student Union
Building has been recorded at its appraised value in 1970 of $38,175, with subsequent
additions at cost.
During 1973, it was decided to account for the appraised value of the Student Union Building
Art Collection as in increase to contributed surplus. This amount had been recorded in
1972 as an increase in the Art Fund Reserve. This change in accounting procedure has been
applied retroactively to the financial statements for the previous year.
2. Buildings on leased land:
The U.B.C. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre which is operated as a joint venture by The Alma
Mater Society and The University of B.C. is situated on leased land. The lease expires in
1987. A portion of the construction costs and certain beam failure remedial costs were
financed by a bank loan which bears interest at Vi% above the prime rate and which is
repayable from future revenues of the Sports Centre.
A beam failure in January, 1971 caused the two new ice areas to be closed to the public,
resulting in a reduction of net income of $77,773. The remedial work required to enable
the facilities to resume operations was completed in October, 1971 at a cost of $160,296.
Joint legal action has been instituted by The Alma Mater Society and The University of
British Columbia, against all affected parties to recover the lost revenue and the cost of all
remedial work required. This action is pending in the Supreme Court of British Columbia.
The claim is advanced against several defendants, one of which is Bankrupt. In the opinion
of Counsel, whilst there is little question of the validity of the claim at law actual financial
success of the claim will depend upon which of the defendants the courts find liable.
During 1973 it was decided to record the Student Union Building in the Society's accounts at
cost instead of at the amount of the related debt, and depreciate the asset over the remaining period of the lease, which expires in 2013. This accounting treatment would then be
similar to that used for the Winter Sports Centre Building. Also, it was decided to reflect
the equity in buildings on leased land separately on the balance sheet and not as contributed surplus. This change in accounting procedure has been applied retroactively to the
financial statements of the previous year.
The President, Council and Members,
The Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia,
Vancouver, British Columbia
ACCOUNTANTS' REPORT
We have examined the balance sheet of The Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia as of May 31, 1973 and the statements of revenue and expenditure and contributed and
operating surplus for the year then ended and have obtained all the information and explanations
that we have required. Our examination included a general review of the accounting procedures
and such tests of accounting records and other supporting evidence as we considered necessary in
the circumstances. It is not practicable {as is usual in organizations of this nature) to extend our
examination of revenue on Schedules 4 and 5 beyond accounting, on a test basis, for the receipts as
recorded.
In our opinion, except for the limitation in the scope of our examination referred to above,
these financial statements present fairly the financial position ended, after giving retroactive effect
to certain adjustments referred to in Notes 1 and 2 of the notes to financial statements.
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.
Chartered Accountants
Vancouver, British Columbia
August 30, 1973.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF
THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Balance Sheet
May 31,1973
(With comparative figures for 1972)
Assets
isza
1972
(restated
Notes 1 and 21
Current assets:
Cash
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances
Accrued interest
Due from investment dealer
Merchandise, at lower cost or net
realizable value
Prepaid expenses
$     72,480
5,807
28,356
32,077
117,150
7,865
4,756
10,192
6,044
39,909
24,681
12,298
4,490
Total current assets
268,491
97,614
Investments, at cost (market value 1973—
$335,000; 1972-1548,000)
336,275
604,766
5,400
40,175
561,375
Total current assets and investments
Club loans, non-current portion
Student Union Building Art Collection (Note 1)
658,989
6,288
38,175
650,341
703,452
Buildings on leased land, at cost:
Cost
Accumulated
depreciation
Student Union Building                    43,619,625
Winter Sports Centre                         1,507,247
405,000             3,214,b2b
420,000             1,087,247
1,162,247
$5,126,872
825 .OCtf
4,301372
4,467,872
See accompanying notes to financial statements
$4,952,213
5,161,324
Liabilities and Surplus
1973
1972
(restated
Notes 1 and 2)
Current liabilities:
Bank loan
Accounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs and societies
$        5.000
94,029
60,674
28,989
47,378
Total current liabilities
159,703
76,367
Special purpose reserves and provisions
445,648
543,948
Total current liabilities and reserves
Surplus, per accompanying statement:
Contributed surplus-
Student Union Building Art Collection
Operating surplus
Total surplus
Liabilities on and equity in buildings on leased land:
Long-term debt:
University of British Columbia, secured by assignment
of student fees at $15 per student year:
6% debentures
6%% debentures
Accrued interest
Less collateral deposit
Bank loan (Note 2)
Less loan recoverable from
The U.B.C. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Total long-term debt
Excess of equity in buildings over related debt
thereon (Note 2)
See accompanying notes to financial statements
605,351
40,175
4,815
44,990
38,175
44,962
83,137
703,452
225,441
1,588.700
355,070
1,588,700
83.458
2.027,558
35.507
1,891396
22,544
1,869.351
1,991,721
734,568
844,068
734,568
844,068
1,869,351
1,991,721
2,432,521
2,466,151
4.301,872
4,457,872
$4,952,213
5.161,324
STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE
Year ended May 31. 1973
(With comparative figures for 1972)
1973
1972
Revenue:
Student fees
$   415,146
427,429
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
17,862
12,815
Investment income
41,008
38,694
Gain (loss) on sale of investments
(11,692)
3,619
Sundries
584
462,908
1.565
484,222
Non-discretionarv allocations:
Student Union Building
$
254,100
262,200
Undergraduate Societies fee levies
17,862
12,815
S.U.B. Management Fund
8,250
8,740
Registration photos
3.792
4,959
Accident Benefit Fund
1,650
1,748
S.U.B. Art Fund
1,500
287,154
175,754
1,500
291,962
192,260
Discretionary allocations:
Interest allocation
29,995
30,000
Provision for loss on
Western Student Services
29,995
145,759
18,000
48,000
144,260
Expenditure:
Campus activities and events.
