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The Ubyssey Sep 22, 1966

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Array /
THE UBYSSEY
comes from
low cows
Vol. XLVIII, No. 3.
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY,  SEPTEMBER 22,  1966 /^"^^'4S f ^ ^p\     224-391
\1ET STUDENTS IN'
—kurt hilger photo
THEY KEEP COMING and coming and coming. The annual
pilgrimage for the sacred printed word again humbles
the already much-behumbled student.
Faces fading fast
on student ID cards
UBC students are losing face — literally.
A combination of film and
developing is blamed for white
spots and faded areas on some
identification photos for AMS-
library cards.
"My God, I've lost half my
face," exclaimed Brian Paisley,
Education III, examining his
one-eared picture.
BAD FILM
"The problem is with the
development of the film, and
will be taken up with the
polaroid people," said assistant
analyst Bob Mcdonald.
Roger McAfee, supervising
the photography, blamed any
spotting or fading on defective
film.
"Of course we expect a few
problems in an operation this
large," (McAfee said. "You'd
have to use five films a month
for 10 years to take the 17,000
pictures we'll have run when
we've finished.
SPOTLIGHTS
"Spotlights shining directly
on the face cause some whitened areas, but I tend to think
it's the film," he said.
A coating of mild fixative is
usually necessary with the polaroid film to prevent air bubbles which cause spotting and
fading. The plastic cover on
the film, however, replaces
this.
If pictures defy recognition,
they can be retaken in the
armonry.
Half-price
sandwiches
hot sellers
The Ubyssey sandwich kings
Tuesday smeared mayonnaise
on food services' head Ruth
Blair by selling cheese sandwiches at half the cafeteria
price and making a profit.
Reporters Rod Wilczak, Bert
Hill, Pat Hrushowy and Val
Zuker turned carnival barkers
in the North Brock foyer, selling 50 sandwiches in an elapsed time of 15 minutes.
"They sold like hotcakes,"
Wilczak snickered Wednesday.
Food services sandwiches retail for 20 cents, Ubyssey sandwiches sold for ten cents.
"It took me half an hour to
make them, and I paid myself
$2 an hour," Wilczak said.
Hill said: "The ingredients
cost a mere $3.60 retail. We
made a small profit, which the
four of us will use to buy two
beers."
A food services spokesman
said there was no noticeable
drop in cheese sandwich sales
Tuesday.
SEP 221966     ^
\j._-./
zon
Point Grey urged
By ROD WILCZAK
Acting Vancouver mayor Halford Wilson Wednesday
suggested the Alma Mater Society ask city council to relax
Point Grey zoning laws.
He said in an interview the request should come in the
form of a brief to the civic development committee which
meets next on Sept. 29.
Because the provincial government has approved a $4.3
million loan for the university to build a 275-suite married
student residence, and a 175-suite general student residence,
the AMS could reasonably ask for a three-year relaxation.
SINGLE  DWELLINGS
The Point Grey area is presently zoned for single family
dwellings, which allow one
family and two lodgers for
each house.
The city cracked down on
illegal suites in the area in
1961. Since then more than
1,800 suites west of Granville
Street have been closed down.
But homeowners and apartment managers interviewed by
The Ubyssey objected to students living in their buildings.
"This (the housing shortage)
is good training for students
to go and damn well find
themselves a place to stay,"
said T. A. Kennedy, president
of the West Point Grey Homeowners Association.
Kennedy, of 4605 Bellevue,
is a UBC graduate.
'TEMPORARY'
"You just don't get it as
you like it," he said. "I think
this is a temporary situation;
you really shouldn't fool
around with long term things
like zones.
student and his wife in here
last year and they had drinking parties all night. We had
to repaint the place when they
left."
But Claude Horsman, manager of University Manor, on
Tenth Avenue, said he would
rent apartments to students.
"Their behavior, and upkeep
of their apartments is generally good," he said. "I had two
last year who couldn't have
been better tenants."
The minimum rent in apartment blocks near the university gates is $70. The average
is $100.
HALFORD WILSON
'. . . relax zoning'
None of the apartments on
Tenth and Fourth UBC area
will rent to students.
"It's not what I have anything against students, it!s just
that we have to be very careful," one manageress said.
BEARD, SANDALS
"Someday you're going to
graduate and you might want
to live in Point Grey.
"You'll want to raise your
children in an area where you
can have a nice lawn to mow
and a swimming pool.
"Students in suites deteriorate the area. You want to be
very careful.
"We (WPGHA) are in favor
of that finer sort of living
which is natural to one-family
dwellings."
C. E. Rielly, manager of the
Bellevue Towers, Tenth and
Blanca, said he never rents
suites to students.
"Students are filthy; they
wreck the place," he said.
"We    had    an    engineering
AMS executives
on soapbox today
AMS president Peter Braund
and vice - president Charlie
Boylan will put their political
careers on the blocks at noon
today.
The library blocks, that is,
where Braund said he will
stand and explain the AMS to
any students who care to
listen.
Braund said he will speak on
the student union building,
the Canadian Union of Students, the housing crisis and
any other topic students want
to ask or heckle about.
Cops stop 'beat'
for pot queries
Two UBC students and a
young worker were stopped by
RCMP drug squad members
and questioned about marijuana and LSD because they
were dressed like beatniks,
police said  Wednesday.
An RCMP spokesman said:
"It is policy to stop and question anyone in the Kitsilano
area if they are wearing beatnik dress."
ALONG FOURTH
The three, Steve Holland,
Science 4, Sonja Fenger, Arts
3, and David Hillie, said they
were walking along Fourth
Avenue about noon on Sept. 7
when the incident occurred.
Holland said the plain
clothes officers, in an unmarked car, stopped them,
flashed wallets, and began
asking questions about marijuana and LSD.
"They filled out a form with
our names and addresses and
things, and asked whether we
had ever tried the drugs,"
Holland said.
DON'T BELIEVE
"When we said no, an officer
said: 'I don't believe you've
never tried marijuana.'
"I admitted to having tried
it once a couple of years ago;
but we didn't know whether
they had a right to ask us and
whether or not we had to
answer."
Said   Fenger,    "They    kept
asking why we'd  never  tried
LSD or pot.
"It happened so fast, we
didn't know what to do."
The RCMP spokesman said
anybody in the Kitsilano area
could be stopped and likely
would be stopped if he "looked
like a beatnik."
"We're trying to find out
how many people smoke marijuana, and if people admit it,
we may keep an eye on them,"
he said.
