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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 23, 1979

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Array THE UBYSSEY
'Federal bill
increases aid'
4^ iftw.
*><*** n
^v-^
DENTISTS-TO-BE participate in close-order drill. Cavorting cavity caterers sink teeth into Dentistry Tooth Trot, eyeing dental floss stretched
across finish line. Race winner Dr. John Silver, after receiving customary
— ross burnett photo
30-second dose of nitrous oxide, was heard to remark: "Sure is easier
than pulling teeth. Faster, too (15 mins., 40 sees.)." Unidentified racer on
extreme left will need to be guided to patients' mouths.
Rev.'s resignation causes controversy
By PETER MENYASZ
The resignation of a gay rights
advocate has sparked a controversy
over sex orientation discrimination
at UBC.
"The situation was made so
unpleasant that I felt I had to
resign," Rev. Mac Elrod said
Wednesday of his December
resignation as librarian at the Vancouver    School    of   Theology.
He added that he had not wished
to bring the matter to the public's
attention to protect his family from
the controversy.
According to a campus source,
the pressure that was brought to
bear on Elrod was a result of his
views on homosexuality, which
were expressed in an article in The
Ubyssey on Nov. 24. The article
was based on a speech by Elrod
defending   homosexuality   in   a
Biblical context.
"This was just one of the multiple factors involved," said Elrod.
He added that he had also made
material on homosexuality available
to a student doing research for a
thesis.
"There was also a personality
conflict," said Elrod.
The whole matter is simply an internal library matter, according to
Vancouver School of Theology
principal Rev. James Martin.
"The problem had to do with
staff, and neglect of the workings
of the library."
Martin denied that the resignation was in any way a result of
Elrod's views on homosexuality and
added that he had known about
those views before Elrod was hired.
Martin also said he had been
unaware of The Ubyssey's article,
and that its publication had had no
effect on the Elrod issue.
Rev. Don Johnson of the
Lutheran Campus Centre said
Thursday he has been aware of turmoil in the School of Theology's
library for some years.
"People hired have been either
incompetent or too competent," he
said, and he added that he felt
Elrod might have been over-
qualified for the job.
Johnson also said that in his conversations with the theology
school's administration, they had
told him that they considered it fortunate that The Ubyssey had not
been publishing at the time of
Elrod's resignation.
Cutbacks explosive at If of T
TORONTO (CUP) — While Vancouver police
chase after the city's bank firebomber, Toronto police
have a more unusual case to deal with — an anti-
education cutbacks bombing campaign.
An underground group calling itself the Direct
Revolt Against Government has claimed responsibility
for a series of small explosions at the University of
Toronto's Scarborough campus last month.
Although the explosions were very minor — a filing
cabinet, a desk and a soft drink can were found booby-
trapped with an iodine mixture — they did prompt
visits from the Toronto Emergency Task Force and
Bomb Squad.
A college employee first discovered the booby traps
the morning when she went to a filing cabinet. When
she inserted the key, she heard a loud bang, saw a
cloud of smoke, and found her hand and wrist covered
with a yellowish substance. The substance was also
found on anearby desk, and in a soft drink can, which
later rolled out of a nearby machine and exploded.
Police said the compound was an iodine mixture
which blew up on contact. A Metro police sergeant
said those responsible knew what they were doing.
About an hour later, a caller identifying himself as a
member of DRAG told the editor of the campus
newpaper, the Balcony Square, that his group was
responsible for the incident.
He said the compound was put there to rebel against
poor college library facilities, as well as against recent
tuition fee increases announced by the government.
Editor Lynn Farquahar said the caller told her this
was only the beginning and that more incidents like this
could be expected.
The Scarborough College Library has been a source
of concern for students there for about a year. Last
autumn, students of the college voted overwhelmingly
to give $10 per year in order to build a new library.
Following this, Scarborough student council president
Sheldon Leith appealed to college and universities
minister Bette Stephenson for the provincial government to match the amount pledged by the students in
order to begin construction next September
Stephenson has been polite but very noncommital
on the matter. Furthermore, the library is the third
priority of the University of Toronto governing council.
Outside groups are suspected in the incident. Most
students of the college would concede the campus'
general   mood   is   very   middle-of-the-road   and-
apathetic.
But another School of Theology
administrator attributes Elrod's
resignation to slightly different circumstances.
"Although I was on sabbatical at
the time, I was in Vancouver and
Martin approached me to discuss
the problem," said Rev. Terry
Anderson, vice-principal of the
theology school.
The problem, said Anderson,
centred "around his (Elrod's) relationship with other library staff."
He added that Martin had explained the nature of the staff's
complaints about him to Elrod, and
Elrod had decided within half a day
or a day to resign rather than participate in a hearing proposed by
Martin.
Anderson said the staff's complaints against Elrod stemmed from
Elrod's progressive beliefs and his
presentation of them to others.
"Because of his style, he (Elrod)
doesn't bring other people with
him," Anderson added.
Anderson also said he really did
not feel Elrod's views on homosexuality had anything to do with the
resignation, adding that the administration of the theology school
had been unaware of the publishing
of the article in The Ubyssey.
Elrod said Thursday he was upset
about being bypassed by the
theology   school's   administrative
system.
"The thing I resented was that
rather than coming to me with the
facts, he (Martin) went to the personnel committee of the board (of
the school)."
Elrod refuted both Martin's and
Anderson's statements that they
were unaware of The Ubyssey's article.
"I had copies of the newspaper
left on my desk and copies of the
replies to the article," Elrod said.
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
A proposed raise in the loan ceiling for the Canada Student Loan
Program will make more money
available for students, even though
the federal government will not
raise the program's budget, UBC's
awards office director said Thursday.
Byron Hender s a i d the ceiling
raise will allow students to borrow
more money than in the past and
will not affect the number of
students able to borrow because the
program currently has a surplus of
funds every year.
"Lots of money isn't spent every
year."
He said there is no need for the
federal program to increase its
budget because of the yearly
surplus.
The surpluses result because low
ceilings prevent the awards office
from lending all the monies
available, according to Hender.
While the federal government announced no increase in the loan
program budget in their 1979-80
budget estimates released Monday,
second reading has been given to a
bill which would raise the maximum
allowable loan to $2,240 per
academic year from its current
$1,800.
The bill was introduced Feb. 8 by
secretary of state John Roberts and
has met with strong opposition
from the National Union of
Students.
Kate Andrew, Alma Mater Society exterual affairs officer, said
Thursday the plan would make it
more difficult to attend university,
because the proposed increase to
the loan ceiling increases the
amount students borrow but not
the amount they receive as a grant.
"Increasingly students will be
paying more for their loans," said
Andrew.
She said loan increases coupled
with the increasing cost of tuition,
books and supplies indicate a lack
of long-term planning in education
on the part of federal and provincial governments.
Andrew said that at a time when
student unemployment is high it is
unreasonable for students to be asked to pay for a larger proportion of
their education.
Students
pay for
bad joke
By HEATHER CONN
When the Alma Mater Society
wants to have a good laugh, it
winds up crying with a joke that
costs $1,100.
Comedian Dave Broadfoot
had the last laugh Feb. 1 when
he charged the AMS a $750 fee
with $200 worth of expenses to
do a show for a meagre audience
of 50 at UBC.
The AMS programs committee isn't chuckling now after
paying for a $100 Ubyssey advertisement and another $100
poster to publicize the funny
event that flopped.
"We didn't do our job," programs committee member Arnold Hedstrom said Thursday.
"I think there's a lot of problems. The committee's really
decentralized and disorganized.
The quality (of UBC attractions)
really suffers."
Hedstrom said the Broadfoot
See page 3: BROADFOOT Pop* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979
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You'll discover that your records sound better than ever on
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PACKAGE
508
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25 watts per channel, minimum RMS at .8 ohms from
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Tfechnics  sl-19
Semi-
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You'll discover that your records sound better than ever on
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rumble is a low -65 dB (DIN B).
SB-4000
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'958 Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Firms ignore morals, says priest
By MICHAEL HELFINGER
Moral arguments are useless in
persuading multinational corporations to end support of repressive
regimes in Latin America and
elsewhere in the Third World, a
former Chilean parish priest said
Thursday.
Father Frank Vanderhoff, who
now works with an interdenominational study group on Latin
American affairs in Mexico City,
told about 30 people in SUB that
multinationals have to be talked to
"in the language they can understand — money, profits, and capital
accumulation."
"In business, theology is the
weakest argument you can use," he
addded. "They are only doing the
job the system demands of them."
Noranda Mines of Canada Ltd. is
negotiating a $350 million in a copper deposit at Andacullo in Chile.
This investment "would create a
few jobs but do little to alleviate the
suffering of the working classes in
Chile," while lending support and
stability to the Augusto Pinochet
regime and its brutal anti-labor
policies, he said.
Vanderhoff said multinational
companies like Noranda must be
convinced that support of reactionary regimes and exploitation of
Third World workers is not in their
long-term interest.
This could be accomplished, he
said, by educating workers and
farmers in both the industrial West
and the Third World about the
detrimental effects of transnational
capitalism on their national
economies. This would create a
worldwide climate of opinion unfavorable to the operation of the
multinationals, Vanderhoff said.
The multinationals have currently succeeded in completely undermining national economic policies,
he said, and countries are no longer
capable of controlling their own
economic destinies.
Vanderhoff added that international capital has succeeded in playing    off   national    working-class
movements against each other and
in buying off trade unions in both
North America and western
Europe.
"Western social democracy is the
worst enemy of the Latin American
working class," he said, citing the
willingness of socialist parties and
labor unions to work within the
capitalist system and defend "national economic interest."
Rod Haynes, of the campus
branch of the committee for the
defense of human rights in Chile,
which organized the meeting as a
part of Chile Week, said the committee originally planned to stage a
panel discussion which would have
included representatives of Noranda and of the UBC administration.
UBC owns 8,000 shares of Noranda
stock worth about $260,000.
Noranda refused the invitation
and proceeded to indulge in some
fancy footwork in defense of their
position, he said.
Haynes produced a written statement by Noranda president Alfred
Powis which states that the planned
discussion would be "a theoretical
argument which will resolve
nothing and not convince anybody
of anything."
Powis also states that "we believe
that the more a country participates
in international trade and investment, the more enlightened its internal policies are likely to be. We
therefore believe that an economic
boycott would be ethically wrong
and self-defeating."
Broadfoot turnout a joke
From page 1
show produced a loss because the
programs committee give it "extremely poor publicity" and due to
poor judgment charged $2 admission for a noon performance.
Broadfoot received a poor turnout
because he's not as popular or well-
known in B.C. as in eastern provinces, he added.
But nevertheless, the joke's on
us.
"We didn't have the person
power to do a heck of a lot to begin
with," said Hedstrom.
The AMS should not have charged   an   entrance   fee   or   only   a
minimal one for the noon-hour
show, external affairs officer Kate
Andrew said Thursday. She said the
lack of publicity and followup caused the show's unhumorous results.
"The committee has not really
judged student audiences as well as
it might. It was a mistake to make
people pay. They (the programs
committee) had to fly Broadfoot
out from back east. That was overly
ambitious."
The AMS is looking into hiring a
salaried program's committee coordinator to organize shows and coordinate attractions.
Speakeasy eases out of its crisis role
In the recent trend towards
self-help groups and grass
roots counselling, UBC's
Speakeasy is growing in importance.
Handling from 250 to 280
calls a week, Speakeasy, in
SUB 100B, offers students
information on everything
from birth control to bus
times, operates a talk centre
dealing with a range of
topics.