83,961
37.974
Publications
34,429
35,997
Administrative and general
expenses
46,398
82,142
Student Union Building
operations
860
165,648
16,639
172,752
Deficiency of revenue
over expenditure
$      19,889
28,492
See accompanying notes to financial statements
STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTED AND OPERATING SURPLUS
Year ended May 31, 1973
(With comparative figures for 1972)
Contributed Surplus
Balance at beginning of year:
As originally reported
Add (deduct):
Transfer of Winter Sports Centre
Building portion (Note 2)
Appraisal value of Art Collection (Note 1)
As restated
Value of art collection acquired during the year
Balance at end of year
Operating Surplus
Balance at beginning of year
Add:
Closure of inactive accounts
Excess provision for loss on
Western Student Services
Deduct:
Adjustment to prior year's revenue and expenditure
Transfer to Referendum Development Fund
Deduct deficiency of revenue over expenditure
Balance at end of year
See accompanying notes to financial statements
1973
1972
(restated
Notes 1 and 2)
$1,162,247
1,237,247
(1,162,247)
38,175
11,237,247)
38,175
38,175
38,175
2,000
_
$     40,175
38,175
$     44,962
69,973
815
170
2,187
-
47,964
70,143
13,356
9,904
(3,3111
23,260
(3,311)
24,704
19,889
73,454
28,492
$        4.815
44,962 Tuesday, October 30, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
* Approval, disapproval given
AMS eyes computer possibilities
By GARY COULL
The possibility of the Alma
Mater Society's bookkeeping
system being processed by one of
the two UBC administration
computers was both ok'd and
rejected Monday.
Jim Kennedy, director of the
computer centre which handles
mainly academic computation,
said the centre isn't equipped to
handle business programs and
supply specialized output data
needed for accounting.
"It's not our mandate to provide
these kind of services and although
the facilities to perhaps do the job
are available at a price we tend to
steer things like that away," he
said.
However deputy president Bill
White said the administration data
processing computer might be
available to the AMS if the present
workload is not too great.
"However I would have to
consult with the people in the data
centre to see what the situation is
and if additional work could be
accepted without disrupting
normal university business."
The need for an alternate AMS
bookkeeping system surfaced at
Wednesday's council meeting
when AMS treasurer John Wilson
asked for approval to lease a
bookkeeping computer for a total
of $25,000.
Last minute opposition to the
scheme by grad studies rep Bob
Angus stopped the motion from
passing. Councillors pressed
Wilson to see if UBC administration computers could be
used for bookkeeping.
Wilson said Monday the computer will streamline operations of
the AMS business office and
provide undergraduate societies
with detailed financial statements,
impossible under the present
system.
The computer — actually a fancy
name for a bookkeeping machine
Students
glue down
head's door
It was a sticky situation for
music head Donald McCorkle and
his secretarial staff Monday
morning when they arrived at
work to find all the doors glued
shut.
Intrepid workers tried several
times before finally breaking
through doors into the inner office
only to find doors and keyholes
there plugged with glue too.
A quick search around the offices
revealed no ransom note or any
explanation for the stick-up,
although sources within the
department said Monday the action may have occurred to further
protest McCorkle's alleged
"aloofness" in the faculty.
with a small memory core — would
process the payroll, keep an up-to-
the-minute financial statement of
the AMS' financial position,
process tax slips and in the long
run save money, Wilson said.
The AMS payroll is currently
punched on to computer cards in
the office. The data is then transferred to the Canadian Imperial
Bank of Commerce computer and
programmed at a cost of $75 a
month. Other bookkeeping
procedures are done manually in
the AMS office by staff who Wilson
said are overworked.
Kennedy said the centre computer handles their own business
accounts but nothing on the scale
which the AMS would want to do.
The centre computer, leased by
the university from IBM, handles
students' programs, stores information on an infinite variety of
subjects and also processes some'
off-campus groups' programs.
Cost per hour of the computers
time is $300 for students and about
$600 for commercial use, Kennedy
said.
Processed data comes out of the
computer in a standard long sheet
form and cannot be readily
adapted to release information in
accounting language.
The data centre computer
processes student's personal
records, the university's entire
accounting system and various
other administrative functions.
Cost to the AMS on an hourly basis
was unavailable Monday.
Wilson objects to using
university computers because of
the extra work involved in
programming the accounts on
them over to the computer, run
ning  them  through  and   then
picking them up after.
Another objection, he said, is the
huge amounts of paper needed to
print out the accounts which would
increase costs and make records
less accessible to the undergraduate societies — a prime
consideration in the first place.
Under the $25,000 computer
scheme, each AMS account, which
includes all undergraduate
societies, The Ubyssey and other
organizations under their
jurisdiction, would have a personal
ledger card which, when fed into
the computer will produce an instant financial statement.
Using the computer's memory
system, the records can be crosschecked and adjusted quickly,
efficiently and more accurately,
Wilson said.
The leasing company has informed Wilson of a 10 per cent
increase in the computer price if a
deal is not signed by Thursday.
However, council is still awaiting
a further report from Wilson, who
said he was still busy with the
budget.
So approval at Wednesday's
council meeting is unlikely.
Wilson also acknowledged he is
studying other off-campus
systems, but he hopes a final
decision is made by late November
or early December.
Wilson said if some computerized system was adopted it
would work simultaneously with
the current system until the start
of the 1974-75 fiscal year starting
June 1.
By then, Wilson said, all the
major bugs should be worked out.
STUDENT PIANISTS TAKE BOWS Leanne Excell, left and Anne
Rush smile to the audience's applause after their playing of the Petite
Suite  by  Claude  Debussy noon Wednesday  in the music building
—larry manulak photo
recital hall. Concert was one of a regurar series of noon recitals
presented by the music faculty.
Liberals' polarization works in Quebec
By CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK
The Liberals Quebec election strategy of polarizing the
campaign around the issue of separatism has been successful.
At the time this story is being written the Liberals are
winning or leading in 101 ridings. They held 68 seats in the
last legislature.