He said Hillie was carrying
a sleeping bag, and wore sandals and Holland was bearded.
Holland said they were on
the way to the bus depot with
the sleeping bag. He admitted
he was wearing a black felt
hat and Hillie was wearing
sandals.
BLACK HAT
Holland said the questioning
lasted approximately 20 minutes. The RCMP spokesman
consulted notes and said it
lasted five or six minutes.
The spokesman said the
three were not told they were
under no compulsion to answer personal questions, nor
were they told why they were
stopped.
IS  YOUR HOME
ILLEGAL?
(SEE PAGE 3) Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  September 22,   1966
2nd veep vote Oct. 6,
but no candidates yet
Students will vote Oct. 6 for
a new Alma Mater Society
second vice-president.
AMS president Peter Braund
said Wednesday Ian Macdougal,
who was acclaimed to the position in the spring election, has
returned to university, but is
academically ineligible to serve
on the council.
Nominations for the position
must be filed at the AMS office
in South Brock by 4 p.m. Sept.
29.
The second vice-president's
duties, which include public
relations and activity co-ordination are presently shared among
Braund, first vice-president
Charlie Boylan and executive
secretary Evie Popoff.
Boylan said Wednesday he
will support any candidate who
will back AMS-run housing.
"I will back anybody who
SURVEY SHOWS
believes the student body must
not tie up its resources in a
Student Union building at the
expense of the major problem
of the housing shortage," he
said.
Former AMS president Roger
McAfee,   Law   II,   refused   to
deny or confirm rumors that he
will run for the position.
'There's a rumor that I will,"
he said.
McAfee, who was SUB chairman for two years, was one of
the main forces behind planning
the building.
New SUB chairman sought
for overloaded treasurer
Alma Mater Society treasurer Lome Hudson wants
someone to take the student union building off his hands.
It's difficult for one person to handle both positions," he said Wednesday.
Hudson took over chairmanship of the planning
committee early in the summer on the understanding
that a successor would be found by the fall.
But no one capable ofhandling the position has
turned up, he said.
He said the major problem was training a person to
fill the position until September, 1968.
NEWAAAN CENTRE PRESENTS
Second Annual Hay-Ride and Dance
Sat., Sept. 24, 8:00 p.m.
Richmond Riding Stables
Single-$1.25 Couples - $2.25 B.Y.O.B.
Tickets at A.M.S. or Newman Centre
"CENTENNIAL BARBECUE"
Thurs., Sept. 22, 5:00 p.m.
1685 W. King Edward Ave.
Admission 67c Everyone Welcome
r
Department of Theatre
Frederic Wood Theatre
~1
THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS
by Carlo Goldoni
Classic farce of the Italian commedia dell'arte
SEPTEMBER 23 — OCTOBER 1
Student Performances — Monday, Sept. 26 — 7:30 p.m.
and Thursday, Sept. 29 at 12:30 noon
TICKETS 75c
Tickets Available — Room 207 — Frederic Wood Theatre
Note — Some tickets at 75 cents available for all performances
SUPPORT YOUR OWN CAMPUS THEATRE
I
No room at UBC
for grads, wives
Seventy per cent of the married students who applied
for housing in 1964-5 did not receive it, a married students'
committee  report  has disclosed.
The survey, directed by grad I
student Jim Slater for the Mar-'
ried   Students'   Housing   Com-
mitee,   showed   an   immediate
need for 600 to 700 suites.
It was based on 1,300 questionnaires completed by married students.
Two-thirds of the students
said they would apply for new
accommodation if they thought
it would be available at reasonable prices.
Half would stay at university
for further studies if good quality, reasonably-priced housing
was available.
Half the students wanted
two-bedroom suites.
"The problem has been building up for the last 10 years and
has been serious for the last
five," Slater said Wednesday.
Student suite
tenders open
Tenders have been called for
a 263-suite married student
residence at Acadia Camp.
A provincial cabinet order
this week authorized the university to borrow $4.3 million
from Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation for the
development.
The residence will include
one, two and three-bedroom
garden-type suites, a university
spokesman said.
The cabinet also authorized
the university to borrow up to
$5.3 million to refinance the
Totem Park residence, completed in 1964. The spokesman
said the university is negotiating with CMHC for the refinancing.
V.O.C/s
Splash n' Dance
Swim 7-9
Dance 9 - 1
TO THE "SHANTELLES"
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
Saturday, Sept. 24
FRIDAY IS
$5ayDay
SHOP
FROM 9 'TIL 9
(?6ec6
your value-packed 10-page Bay Day flyer! Shop at the
lowest prices of the season on clothes for campus, sports
coats and suits for career... PLUS many, many more
exciting  savings!
Pi
awe
when you can't come downtown to shop call 681-6211
from. 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. Friday, Bay Day! Every item
has   been  numbered  for your  ordering convenience.
Tjubscm'sUay, Company,
INCORPORATED 2"° MAY 1S70 'Thursday, September 22,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
BACK  TO  CAMPUS
STILL A FEW illegal suites left, as well as a few legal ones, in the areas marked on this
map of the western part of Vancouver. Eager city inspectors have closed nearly 1,800
suites since   1961   and   homeowners'  groups keep them closed.
Zone laws not for students
So you share a basement
suite near the university with
another guy.
And you have a private
entrance, and the family upstairs doesn't make too much
noise?
Or perhaps you're boarding
with a family along with two
or three other persons.
Then start looking for something else, or next week you
could be out in the rain.
Chances are you're illegal.
With the exception of a few
high-rise apartments which
usually don't accept students,
all of Point Grey is zoned for
single-family dwellings.
A single-family dwelling in
the City of Vancouver Zoning
and Development By-law No.
3575, dated Feb. 14, 1963, is
a house in which only one
family may stay.
It is designated by the prefix   RS.
The family is allowed two
<no more) boarders or lodgers
or four foster children.
If your landlady has adopted five children, even though
she has none herself, she could
foe prosecuted.
The penalty is a fine of not
more than $100 or not more
than two months in jail, with
or without hard labor.
The same goes for basement
suites or lodging houses, unless they were in use before
June 18, 1956.
Even so the city must grant
special permission for the operation of such a suite, and the
permit has a time limit on it.
In the area east of Alma as
far as Trafalgar, and north of
Eighth as far as the sea, most
blocks are zoned RS-2.
This means a building "by
reason  of  its age and  size  is
deemed unsuitable for its present use" may be turned into a
boarding or lodging house.
But in the RS-4 area bounded by Sixteenth, Arbutus, King
Edward and Oak, it is illegal
to have a basement suite.