By JULIE
WHEELWRIGHT
"We're getting more and
more information, people
and contacts. We're getting
away from the image of cliquish social workers and are
becoming more of a student
service," says Speakeasy coordinator Ernie Ogilvie.
The number of calls that
Speakeasy receives has increased
and the nature of the callers has
changed.
"We're getting the same percentage of help calls, but a greater
There is a trend among the
Speakeasy staff away from people
coming to the centre with crises,
because of the Vancouver Crisis
Line and the well-publicized Rape
Relief service.
This   has   meant   that   "lower
We're trying to change the image
that you can take your problems to
us and well solve them for you.
percentage of information calls.
"We're also getting away from
drug problems. Now there's
probably just as much of a problem
with alcohol," said Ogilvie.
level" problems have been the
major counselling concerns for the
Speakeasy volunteers this year.
"We're   trying   to   change   the
image   that   you   can   take   your
problems to us and we'll solve them
for you," said Ogilvie.
The most common problems
which volunteers encounter involve
people who come from off-campus
and have trouble adjusting to their
new  lifestyle  and  responsibilities.
Ogilvie said people new to
campus life sometimes meet
"hassles with the bureaucracy" and
Speakeasy often handles problems
of this type.
Kip Cates, another Speakeasy
volunteer, said one of the advantages of the centre is that it is
run by students who can identify
with student problems.
"A lot of people get stuck into
roles and they can't talk to their
parents, so Speakeasy is a good
thing because there's a friendly
person on the other end of the telephone. You can talk about your
problems with no pressure," says
Cates.
Advertising coordinator Nancy
Henderson said one of Speakeasy's
principles is approachability.
"One of our big pluses is that
we're students and we're volunteers. We've gone through the same
things they have. A professional
may not pick up on experiences
such as failing exams," says
Henderson.
Speakeasy provides a service that
someone doesn't know where to go,
or whether their problem is big
enough to go to a psychiatrist or
whatever."
Cates says many people think of
Speakeasy as a crisis centre, which
is misleading.
"It seems that a lot of people
think of us as a crisis centre, but
we're not, we're a talk centre. Our
philosophy is that people have to
make their own decisions.
"We don't solve problems, we
just show people their options and
let them talk about their feelings,"
Cates says.
Most people who get involved
with Speakeasy are motivated by an
interest to help people or a hope to
gain experience for their future
occupations.
Joan Cameron says she joined
the centre because she's interested
in becoming a social worker.
"A lot of people whose future is
working with people join Speakeasy
for the experience."
The volunteers find that the
busiest time of the week is on
Monday morning and Friday and
Saturday nights.
"Weekends do affect people,"
said Ogilvie.
Founded in Jan. 1970, Speakeasy
began as an information and short-
term counselling centre, and their
network of referrals and sources of
information have grown substantially.
The wide variety of referrals that
Speakeasy has includes the Vancouver Crisis line. Volunteers from
Speakeasy are trained to handle
threatened suicide cases, but prefer
to refer people with serious
problems to the crisis line.
It seems that a lot of people
think of us as a crisis centre, but
were not, we're a talk centre.
is not fulfilled anywhere else on
campus, according to Ogilvie.
"The other things on campus are
professionals and they're part of
the    bureaucracy.     Sometimes
Speakeasy's information line is
228-3777 and the crisis line is
228-3700. The Vancouver Crisis
Line is 733-4111 and Rape Relief is
at 732-1613. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979
New wave music will roll on
Anarchy. Riot in the streets. To read
some of the letters to the editor and to
listen to the comments of some Alma
Mater Society politicians and bureaucrats
one could be led to believe that new wave
music is enough to stir the quiet, timid
souls of UBC students to a revolution of
anarchy. Would that there was something
to stir this campus from its apathetic
stupor.
To say that there has been some confusion surrounding the cancelled punk rock
concert is an understatement. There is
clearly considerable misinformation on the
part of many attempting to participate in
the debate. Your humble newspaper will
therefore try to clarify some of the misunderstanding.
The issue started Feb. 12 at the student
administrative commission meeting. At
that time SAC approved a proposal by The
Ubyssey to hold a punk rock dance in the
SUB auditorium and to extend the AMS liquor license to the ballroom for that event.
Everything was therefore ready to go, or
so we thought.
The following day, the AMS general
manager Bern Grady had a discussion with
Sergeant Al Hutchinson of the local constabulary to the effect that the police
would take a "dim view" of the AMS approving the liquor license for the event.
Later the same afternoon Grady said he
was phoned again by the RCMP and told in
stronger terms that the RCMP disapproved
of the serving of alcohol at this function.
Hutchinson told Grady he would appeal to
Liquor Administration Branch officials to
support his view. At this time it was
pointed out in AMS circles that the LAB
based many of its decisions on local police
reports and that the Pit license could
therefore stand in jeopardy of not being
renewed.
At no time during this process did the
police consult the dance organizers and express their reservations.
The commission decided therefore to
revoke their earlier decision to extend their
liquor license to the event as a result of the
pressure.
Faced with holding the event without the
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 23, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student   Union   Building.   Editorial   departments,   228-2301;   Advertising,
228"3977' Editor: Mike Bocking
"Is the concert all ready to go," asked Mike Bocking as he tightened up the buttons on his new tuxedo, while Heather Conn watched and
smiled saying, "I Love men in three-piece suits." "Oh yes, we've got Pat Boone, Anita Bryant and the RCMP musical ride to play and Bill
Tieleman and Tom Hawthorn will be selling orange juice for The Ubyssey Ladies' Aid Society," said crew-cutted Peter Menyasz as he watched Kevin McGee and Geof Wheelwright put up streamers in the SUB ballroom. Julie Wheelwright donned her pink chiffon party dress and
patent leather shoes as Greg Strong arrived with a load of chocolate cup cakes for the refreshment stand. Gray Kyles beamed happily and
said, "Gee I'm glad my parents let me stay out tonight." Wendy Hunt, Ingrid Matson and Alice Thompson had their autograph books ready
and were excited as they'd heard President Kenny would be there. Paul Hodgins, Kirk Wirsig and Kerry Regter were humming in harmony as
ihey were going to lead the hymn-sing with Anita Bryant. The excitement was mounting as Dave Williams, Steve Simkin and Larry Green
•tui the happy gang's way into the auditorium. Then suddenly Mike Helfinger cried, "Does anybody want some coke?" as Verne McDonald
finished his last spin in the Virginia reel. Al the mention of coke, the dutiful RCMP officers in the musical ride jumped down from the bands-
iuiid and arrested all the guests in the name of campus security.
license, the dance organizers were forced
to admit defeat and cancel the event.
The Ubyssey, which was sponsoring the
event, stood to lose $120, most of which
was the cost of providing security at the
dance. We hoped liquor sales would lessen
the debt and hopefully make the function
break even. The paper, at no time, was
entering into the project with a view to
making money. We only agreed to sponsor
the event after a group of students interested in bringing such an event to UBC
approached us after getting nowhere with
the AMS.
Punk rock and new wave groups such as
Elvis Costello, Devo, Clash, D.O.A., The
Subhumans and The Pointed Sticks are a
musical expression of the frustration of
many youg people, usually working and
lower-middle class young people, who are
becoming increasingly alienated from a
system which gives them unemployment,
little opportunity of finding enjoyable occupation in the mind-numbing-business
and work world. Few of the people who are
heavily involved in this form of music are
from the university world or the more
privileged segments of society, of which
most of us are a part.
Our reason for sponsoring this dance
was to bring something different to the
university, to let students get a taste of
something they might normally experience
on this plastic, disco-oriented campus.
A university is a place where people
should be able to sample different approaches and points of view.
It is bureaucratic nightmares, like the
one created in this instance, which have
given rise to the development of this subtly
anarchistic musical form and the increasingly hostile reaction of young people to
our stacked deck of a society.
They tried but failed to stop rock and
roll. Neither will they be able to stop new
wave.
Letters
RCMP catches firebomb fever
Anybody who believes that the
reason UBC's wake-up to punk
dance was cancelled by the
R.C.M.P. was for lack of security
has either got shit for brains or
doesn't really care. The real reason
is tied directly to the recent anarchist fire-bOmbings of banks
downtown and our fascist Alma
Mater Society.
Vancouver is in the midst of an
anarchist revolution, the authorities
are shitting bricks, and the average
UBC student says, "Whadya say?"
Anyone who was at last week's concert at O'Hara's knows what I
mean. There were at least two undercover police taking pictures of
the audience. (What punker takes a1
$200 camera to a concert to take
pictures of the crowd?) They have
been ai almost every punk gathering
since the bombings started.
You see, the police aren't afraid
of violence, they're afraid of an er-
ruption — a la F.L.Q. Little did
they know that UBC students are
nothing but cuddly little pussycats.
All we want is a job — and I'll cut
my hair too. Anyways, it's easier to
get laid if I'm into disco. It's a
funny situation when it's the dumb
working class who are leading the
revolution, and the free thinking intellectual scholars are unaware of
what is happening.
I knew last week that the concert
was likely to be cancelled because a
member of one of the scheduled
bands told me (can't mention
names you know). The reasons —
the A.M.S. didn't want it. Of
course that was just hearsay (please
don't sue me for libel Bruce). But
when we elect such progressive
scholars as Basil Peters as our
representatives (and I really mean
this) it's not too hard to imagine
that other elected student administrators are also acting in the
best interest of the university. The
state's reaped the consequences of
their decisions, and so shall we.
There is no doubt that the police
were quite willing to "take the rap"
in order to prevent the concert.
Come on — does anybody really
believe that the R.C.M.P., who are
already in disrepute with the public,
would risk nation-wide publicity for
taking away a university's liquor
license because they held a concert
the police disapproved of?
Are we going to stand for it? Up
till now the only student organiza
tion which has been backing this
concert and other progressive
thought on campus is The Ubyssey.
What are you as students going to
do? I say screw the bastards and
organize another concert — the
bands would love to come. Or do
we have the guts to deny an oppressive authority?
R. Rem pel
Concert article misleading
I feel it is about time the students
of UBC were given the true facts
about the punk rock concert. The
Ubyssey came to SAC on Feb. 12
asking them to approve their contract with the punk bands and approve the use of the AMS liquor
license in order to make money
because all the revenue at the door
would be given to the bands. They:
also stated that unless a liquor:
license was granted they would not'
hold the concert.
Later that week the RCMP told
the AMS that it was a generally accepted rule that liquor licenses were
not granted to "rock concerts."
They said that they would use their
influence with the liquor control
board to see that a license was not
granted. Upon hearing this new information SAC revoked their
previous motion that granted the
use of the AMS license. The
Ubyssey then cancelled the concert,
not the RCMP; the obvious reason
— The Ubyssey could not make any
money on the event.
I do not condone the interference
of the RCMP in student run affairs
sponsored affairs, especially since
the past record of AMS sponsored
events has been without any major
difficulties. I only wish that The
Ubyssey would try to report the
facts and not some radical
statements of 'Soviet Union tactics'
of censorship.
The thing that scares me is that
you people may be the reporters of
the future. Paul Tompkins
member of SAC
'Cultural Fascism9
First it was emotional fascism as
practised by the board of governors; now we have cultural fascism
courtesy of the RCMP!
How much more will it take
before collective rage surfaces with
its attendant violence?
Is the local detachment of the
RCMP run by morons or is this just
another indication of the incipient
Canadian police state?