The Parti Quetecois is leading in six ridings. They had
previously held seven seats.
The Credistes are leading in two ridings. Their competition, the Union Nationale, seems to have been virtually
wiped out.
A large turnout at the polls gave the Liberals 55 per cent
of the vote. They are the only party in recent Canadian
history to get a majority vote.
The popular vote of the PQ has remained virtually
unchanged. It is surprising however that despite the recent
electoral reforms the PQ was unable to transfer their
percentage of the popular vote into seats.
The apparent Liberal landslide has come as a surprise.
They were expected to win the election but not with such a
majority.
The PQ's showing has also been surprisingly weak.
Although they will form the official opposition they will be
much weaker in that position than originally predicted.
Since the issue the election was fought on was
separatism, the vote can be interpreted as a clear
statement of support for Robert Bourassa's brands of
federalism.
The future of the PQ is dubious. It has not made any
gains in the popular support the party has received.
Rene Levesque seems destined to become head of the
Quebec opposition. It seems likely that the party will
concentrate on criticizing the Liberal economic and social
legislation and gradually abandon the independentist
component of their platform.
As a result of this election the Union Nationale will
disappear from the Quebec political scene. The Creditistes
also seem doomed to share that fate.
The Liberals seem solidly implanted in the seat of
power in Quebec with virtually no opposition, now that
Quebec voters appear to have rejected independence as an
option. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1973
Gloves off
It's time to take the gloves off in the dispute over the
authoritarian policies of music department head Donald
McCorkle.
The uproar has reached the point where dissident students and professors should begin concrete action to remove
him from office (if they're serious) but instead they continue to retreat behind a cloak of anonymity and unsubstantiated accusations.
Initially The Ubyssey was willing to accept that
something must have been rotten in the department since
four professors don't simultaneously become upset with
their department head and start bitching to the campus
newspaper.
When they are joined in their protest by students the
rotteness becomes even more apparent.
But there hasn't been any follow up to those first few
bitches and if something doesn't happen soon McCorkle will
have his victory, and of course the OK to continue his
policies.
Some pf the questions we'd like answered are:
Just how exactly is McCorkle oppressive? What
evidence is there to back up accusations? Who has he
screwed? And most important, what action are the
protesters going to take to send him on permanent leave of
absence?
We realize that the university structure and
appointments procedure is frustrating to those who would
like to get rid of McCorkle but if they want to progress
beyond the personality conflict stage they'll have to either
put up or shut up.
... to science
Meanwhile; over in the science faculty an overblown
personality conflict has completely obscured an important
dispute over quantity of student representation on faculty
and department committees.
The issue is whether or not the science undergraduate
society should ask for the maximum 25-per-cent
representation permitted under senate guidelines or instead
press for the so-called more realistic five-per-cent minimum
representation.
This simple question has become tangled in endless
bickering between student politicos trying to take the most
popular posturings on the question.
Ignoring them (their petty squabbles, detailed in The
Ubyssey previously are still being carried on in our letters
column) we think the answer is as simple as the question.
Ask for the absolute most possible — then compromise
if you have to.
Proponents of asking for only five per cent say
currently most faculty don't show up at meetings so even
with that meagre representation students would outnumber
them.
While this may be true obviously faculty will eventually
start showing up en masse if students try to take control.
Once that happens we wouldn't like to bet on the
chances of increasing student representation once the bad
precedent of asking for the minimum amount has been set.
And to those who say the faculty will never grant 25
per cent are probably playing right into the hands of those
liberal faculty members who would just as soon not be
forced into making that decision.
Don't make it any easier on them.
r
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 30,1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges
"My head still feels klnda orange and full of holes from Saturday night,"
said Kathy "Skipper" Carney. "Pumpkinhead" said Jean Clarke, Linda
Hossie and Pat Kanopski as Gary Coull, Mike Sasges and Ryon "Chuckles"
Guedes huddled in the corner sporting silly grins. "Oh they're planning some
Hallowe'en trickery to shock and amaze the masses," admonished Lesley
Krueger, Michael Findlay, Christine Krawczyk, Vaughn Palmer, Arnie
Banham, Larry Manulak, Ralph Maurer, Sheila Gogg, Allan Doree, Marise
Savaria, Rick Lymer and Jake van der Kamp. "That's o.k. with me," leered
Dean Kenny Dodd, "as long as they don't use any abdomen jokes."
TtfpoKa^ n*,^^
—robert eyre cartoon
Where are the cartoonists of yesteryear?
Rec UBC
An open letter to Ed Gautschi,
director of Recreation UBC:
The purpose of this letter is to
give you our opinion, as card-
carrying members, of your wonderful organization. Since you
won't look at it yourself we decided
to mail this to your ivory tower.
We are grateful that in your
letter to the editor (The Ubyssey,
Oct. 23) you cleared up the matter
of the serious jock. But let us
remind you that it was "no
distortion of facts" which started
the rumor that only serious
athletes were wanted by your club;
it was a direct quote from your
office.
In attempting to use our "new
found" privileges we have found
the same sort of inconsistency and
incompetence well entrenched in
your bureaucratic showcase.
We have found doors locked, the
necessary equipment unavailable,
no one around with the "right
key", our gym time changed and
the gym we reserved issued to
someone else. It seems your lackey
forgot and was unable to get his
jock brain into action long enough
to read the schedule beside the
door.
Our group has gym E reserved
for floor hockey every second
Tuesday evening. That is the gym
with the face-off circles and. goal
creases painted on the rubberized
floor, but Ed, forgive us for being
stupid enough to think Wreck UBC
would allow us to play floor hockey
on it as we have the last two years.
This past Tuesday we arrived in
time to spend five minutes looking
for an open door, then we find the
gym taken, your lackey tells us we
can't play floor hockey because the
wooden sticks were marking the
floor. Finally we get some old
cheap plastic things which are not
long enough for a six-year-old to
use, obviously left over from
someone's Rec Kindergarten days,
to use as sticks.