Most of the area close to the
university is RS-1, which allows a few basement suites to
operate.
But if the owner fails to let
the suite for any period of
time, he must shut it down.
There are no RS-3 areas close
to the university.
You don't get itno multiple
You don't get into multiple
dwellings untill you cross
Trafalgar.
So to be sure of keeping
your home, live on the other
side of Trafalgar.
Otherwise, be ready to move
out.
Boylan says housing lack
outweighs need for SUB
Alma Mater Society first
vice-president Charlie Boylan
is looking for students who
think a place to live is more
important than a place to congregate.
Boylan said Wednesday an
answer to the drastic student
housing shortage must come
before construction of the
planned $4.8 million Student
Union Building begins.
He said he is looking for
students with the same opinion.
"Students are faced with a
critical housing shortage," he
said. "Their financial resources must not be tied up in
a nice sandbox for 30 years.'r
Of each students $29 AMS
fee, $15 goes towards construction of SUB.
Boylan's comment came
after he voted Monday against
a motion by AMS treasurer
Lome Hudson that the council request the board of governors to give SUB top priority.
The board has yet to give
final approval to the project.
Boylan said he would be
soapboxing for the next few
weeks in an attempt to find
response.
"I want to know if there are
enough students who feel as I
do—that SUB should be stopped now and an assessment of
a real priority matter (housing) be recognized by council," he said.
Council recently quashed a
referendum planned for this
fall on the question of a reassessment of the project.
Boylan, who initiated the
referendum, said if he finds no
concerted opposition to SUB he
will give up the fight.
"I will say the student body
has got itself into a bad deal,
and let's get it done," he said.
Hell be here,
just a bit later
Economist John Kenneth
Galbraith will lecture at UBC
Sept. 27 and 28, not Sept. 25
and 27 as reported Tuesday.
He will deliver the first of
two Dal Grauer memorial
lectures at 12:30 p.m. in the
Hebb lecture theatre. Title of
the lecture is Economic
Power.
The second talk, the Economic System, is scheduled
for the Totem Park common
block at 8:15 p.m.
Edmonton quits
national union
EDMONTON (UNS) — University of Alberta, Edmonton,
Tuesday quit the Canadian
Union of Students.
CUS president Doug Ward,
informed by telegram from Edmonton, said the move has been
expected in Ottawa for some
time.
Edmonton council president
Branny Schepanovich has continually levelled criticism at
the national group for over-
extending itself in its activities.
At the 30th CUS conference
earlier this month, Schepanovich threatened to pull Edmonton out.
Schepanovich warned h i s
council last March against overextension, particularly in international affairs.
He also challenged CUS's
right to speak for all Canadian
students.
Ward said he expects little
financial loss from the withdrawal. Edmonton has 11,000
students and would have added
nearly $7,000 to CUS's coffers
this year.
Ward said the loss would be
covered by the five per cent
per-capita fee increase approved
at the last conference.
He predicted a CUS fund
raising campaign to prevent
any cutback in future activities.
Ward would not comment on
what effect the pullout will
have on a $300,000 festival to
be held on the Edmonton and
Calgary campuses. The festival,
call Second Century Week, is
sponsored by CUS, the Centen-
DOUG WARD
'. . . work harder7
nial Commission, the Alberta
government and private
sources.
Loss of the Edmonton group
leaves CUS with 43 members
representing 160,000 students.
"We're all going to have to
work much harder," Ward said.
"It will be a smaller and tighter
union now."
In Vancouver, UBC student
president Peter Braund refused
comment on the pullout until
he has time to contact Edmonton and discuss the matter with
his executive. Braund was concerned over the future of
Second Century Week.
"It is a major student contribution to Centennial year
and is intricately connected
with both CUS and Union Gen-
erale des Etudiantes du Quebec," said Braund.
Birth reduction eases
registration pains
The best thing about registration week was that many
students managed to avoid it.
Registrar J. E. A. Parnall
said Wednesday more than
17,000 students have enrolled,
many of them iby the pre-
registration program introduced  this  year.
The total, with 10 days of
late registration still to go,
is 800 over last year's enrollment.
Arts faculty advisor, W. J.
Dusing said the pre-registra-
tion program made it easier
for faculty   and  students.
He said advisors found it
easier to counsel students.
"At   no  time   did   we  have
long lines of people waiting
for approval of programs," he
said.
One of the reasons arts advisors had it easy was that
enrollment in the faculty has
dropped this year.
Arts Dean Dennis Healy
attributed the reduction to a
decrease in births 19 years
ago.
"About five per cent fewer
students were matriculated
from B.C. high schools this
year," he said.
Greater enrollment in Simon
Fraser    Academy    also    took
some of the load off UBC.
Registration
in advance
a success7
Science dean V. J. Okulitch
Monday termed the faculty's
pilot pre-registration program
a success.
Okulitch estimated 50 per
cent of third and fourth year
students took advantage of the
opportunity to register during
the summer, thirty per cent
second year, and 10 per cent of
frosh registered before registration week.
"It puts a strain on the faculty advisers, who have to remain
on duty all summer this way,"
said Okulitch.
"But the students get better
advice, without the rush and.
hurry of registration week."
He said students got better
selections of_j.ourses under the
new system, and fewer course
changes were being made.
"It was successful," Okulitch
said. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review;
and Focus, a weekly news magazine of world university affairs. Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS).
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; Focus, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
SEPTEMBER  22,   1966
The public buys its opinions as it buys its
meat, or takes its milk, on the principle that it
is cheaper to do this than keep a cow. So it is,
but the milk is more likely to be watered.
—Samuel Butler
BY  GABOR MATE
Edmonton on sabbatical
All 11,000 students at the University
of Alberta at Edmonton are no longer
members of the Canadian Union of Students.
Edmonton council president Branny
Schepanovich was elected on a platform
of a possible CUS pull-out.
Schepanovich is an honorable man, and
has spent the seven months since his
March election carefully weighing  CUS.
He thinks CUS does not represent
Canadian students, and has no business
speaking to governments on behalf of
students.
He therefore urges the union to pull
back to campus service station policies,
and drop issues such as universal access-
ability, academic freedom, and reform of
education finance.
When he found little support for these
ideas at this month's CUS congress in
Halifax, he warned student leaders his
school would probably leave the union.
And while we cannot agree with Schepanovich, we believe Edmonton's decision
has been responsibly and carefully considered.
But in the past, Edmonton was always
one of the silver-lined pockets which supported CUS in its usual times of duress.