Well, I'm mad as hell and I'm
not going to take it any more. I
wonder how Hutchinson would feel
if 200 placard carrying, slogan
screaming students surrounded his
little bastille in front of the cameras
of the people's network? Would his
paranoia be heightened or merely
affirmed?
Marie V. DeFazio
grad studies Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
It is getting to the point where you can't
tell the clowns without a scoreboard.
Wednesday night's performance by certain
members of the student representative
assembly catapulted them down to the dizzy
depths previously occupied by the engineers
and the campus branch of the RCMP.
In fact, the last hour of the meeting was
Welcome to the Bungling Bros* circus
demn the whole lot of them.
The major issue, which several members
clearly stressed, was the RCMP's
authoritarian attitude in refusing a liquor
license and then avoiding the organizers of
the concert like the plague when called upon
to justify their interference.
(f reestyle)
A final, semi-related thought regarding the
Lady Godiva ride. Since the campus RCMP
seem to do the majority of their work by
reading The Ubyssey and then acting before
any formal complaints are laid, why the hell
don't THEY do something about Godiva?
The ride upsets a lot more people than the
idea of a punk concert, and 1 am certain that
if I chose to ride around the RCMP station
on a horse without any clothes on, 1 would be
arrested before 1 completed one lap.
Bloody hypocrites.
c
By KEVIN McGEE
j
the most hilarious scene I've witnessed outside of Monty Python.
Playing the role of Chicken Little, in a
bravura tour de farce, was student board of
governors representative Bruce Armstrong.
"The fact is, the article in The Ubyssey
could jeopardize the Pit liquor license's ability to extend beyond the Pit and the Lethe.
We could even have difficult renewing our
Pit license," whined Armstrong.
An incredible idea, you think, the RCMP
putting in the screws because they've had
their wrists slapped for meddling in an area
which was none of their concern.
Yet according to student administrative
commission chairman Gary Waters, that is
precisely what might happen. "The article
was completely false. The RCMP feel intimidated, and Sergeant Hutchinson has informed us that he is going to lobby the Liquor Control Board (or Liquor Distribution
Branch, or Liquor Administrative Branch,
whatever the hell they're calling themselves
these days) to withhold the privilege of extending the Pit liquor license beyond the Pit and
the Lethe," Waters said.
Now you, the reader, might find it hard to
believe that the RCMP would do anything as
stupid as that merely because of a little
vendetta which was their own making
anyway.
But, since according to such illustrious assembly members as Mssrs. Armstrong,
Waters, Brian Short, Craig Brooks, Jim
Bodner and Chris Niwinski, The Ubyssey is
always totally misrepresenting the facts, far
be it from me to assume that Waters is telling
us anything other than the gospel truth.
"We're publishers of The Ubyssey. We
pay for it to the tune of $32,000 per year. The
Ubyssey puts across the image of the AMS to
the campus and to the public," Short said.
If the image of the AMS is personified by
the above-mentioned group of six, then I sure
as shit hope that the image we present does
not reflect their ostrich-like mentalities.
It was a frequent complaint of the group of
six that nowhere in B.C. were concerts allowed to have liquor licenses. To imitate Armstrong, bullshit! What about the Commodore downtown, the Windmill, or the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre? I suspect these
morons seldom go out at night, either that or
they still live with their parents and have a
nine p.m. curfew.
I could go on listing the paranoid comments these buffoons kept mouthing, but I
trust you get the general idea.
In all fairness to the SRA, the great majority of the members argued and voted against
the motion, so it would not be fair to con-
Letters
Ubyssey uses demon liquor to draw crowds
COPS CANCEL PUNK PARTY .. . Bullshit! The Ubyssey
cancelled the punk concert because
they found that they could not obtain a liquor license for it. The
report states that SAC was
blackmailed by the RCMP into
cancelling the extension of the AMS
liquor license. Forgive me my ignorance, if I show any, but, try as I
might, I cannot remember any occasion when a concert anywhere in
this province has been licensed for
the consumption of alcohol. Does
the staff of The Ubyssey feel that a
punk concert is the correct place in
which to start such a precedent? I
think that SAC, much as I hate to-v
say it, are in the right in this case,
and I think that they were proven to
be so last Friday night at O'Hara's.
For those who didn't hear about it,
it was a performance of punk at a
Vancouver club; it was aptly named
the St. Valentine's massacre. This
punk performance featured two of
the bands that The Ubyssey wanted
to present to you, namely, D.O.A.,
and The Subhumans. The performance assumed near-riot conditions
and the police had to be called in to
break it up. They had their own
security personnel and bouncers,
presumably somewhat better and
more experienced than the UBC
engineers, but they still had to call
in the cops . . . does The Ubyssey
really believe that the engineers,
while a capable batch of people,
could  have controlled the crowd
that they would have had to?
Let's stop being childish, Mike,
and accept that the RCMP's fears
were not without grounds . . . SAC
did and as a result, we still have a liquor license that we can call our
own.
While I do agree that the RCMP
were out of their territory to suggest
a threat to our liquor license, I find
it hard to connect this to Mr.
Whiteley's "Fascist Police State"
or your own likening of the situation to that found behind the iron
curtain.
Some people in your readership
will undoubtedly point to Feb. 8
and the Scirocco dance presentation of CITR radio. They
will want to know if I am aware of
the facts of the case (why the radio
station did not get a license for its
function) and if I do not believe
that the RCMP had something to
do with it. Being on the organizing
body for this presentation, I believe
that I can present the facts just as
well as most and better than many.
The truth of the matter is that SAC
would not extend the AMS liquor
license to us because they wished to
get back at us and "teach us a
lesson" for going above them to the
SRA to get the free booking of the
ballroom that we got. There was no
pressure on SAC not to give us the
master charge
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (next to Bank of Commerce)
license, just their own spite. I fully
expect the commissioners of SAC to
say, but look, the LCLB said no to
your having a liquor license. The
fact of the matter was that the
LCLB advised us, through the
RCMP, that due to illegalities in
our advertisements about ticket
sales, we could not have a liquor
license.
It should be noted that CIRT-
UBC did not back down and start
whining to its public about this. Instead, we stood behind the act that
we had and gave it all of our support . We did not do badly when all
things are considered. I think that it
is a measure of The Ubyssey's faith
in its presentation that prevented it
from continuing on, arid I now ask
The Ubyssey ... did you not have
enough faith in your booked acts to
continue, or were you depending on
the liquor license to draw your
crowds for you.
James A. Bodner,
executive, CITR-UBC
science representative
student representative
assembly
LAST CHANCE - (ARTS STUDENTS)
to have a say in the A.U.S.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE ON MARCH 2nd FOR
1. ARTS PRESIDENT - Lisaon between students and Admin., Chair, of
Arts Council, Arts Rep. to S.R.A.
2. ARTS VICE-PRESIDENT - Social Coordinator and assists president.
3. ARTS TREASURER - Looks after all financial matters.
4. ARTS  SECRETARY  -   Correspondence and  Chief  Returning  Officer
(Positions 1-4 — attend Arts meetings and Arts Council Meetings.)
5. 4 ARTS REPS to the Student Representative Assembly (SRA) (attend
Arts Meetings, Arts Council Meetings & SRA Meetings.)
ELECTIONS ARE MARCH 7th
Advice, Information and Nomination Forms Available
at Arts Office (Buch. 107)
SPORTS WORLD CLEARANCE SALE
(While Supplies Last)
Clearance
Reg.
JOGGING SHOES
Adidas Runner
Saucony Gripper
Mens & Ladies
Pony Marathon Blue
Polaris Jogger
Nike LD 1000
Nike Roadrunner
COURT SHOES
Puma Court
Volbi Tennis
Nike All-Court
LEISURE SHOES
Puma Racer
Kawasaki Racquetball
Racquet
Black Knight Fiberglass
Racquetball Racquet
Grays Red Devil
Squash Racquet (strung)
TENNIS RACQUETS
Dunlop Gold Cup 13.95
Dunlop Professional 13.95
Donnay Metal 13.95
Martin Attack 5.95
All other tennis racquets 10% OFF
45.95
39.95
23.95
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29.95   19.95
"Sport" Jackets
Adidas Windbreakers
Ladies Antonnella T-Shirts
Pony T-Shirts
Umbro Singlets
Orron Velour Shorts
Satin Shorts
Slazenger Socks
Russell National
Tube Socks
Assorted T-Shirts
STRIP SALE
1 Sports World T-Shirt
1 pr. Fairline Shorts
1 pr. Slazenger Socks
NOW   5.99
AT 2130 WESTERN
PARKWAY
IN THE UBC VILLAGE
Phone 228-0626
Open Mon-Sat 9:30-6:00   "*
14.95
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2.45
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1.95 Pag* 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Nomination forms available for next year's elections, today until Wednesday during lunch hour,
SUB216A.
AQUA SOC
Parly with refreshments, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Happy hour, 4 to 6 p.m., Cecil Green Park.
UBC SKYDIVING
Meeting regarding elections and arrangements
for student meet, noon, SUB 212,
UBC HANG GLIDING CLUB
Slide show and information regarding lessons,
noon, SUB 111,
SUS
Chemistry magic display, noon, Chem. 150.
Science   week   dance,   8   p.m.,   Grad   Centre
ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Reunion, midt, la Maison Internationale.
CANADIAN INSTITUTE OF UKRANIAN
STUDIES
Lecture on Perceptions of Ukranian-Canadians in
English-language works, noon, Buch. 2244.
GSA
Folk  night with no admission charge and free
coffee service,  8:30 p.m.,  Grad Centre garden
SATURDAY
CSA
Sports  myhi,   7:30  p.m.,   Thunderbird  Winter
Sports Complex gym A
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Disco party, 7:30 p.m., SUB party room.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship dinner, 6:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
SUNDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Women's floor hockey practice, 3:30 to 5 p.m.,
Thunderbird Winter Sports Complex gym E.
HEALTH SCIENCE STUDENTS'
COMMITTEE
Seminar on Diabetes: A team approach to patient care, 1 to 4:30 p.m., IRC 1.
MONDAY
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
Anti-tuition increase meeting, noon, SUB 260.
CSA
Mandarin class, noon, Angus 212.
TUESDAY
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE AND
ACADEMIC WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION
Lecture on rape by Loreen Clark, noon, Buch.
102.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Special dinner then final evaluation of revelation,
6 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting for elections, noon, SUB 215.
ART OF LIVING CLUB
Dale Maranda speaks on stress without strain,
noon, Buch. 319
Hot flashes
Radioactivity's
hot stuff
It'll be the battle of the campus.
Greenpeace will square off with
the Fusion Energy Foundation on
Friday, March 2, on the benefits on
nuclear energy.
Rod Marining of Greenpeace will
argue the pro side that nuclear
energy development be halted.
Steven Bardwell will be con.
Greenpeace has been actively involved in protecting the environment against the dangers of
radioactive leaks, while the Fusion
Energy Foundation believes that
only nuclear energy can solve the
world's energy problems.
Action begins at 1:30 p.m. in the
SUB auditorium.
Lookin'good
If you want to make your-
residence floor look snazzy with a
new artistic design, then you
should contact Leo Mitrunen at
224-9083. He's been involved with
the application of a design on the
third floor of Mackenzie House in
Vanier residence and can answer
your questions.
Nominations open For
All Science Positions
• president
• vice-president
• treasurer
• program coordinators
• athletic director
• publications officer
• public relations officer
Nominations Close Mar, 2, 1979
Election Mar. 7, 1979
HAWAII
ACCOMMODATION
FROM
$10
PER DAY PER
PERSON,
based on
triple occupancy.