In the ensuing play, in the normal use of the sticks, two were
broken. Your lackey then hauls a
sign out from under the counter
saying broken equipment must be
paid for. He then confiscated two
guys' cards until they pay for the
sticks they broke, which amounts
to $5 each. Ed, we would like to
inform you that a real stick costs
less, if you paid $5 for them, you
must be even more incompetent'
than we dreamed.
Finally, Ed, a suggestion. Look
at the marked-up floor. Any
asshole can see that the marks are
made, with the exception of four or
five that were caused by black tape
on the hockey sticks, by running
shoes. Therefore, Ed, the solution
Letters
is simple, ban black tape and
running shoes from the floor
hockey gym. It could just possibly
be the most logical thing your club
does all year.
Where can we get a refund?
10 signatures
Sherwood Lett house
Place Vanier
Plight
To: Herner and Hendel
Re: Angus Lounge Bitch
I do wish you would consider the
plight   of   the   social   science
departments. We lost the whole
building to commerce.
The anthro-soc department  is
lodged in temporary quarters
(hut) until further notice.
Kathy Carney
arts 4
Study
Re: Ed Herner's letter bitching
about the conversion of the Angus
building lounge to study space
(The Ubyssey, Oct. 25).
Have you tried to study in the
Sedgewick underground library
recently?
Those who have will back me up
when I say it's just about impossible.
Most times you walk in, sit down
and just get settled when right
behind you or next to you someone
starts to talk. None of these people
even make an effort to whisper —
they just start talking. Worse, they
don't talk for 30 seconds but carry
on for 10 to 15 minutes.
Many times I've wanted to
scream at them.
Then I discovered the new study
area in Angus. It's perfect! There
are soft chairs, individual carralls
and most of all PEACE and
QUIET.
For people who want to relax
there is another lounge area in
Angus. Better still there's Ponderosa cafe, education lounge,
Buchanan lounge, Bus Stop cafe,
SUB cafe, SUB lounge area, SUB
listening room, the Pit. . .
M.J. Hendel
biology 3
Obscure
Re: Cheech and Chong review.
I understand the book of the
month club recently made an
outstanding offer concerning a
dictionary of synonyms.
Obviously your pseudo-critic can
read and write but did anyone take
into consideration his critical
ability?
Clearly the reader cannot answer this question.
David Thomas Humeniuk
Senseless
While I don't wish to prolong
what at times has been a senseless
ad hominem debate I must respond
to the criticism reported in the
article on the science undergraduate society (The Ubyssey,
Oct. 26).
First of all, to clear up some
factual inaccuracies, I was elected
in the spring of 1972 to represent
not only science, but also medicine.
At that time I was in second year
science. Shortly after being
elected, I met with representatives
of the medical students, and also
with what little there then was of
the SUS.
I made it clear at that time that if
any matters arose which they felt
merited attention in senate, I was
concerned that they contact me.
The medical students have
contacted me on a number of occasions, the principal one being the
dispute over the clinical clerkship,
which I brought up in senate and
which was subsequently resolved
by a committee to look into it, of
which I was a member.
Not once, in the year and a half
that I have been on senate, have
the SUS executive approached me.
So, even though I am now in the
faculty of law, I have consistently
supported the efforts of all students
on this campus to improve their
conditions. I would challenge the
righteous SUS to point to one occasion on which I have not, both on
the floor of senate and in the four
committees of which I am a
member, fought to improve the lot
of students — and that means
science students as much as law
students or arts students.
The many problems faced by
science students are basically
those confronting all students on
the campus, and to suggest that if I
were registered in science now I
could better understand them is
nonsense.
I'm glad to see the SUS becoming
more active this year. While I
disagree with Charlene Moriarty's
analysis of the student
representation issue, I know that
she is an effective and hardworking member of the SUS.
I hope to hear much more from
the SUS in the coming months, and
if at any time I can be of
assistance, either in senate or
otherwise, I hope the SUS will
contact me.
Let's not let stupid bickering
over non-issues and arrogant
nonentities drain our energy from
the monumental task that lies
ahead.
To bastardize the motto of UBC,
"Nostrum Est".
Svend Robinson
science senator Tuesday, October 30, 1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Complaint lodged
about UBC buses
By JAKE van der KAMP
The Alma Mater Society has lodged a formal
complaint about UBC bus service with the provincial
Bureau of Transit Services. '
AMS external affairs officer Bonnie Long, in a
letter to the bureau dated Oct. 25, mentioned several
specific complaints and offered some proposals.
She complained there are no direct buses to
North Vancouver in the evening for students and
suggested a run at 9 p.m. and/or another somewhere
between 11:15 and 11:45 p.m.
She mentioned difficulties due to the timing of
morning runs. For instance, some buses arrive on
campus too early for 8:30 a.m. classes, while other
buses arriving a little later become full before
reaching campus and leave potential passengers
behind.
Long also complained the Hastings bus is fully
loaded when it leaves UBC between 2:30 and 6:30
p.m. and cannot pick up anyone outside the gates.
She said Ian Graham of the Transit Bureau was
receptive to some of the suggestions, especially those
regarding co-ordination of routes and provision of a
later North Shore run
"He didn't promise anything but he said he would
take the suggestions into consideration," she said.
A B.C. Hydro spokesman told The Ubyssey
Thursday it would be difficult to increase services
because of a shortage of operators.
"There have been no cut-backs in routes though
one or two runs have been cancelled on a particular
day," he said. "On a bad day we'll have 20 cancellations of a run."
The spokesman said the training program had
been expanded, 80 drivers were in training and the
shortage would soon be remedied.
Nathan Davidowicz, math 4, who has done a
report on proposed route changes for buses to UBC
said the shortage was B.C. Hydro's own fault.
In his report Davidowicz said: "The operators'
wages are below the wages of B.C. government
employees or wages in the private sector. The last
contract was accepted by only 56 per cent of the
drivers."