A few years ago, Edmonton's voluntary
levy of 40 cents per student in addition
to the compulsory levy of 60 cents was
all that kept CUS in business.
A former Edmonton council president,
David Jenkins, was CUS national president in 1964-65.
Under president Richard Prince,  Ed
monton last year became sponsor of CUS's
$300,000 centennial pToject — Second
Century Week.
Schepanovich has said he will honor
that commitment and the week will go
on.
Edmonton's past ties it too firmly to
CUS; it cannot reject that past and long
remain out of the union. While we regret
its decision, we are confident Edmonton
will return to CUS.
The withdrawal seems to be a passing
crisis, a catharsis necessary to Alberta
students — before they can confidently
support the main block of Canadian students.
Call it a sabbatical leave, if you will,
and expect Edmonton back in a year or
two.
In the meantime, the rest of CUS.
including UBC, must respect its decision
and allow the crisis to pass without malice
and without isolating Edmonton from the
rest of Canada.
There is no reason why Second Century
Week cannot receive full support from
councils still in CUS.
There is no need to make an enemy
of Edmonton.
There is a serious need to respect a
hard decision, buoyed perhaps by the hope
that when Edmonton returns, it will again
take its leadership role in the union —
with greater vigor and wisdom than ever
before.
Heckle, jeer, hiss and boo
After three years of foolishness, Alma
Mater Society executives have decided to
become relevant.
Relevance, in our terms, means actually trying to communicate with the
students the AMS purports to represent.
And so we have nothing but praise
and a tip of our grouchy hat for AMS
president Peter Braund and vice-president
Charlie Boylan, who plan to harangue the
student mass from the library blocks today
at noon.
The last man who regularly did this
was Jim Ward, vice-president in 1963-64.
Ward developed a fine soap-box style,
and was perhaps the most popular student
leader on campus.
He was certainly the best known, and
certainly the most courageous—Ward took
both student ire and heckling, and inane
chides from other councillors for his nonconforming, relevant attitude.
While the other councillors sat in their
Points of incest
According to the West Point Grey
Homeowners Association, living on the
lovely point is a lot like incest.
It's okay, as long as you keep it in
the family.
shiny offices and played bureaucratic
games, Ward agitated and worked to solve
some real problems.
When Ward left, the usual foolishness
once again pervaded all instead of most;
the service station carried on.
Student council is more than a service
station to provide dances and swimming
clubs. It is also a policy-action body to
carry the cross for causes which affect
all students — poor library conditions, bad
professors, inhuman and insufficient housing, ptomaine cafeterias, high tuition fees.
These causes are the relevant ones;
services follow bureaucratically and automatically when a group of students find
a need and ask for money.
Relevant student government must
determine the causes which most annoy
students, then formulate a plan of action,
then effect that plan.
Each of these steps requires continual
communication with people who don't want
much to do with Brock politics, but simply
want the best education they can get in
the shortest possible time.
So go with god, Braund and Boylan.
Get thrown in the library pond, shrug off
vicious criticism from we who are usually
most unhappy with you, but get out there
regularly and often.
You may wake and find you actually
are relevant.
Macbarfoot swims
wild library pond
We bring you an exclusive
interview with Marshall J.
Mac-Barfoot, president of the
tiny country of Youbeessia,
and chairman of the ruling
Multiversist Party.
Marshall Barfoot, popularly
known as Chairman Mac; received us in his spacious
office which overlooks a vast
area identified by numerous
signs as Noparkingland.
We asked the venerable
leader to tell us of his summer activities.
Or, to quote:
Q: Venerable Leader, may
we ask you to tell us of your
summer activities.
A: Well, as you know, last
month I swam the raging
waters of the Library Pond
in the -record time of 10
hours and five minutes.
I did this to prove to the
world that while our administration may be all wet, we
are certainly not all washed
up yet.
Also, I swam to disprove
certain rumours that my
health is failing.
This definitely isn't true.
(Hack, cough, hack - hack,
cough-cough, hack-hack-hack,
cough-cough-cough).
Not true at all.
Q: Chairman Mac, there
were suggestions in the hostile press that you did not
actually swim the distance,
but were transported by
underwater frogmen in green
sweaters.
A: This is also false. There
were no French - Canadian
foresters involved in the proceedings.
The Library Pond is at
places too shallow to swim,
so I had to crawl on my
hands and knees.
But as you know, I am
used to that.
Q: Thank you for clearing
that up.
Now could you tell us about
your cabinet for the coming
year.
A: Certainly. It is the same
as last year, built out of ma-
hagony wood and painted
black.
It contains all my papers
and a few skeletons.
Q: Pardon us for not making ourselves clear. We were
referring to your government.
A: Oh, that also contains a
few skeletons.
For example, my Minister
of the Interior and Housing,
Malbones F. McGreek.
Invaluable man. Hasn't
once opened his eyes in the
last hundred years.
Invaluable man.
Then there is my Minister
of Propaganda, Ralph (may-
I-correct) Dreary.
Through his valiant efforts
he has made "obfuscate" a
respectable word once more.
Q: What does it mean?
A: I don't really know.
That is the beauty of it.
Nobody ever knows what
Ralph is saying.
But you will have to excuse
me now. I have an urgent
matter to discuss with some
French-Canadian foresters.
LETTERS
The Ubyssey welcomes letters lo the editor, but we
reserve the right to edit all
submissions for brevity and
grammar. Letters may be
sent to the editor via campus
mail, or brought to The
Ubyssey offices in the north
Brock basement.
INSANE   FEAR
Editor, Tho Ubyssey, Sir:
There seems to be an insane fear of radical political
activity on campus residing
in the minds of some figures
of officialdom.
One further indication of
this has been recently attributed to the classically conditioned Malcolm X.
Would you believe that certain people desire that residence committees not become
political bodies?
Further, that committees,
i. e. residence committees,
exist simply to discuss problems, not to make decisions.
This is utter nonsense, and
is nothing less than a reactionary fear response.
Who does make the decisions? You do, Joe Student,
and don't forget it.
Committees, or student forums, exist solely to make de
cisions through conscious, intellectual discussion.
When decisions are reached,
they are then acted upon.
If a student committee feels
the decisions reached by them
alone, without outside influence, are just, its duty to
students is to act' and help
other students become conscious of the unjust, intolerable, and dehumanizing conditions that do exist.
This is a political position
—a consciously political position—that is necessarily radical because the changes
needed are radical.