It's almost as cheap as
sleeping on the beach.
And a hell of a lot
more comfortable.
' Arrange your air charter, then call us.
• Self-catering air conditioned
condominiums • Everything included,
from colour TV to kitchen utensils • In
the heart of Waikiki, a few minutes stroll from
the beach • Double occupancy from $15 per
day • One bedroom condos in the new Royal
Kuhio • Better hurry, bookings are limited • Air
fare is extra to the $10 per day per person. Call
now for complete information and reservations.
HARWOOD AGENCIES
Suite 611,543 Granville Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6C1X8.
681-3401 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays.
«PO»
J\SSMFiBDS
RATES: Snuhm - 3 ikm. 1 ^*l*Qr»d#ti*irt ttwrWe.
Commercial - 3 Ikm, 1 *y #£75;«*gtk»tf HmtSOe. Addft*** *** &&*** 4Se.
Classified ads are not accepted by t&epfa^mrtarepgys&»inmJihmieK.   ....'
Oeaoiiri9k11:Mi\m., the o\wMorepubh^a^n.
Publications Office, Room 24tt &Ut%, UBC WwufcC VST1WS.
5 — Coming Events
Commedia dell'Arta anyone?
Vancouver Little Theatre Association
presents the comedy
A COMPANY OF WAYWARD SAINTS
By George Herman
Feb. 7-24. Wed. Sat., 8:30
METRO THEATRE. 1370 S.W. Marine Drive
Students $2.50. Info: 266-7191. 731-1516
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
BENEFIT DANCE
Fri. Feb 23  8 p.m.
8-9 pm Chilean Cultural Show
9-1 am Dance to "RIO BUMBA"
ADVANCED TICKETS
$3.00 hon-members from Booth in Sub
$1.50 I.H. members f[pm lnt'l House
organized   by    Committee   for   Defense   of
Human Rights in Chile in cooperation with Inl'l
House INFO 228-5021
The Vancouver Institute   -
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
Prof. Anne Treisman
UBC Psychology Department
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF
PERCEPTION AND
THOUGHT
A former teacher at Oxford University in
England, Prof. Treisman is internationally
known for her work in the field of
cognitive psychology.
Saturday, February 24,
at 8:15 p.m.
In Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre
IN PERSON!!
The ECKANKAR
("Co-worker with God")
spiritual movement, which teaches
that man has access to special life-
sustaining forces, is bringing Sri
DARWIN GROSS, the Living ECK
Master, to the Holiday Inn Vancouver—City Centre on Feb. 24-25,
to speak to the public on this ancient
Way of Life. Call ECKANKAR for
more information. 732-5514.
PRE MED Society presents Conference
'79. This year's topic is Biomedical
Engineering. Saturday, February 24.
in IRC 4, 1:00-4 30. Admission is
tree. Everyone welcome. Reiresh-
ments.
TRAVEL TO JAPAN — With the UBC-
Japan Exchange Club. Applications
for this trip of a lifetime summer
exchange are available at Speakeasy
and the Asian Studies Office.
FELLOWSHIP DINNER, Lutheran
Campus Centre, 6:30 p.m.. Sat., Feb.
24. All welcome, nominal cost. Sponsor Charismatic Fellowship. R.S.V.P.
291-1854.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
Need a Graduation Dress?
Bring your fabric and patterns to
"LES CREATIONS
MONIE"
Special Offer: $25.00 to
make your dress. Offer expires 30 March, 1979. By appointment only: 734-5015.
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
15 —Found
20 — Housing
STUDENT Housing Office Vacancies.
There are single rooms available
for women in Gage, Place Vanier and
Totem Park residences. Also available for men: Double rooms in Place
Vanier and Totem Park. Please enquire at the Housing Office, Ponderosa Building. Office Hours: 8:30-
4:30, Monday through Friday. Phone:
228-2811.
THE Pack and Boots Shop. Winter
Specials: Dacron H, double quilted
parkas by Pioneer $39.99. Down
jackets by Pioneer $49.95. All Cross
Country skis on special. Free binding, free installation, free hotwax.
free "Poiwier to the People" T-Shirt
with each pair of skis sold. 3425
West Broadway, Vancouver, 738-3128.
1970 Datsun 240-Z. Good condition,
mags, radials, rear window louvres,'
sunroof, am/fm, cassette stereo and
Bosch headlights. Asking $3,500 o.b.o.
Phot)* 228-2305 days aud 738-6021
•vem. Ask for Geoff.
30 — Jobs
INTERESTED in earning an extra income in your leisure time? A
business of your own at home?
Maybe $150,, $500., even $1,000 a
month? For interview, phone 530-
7867. No obligation. No-information
over the telephone. Let's have coffee and talk.
35 - Lost
40 — Messages
EDWARD YEUNG was killed in an
automobile accident on 20th Feb.
Funeral at 11.00 a.m., 27th Feb.,
1505 Lillooet Road, N. Van. Boal
Memorial Chapel.  Everyone welcome.
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
EVERY   Body  Needs  Milk  Even   Beta
WoniM's.
70 — Services
WEDDING Photography Specialist.
Complete professional coverage at
very reasonable rates. Call for consultation at your convenience.
732-9651   eves.
M.A. Grad will proof read theses and
papers. Can also check bibs. 684-7940.
Tony.
RESUME Service. Expertly prepared —
excellent rates. Yvonne Patrick
Steno Service Ltd.  594-7722.
ART&
f CALLIGRAPHY]
SUPPLIES
NOW AVAILABLE.
For lower prices and a wide
range of office and school
supplies, try
MOLLIES
QUALITY STATIONERS
4479 W. 10th AVE.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate ser-
viae. Bilingual. Clemy 324-9414.
FAST efficient typing. Reasonable
rates.  266-5053.
PROFESSIONAL Typing. IBM Selectric.
Essays, thesis, etc. Kits area. Phone
Lynda   7324647.
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-4870  after  6:00  p.m.
90 —Wanted
WANTED: Part Time Housekeeper to
assist 4 handicapped adults in private home. Good pay! Phone Taz
evenings 263-4400.
CUB leader or assistant. Shaughnessy.
Mon. or Tues.  Phone:  738-5410.
CREW WANTED. No pay. To finish
and sail 38' ketch. Call 736-9503. ASk
Vlad.
SEA SCOUT Leader or assistant.
Shaughnessy, Wednesday. 15 boys
ages 8 to 11. Phone 266-4956 or 261-
6377.
HELP WANTED
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPOR1
PHOTOS
I '    """      yicjo \fll lf>
AMERAS LTD.
4538 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   eves.
AFRICA — Overland  expeditions London/Nairobi     13     weeks.     London/
Johannesburg 16 weeks.
KENYA SAFARIS — 2 and 3 weeks.
EUROPE — Camping and hotel tours
from 4 days to 9 weeks.
For     brochures     contact     TRACKS
TRAVEL, Suite 300, 562 Eglinton Ave.
East, Toronto, Ont. M4P 1B9.
TYPIST. Reports, essays, term papers,
etc. Also transcribes standard cassette tapes. Reasonable. June
682-4870   after 6:00 P.m.
FOR ACCURATE typing on an IBM Selectric Correcting typewriter call 986-
2577 after 2:00 p.m. Rush work accepted.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
=li=Jp=lr=lr=ii=if=ir=ir=tf=ir=ii
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
Jl=Jr=di==Ji^r=lndi=li=Ji==»f==ll=
SCHOOL
DISTRICT 52
PRINCE RUPERT
Representatives from
Prince Rupert will be conducting interviews on campus on March 15 and 16.
As interviews will be by
appointment only, students
interested in teaching in
Prince Rupert should apply
as soon as possible to:
J.M. Loew,
District Supt. of Schools
S.D. 52 (Prince Rupert)
P.O. Box 517
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
V8J 3R6
Resumes must include
references acquired during
practice teaching, that is:
school principals and sponsor teachers. As all screening
will have to be done by
telephone, it is essential that
references' telephone
number be provided.
WANTED
to interview
STEPPARENTS
Your experience may help others
Phone Reg Oumont at 681-2690
or leave messages at 228-2255 s Jr
r
INSIDE PAGE FRIDAY
• CUBAN CINEMA — cultural expression profile
• CAPILANO REVIEW — story of a literary image
• THREE UBC ARTISTS — women seek new insights
• SCI— Fl ART— New York edition proves fatal
• SCI-FI CONVENTION — locals send saucers sailing
• JAZZ DUO — three sets at the western front
• VSO — inovative music underplayed by orchestra
• BETTY CARTER — powerful woman in jazz concert
• TALES FROM VIENNA WOODS   — period drama
• SAME TIME NEXT YEAR — situational comedy
• ARTISTS' ALLIANCE — one view of gov't spending
• DU MAURIER FESTIVAL ^ Vancouver playwrights ! artists profile
Photo artists take work seriously
By PETER MENYASZ
So who says university graduates
can't become successful artists?
It all depends what you consider
the criteria of success. If it is based
on commercial viability, then
perhaps the three artists presenting
their works in the student union
building art gallery aren't successful. But if success is based on
achieving a goal of creative and
technical excellence, then they are
certainly a success.
Three Women Artists
Claudia Headley, Gloria Masse
and Wendy Hamlin
SUB Art Gallery until March 2
Claudia Headley, a 1977 BFA
graduate from UBC, was approached to put on a show in the
gallery. She contacted Gloria Masse
and Wendy Hamlin, 1978 BFA
graduates, and they agreed to
participate.
"Those are derived from
photographs that have said
something special to us," says
Masse.
Although some of the works are
direct representations of the
original photographic images, most
are in some way altered or
distorted. Figures are distorted to
make the artist's insight more
obvious. Sometimes the effect is
not successful, and both women
agree that some of their attempts
have failed.
"Sometimes you can't add to the
photo," says Hamlin.
Several of Masse's works are of
people climbing out of the back
seats of automobiles. She explains
that one was a photograph of her
daughter climbing out with a plate
of egg salad. It was obvious when
she had completed the painting that
the subject matter was trite —
simply a very pretty young girl
getting out of a car. Then she made
We've never been painting
with the thought of selling.
We never expect to make
a living from our art.
The paintings in the exhibit are
interesting because they are derived
from photographs. One of
Hamlin's works is from a
photograph taken of Hamlin,
Masse and a friend on their way to
a costume party. One of Masse's
paintings is derived from a photograph of a friend riding a coin-
operated horse ride in a supermarket. Masse considered the
photograph for five years before
the inspiration to create the
painting arrived.
a decision to alter the painting to
make it more striking.
"Sometimes you just delve in and
take a gamble," says Hamlin.
"You have to go crazy,
sometimes it pays off, sometimes
it's a disaster."
In the particular case of the
young girl, the gamble paid off.
Her head was replaced with a bird's
head, and the plate of egg salad
became a plate full of eggs. The
effect is certainly striking.
Another of Masse's paintings is a
combination of a number of
factors. The original photograph
was of Masse as a little girl. The
automobile was added to the
background. The final touch is a
mask placed in front of the little
girl's head.
The mask is a story in itself. It
was originally created by Masse for
a fine arts project and she made it
with her eyes closed. As a result,
she feels that the mask has a strong
relationship to her personality and
that is why it appears in the
painting.
The use of photographs is not a
wholly uncommon practice for
painters and there are a number of
reasons. For Masse and Hamlin,
the justification for the use of
photographs is two-fold.
"We're still at the point where
we're learning about objects," says
Hamlin.
"And we can't afford to pay
models," adds Masse.