Davidowicz told The Ubyssey the bus service to
campus is inadequate.
"SFU has got three bus lines running day and
night, one from Kootenay loop, one from Edmonds
loop, and one from Lougheed mall while we have only
one bus line running day and night, No. 10 via
University Boulevard," he said.
"Why should SFU have better bus service than
UBC? It's a matter of politics. Barrett promised it to
them."
Davidowicz also complained about the timing of
bus runs. The 46 Marine-University bus runs only
once an hour in the morning and most people come to
university during the morning, he said.
"The Hastings bus leaves every 10 minutes
during the week and every eight minutes Saturday,"
he said. "The frequency during the week should be
the same as Saturday's every eight minutes."
UBC students are not the only ones to complain.
Pam Glass, planning consultant for the Dunbar West
Point Grey Area Council said Monday, her group has
received numerous complaints.
Glass said one major problem was a lack of bus
routes for students going to Lord Byng High School
and a lack of service for Spanish Banks.
"We've had a tremendous number of complaints
from senior citizens on Spanish Banks," she said.
Glass said the principal of Lord Byng had told her
he gets annoyed when students come in soaking wet
from walking to school in the rain.
She also said the loaded buses coming from UBC
were causing a problem because they could not stop
for more passengers.
"I've seen kids, even froih grade one at the school
on the 4000 block West Tenth standing in the rain
while the buses go by fully loaded with UBC
students," she said.
Barrett's UEL policy
surprises AMS exec
Doug Brock, Alma Mater Society
internal affairs officer, said
Monday he was completely surprised by Premier Dave Barrett's
Sunday statement in favor of
developing the UBC endowment
■' lands.
Brock referred to a television
interview Sunday in which Barrett
said the UEL should be primarily
developed for housing though some
land should be set aside for park
use. Barrett did not say how much
land he believed should be
allocated to either.
"This may be a good sign,"
Brock said. "If Barrett has finally
' said something about it, then
maybe it will be easier to get some
answers from the government."
"The community groups I have
talked to seem to be opposed to any
sort of development," he said. "I
feel the consensus of the opinion
poll will be against development as
well."
AMS council voted Wednesday to
hold a student opinion poll on the
matter Nov. 22. He said Barrett's
statement would help draw public
attention on the UEL.
"It's going to be interesting,"
Brock said. "This indicates the
government is ready to say
something when they're asked."
"And if they see a number of
people opposed to any development, the amount of land they plan
to allocate to housing might
diminish," he said.
Brock told The Ubyssey the
Monday meeting of the AMS endowment lands committee, which
he chairs, was a seminar to gather
reactions to the UEL problem.
"The committee is meeting to
determine how to tap student
awareness and involvement,"
Brock said. "And also to gauge
what reaction students have to
possible development of the land-
s."
Describing the format of the
opinion poll, he said it would ask
• the student whether the student
was in favor of development, what
kind of development would be best
— housing, park lands, recreation,
or outdoor education — and what
kind of housing, if any, should be
constructed.
Brock said he believed the
government had so far been quite
reticent regarding the UEL.
"Housing minister Lome
Nicholson said the government did
plan to develop the lands, but not in
an insensitive manner," he said.
Brock said members of the NDP
caucus would be meeting Nov. 9 in
Vancouver to draft a letter to
Nicholson requesting he announce
the government's plans for the
lands.
Jh Morse and Muggy frays
SAFETY LENSES WERE ALMOST UNKNOWN
Western Optical
Company Ltd.
10% DISCOUNT FOR STUDENTS
1774 W. 2nd 736-8055
Ahm
Graduating this year?
Having trouble making a
career decision ?
Why not consider bank
management? Read our
brochure (available at the
placement office) and
meet us on campus.
November 5, 6
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
UNB trusts admin
*      FREDERICTON (CUP) — Relying on the administration's good
faith, the student council at the University of New Brunswick will not
ask for student representation on the senate student standings and
promotions committee.
This committee deals with re-marking exams, student appeals
against assessed grades and other special cases pertaining to students'
academic records.
Most UNB student councillors said they believe students should rely
simply on the good intentions of the university administrators.
V    Student council president Roy Neale said UNB administrator Frank
Wilson, has been "very successful to date on dealing with student
probleriis.
"On the political side Wilson explains it to the extent that students
are usually a lot harder on themselves than anyone else-would be.
Students, would receive a great deal more sympathy than they would get
if students were sitting on the committee."
The student councillors apparently feel they are protecting student
interests by making no move to get students on the committee. Another
student council executive commented, "I really wouldn't want a student
*on the committee. I'd rather have faculty making decisions they've
dealt with before."
MAKES A COED
EASIER TO LIVE WITH
CONTACC
12
HOUR RELIEF
10
CAPSULES
Each capsule gives 12 hours of relief from the symptoms of a cold. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1973
Hot flashes
Women's night
exploration
The women's office is
sponsoring a panel discussion on
exploration of women's sexuality
at 7:30 p.m. today and Nov. 6 in
SUB ballroom.
The panel will attempt to
integrate or link personal
experiences with changing social
role expectations.
Members of the panel are Ellen
Tallman of the Cold Mountain
Institute, physiotherapist Wendy
Barrett, and UBC EnglFsh profs
Kay Stockholder and Mirium
Ulrych.
Bioefhics
Vancouver Institute will
sponsor a lecture on "Human
Biology and Ethics" by Michael
Lerner, a population geneticist
from University of California at
Berkeley, 8:15 p.m. Friday in
Lecture Hall 2, instructional
resources centre.
AUCE in SUB
Organizers for the Association
of University and College
Employees currently recruiting on
campus have been given office
space by the Alma Mater Society.
Campus organizers are now
available for all inquiries in SUB
228 or at 224-5613.
City wizards
Alderman Michael Harcourt,
city planning director Ray
Spaxman and Judy Aldritt, a
development worker in Point
Grey and Kitsilano, will speak on
Tween
classes
TODAY
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting and film on
Bavaria, International House, 402
noon.