Michael Aing*
Arts 4
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing Richard Blair
Newt Carol Wibon
City ; Danny Stoffman
Photo Powell Hargrove
Page Friday Claudia Gwinn
Focus George Reamsbottom
Ass't City Rosemary Hyman
Ass't News ...Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Ass't Photo Dennis Gans
Them what worked were Tom
Morris, Val Zuker, Rod Wilczak,
Joy Archer, Irving Fetish, Kath- .
erine Keate, Kathy Hyde, Bert
Hill and Marilyn, who was scared,
Carol Waldman, Mary Ussner,
Angela Ottho, and the entire editorial board with the exception of
the city editor who forgot to turn
in a masthead. This is a masthead.
You will find your name here
tomorrow if you come to work
again today. To those whose
names are missing, Stoff apologizes.  Blame him. Thursday, September 22,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
PART TWO:
crisis
This is the second of three parts
of an article by Canadian Union of
Students secretariat member Paul
Ladouceur.
On Tuesday, Ladouceur began to
develop his thesis—higher education
in Canada has reached a crisis point
and must either undergo a radical
change in the near future or steadily decline in quality.
This article is reprinted from the
International Student Conference
magazine. The Student.
See the third and final part tomorrow.
Parallel to students' briefs
to university authorities were
submissions to the Bladen
Commission, now conducting a
series of tea-party hearings at
different universities. It was
the studens' briefs which received all the attention, for in
many cases they dealt with
more fundamental issues than
those of the university administrations which were only concerned with estimating how
much money they would need
to keep their physical plants
in operation.
The CUS brief for example,
developed the notion
that society benefits at least as
much as the individual from
higher education, and that
therefore society should bear
the major portion of the cost
of education. As it is now, the
individual, either personally
or through his parents, is required to bear toy far most of
the cost of higher education.
On the whole, the benefits accruing to society as a result
of investment in government
support of education for greater numbers of citizens. Although the commissioners generally recognized this they
nevertheless remained unimpressed by the social and eeon-
namic arguments for a new
approach to student financial
assistance, as the final report
was to prove.
As a result of the heightened interest a more fundamental approach was evident in
the students' debates and decisions on the education crisis
at the 1965 CUS Congress.
Rather than thinking only of
the immediate effects of higher fees, the wider social implications of such action were
thoroughly examined. It was
felt that, returning to the Universal Declaration of Human
Rights, education is a right
which belongs to all and that
all those who have the required ability should be able
to attend the university. Social and financial barriers were
seen as preventing many capable individuals from attaining the full development of
their abilities through education.
Statistical surveys show
that a much higher percentage of children from higher-
income families than from
lower-income families undertake higher education. A
1961 survey, for example, revealed that 10% of arts and
science students come from
homes with an income of less
than $3,000.00 per annum
whereas 36% of income tax
payers fall in this category.
At the other end of the scale,
the figures are more striking: only 1.2% of Canadian
tax payers earn over $15,-
000.00, but students whose
parents have such an income
account for 11% of arts and
science students.
In line with its recommendations to the Bladen Commission, the Canadian Union
of Students therefore adopted
a general resolution as its
Congress calling for the removal of all social and financial barriers to post-secondary education. The elimination of financial barriers in
particular was seen as a major
step forward in the democratization of post-secondary
education; specifically, CUS
was to seek the elimination
of tuition fees as a first step
in this direction. While everyone is in favour of ''universal
accessibility", as the principle
is called, it is the latter that
is contentious: the means of
implementing this equality
of opportunity.
The 1965 CUS Congress
also voted to hold a National
Student Day, the first of its
kind in Canada, which took
place on October 27, only
two weeks before the national
federal election. The aim was
to bring home to all students
the significance of the issues
a stake, and to bring to the
attention of the general public the urgent need to attend
to the increasingly-desperate
situation of the universities.
To be continued
Come on strong!
go all the way with
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Full   Dress Shirts   &   Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue   Blazers
Directors'   Coats 10<;;,   UBC   Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO  CHOOSE  FROM
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2608   Granville   (at  10th)   4691   Kingsway   (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by   Sears)   HE   5-1160
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
Nominations are now being received for the position
of Second Vice-President of the Alma Mater Society
Student Council. Eligibility and nomination forms
are available at the A.M.S. office (S. Brock). These
forms are to be submitted to the Secretary, Box 54,
Brock Hall. Nominations will close Thursday, September 29th, 1966.
CHARTER FLIGHT DIRECTOR:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Charter Flight Director for the A.M.S. Charter
Flight which will leave for Europe May 11, 1967 and
return August 25th, 1967. All applications and inquiries should be directed to Peter Braund, President, Student Council, Box  50, Brock Hall.
COMMITTEE MEMBERS:
Applications are  now  being  accepted  for positions
on the following Committees:
Elections Committee
Eligibility Committee
All applications should be directed to the Secretary,
Student Council, Brock Hall, Box 54.
RETURNING OFFICER:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Returning Officer. Applications should be directed
to the Secretary, Student Council, Box. 54, Brock
Hall. Eligibility forms are available in the A.M.S.
Office (S. Brock).
STUDENT UNION
BUILDING COMMITTEE:
Vice-Chairman — Mature student, experienced in
student affairs with an ability to assume major responsibilities, write final reports, etc. Applicants
should be prepared to sit on the committee for the
next two years of construction with the possible
eventuality of assuming the chairmanship.
3 MEMBERS AT LARGE:
3 Members at Large — To sit on the committee and
assume specific responsibilities and assignments. A
willingness to work steadily on the project throughout the year is required. Preference will be given
to applicants able to serve on the committee over
the next two years until completion of construction.
Please apply in writing to the Secretary Box 54 by
4:00   p.m..  Friday,   Sept.   23.
ASSISTANT TREASURER:
Applications are requested for the position of Assistant Treasurer. This position offers valuable experience in a variety of tasks assigned by the treasurer including a seat on the Finance Committee.
Experience in student affairs and a knowledge of
of accounting fundamentals are helpful, but not
essential Please submit applications to the Treasurer,
Box 53, Brock Hall by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 23rd.
TIRED OF  REGISTRATION & FIRST WEEK
LINE-UPS ???...
DANCE TO THE
NOCTURNALS
FIRST & BIGGEST MIXER OF THE YEAR
U.B.C. ARMOURIES
FRIDA Y, SEPTEMBER 23
Time: 8:30 - 1:00 a.m.
Ladies $1.00
Males & Others $1.50 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 22,  1966
ENGINEER'S VICTIM . . . needs survival swimming course.