"We live very cheaply," Hamlin
says, "and we spend our money on
paints and food and shelter."
Living cheaply is a necessity and
since studio space is expensive, the
women work in a basement room.
The room had no windows and
lights at first, but the artists painted
all of the walls white, put in good
lighting and an exhaust fan to make
the studio comfortable enough to
work in. It's not always comfortable, though.
"We sometimes have to dress
warmly," says Hamlin.
The small studio space is one
more reason why Hamlin and
Masse were glad to have an opportunity to display their works. As
the finished paintings began to pile
up, they had to be turned to face
the wall, so that the constant exposure to the staring images would
not disturb the work in progress.
"Even when they're turned to the
wall, you know the images are
there," says Masse.
Economics was also a reason for
the women's venture into university
life. Both Masse and Hamlin took a
number of years off after completing high school. They feel that
entering university at an older age
helped them set realistic goals for
their educations.
"We really knew what we wanted
when we came here," says Hamlin.
The student's life can also be
beneficial in terms of student loan
support and the considerable time
available to pursue artistic endeavors outside the classroom. The
interchange of ideas with other
students is another big plus for the
university.
"You get exposure to other
artists," says Masse.
But economics is not the last
word.
"We've never been painting with
the   thought    of   selling,"    says
-painting by wendy hamlin
-painting by gloria masse
Hamlin. "We never expect to make
a living from our art."
Although a large number of
serious artists earn livings by doing
commercial art, both Hamlin and
Masse agree that they would rather
not finance their creativity in that
way.
"I'd rather drive cab than do
commercial art," says Masse.
It's a rare occurrence when two
artists' styles complement each
others as well as Hamlin's and
Masse's. Both artists prefer to work
from a photographic source and
although their interpretations are
considerably different, the basic
idea is still the same.
Using photographs to produce
paintings is in a way combining the
best of both forms of artistic expression. A photograph has intrinsic artistic value in its own right,
but often the message that it offers
might be hidden or confused.
By taking the element of the
photograph that most catches the
artist's eye and focusing attention
on it by means of distortion or
manipulation, the new image
formed is closer to the painter's
personality.
There are a few works where the
insight is perhaps too personal to be
of much relevance to the viewer,
but it would be difficult to find a
single painting that would not
evoke some kind of response.
"It seems that people are feeling
positive," says Hamlin in
describing the public's reaction to
the paintings.
"Weird is the most common
word used, but not in a negative
way," adds Masse. "They're
amused, mystified."
Response has been good and as
the artists are providing the
manpower for supervising the
exhibit, watching students and
faculty members examining the
works has been a reinforcing experience.
"It makes you feel good when
you've worked on every square
inch," says Masse.
What does the future hold for
two aspiring artists in our cultural
wasteland? Probably years of less-
than-fascinating jobs to support
their creative addiction. But if
they're lucky, and their show in the
SUB art gallery and an upcoming
show in Kamloops later in the
month attract enough attention to
their work, Gloria Masse and
Wendy Hamlin might yet prove the
value of sticking to artistic principles.
"We're serious about art, but
we're not serious about ourselves,"
says Hamlin.
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23,. 1979 theatre/jazz
Jazz not quiet on Western Front
By STEVE SIMKIN
Lee Konitz does shtick. Konitz,
the Jonny Olsen of the jazz set had
won his audience before a note of
his recent Jazz Society concert at
the Western Front had been played.
No snappy lines, seltzer bottles or
smirks. Just unpretentious, warm,
New York Jewish wisdom about
two short sets per show versus one
long set, bright spotlights and a
piano player.
The piano player Martial Solal is
one of the finest French imports
around. He is a stylist. He has absorbed the playing of the masters
and reworked it to his own swinging
ends. Within the formal structure
of the standard tune, he pushes the
boundaries of time and harmony
Jmost beyond recognition. But
never breaks them.
Like   Cecil   Taylor   and   Art
Tatum, he doesn't accompany horn
players in the traditional sense of
laying down repetitive rhythmic and
harmonic patterns, but rather plays
beneath them, providing them with
a constant counter-force, against
which they must pit the strength of
their musical personalities and risk
getting blown away.
Konitz holds his own. Although
his somewhat ethereal approach to
the alto saxophone utilizes neither
raw power nor virtuosic speed, he
remains firmly on top of the proceedings. Rather than attempt to
match Solal's output as a more
robust player might, he plays off of
or independently of the pianist,
always listening, sometimes picking
up phrases and feel's, sometimes
leaving large spaces in strange
places, but always trekking on in his
own sweet way.
Konitz' playing has changed a
good deal since his early days with
Miles Davis' tuba band. His sound
has grown, becoming foostier, fuzzier in the best Ben Webster sub-
tonish sense. He is also going further with his instrument, integrating
the tonal explorations of the so-
called avant garde into his own
work. This showed up particularly
in his unaccompanied numbers, in
which a wide vocabulary of sounds
was combined with his longer-
established penchant for melodical-
ly apt turns of phrase.
The duo's repertoire is made up
of standards with occasional
originals tossed in. Although the
titles are familiar Alone Together,
Green Dolphin Street, Invitation,
the approaches to each tune are new
and one rarely gets more than a few
notes of theme by which to make
identification above the markedly
reworked harmonies.
In many ways, each man did his
most impressive work on his second
solo number. Solal's was an interpolation of Hanon exercises, I
Won't Dance (Can't Make Me) and
Things Ain't What They Used To
Be that sounded like one of Roland
Kirk's bad dreams. This kind of
piece can fail in any number of
directions, but Solal pulled it off
with only a few moments of unfortunate kitch near the beginning.
Konitz' second solo outing began
amorphously enough, but eventually formed itself into Out Of
Nowhere. The shift from the
unrestricted twisting of the opening
into the strict harmonic structure
that took over was fascinating.
Gradually one became able to hear
the chords behind the soloist, until
Konitz' foot-tapping seemed to be a
full trio, swinging lightly away
behind him.
The interplay during the encounters between the two men was
also dynamic. Both play with their
ears wide open, reflexes ready to
react to any provocation. Often
they would finish each other's
quotes, or more subtly develop an
idea thrown out by the other.
Konitz' contrapuntal bent was indulged in I'll Remember April,
through much of which Solal
restricted himself to a single line.
The momentum never lagged as the
two melodists crossed each other's
paths simultaneously or in eight bar
alternation. .
This duo has managed to plant
itself firmly on both the mainstream
of tradition and the delta of experimentation.
Hicks picks quick licks
By STEVE SIMKIN
When John Hicks, Curtis Lundy
and Kenny Washington embraced
their instruments and cooked from
note one, one thing became apparent. Betty Carter is the only
singer who could follow this trio.
By the third tune — Coltrane's
Moment's Notice — the group was
generating so much energy that
even those who had felt, "Let's get
on with it," were intrigued.
Hicks faster-than-lightning runs,
over some of the most difficult
changes in jazz, Washington's
fragmented soloing which never
lost the phrasing of the composition, and Lundy's sprinting
bass lines, made one wonder
whether they could actually
maintain that level for yet another
chorus. But they did. And notice
that at no time did their fingers
leave their hands.
When Carter did arrivej she
wisely chose to take the intensity of
the concert down a couple of
notches with her rendition of
Monk's Round Midnight.
Floating over the shifting feels of
the rhythm section, she executed
what must be the laid-backest
version of the tune on record. Slow
as the tempo was, she drifted as
much as three bars behind her
accompanists, creating an uneasy
juxtaposition as she took the time
to form each phrase, seemingly
heedless of her more metro-
nomically obligated fellow
musicians.
She went on to make a strong
case for her modest billing as "the
best jazz singer in the world."
Flawless pitch and technical versatility complement a penchant for
experimenting with sound and
playing with motifs.
She picks up Hicks' licks and
makes them her own, not letting go
of them until she has twisted,
augmented, diminished, inverted,
and for all I know retrograded them
to her own satisfaction.
Having seen Ella Fitzgerald two
weeks ago, I find comparisons hard
to resist. And frankly, there is a
spontaneity and substance to
Carter's music that has rarely come
across in Fitzgerald's recent performances and recordings (the July,
1973 Carnegie Hall concert excepted, of course). The differences
between the two are most apparent
during their scat choruses. Ella is a
facile bebopper. Betty is at least a
step beyond.
She   is   an   intimidating   and
passionate performer. The former
aspect came out in her treatment of
Lundy, who has only been with the
band for a week, and is evidently
still on probation. While a sound
man was fixing the monitor levels,
Carter turned to Lundy, and said,
"You can tune up in the meantime."
Later during My Favorite Things
taken in four at her own cruel
tempo, she perched herself within
inches of his fingerboard and tried
to stare him down. Much to his
credit, he thrust out his jaw and
matched her stare, without
dropping a beat. They both know
their worth.
The passionate Betty Carter came
through in almost every lyric. It was
also evident in her dramatic, occasionally Joe Cockerish gestures,
which ensure that every eye in the
place remains squarely on the
singer. On Can't We Talk It Over,
her pleading filled the spaces left by
the simple background until the
rhythm section cut out entirely, as
Carter pronounced,
Either it's love or it isn't.
The effect was shattering.
An extended, intricately arranged
medley including a stunning This Is
Always, If I Should Lose You, (a
BETTY CARTER
— Steve simkin photo
. exceptional jazz performance at QET.
duet with Hicks), Just Friends, in
three, again straying from the
rhythm section's paved way, All
The Things You Are, (swinging
hard), I Didn't Know What Time It
Was (fast! — this band is tight),
and Star Eyes which is evidently as
special a tune to a lot of people as it
is to me.
Another personal favorite' By
The Bend of The River, closed the
set. The standing ovation which
followed was earned several times
over and as I watched Xhe masses
departing, physically exhausted
from just listening, I thought of the
musicians who would soon be doing
a second show.
Horvath tells tall Vienna tales
^^"""'UgS'
TALES FROM THE VIENNA WOODS . . . dynamnic truth and
statement of deep sadness.
By LARRY GREEN
We don't often have the chance
to experience the characterizations,
the feeling for the environment, or
the niceties of stage movement the
way they are presented in Tales
from the Vienna Woods. They are
the greatest successes of the
Playhouse's new three-hour production.
Odon von Horvath's period piece
of 1930s Vienna changes from gentle satire of city manners to a statement of deep sadness at an almost
imperceptible rate as the play progresses. At its best the play's transition brings the audience along with
it in a forceful, unassuming way.
Tales from the Vienna Woods
By Odon von Horvath       ~
Directed by Rodger Hodgman
Ai the Playhouse until March 17
Director Rodger Hodgman plays
on the lightness and the comic
ironies of the simple characters and
the actors rise to it. In a variety of
American-based accents despite the
setting, the large cast delivers a gentle funny quality that brings a
deeper meaning to the importance
of the play. The satirical levity, and
the resulting laughter and empathy,
bring about a full dramatic contrast
with the despair and rootlessness of
inter-war Austria.
The lack of sententiousness or
thudding away at significance is this
production's most intelligent and
best sustained achievement, yet it is
also its greatest failing.
It's more of a structural fault
than a production fault because it is
the- lack of the same dynamic core
that the director has done his best
not to falsify that prevents the work
from communicating anything new
or incisive about its real subject.
The action centers on Marianne,
Lynne Griffin, who is engaged to a
butcher. In a burst of self-
expression she runs off with a
gambler, Andrew Gillies who has
left his middle-aged protectress,
Patricia Hamilton.
Marianne alienates her father,
Heath Lambert, gets arrested, loses
her baby and is forgiven by the end.