YOUNG CONSERVATIVES
General meeting SUB 213 noon.
UBC TAI CHI CHUAN CLUB
Practice in SUB 125 today and
Thursday    from    11:30    to    2:30.
rRO-LIFE
Discussion with Bernice Gerard:
Right to Abortion? SUB 215 noon.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General    meeting   and    slide   show
Angus 104 noon.
BIO SCI ASSOCIATION
First organizational meeting in Bio
Sci 3219 noon.
POLI SCI STUDENTS ASSOC.
General     meeting     to     discuss
executive     and     constitution
Buchanan 204 noon.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Meeting, SUB clubs lounge noon.
ARTS AND CRAFTS CLUB
General    meeting   SUB   251   noon.
Membership cards are in.
ONTOLOGY
Lecture, Buchanan 216 noon.
SAILING CLUB
Film    of   spring   cruise   SUB   205
noon.
CUSO
Publicity   gig,   International   House,
Room 204 at 7:30.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Lecture. SUB 113 noon.
THURSDAY
VCF
C;rl Armerding speaks on justification by faith, SUB auditorium
noon.
PRE-DENTAL
Tour of faculty. Meet by info desk
in J. B. Macdonald Building at
noon.
CCF
Musical presentation SUB 215
noon.
SPEAKEASY
Volunteers meeting SUB 111 noon.
FRIDAY
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
General   meeting SUB  105-B  noon.
Rap   group,   Arts   I   Building,   Blue
Room 8:00 p.m.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
AGAPE    life    meeting    3886   West
14th Avenue 7:30.
WOMEN'S ACTION GROUP
Meeting    to    draw    up    provincial
government    submission   SUB   205
noon.
designing living communities for
the future, as part of a display at
the Vancouver main library.
The discussion, sponsored by
the Citizens' Forum, will be held
at 8 p.m. Nov. 7 in the auditorium
of the main library Burrard and
Robson. Admission is free.
Lalonde
Marc Lalonde, federal health
and welfare minister, will be
speaking at 8:45 p.m. Thursday at
the faculty club.
Lalonde's speech, sponsored by
Vancouver Quadra Liberal
association, will be on Liberal
policy toward Western Canada.
A reception from 6:30-7:30
p.m. and dinner at 7:30 p.m. will
preceed the dinner.
For information regarding
tickets, contact Kate Parfitt at
224-1730.
Grievances
The women's action group at
UBC has established a grievance
committee which confidentially
handles individual women's
grievances.
The committee can be reached
at the women's office, on
Mondays from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. in SUB 230. Phone
228-6228 or write box 85 SUB.
Good
Remember Zegma man that
weird-looking    berobed    fellow _ ^
wearing    a    hockey   mask   who   BfeeCf
appeared on Friday's front page?
Well if you see him wandering
around campus and can identify
his real name (clue — he isn't Ken
Dryden or Zorro) CYVR the
campus' petit bourgeois answer to
CFUN will give you a Beach Boy's
album.
Like good vibrations, man.
Wow!
Segregation
Hermann Giliomee from the
University of Stellenbosch, South
Africa, will be giving a lecture on
the roots of segregation noon
today in Buchanan 102.
Giliomee will take a
comparative look at slavery and
race relations in South Africa and
America from the 17th to 19th
centuries.
Youth action
The Youth Action Service, a
division of the Jewish Family
Service Agency, is providing
counselling and community
information at the Jewish
Community Centre, 950
Forty-first.
The service, operating since
1969, also runs a drop-in centre in
the evenings. For further
information contact Percy
Spilberg at 266-2396.
Minerals
David Brooks, an economist
for the federal department of
energy, mines and resources will
give the third in the series of
Westwater Research Centre
lectures at 3 p.m., Friday in
Lecture Hall 1, Instructional
Resources Centre.
Brooks' topic will be:
"Minerals, a Renewable or
Non-renewable Resource?"
A special one day Red Cross
blood donor clinic will be held
from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Thursday, in SUB 207.
Last month's clinic at UBC was
the best in several years with
1,870 students turning out to
donate blood, the Red Cross said
in a press release.
TEXAS POWER TRIO
ZZTOP
(Zee Zee Top)
PLUS
Bachman-Turner
Overdrive
Nov. 5-6 8:30 p.m.
at the Commodore
Tickets available at the Thunderbird Shop and all Concert Box
 Office Outlets.   	
Coming November 1 - 4 in SUB Auditorium
DONALD
SUTHERLAND
ELLIOTT
GOULD
MAS I
Directed by ROBERT ALTMAN
Thurs.: 7:00
Fri.: 7:00
&   9:30
50
Sat.: 7:00
&    9:30
Sun.: 7:00
&     9:30
Anglican-United Campus Ministry
Songs of Hope & Joy
& Celebration
With JIM STRATHOEE
In Concert:
OCT. 30 - 12:30 - SUB BALLROOM
NOV. 3 - 8:00 - TOTEM PARK
Workshops Noon Hours
Lutheran Campus Centre
Do You Want To Put On An
ART SHOW?
In The S.U.B. Art Gallery
The A.M.S. Art Gallery Programs Committee is now setting up
the program of shows in the S.U.B. Art Gallery for second term.
Please submit proposals to
BOX 23 - S.U.B. by NOV. 10
if you want to be considered in this program.
THS New-Look*
CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
SCOTTISH    WOMEN'S    Bazaar    &
Tea at Scottish Auditorium, 12th
& Fir. Sat., Nov. 3rd, 1 p.m.-4
p.m.
10 —For Sale — Commercial
M.T.0. 500 f.8
Mirror Lens!
i %  Actual focal length: 548 mm.
Length: 5% in.
PRICE (complete with hood
& 4 filters)
$189.95
trje JLtn& ano Shutter
Cameras!