Swim, don't sink
in library lily pond
You can't swim, so you're
the library pond by a band of
Float easy: help is on the
way.
A course in survival swimming is being offered this year
at Empire Pool.
Both physical education majors and volunteer enthusiasts
can register now at Memorial
Gym for classes at 9:30, 10:30
or 11:30 a.m.
Non-swimmers can learn the
'basic skills of swimming, while
the more advanced will increase their  swimming  skills.
Basic skills of survival
swimming which will be taught
are: entry from a height; submerging; swimming under
water; swimming for speed;
swimming for endurance;
treading water and floating;
removal of clothing; use of
miscellaneous    supports    and
Frat Plans
Mansion
The newest addition to fraternity row will be a $250,000
mansion with electric heating,
wall-to-wall carpets and a
covered swimming pool.
Construction of the house,
planned by Delta Kappa
Epsilon, is expected to begin
in December.
The new building, which will
replace the Eleventh Avenue
house, also includes two recreation rooms, one dining and
one living room, and a chapter
room.
terrified of being tossed into
red-shirted maniacs.
WIN RAM
INSURANCE LIMITED
Specializing in
Reducing Surcharged
Auto   Premiums
731-5328
1678 W. Broadway
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The Daroff Touch does it . . . all
the way. Set the pace whenever
it's Sport Coat time ... in famous
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slacks.
Sport   Coats   from   49.50
Slacks from $25.00
*     MSTINCTIVI MEN* STOtIS
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at  Mackenzie
ALPHA DELTA  PHI
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the Fraternities at UBC invite
men in 2nd year and above
to
RUSH
this Fall
REGISTER
TODAY
AMS OFFICE - BROCK HALL
(THIS ADVERTISEMENT  PLACED  BY THE  INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL) Thursday, September .22,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
review
200 TO GO
Black'
gets out of red
The Science Undergraduate Society's anticalendar may
pay for itself this year, SUS editors said Monday.
More than 400 copies of the
Black and Blue Review have
been sold so far.
The sale of another 200 will
pay for the anticalendar, review editors said.
The new anticalendar has
been revised from last year's
initial issue, but contains the
usual criticism of science
courses and professors.
The Black and Blue was
first published to aid science
students in their selection of
courses and professors.
This year's edition warns
students not to judge a professor or a course solely on
the basis of the review.
Although similar anticalen-
dars have met strong faculty
and administration opposition
on other campuses, there has
been little dissent from UBC
professors concerning the review.
The  book will be   on sale
Atomic safety
taught to
UBC profs
UBC has acquired an isotope
watchdog.
Newly appointed William
Rachuk's official title is radiation surveyor.
For the past 13 years he has
worked as a safety official
with Atomic Energy of Canada
Limited at Chalk River, Ontario.
"There Is a growing use of
small amounts of radioactive
materials in a great many
UBC departments," said Dr.
Sidney Zbarsky, chairman of
the committee on radioactive
isotopes at UBC.
"This does not mean, however, that there are widespread radiation hazards on
the campus. In the interests of
safety, scientists need to be advised and instructed on safety
measures and equipment necessary for the experiments they
plan."
Among the UBC departments which use radioactive
materials are pathology, metallurgy, zoology, chemistry,
oceanography, biology and botany.
Rachuk will monitoi- radiation levels with geiger counters, radiation survey counters
and scintillation counters.
He said he didn't anticipate
that there would be many
difficult problems on the UBC
campus.
"The amounts handled are
extremely small," he said,
"and those who do the handling are aware of the dangers.
"Basically it's a matter of
teaching people good housekeeping."
outside Henning 200 for the
rest of this week. Cost is 75
cents.
SUS editors said that in the
future the Review will be published in alternate years with
a supplement in the odd years.
The proposed Arts anti-
calendar was not so successful.
Artsman took their chances
again this year—there'll be no
anti-calendar until next March.
Arts president Don Wise
said the anticalendar won't be
out until mid-March. It was
originally scheduled for registration week.
"Fall is the wrong time for
an anticalendar," said Wise.
"By this time people have already chosen their courses."
Wise said publication was
delayed for several reasons:
disagreement among the staff
over whether it should be an
evaluation or a criticism; no
standardization o f material;
and  obsolete opinions.
"The way it is now, it's unsuitable for editing," said
Wise.
When the calendar comes
out in March, Wise said, it
will contain evaluations by
grad students capable of valid
criticism.
Athletics
advertise
HOCKEY
Thunderbird hockey players
and all interested in hockey
tryouts should meet with team
officials in the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre lounge
today at 12:45 p.m.
RUGBY
Thunderbird rugby coach
Brian Wightman invites any
interested students to rugby
practices today at 12:30 and
Tuesday at 5:30 at Wolfson
Field at the south end of the
campus.
Git-4 Caqe
"For Damsels"
World's Finest
Pants Suil
This Camel Hair suit tastefully fitted by Bad Boy's
"Turkish   Craftsmen."   $130
BAD BOYS
I Advance Mattress Coffee House
1   Blab Night Tonight
(Make your own harangue or comedy on stage)
8:30; 10th & Alma
Admission: 25c, 50c non-members
fe) I
Special Clients
PRESENTS
JAMES MEREDITH
AUDITORIUM - TODAY - 12:30 - 35c
COMING
Tues., Sept. 27 - J. K. GALBRAITH
Thurs., Sept. 29 - STAN WILSON - Folk Singer
Tues., Oct. 4 - BUFFY SAINTE-MARIE
(Advance tickets now on sale at A.M.S.
& Van. Ticket Centre)
Go Naturally in Richards and Farish, Suits and Sportscoats
Like the traditions) look? Then you'll appreciate the young man's styling, the quiet excitement of both of our downtown shops, which are loaded with the finest sweaters, casual
/vear,  and   haberdashery  available.
Mill 1IIIIN & FiltlNII LTD.
Als
786 GRANVILLE   STREET.     VANCOUVER  2.   B.C.,     PHONE.   681    4814
THE   COLLEGE   SHOP
802 GRANVILLE STREET Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 22,  1966
'TWEEN  CLASSES
Bone-diggers organize
ARCHAELOGY CLUB
Organizational meeting of
the Archaeology club, noon
Friday, Bu. 204. Executive
and anyone interested in joining please attend.
• •    •
UCC
University Clubs Committee
general meeting Monday noon
in Bu. 202. Attendance compulsory.
• •    •
EUS
Campus-wide mixer will be
held Friday. Dance to the Nocturnals!    Ladies:    $1.00,   Men:
$1.50. 8:30 to 1:00 in the Armouries.