The performances are Jively and intricately woven between each
character, secondary or principal,
are the rules and meanings that
define each relationship. Lamberts
and Hamilton are especially good in
their central roles.
Yet they're not the apparent
thrust of the play. The place is a
decaying, doomed society that
should be shaping the action, but
there's no feeling of it. The result is
that it's hard to blame society for
the central actions of each
character. They shrug and tell each
other that better times "weren't
meant to be," and they seem to
refuse to help themselves beyond
the way any social climate could
harm them.
Tales is more an occasionally
light examination of helpless people
than the tragic struggles of a society
losing hope, something that could
have far more impact than it does
here.
The fact that the ideas of Tales
actually could fit in any time, any
place, as the cliche goes, is in this
case not a compliment. Hodgman's
attention to surfaces damns it all at
one turn, at another it saves it. The
acting and pacing of the short
cinematic scenes are very fine, and
the feeling it generates is more than
believable, but the theme doesn't
match the results. The dynamic
truths of the setting and period fall
secondary despite everyone's efforts .
Tales features Cameron
Porteous's costumes and sets.
These sets make the most of the
Playhouse's revolving stage and
lighting by Jeffrey Dallas, all of
which are attractive and provide the
production with a handsome and
singular atmosphere.
Friday, February 23, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 ' film feature
Revolutionaries
making movies
By GRAY KYLES
Fidel Castro may be one of the greatest
showmen on earth. His entire career has
been, among other things, an example of
brilliant public relations.
He led a popular revolution which
culminated fittingly on New Year's Eve.
Then with great pomp and celebration he
sent his friend Che and chief rival for power
off to the jungles of South America where
he'd be out of the way.
He also mastered the ability to enthrall a
crowd during his lengthy but lively speeches
and of course he has developed an image
replete with cigars and guerrilla garb which is
recognized around the world. This man
understands show biz.
It is fitting then that in March 1959, only
three months after the revolution, Castro,
established the Instituto Cubano del Arte e
Industria Cinematograficos (ICAIQ.
Castro recognized that film is a powerful
social tool which could be used to further the
cause of the revolution. He appointed a
former comrade in the guerrilla army,
Alfredo Guevara, to head the institute and
provided a large government subsidy to get it
started.
ICAIC
Now, after only 20 years there is a well-
established and prolific film industry in Cuba
where once there was nothing. Long
recognized in Eastern Europe, the Cuban
cinema has finally begun to make some
inroads into the West.
In the past year there have been Cuban
film festivals in New York, Washington and
San Francisco. And during January a
collection of the best Cuban features played
in Montreal and Toronto. That, same
collection recently completed a two-week run,
in Vancouver at the Pacific Cinematheque
Pacifique.
Last year the Cinematheque introduced
the films of China to Canadians for the first
time. By showing films from countries not
normally considered part of the commercial
film market the Cinematheque is making a
valuable contribution to Vancouver cultural
life.
Although the crowds were small during the
week the new 350-seat Robson Square
Cinema was packed on the weekends. There
is apparently some interest in Cuban cinema.
However judging from the make-up of the
audiences I think it's safe to say the majority
were more interested in Cuba than in films.
There were a good collection of various
types from the so-called New Left. After
dodging several of their cohorts who were
selling various left-wing publications outside
one eventually made it to the lobby.
Inside you were greeted by more turtle
necks, pipes, moustaches, wire frames and
Afros than you've probably seen since the
last demonstration. As a matter of fact I
swear that I saw at least 10 people who have
personally handed me leaflets outside of
various liquor stores over the past year.
There were also of course the usual group
of language students, Spanish this time, that
always turn up at Cinematheque showings
simply to get some practise at the language.
And there were a few ex-Cubans as well.
Because of the make-up of the crowd the
films received, I think, some odd reactions.
Out in the lobby few people were talking
about the movies as artistic achievements.
Instead many seemed to view them as
authentic depictions of events from the
revolution or from the pre-revolutionary
period. Others denounced them as sheer
propaganda while some were disappointed
that they hadn't seen the kind of Cuba they
had imagined.
But most of those who managed to bury
their b i a s e s for awhile were exposed to a
good sampling from a young but remarkably
mature film culture. The Cuban industry has
a lot to teach our filmmakers although it has
been in existence for only one-fourth of
Canada's film industry.
When the ICAIC was founded in 1959 it
had very little at hand. There was virtually no
indigenous film industry. What little filmmaking had occurred had been mostly
location work for Hollywood studios or the
few locally produced newsreels about the
Batista regime. A few porno flicks were
filmed on the island as well. The exhibition
circuit was controlled by the Americans and
Mexicans and it was their films which were
exhibited throughout the country.
When the institute took over it had the responsibility of producing, distributing and
exhibiting all films made in Cuba and
distributing and exhibiting foreign films. The
first filmmakers were inexperienced, working
with antiquated equipment in a medium they
didn't fully understand. Their first films
were usually crude documentaries, cinema
verite without trying, that chronicled important moments in the early years of the
revolution.
But very quickly there developed a talented
group who mastered the techniques quickly
and with limited experience began to create
some sophisticated shorts and features.
Tomas Gutierrez Alea was the first Cuban
director to achieve recognition outside of his
homeland, primarily for his 1968 feature
Memories of Underdevelopment. That film
is a watershed for the Cuban cinema. It
introduced Cuban film to the West but more
importantly it is an example of the freedom
that most Cuban filmmakers enjoy.
State controlled
Because the film industry is completely'
state controlled many have assumed that the
films produced will represent the party line.
Yet Memories has as its hero a bourgeois
writer who cannot completely reconcile
himself to the new Cuba. He is alienated and
incapable of any kind of decisive action.
The picture was only adequately filmed
but it was imaginatively structured, well
written, directed and acted. It was an impressive achievement and gained new respect
LOS ADVENTURAS DE JUAN QUIN QUIN . . . Cuban cinen
Page Friday, 4
RIO NEGRO . . . morning of the Bay of Pigs Invasion in 1961.
for the Cuban industry. It was also the first
film to break through at various film
festivals, notably those Of Moscow and
Berlin.
Alea has since become the Head of
Production for ICAIC and under him and
Guevara, filmmakers have been fairly free
from censorship. This is no doubt largely due
to the fact that the filmmakers like most
Cubans are committed to the ideals of the
revolution. But it is also in part due to a
tolerance for some degree of questioning or
even dissension.
Dissension
Memories of Underdevelopment was not a
part of the Cinematheque series but it has
appeared in Vancouver before. It was
screened at Douglas College five years ago,
before it had played in New York and gained
recognition in North America, and again at
last year's Varsity festival.
Although Memories is the first international success for the Cuban industry it
was not the first big hit at home. That honor
goes to The Adventures of Juan Quin Quinn
which was released in 1967 and achieved
success throughout the nation.
This movie was a difficult one for much of
the Cinematheque crowd. It was a farcical
comedy and many in the audience weren't
ready for that. Also, it poked fun at the very
revolution itself.
Juan Quin Quinn is a hustler whom we
first meet in pre-Castro times. He will do
anything to piake a buck and to enjoy a little
adventure. Unfortunately there is always a
bad guy in the form of a sheriff, landowner
or Batista general who tries to stop him.
Eventually he joins the revolutionary forces,
as much for the adventure as for anything
else and engages in a series of comical
manoeuvres.
Director Julio Garcia Espinosa ignores
chronological time or logic in his film. It is a
freewheeling, almost slapstick production
which exhibits the influence of European
directors like Godard, Fellini and Renoir and
yet is thoroughly original. It was certainly the
THE      UBYSSEY
most  lively and  one  of  the   best   films
presented in the series.
The worst was The Man From Maisinicu, a
humorless, unimaginative thriller by Manuel
Perez which concerned itself with the murder
of a patriot who had infiltrated a counterrevolutionary guerrilla operation.
Perez succeeds in making both the good
guys and the bad guys totally unappealing.
The anti-Castro guerrillas are vicious boors
while the Cuban authorities are a rigid,
deceitful group. The Man From Maisinicu
was released in 1972 and is a poor blend of
the styles of political thrillers like Z and
American westerns.
In fact the American westerns and spy
movies of the '40s and '50s have had a strong
influence on Cuban filmmakers. Prior to the
revolution these films were very popular and
many have been shown on television since
1959. No new American product came into
the country for many years due to the
blockade.
As a result these grade B American movies
were, for a while, the major references for
the budding young Cuban cineastes. Some,
like Espinosa, have made clever satires of
them while others such as Perez have
resorted to uninspired imitation.
By the mid-'60s the ICAIC was importing
movies from around the world and Cuba's
directors and writers began to gain a broader
view of the cinema.
Broad viewpoint
The criteria for choosing films to import is
interesting. They must be of good technical
and artistic quality, accessible to the general
public and should have some kind of political
content.
Although this is often assumed to mean
that the pictures must have a socialist
viewpoint that is in fact not the case. Francis
Ford Coppola's Godfather I and II have
become favorites in the Republic as have
films such as The Mattei Affair and the
British film The Servant, none of which can
be called socialist films.
Friday, February 23, 1979 literary feature
Capilano Review
covers issues
t/eloped quickly under Fidel Castro.
i same basic criteria applies to Cuban
ictions. Unlike many state-controlled
nstitutes, including the Canadian Film
opment Corporation, the ICAIC puts
nphasis on producing films that are
aining and accessible.
; general population of Cuba is the sole
et that the institute is after. Any success
ie the country is really only the icing on
ake though in recent years there has
more effort put into obtaining foreign
tmtion.
ilf-sufficiency
MC has been self-sufficient for several
now which is an indication of its
ss in reaching the people. The institute
eveloped an exhibition and distribution
n which incorporated existing cinemas
00 mobile cinemas which included large
and boats equipped with 35mm and
1 projection equipment.
example of the success of both the
iction and distribution wings of the
ite is Octavio Cortazar's El Brigadista.
well produced drama was released in
and attracted over 500,000 viewers in its
nonth. It was anxiously awaited in the
or and has since become the most
lar production ever released in Cuba.
I with Juan Quin Quinn, El Brigadista
he best of the seven films shown by the
natheque.
5 the story of a 15-year-old student who
s to a remote town to teach the illiterate
nts how to read and write. The year is
the Year of Education in Cuba, and
>oy is one of more than 100,000 young
e who volunteered to spend 10 months
ing in the country.
■ people outside of Cuba the film is very
native, for the Cubans themselves it is a
ration of the successful program. The
g student, Mario, doesn't teach
one in the village but he does succeed in
ng many literate. During his story he
sarns much about the value of human
nd about the rural poor from whom he
has been isolated while growing up in
Havana.
El Brigadista was shot entirely on location
in a small town in the Zapata Swamp. The
production values were very good, the script
well written and the acting excellent. The
young actor Salvador Wood was especially
fine.
One interesting aspect of Cortatazar's film
was that it exhibited quite clearly and sincerely the pride most Cubans have in their
new country. The film displays the excitement and joy of the early years of the
revolution. If this is propaganda it is the
most palpable kind; honest and unforced,
the enthusiasm is sincere.
Judging from the limited selection of films
shown by the Cinematheque it would appear
that ICAIC puts considerable interest in developing the history of the island.
None of the pictures had contemporary
settings. Four dealt with the first few years
after the revolution, one with the period just
before and two with the slave society of the
18th and 19th century.
The documentary Giron was a re-enactment of the Bay of Pigs using many of the
combatants. The Man From Maisinicu, Rio
Negro and El Brigadista all were concerned
with the events of the early sixties. As a
matter of fact the Bay of Pigs figures in all of
them in differing degrees.