3010   W.   Broadway 736-7833
DECORATE with prints & posters
from The Grin Bin, 3209 W.
Broadway (Opp. Liquor Store &
Super-Valu).
BIG BARGAIN for UBC Students.
15% reduction on used clothes,
mainly for ladies. We also carry
wedding gowns. The Nearly New
Shonve, 3372 Ombie St. (18th
AvpTV. Van.  874-3613.
11 — For Sale — Private
15 — Found
CANVAS   KNAPSACK    (brown).
Phone   224-1361,   Peirson.
PERSON   WHO   LOST  MONET   on
Campus    Oct.    25    can    claim   by
identifying via Box 797 Gage.
20 — Housing
S/C SUITE, very reasonable rent,
in exchange for some babysitting of infant. Nursing student
preferred. Vicinity 10th & Crown.
Avail.  Nov.  1.   224-4751.
BOOM for female student in large
shared house in Kerrisdale. All
home comforts. 263-9474 or 1949
W.  36th Ave.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
35 - Lost
PERSON   HOLDING   WATCH   for
me   since   Arts   20    race   please
call  Bill,   731-7860.
40 — Messages
60 — Rides
70 —Services
RESEARCH—Thousands of topics.
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Another SUB FILM SOC Presentation
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM Tuesday, October 30, 1973
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 7
World Campus Afloat: Join Us!
Sails each September & February.
This is the way you've always wanted
to learn . . . and should. Combine
accredited study with a fascinating
semester of travel to Africa, Australasia, the Orient, and the Americas.
Over 8500 students from 450 colleges
have already participated. Financial
aid is available. Write now for free
catalog:
WCA, Chapman College
Box 1000, Orange, CA 92666
A NEW CONCEPT
in hair cutting and styling
SANCT (J HAIRY
A   newly   designed   room   at   the   back   of   our   regular  salon
specializing in blow-waving and mod stylings.
\IiiiiiI Town Hair Stylists
4603 West 10th
(One block from campus gates)
224-4384
—rick lymer
THE BIRDS FINISH OFF an undefeated exhibition hockey schedule by downing Fraser Arms 7-2. This
year's team has good chances to win the national championship which will be hosted by UBC. The team's
first league game is Friday at 8 p.m. at the Winter Sports Centre against the University of Calgary.
Hockey season here
By ALAN DOREE
Those who feel Thunderbirds is a
synonym for defeat take heart, the
hockey season is here.
The Birds won 7-0 and 7-2 against
North Shore Hurrykings and
Fraser Arms Canucks Friday and
Saturday night at the Winter
Sports Centre.
The Canucks game was a lively
contest, spoiled by several fights in
the last period. UBC was never in
danger of losing, but led only 2-1
after one period on goals by center
Yoshio Hoshino and right winger
Rich Longpre.
Goalie Fred Masuch who played
a strong game, was under some
pressure at the start and made
several fine saves. From then on
the Canucks posed little threat.
Chuck Carignan, Brian
DeBiasio, Bill Ennos, Jim
Lawrence and Hoshino, with his
second, finished the scoring.
Friday night's shutout was a dull
affair, enlivened only by several
pretty goals and a couple of
thumping checks by UBC defenceman Len Ircandia. Left winger
Keiji Ohsaki led the attack with
two goals.
The two wins completed UBC's
exhibition sweep, having beaten
Powell River Regals 11-3 and 6-1
earlier.
Birds' home opener is against
University of Calgary Friday.
Birds lose again
By RICK LYMER
In a contest which stretched over three hours, the UBC football
team was beaten by front ranking University of Manitoba Bisons, 49-23,
Friday.
Again the reason for the defeat were mistakes. Momentary lapses
execution allowed the Bisons to: make a touchdown on their second
offensive play, make a 97 yard run back on a kickoff, return a punt for a
touchdown, to score on a series of plays resulting from a fumble on a
short kickoff.
The problem was not helped by the injury to flanker Bill Baker
early in the game. Baker is presently sidelined with a possible broken
leg. *
However, the offence played their best and most productive game
on the cold and fast field. Thomas said quarterback Jim Tarves called
his best game this year. Fullback Vince Busto and tailback Don Heinz
both turned in good ground games, Heinz making a 57 yard run during
the contest.
As a result of the injury to Baker, Tarves had to throw to more
receivers which gave the Bird attack much more potency. For the first
time, UBC regularly marched the ball down the field to score.
You Can Buy
This And/Or This
The
m
The National Lampoon Encyclopedia ol
Humor—all new material, lavishly illustrated
in color, with tree bonus poster-size
foldout Humor Map ol The World. Hard
cover $7.95. Soft cover $2.50.
At better bookstores and newsstands.
Nvvemoer sports issue witn Sports
Illustrated parody. "The Day Babe Ruth
Licked The Big D," "Paper Plimpton,"
"Secret Communist Releree
Signals," and new specialty sports
magazines. 75t everywhere.
But you must do one. That's the new rule. You can do
both. Doing both things would be good but you must
do one or the other. There's no getting around it. It's
the new rule. It was on the news the other night, maybe
you missed it. But nonetheless, it's the new rule. And
you have to obey it.
<*)
Southern Comfort: it's the only way to travel
Join the fun on the S.S. Southern
Comfort. The party takes off any
night and the only baggage you
need is some Southern Comfort,
ice, and mix.
See you on the levee.
Arrivals from the South:
Cold Comfort
Pour IV2 ounces of Southern Comfort
over crushed ice. Add a twist of lemon.
Comfort Screwdriver
Pour IVz ounces of Southern Comfort
over ice. Top up with orange juice.
Comfort Collins:
Mix IV2 ounces of Southern Comfort
with the juice of a quarter of a lime.
Add some ice. Fill the glass with
lemon-lime drink.
DDDBOOQOOflflaaDQDaODDOODODDOQOPDDDPDODOflflDD
7.