• •    •
PHRATERES
First meeting for all-Phi
actives Friday, September 23
at 12:30 in Bu. 100.
• •    •
MARDI GRAS COMMITTEE
Committee members requested to attend the first
meeting in AMS Council
chambers,  Friday.
• •    •
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Testimony    meeting     every
Education first,
medicare second
OTTAWA (CUP) — Ontario's provincial government
places a higher priority on federal aid to education than
it does on medical insurance for all Canadians.
Premier   John Robarts told
CULF rejects
medicare plan
postponement
HALIFAX (CUP)—Delegates
at the Canadian University
Liberal Federation conftrence
here passed two resolutions
condemning the federal government's decision to postpont
its medicare plan.
In a Commons speech Sept.
8, Finance Minister Mitchell
Sharp announced the postponement would be for one year.
At that time he said the
Liberal government would also
postpone indefinitely the federal scholarship program.
The moves are part of government action designed to
curb inflation.
Anthony Pearson, CULF
president, called the government's decision a serious mis-
evaluation of priorities; and
asked for reconsideration of
both steps.
"We unequivocally support
the efforts of Health and Welfare Minister Allan J. Mac-
Eachen to obtain these and
other progressive measures,"
he said Sept. 10.
the federal - provincial tax
structure committee Wednesday that Ontario supports the
principle of universal public
medicare, but welcomed the
decision of the federal government to postpone its scheme
until July 1, 1967.
However, the provincial government does not approve of
postponing federal aid to education until July of 1967.
"While Ontario believes
firmly in the desirability of
universal medicare schemes
for Canadians, we are convinced that expenditures on
higher education deserve the
greatest priority " the premier
said.
Medicare is already universally available i n Ontario
through the Ontario Medical
Services Insurance Plan and
various private insurance
schemes.
But Ontario does not have
sufficient facilities and personnel to accommodate and teach
students already in their final
high school years, Robarts
said.
10%  Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
Vogue Flower Shop
2197 W. Broadway 736-7344
NOTICE TO STUDENTS
FROM YOUR UBC BOOKSTORE-
DURING SEPTEMBER
BUY ALL TEXT BOOKS
Except -
Medicine Law
Rehab. Medicine Architecture
Pharmarcy Dentistry
Social   Work Librarianship
at THE FIELD HOUSE
(Next to Brock Hall)
Hours: 8.45 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Friday
Friday at noon Hut 0-12, behind   the   education  building.
Everyone welcome.
•    •    •
ALPHA OMEGA SOCIETY
First general meeting for all
Ukrainian Varsity Students
Monday noon in Bu. 225.
Classical Guitar
Instruction   in   Technique
and  Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096  or  874-3547
Studio   at  2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
Phi Kappa Sigma
IS BUILDING A NEW $100,000
FRATERNITY HOUSE ON CAMPUS
with: — Dining   Room
— T.V.
— Sauna Bath
— Spacious Rooms
— Pool Table
— And many other extras
2nd and 3rd year students are invited to rush and have
an opportunity to become members in this international
organization.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall,. Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND     WALLET     UNIVERSITY
Blvd.
WILL THE PERSON WHO TOOK
a man's black umbrella by mistake (made in Hong Kong, has
Chinese characters inside) from
the Woodward's Library on Saturday, Sept. 14, please return it to
Dr. Eng., room 218, Dept. of Bio-
chemistry,   Medical   Block   A.
COMM. 492 & 371 TEXTS TAKEN
from my briefcase outside stack
level  3.  Phone  Sam  922-7489.
FOUND LICENSE PLATE NO. 362-
389—on C lot. Claimed at UBC
Home Oil Station.
Coming Dances
12A
DANCE WITH SUS AND THE
Fabulous ACCENTS this Saturday
night 8:30 to 12:30 in Brock
Lounge. Men $1.00, Women .75.
Everyone   Welcome.	
FRUSTRATED BY FIRST WEEK
line-ups? Relieve your tensions.
Attend the first big bash of the
year. Dance to the "Nocturnals"
Friday, Sept. 23 in the Armouries,
8:30-1:00 a.m. The first of all
mixers.
BACK ON CAMPUS BIGGER AND
better Don't miss them this Sat.
night in Brock! The dynamic Vancouver Accents featuring "Derek
Cave" and the Motown Sound of
the   "Soul   Sisters".
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone   Ted  Elliott,   224-6707.
ACADEMIC SYMPOSIUM 1967 —
A committee is now being formed
Students from all faculties if interested leave name and phone
No. at AMS,  Box 2.
THE  PHANTOM   IS   COMING.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents —Publications   office   in   Brock.
UPPER TENTH BARBER'S SPEC-
ial for September —10% off all
Toiletries. 4574 W. 10th—1 block
from the gates.
Transportation
14
RIDERS WANTED; FROM VICIN-
ity of 20th Ave. to Kingsway
along Victoria. Phone Pete at
TR   2-2263.
RIDE FROM RICHMOND NEED-
ed. 8:30 classes. No. 2 & Blundell.
Call Judy BR 7-5149.
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY
16th & Burrard. Can drive 1 day.
Phone  733-4620.
RIDERS WANTED FROM NEW-
westminster, M-F, Phone Ian,
521-9254.
RIDE FROM 16th & GRANVILLE
M-W-F for 9:30's, returning at
3:30 — Phone RE 6-0989 after 5 or
Tues.   after 9:30.
RIDE WANTED FOR 9:30 CLAS-
ses from vicinity of 4th ft Macdonald also 5:30 return. Phone
Barry   731-2563   after   7.
RIDE OR RIDERS LEAVING
from 6th and Lonsdale, that stays
out several nights a week. Please
call   Brigitte.   985-5114.
RIDE WANTED VICINITY OF
10th and McBride, Newwest. Ph.
526-2149.
RIDE WANTED FROM 33rd AND
Marguerite for 8:30's, M to F.
Call  Marg.   733-7758.
RIDE NEEDED 8:30 MON. - FRI.
1200 W. 22nd St., N. Van. YU 8-
3279.   —   Ken.
SHARE DRIVING FROM NEW
West, Moody Park area 8:30 to
5:30 except Wednesday. LA 1-2364.
RIDE WANTED FROM WEST
End, vicinity Haro & Bute.
Please  call Lesley 922-2013.
TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED FROM NO. 4 &
Alexandra Rd., Richmond, for
8:30.   Phone  CR  8-0021.