Bay of Pigs
The two slave films dealt with an older-
period and as a result were a bit less strident
than the other films. Rancheodor is based on
the diary of an ambitious slave hunter whr
lived during the last century. It is a down-to-
earth drama which pits the hunter against his
slave guide in a search for Melchora the
queen of the runaway slaves.
Turn to PF 10
By PAUL HODGINS
and STEPHANIE SLATER
When the Capilano Review began
publishing in 1972 the UBC library kept its
copies of the literary and visual art magazine
in Special Collections instead of grouping it
with other periodicals. "I think they had the
sense that we were going to die," says editor
Bill Schermbrucker.
Instead of dying the lively little magazine
has thrived. Originally publishing only a few
hundred copies on a miniscule $500 budget,
the Review now produces almost 2,000
copies per issue for national and international distribution. With increased
funding and circulation expected this year
the Review is-on the verge of becoming a
quarterly. Now the UBC library puts copies
of it on the shelves as well as in the Special
Collections section.
College funded
Conceived and founded by a Capilano
College English instructor, Pierre Coupey,
the Review is partially funded and published
by the college and the editors selected from
its Humanities division. Its aim is to publish
the very best of what is "fresh and new" and
from the beginning the Review has
established and maintained a reputation for
being well produced and readable. The first
issue included work by Earle Birney, John
Newlove, Phyllis Webb, George Bowering
and Evgenii Evtushenko.
Schermbrucker agrees. "If we were going
to put out a mag just like all the rest, what
would be the point of it?" He believes that
the quality of the Review "really reflects
Pierre Coupey's sense of Style." Af; artist SS
well as a poet and journalist, original editor
Coupey feels strongly about the importance
of visual and textural quality. "I wanted the
Review to be something that was really
appealing. It had to be an attractive format."
The Review is also unique among literary
magazines in its treatment of visual art. As
an artist Coupey naturally saw the magazine
as a forum for many different art forms
although he thinks the size and format of the
Review are limiting.
Schermbrucker disagrees. "I used to think
we were too small a format for visual art, but
now I think we're a very good size for visuals
because we can print something alone on a
page, not crowded in with something else as
we might have to do with a larger size."
The origins of the Review were scarcely
poetic. Shortly after Coupey was hired as a
part-time instructor Schermbrucker
suggested he involve himself in some extracurricular work. "It was simple," says
Coupey. "I was expected to make some
contribution to the college besides teaching.
Some people work on committees, things like
that. Well for me, this naturally came to
mind."
Controversial
The first issue appeared in Spring 1972 and
the Review has always enjoyed a certain
reputation for publishing controversial
material.
Coupey decided to feature an explicit
photograph of a nude woman on the cover of
Issue No. 3 which appeared just as women's
groups were establishing themselves on
campus in 1973. After the ensuing controversy the college insisted on the establishment of an editorial board and a formal
constitution to govern the Review more
closely.
But the editorial board has not prevented
the Capilano Review from remaining controversial. Poems such as Zonko's Always
Loving Fucking spark as much protest as
does the work of such artists as bill bissett
and bp Nichol. Says Schermbrucker, "Our
aim is not to be controversial per se but to
publish what is fresh and new, and what is
fresh and new tends to be controversial."
Even the format of the Review has been
criticized for wasting valuable printing space.
"I have realized the mistake of trying to cut
down on 'waste,' " says Schermbrucker,
referring to the kind of economy that results
in visual clashes between different works on
facing pages.
Esoteric poetry
Another criticism is that the work
presented in the Review is esoteric and
inaccessible. Schermbrucker responds, "One
day I was talking to somebody who raised
that objection, that this stuff is impossible to
get into."
Turn to PF 8
m^m*m^mW      :b®..:      -.. ^^
:§^f^g^f/;
mmm
CAPILANO REVIEW . . . esoterica not a liability.
Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 MOVIE LISTINGS ARE EFFECTIVE FEB. 23-MAR. 1
now in
7:00. 9.15. Mats. Sat.. Sun. 2:00
 STANLEY	
GR ANVILLE at 12rh 733 2622
"THE OTHER-
SIDE OF
MIDNIGHT"
plus
"THE DRIVER"
FREE PARKING FOR BAY THEATRE
PATRONS AT THE COMMUNITY
CENTRE LOT, 1700 BLOCK HARO
Admission $3.00
Warning:    occasional    sex
scenes; frequent
violence—B.C. Director.
Driver 7:30, Midnight 9:10
 THE BAY	
DENMAN ot BARCLAY 6859822
-.    _--...- Warning: some gory violence
IVC^TTT^.       and nudity    B.C. Director.
 CAPITOL 6,
1820 GRANVILLE MALL
,   -. LOUGHEED DRIN
BROADWAY E of BOUNDRY 2942991
Capitol: 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:30
Lougheed Drive In: Gates 7:00
Show: 7:30
Drive   In   open   Friday,   Saturday,
Sunday only.
One night when you come home,
you'll find me inside, waiting...
and that will be the night
you'll wish you'd never been born..
ELLIOTT GOULD
CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER
SUSANNAH YORK
fl distinguished cast brings
you ine mosi incrediDle case of
Sherlock Holmes career
CUrisiopner
Plummer
a* StierW:b Holme*
James
mason
Paramount Pictures Presents A Lawrence Gordon Production "THE WARRIORS
Executive Producer Frank Marshall Based Upon the Novel by Sol Yurick
Screenplay by David Shaber and Walter Hill Produced by Lawrence Gordon
Directed by Walter Hill 	
Cap.: 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20
Columbia: 7:30, 9:30.
Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
 CAPITOL 6	
B20 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
 COLUMBIA
NEW WESTMINSTER
Warning: frequent violence
and coarse language—B.C.
Director.
David    Susan
Hemmings Clark
flnmony  Jono
Quayle  Gielgud
and
Frank
Finlay
and
Donald
Sulherland
_ a» "Th© f*»ythic" Robert L«««
Genevieve
Bujoifl
■:;:;,: ,** Annte Crook
"A marvel of stupendous film-making...
a movie extravaganza. This one will
outgross them all. This enchanting
(film)... will sweep you away into a world
of unparalleled entertainment."
-REX REED-NY DAILY NEWS
Murder by Decree
adetrtllsltfy clever rqysiery.
Robert A. Goldston Presenta A Film By Bob Clark "MURDER BY DECREE
Starring Christopher Plummer • Jamea Maion
David Hemming. ■ Susan Clark • Anthony Quayle • John Gielgud and Prank Finlay
and Donald Sutherland as   The Psychic" Robert L.eea and Genevieve Bujold aa Annie Crc
Screenplay By John Hopkins • Executive Producer Len Herberman
Produced By Rene Duponl and Bob C |ark ■ Directed Bv Bob (lark
An Ambaaaador Film Distributors Production Produced In Cooperation With
The Canadian Film Development Corp and Famous Players I muted
Warning: some gory violence—B.C.
Director.
VANCOUVER CENTRE.
GRANVILLE 8. GEORGIA 6694
VanCentre: 2:00, 4:20,
6:45, 9:15
Guildford:     7:15,     9:45.
Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:15
milH.irl.lM'
GUILDFORD
Page Friday. 6
CAPITOL 6
„■- GUILDFORD
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE
.RICHMOND SQUARE
NUMBER THREE ROAD 273
Cap: 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 10:00
Richmond Sq.: 7:00, 9:30.
Mats: Sat., Sun. 2:00.
Guildford: 7:00, 9:40.
Mats: Sat., Sun. 2:00.
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979 'There is only one Emmanuelle.
Only one Sylvia RristeL
MOT SINCE THE STING
has there been a movie that so happily combines a crime, the
devilish and engaging rogues who carry it out, the cheerful use
of music, elegant costumes and such stylish character acting
... A WONDERFUL, QUITE WONDERFUL MOVIE."
_ — — -GeeeSlamriodey"UK-TV
"CLASSY
ENTERTAINMENT
DIRECTED WITH GREAT
GOOD HUMOR...
IT TAKES YOUR
BREATH AWAY."
-Vincent Canby,
New York Times
"AN ABSOLUTE
FEAST FOR
THE EYES."
Bona Bamtt, ABC-TV
"TASTEFUL,
CHARMING,
WITTY,
ENJOYABLE."
-Andrew Sams
Village Vow
DINO DE LAURENTHS presents
A MICHAEL CRICHTON FILM
starring
THE
"A LARK...A BRISK,
GRINNING VALENTINE."
—David Ansen, Newsweek
SHEER ROLLICKING
*    ENTERTAINMENT."
-Richard Fmdman,
Mewhoioe Syndicate
"SMASHINGLY
WELL
EXECUTED.
-Stephen Farber,
New West Magazine
"HAS WIT,
1    STYLE AND
SEAN      DONALD
CONNERY SUTHERLAND JL
LESLEY-ANNE DOWN     THAI"
A JOHN FOREMAN PRODUCTION
Screenplay by
MICHAEL CRICHTON based on bis novel
Music by JERRY GOLDSMITH
Produced by JOHN FOREMAN
Directed by MICHAEL CRICHTON
A Famous Films N V Production
PANAVtSION™ • TECHNICOLOR'-
tFIEAD THE BANTAM BOOK
T United Artists
ATransamenca Company
Copyngfit c 1979 UAC  All rights reserved
Cap.: 3:35. 5:40, 7:50, 10.00
Lougheed Mall: 7:40, 9:50.
Mats.: Sat., Sun. 2:15.
 CAPITOL 6.
820 GRANVILLE MALL
iWarning:    some    occasional
violence and suggestive scenes
B.C. Director.
LOUGHEED MALL
Cunt Eastwood
will turn you
Every Which Way
But (Loose9
Downtown: 1:35. 3:35. 5:35. 7:40. 9:45.
Lougheed   Mall:   7:16,   9:30.   Mats:   Sat.,
Sun. 2:00.
ZH2ZEE
DOWNTOWN
LOUGHEED MALL
Warning: frequent coarse language;
occasional nudity — B.C. Director.
Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 7 I film /literary feature
Situational movie spins success
By GRAEME FOSTER
Laughers be forewarned that
Same Time Next Year is a film for
chucklers and gigglers only, or for
people who don't take their
humour too funny.
Same Time Next Year
Directed by Robert Mulligan
Park Theatre
Adapted from the stage play by
Bernard Slade it is based on the
charming premise of two adulterous
lovers, Doris and George who leave
their families once a year to rendezvous in their retreat on the
Mendecino coast. The film views
the crises and changes of the lovers
at five year intervals as played by
the gracefully aging Ellen Burstyn
and Alan Alda, two very likeable
and capable actors.
Both Burstyn and Alda give
remarkable performances of transitional acting, especially Burstyn's
leaps from fifties spray blond to hip
earth mom and acquisitive feminist.
Alda's changes are more nebulous
although often touching, as in one
vignette as the liberal-turned-hawk
after his son's death in Vietnam.
What detracts from Doris and
George's believability is Slade's insistence in turning them into
American allegorical figures rather
than deepening their personalities,
as in the farcical-exasperating scene
where Doris refuses George's advances because he voted for
Goldwater.
Further damage is done to the
continuity of the film by linking
their perennial meetings with
photo-montages of irrelevant public
events from the intervening years.
After each well-turned scene the
director pans the audience through
the archives with images of Kennedy, Elvis and hula-hoops to the
tune of Marvin Hamlisch's droning
schmaltz. A commentary by Mary
Worth couldn't have been worse.