Try these, too:
Comfort 'n' Cola,
Comfort and Tonic,
Comfort Daiquiri, etc., etc.
fr,,,,,,,,/,-,/,,, //„ A,«/0 j"//, .M^/.^y,,;
SOUTHERN COMFORT CORPORATION c Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 30, 1973
U of T students support
student representation
TORONTO (CUP) — In a recent
referendum on student representation on faculty committees
students at the University of
Toronto overwhelmingly supported the position their student
council has upheld on the matter in
clashes with university administration.
Thirty per cent of U of T students
voted seven to one in favor of the
principle of student representation
on faculty committees dealing with
staffing and tenure. The position of
student-faculty parity on such
committees was supported by
about the same margin.
The student council position is
students have a right to involve
themselves in the choice of those
who give them their education and
that teaching has to become an
integral aspect in the choice.
Student council president Bob
Anderson said he believed the vote
gives his council "a mandate to
proceed with the policy we
developed."
"We demonstrated that students
do not accept the Forster report,"
Anderson said.
The Forster report on academic
appointments and tenure, released
in August, called for no student
participation in tenure or staffing
decisions.
Despite its recommendations the
report did say: "Most members of
the task force have known
students, both graduate and undergraduate, whose intellectual
capacity and judgement are such
Papers
stolen in
St. John's
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) — Student
newspapers face a lot of problems
getting their issues finished and
out to their readers.
But The Muse at Memorial
University faced a new one last
week — all 5,000 copies of the Oct.
15 issue were hijacked before they
reached the campus.
The stolen papers mysteriously
re-appeared on campus the next
morning but not before the Muse
staff had ordered 5,000
replacement copies.
Although no proof exists as yet,
Muse staff members suspect the
theft is connected to the student
council elections, which took place
Oct. 15 and 16. The stolen issue
contained a considerable amount
of election coverage.
The staff immediately ordered
5,000 more copies to be delivered to
the university Oct. 16. The new
"shipment was printed with a red
front cover, so that the stolen blue-
cover issues would be immediately
recognizable if returned to campus.
Only a few people found out
about the elections on Monday, but
students were able to read the
Muse's election coverage before
the polls closed Tuesday.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - A
formerly well-known noxious blorg
was seen to appear in the capital of
this small island republic early
Wednesday.
M. Dorkle Greasely was seen to
wander bongolokreegiously
through the snortches murmuring
incantations to the sluming
masses.
"Hardly Bent, Hardly Bent," he
said speculatively. "And Snow's
Very Brown while blorgs eat
branches and Twiggs on a Sunday."
Formerly unknown blorg Oscar
Panderton was similarly seen to
greet him  faustianly.
that one could easily accept their
presence on a tenure committee."
The student council has lobbied
strongly against the report's
recommendations.
U of T administration
spokesman Don Ivey said he
believed the results of the
referendum were doubtful due to
the wording of the ballot.
"It's not hard to get support for
that kind of yes or no referendum,"
he said.
Bill Nelson, president of the U of
T faculty association said his group
opposed the principle of students
sitting on tenure committees but
said some way should be found for
student input.
However some faculty members
disagree with the association's
position. Chris Plowright of the
Faculty Reform Caucus said:
"I'm absolutely furious about the
way our tenure committees are
presently operated. The student
viewpoint should be properly
represented. It is absolutely
essential that these committees
hear student opinions."
In the summer of 1972, on
four nights from midnight to
dawn, some of us got together
overWBAI in New York.
The experience of tuning in
together during quiet hours
turned out to be very special.
Edited tapes of those nights,
augmented by material from
other gatherings across the
country, were compiled
into a six record album.
Thecontents include phone
conversations that reflect the
concerns we share, music, a
meditation, readings from the
Ramayana, Gospel of John,
and Third Chinese Patriarch
of Zen. There is included
a twelve page booklet of
artwork, photos, notes, and
translations. To make LOVE
SERVE REMEMBER as
inexpensive as possible, we
are distributing it by mail
order only. _^^^£,
•^(LmZm^lm^UtmSs&C^
A Six Record Album
To order, send $6.50* by check or money order to:
ABERCORN SATSANG; YS11, R.R. 2, ABERCORN, P.Q.
Quebec residents add local sales tax.
Do something interesting
while drying your hair.
With the new Lady Braun Astronette
you don't have to sit still while using it.
There s no hose or stand to confine you;
yet you get powerful drying results for
any type of hairdo. The only connection
is a 15' cord, which gives you freedom
to move around to pursue a hobby,
finish dressing, even answer the phone
or the door.
The Lady Braun Astronette has two
heat settings and comes with a purse-size
orange tote for convenient storage
or travel.
Lady Braun Astronette
lets you go places
Braun Styling Dryer with convenient
pistol-grip and directional nozzle for
fast drying and styling with professional
results.
See Braun's line of hair dryers at
fine department and appliance stores.
All covered by our 5-year warranty.
BRflun
Braun Electric Canada Ltd.
3269 American Dr., Mississauga, Ont.
Today's
the day!
THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Student Telephone Directory
1973-74
Bird Calls is
now on sale
And just look at what it
contains:
• the names, addresses, phone numbers, academic programme
and year of all U.B.C. students.
• pertinent university administration and department telephone
numbers, A.M.S. numbers, and residence phones.
• information on S.U.B., Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre, and
the Thunderbird Athletic Schedule.
• everything you wanted to know about where to shop ...
where to find what you're looking for — from pizzas to
motorcycles. Yellow Pages advertisers are accustomed to
students, and are eager to serve student needs.
• souvenir photos on the cover of sights that make U.B.C.
unique among universities.
• 36 bonus coupons worth over $60 in goods and services from
Yellow Pages advertisers.
1973-74
BIRD CALLS
STUDENT
TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
Only 75
at the following locations:
The Bookstore, S.U.B. Information Booth, A.M.S.
Ticket Office (S.U.B. Rm. 266), the Thunderbird Shop,
University Pharmacy and Mac's Milk in the Village.

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