RIDE WANTED. 33rd AND MAC-
kenzie. 7145 a.m. (approx.) and
5:00 p.m. Please phone B & G
switchboard (2171) or Melanie 266-
9989  after  6:00  p.m.   	
URGENT — TRANSPORTATION
wanted for four year old boy
from Burnaby to 41st and Oak,
Mon. thru Fri. To arrive 1:00
p.m. and return 3:30 p.m. Any
arrangement of drivers and days
O.K. Mr. Feldhammer, P.S.A.
Dept.   S.F.U.  291-3588,  or 299-5992.
PASSENGERS WANTED TO UBC
6 day week. Vicinity 49th and
Granville. Peter AM 1-7696.
RIDE   WANTED   4100   BLOCK   W.
13th.   Phone   Gary,   CA4-5813.
RIDE WANTED FROM HASTINGS
& Victoria for 8:30 classes.
Phone 253-8939, Rita. 	
RIDERS WANTED FROM DUN-
bar area. Mon. to Fri. 8:30 to
5:30?  Phone  Ian  at  261-9405.
RIDE WANTED!' FROM NAN-
aimo and Kingsway for 9:30's
M. to F. Phone HE1-3842 after
6   p.m.	
WANTED RIDE FROM WEST
End, New Westminster. Mon. to
Fri.  Phone   Klaus,   522-9395.
TWO DRIVERS WANTED FOR
carpool from New Westminster,
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-4:30. Phone Phil,
LA1-3262.
RIDE FROM NORGATE PARK,  N.
Van.   Phone   985-4501.
RIDE WANTED FROM VICINITY
of Broadway and Nanaimo, Monday through Friday. 8:30s on
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday.
Phone Terry, AL 3-6456 after 6
p.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
WANTED BY TWO CHARMING
girls. Ride to Calgary, Friday,
October 7th. Will pay for gas.
Phone Cathy 224-9982 after 6:00
p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1953 HILLMAN HARDTOP. SHAB-
by but reliable. City tested. $100.
F.   K.   Bowers,   228-8631.
CAR INSURANCE TOO HIGH?
Maybe one of our 60 companies
can provide lower and better coverage. Phone J. Enright, MU 2-
1474 or 922-6936.
1956 CHEV. V8. BLUE AND
white. |350. 224-4814 or 731-6921.
Bill Phillips.
RECON. '52 MORRIS MINOR. RE-
built A40 motor and trans. Phone
Dave,   876-3197.
'58 STD. 2 DR. PLYMOUTH. GOOD
cond. City tested. Low mileage.
Best   offer   takes.    874-9709.
1965 CORVAIR MONZA, 4 SPD.,
bucket seats, radio, w.w. deluxe
interior,   etc.   224-5979.
'57 METEOR, STD., TWO-TONE,
white-walls. Phone Friday after
6 p.m.   681-2775.
VW 1965 DELUXE. RADIO. GREY.
S1.49R.00. Phone George CA 9-4900.
5-6:30  p.m.
LEAVING COTWTRY. MUST SELL
two cars. 1965 Rambler Cla«s'c.
770 Hardtop. Fully enuipned, 7.800
miles. $2695. 1965 Isuzu Pellet Deluxe. 8.000 miles, $1,595. Telephone
228-8577.
FOR SALE — 1957 PREFECT SE-
dBn. New mot^r, erood rubber, etc.
Private.   $200.00.   Phone 942-4458.
11S8 SUNBEAM RAPIER HDTP.
Excellent cond. New w.w's, ex-
hoiigt. Complete repair record.
S595.   Neil,   224-3510   eves.
Motorcycles
27
FOR SALE — 1954 SUNBEAM S8
500c.c. Best offer takes. Phone
CA 4-3591 after 6 p.m.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters  &  Repairs 42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
O L YM PIC PORTABLE TYPE-
writers. Excellent condition. Reasonable price.  228-2855 or 291-2561.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED FOR
UBC Alumni Chronicle. Retainer
paid for regular services. Apply
with samples of work to Alumni
offce,  252 Brock Hall.	
WAITERESS WANTED — SAT.,
Sun. and Mon. nights. Must be
neat, pleasant and hard working.
Apply The Friar, CA 4-0833 evenings,   4423   West   10th   Ave.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COKE MACHINE FOR SALE. Excellent for fraternities. Can be
viewed   at   Campus   Barber   Shop.
FOR SALE: FRIDGE, '2 LARGE
arm   chairs.   263-3397.
FOR SALE
NOTE Publishing Business, Now-
well established at U.B.C, Gross
Sales $2,400.00 ANNUALLY; Ideal
for Commerce or Business-minded
Student; Terms available; reply
to Box 255, Postal Station "A"
Vancouver 1, or RE 8-9661 (after
6 p.m.).	
LE MAIR FLUTE $70.00. PHONE
942-4458.	
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
in the Armouries or Publications
Office  in  Brock.
PURE COCONUT OIL — UPPER
Tenth Barbers & Toiletries. 4574
W.   10th.
GRASS MATTING, IDEAL FLOOR
covering, 9' x 19', 15c per sq. ft.
224-9143.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM  FOR  RENT:   2823   WATER-
loo.   MU   2-6902,   MU   1-8008.	
AVAILABLE—FURNISHED ROOM
for women only. Mrs. Anderson—
3548 West 38th Ave.
SLEEPING ROOM — MALE—$45.00
month. Coffee & Laundry included.   4th   &  Larch.  Phone  738-7474.
AVAILABLE 2 ROOMS FOR MAN
or woman at 4547 West 16th, Call
Chris Maude.
AVAILABLE — ROOM AT 3336
West 2nd for one girl. Phone 738-
1696.
AVAILABLE—Apartment   to   share.
Phone   Marlene   Allen  —  662-8580-
_ Women Only.	
PRIV.    ROOM.    SHARE    KITCHEN
with   2   others.   2737   W.   3rd.   $10
week.   RE   8-0086.
Room & Board
82
AVAILABLE ROOM AND BOARD,
3443 West Fourteenth $80 month.
Single room, shared bath. Phone
738-8505   after   5.   Mrs.   Colbourne.
WANTED: ROOM AND BOARD
for year or housekeeping suite.
Phone   987-7470   after  six,
Furn. Houses & Apis.
83
WANTED ROOMMATE TO SHARE
costs of suite. Upper years student preferred. Phone RE 3-2987
after 5 ask for Bruce.
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE SPAC-
ious West End Apartment, Own
bedroom. Very reasonable. Ph.
684-2636   after  5.
Unfurn. Houses    8. Apts.
84       -
Halls For Rent
85

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