This film will undoubtedly be as
successful as the play has been and
probably will be revived frequently.
Same Time Next Year is the same
kind of fluffy vehicle as the Four
Poster Bed and Charlie's Aunt once
its stripped of its socio-sexual
veneer.
Conversely, it's a hard flick to
shout down without being condemned as a raving misanthropist
and bummer insensitive to the genuine, wholesome feeling expressed
in films like this.
But Doris and George are too
firmly ensconced in their middle-
class sensibilities to make a dent on
reality despite Burstyn and Alda's
fine and flexible performances.
Doris and George are trapped in the
caricature of their dialogue and
situation.
Same Time Next Year has been
rated PG and I'd guide my parents
to see it anytime despite its dentured
bite. On the other hand 1 might just
wait and watch it with them on TV
next year.
SAME TIME NEXT YEAR
a fluffy vehicle once stripped of its social satire.
Poetry demands special readers
From PF 5
"Poetry demands a special kind
of attention and some people aren't
able to give it that." He doesn't
worry that readers might find a
work difficult to comprehend. "If
all the stuff we got for an issue was
extraordinarily hard to get into,
we'd just say, 'Well, that's the state
of the art right now.' "
But the Review has been equally
uncompromising in its own
standards of quality, a policy which
led toward one of the more tragic
incidents in its short history. Editor
Pierre Coupey planned to feature
the work of Quebecois writers and
visual artists in a special issue
planned for Fall 1975 and then the
art work submitted was found to be
unreproduceable, translations
unsatisfactory and the writing was
judged by the board as being
generally inferior.
Coupey cancelled it entirely and
is still bitter. "It was exhausting,
frrfkrating, disappointing. It wore
me out because of course we had to
start work immediately on a new
issue to make up for the loss."
Coupey left the Review after
publication of the double issue in
Spring 1976.
Under  Schermbrucker's   editor
ship the review has changed only
slightly in content, leaning more
toward longer prose pieces.
Schermbrucker illustrates
through example his use of what he
calls 'the organic nexus of friends.'
"With Martin Jenson's poem 'If
Live', Pierre read it first. He and
Martin were at a party I was at;
Pierre called me. I read it — absolutely drunk at the time — and
with the clarity of drunkenness saw
it to be a most beautiful poem.
Took it home, had some doubts
about it in the morning, read it
again later and finally realized it
was a fine, fine poem."
The editors of the Review are
cautious   about   how   often   they
publish the work of any one person
as critics often accuse the editors of
publishing their friends.
"They think we don't exercise
any editorial judgment on people
we know; we do," insists Schermbrucker who also points out that
the editors have rejected pieces
from "name", writers.
Although Schermbrucker admits
the Capilano Review is a regionally
rather than nationally representative literary magazine, he maintains
"I never really see it as a local
magazine.'.' He estimates that 85
per cent of the content is Canadian,
10 per cent is American and
perhaps five per cent comes from
other countries.
THE
FOUNTAINHEAD
with
GARY COOPER
SUB AUDITORIUM
TUES FEB 27     12:30      75c
In SUB
Basement
• Sausage Rolls
• Meat & Vegetable Samosas
• Potato Chops
• Italiano & other Submarines
• Ice Cream
• Also Special Sandwich
Counter Open 10 AM —3PM
CANADIAN ODEON Theatres
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION PHONE 681-7836
sun„PETER FALK »-PETER BOYLE
SHOW TIMES: 1:00 3:05 5:10 7:20 9:30
Sunday 3:05 5:10 7:20 9:30
Warning:       Some i
swearing and coarse]
language.
voquE
-B.C. Director "»  GRANVILLE
GEORGE G. SCOTT
HARDCORE
Show Times:
1:00 3:15 5:30 7:45 10:00
Sunday: 3:15, 5:30 7:45 10:00
i BOY IT
Warning:    Some
violence. Nudity & |
coarse
ocIeon
881 GRANVILLE
682-7468
Warning:    Some   frightening
scenes. - B.C. DIRECTOR
Show Times: 12:40 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
Sunday 2:20 4:10 5:50 7:45 9:45
CORONET  I
85|   GRANVILLE
68S-6828
lAMPtw* ANIMAL IMVtV
Show Times: 2:05 4:04 6:05 8:05
10:05 daily
Warning:    Occasional   nudity,
suggestive    scenes,    coarse
language   throughout.    B.C.
DIRECTOR
CORONET 2
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
Jt
NOMINATED FOR 6 ACADEMY
AWARDS! Including Best Picture.
Show Times: Broadway 7:10 9:15
Dunbar 7:30 9:40
DROAdwAV 11     dlJNbAR
Warning:     Fre
coarse   1^70 7   W.BROADWAY    DUNBAR at 30th
B.C. Director. 874-1927 224-7252
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE including Best Supporting Actress — Maggie Smith
NEIL SIMON'S
|CA\lLl[PDRNl[A\7Sh3^:3oTimes:
SITF1H1F ^,IUII 1^.     70 7W. BROADWAY |
874-1927
DROAdwAy2
Nominated For 4 academy awards
including Best Actress — Ellen Burstyn
They couldn't have celebrated happier
anniversaries if they were married to each other.
The Mirisch Corporation presents
Ellen Burstyn   Alan Alda
"Same5Iime.6Next ^ar"
ELLEN BURSTYN and ALAN ALDA in'SAME TIME.NEXT YEAR"
A Walter Mirisch/Robert Mulligan Production
Screenplay by BERMARD SLADE ■ Based on the stage play by BERNARD SLADE
Produced on the stage by MORTON GOTTLIEB • Music by MARVIN HAMUSCH
Produced by WALTER MJR1SCH and MORTON GOTTLIEB • Directed by ROBERT MULLIGAN
A Universal Picture ■ Technicolor * Now a DELL Book
.   Theme Song,"The Ldsl Time I Fell Like This.'1 Sung by JOHNNY MAT HIS C JAM E OL IVOR   ]
| Lyric by MARILYN & ALAN BERGMAN- Music by MARVIN HAMLISCH i
Warning: Some suggestive scenes. B.C. Director
Show Times: 7:20 9:30
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE
Bergman
AUTUMN SONATA ' "S ■"""SSSSS-
■ Ingrid Bergman and Liv Utlmann ^^^^^^Jl
English sub-titles 224-3730
Show Times: 7:30 9:30 4375 w. 10th
Best Actress Ingrid
P&qeFridayilr
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979 sci-fi/opinion piece
Science-fiction fans dissolve in RAIN
a
By DAVID WILLIAMS
"They ain't gonna lay this on
me," said science fiction writer F.
M. Buzby the only judge in attendance at Rain, the science fiction
convention masquerade ball last
Friday. While the contestants were
waiting for the judges to come and
the dress-rehearsal to finish, other
fans were in the film-room glued to
The Forbidden Planet which was
just one of the many SF films
shown at the convention.
When a fan writer Susan Wood,
an English professor at UBC and
Bubbles Broxon, another SF writer
arrived, the masquerade ball was
ready   to   begin.   Paul   Sims   was
master of ceremonies and introduced the six masqueraders. Although
there were only six contestants, the
small gathering of science fiction
fans noisily applauded.
After a few yells, roars and
drinks from the audience, the
judges decided in favour of Thom
Wescott who pourayed Bazer
Kronos: Trader and Wanderer of
the Second Gallactic Millenium.
Second prize was a revolving
dinky toy and went to George Gi-
quere for his costume of Alin of
Belain while third went to Dan
Roode for his portrayal of Toilet
Paper Man. Responding to the
result of the masquerade contest,
"a
Toilet Paper Man said it was
clean wipe."
According to convention
organizer Joanne McBride, there
were 110 people who visited the
convention, mostly from Vancouver, Seattle and Bellingham.
McBride said the convention was
a small success that financially
broke even and was mainly a warm-
up for the bigger V-Con which is to
be held at Gage Towers during May
25-27.
The purpose of Rain was to introduce people to Vancouver and
advertise its bid for the 1984 World
SF convention.
Canada Council spoon feeding arts
By KIRK WIRSIG
An opinion piece on government.funding to
the arts which in no way represents a consensus of Page Friday staff members.
The true driving force behind the growth
of the arts in Canada is the availability of
grants through art subsidy programs such as
the Canada Council which distributes close
to $50 million annually.
But rumor claims that CC is planning to
cut the financial jugular of approximately 60
theatre groups over the next few years. If you
think such decisions of cash flow are based
on a standard criterion of need and merit,
you're wrong. The distribution of Canadian
art subsidy funds is dependent on a
frustrating exemplum of typical bureaucratic
inefficiency.
Spoon feeding
In order to explain how the prospective
starving artist might help himself to a modest
slice of the substantial subsidy pie, the
Vancouver Artists' Alliance staged a Teach-
in on Feb. 4 at the headquarters of the
Actors' Workshop. The teach-in focused on
the various components of tri-level funding;
a phrase which encompasses subsidies from
the municipal, provincial and national levels.
National level funding controlled by
Canada Council has by far the fattest wallet,
$48 million as compared with a provincial
coffer of about $3 million and $1.6 million
for the city of Vancouver. After listening to a
number of speeches concerning the confusing
processes of art subsidy distribution it
became uncomfortably obvious that no one
at the Teach-in had a precise knowledge of
just what is going on in the subsidy
programs.
I was left with the impression that artistic
survival in tri-level funding is dependent on a
combination of politically-oriented abilities
— being an effective lobbyist and cashing in
on the benefits of bureaucratic inbreeding.
Back scratching
All this happy backscratching is made
possible through the absence of a coherent
mandate. The allocation of monies is left in
the hands of a few individuals who are not
required to adhere to a specific policy. Thus
cash flow becomes ultimately a matter of
personal discretion.
Here in Vancouver, subsidy purse strings
are controlled almost exclusively by Ernie
Fladell and Frannie Fitzgibbons. Of the $1.6
million they distribute through the City Arts
Function and the Council committee of Arts,
most goes to Art Galleries and Museums,
$236,170 reaches the hands of the civic
theatres, cultural grants to professional
organizations come to $222,300 and
$103,000 is allotted to festivals and groups
such as the Heritage Festival Society.
The establishment of spending priorities
seems largely to rest on the historical process
of precedent as interpreted by Mr. Fladell
and Mrs. Fitzgibbons.
None of the subsidy programs have artists
serving in a decision-making capacity as this
supposedly constitutes an irreconciable
conflict of interest. Yet I heard persistent
suggestions at the Teach-Jn that a very real
gap exists between the needs of the artistic
community and the whims of the administrators.
The goal of the Vancouver Artists'
Alliance is to establish a unified organization
of artists which can more effectively state its
position on subsidy distribution. Unfortunately, that position seems about as
nebulous as the policies of the programs it
would comment on.
Nebulous
This sort of terminal unsurety is corollary
to a system which attempts to divorce artistic
expression from the wants of the community.
Although Canada Council is the major art
subsidizer, and theoretically autonomous
and not directly affiliated with the federal
government it still has a similarly uncanny
penchant for confusion, emulating governmental procedure with its impressive
catalogue of subdivisions and advisory
boards and so on.
The justification of organizations such as
Canada Council is not so much that they act
as catalysts to artistic development, but that
they protect the artistic community from the
ruthless apathy of public exposure.
I'm sure that a much different situation
would develop if we released our artists to
the economic realities of Canadian life. The
fellow down the street might well have to
abandon his tire-tube collage as a sole source
of income if he had to depend on a paying
audience rather than a CC grant.
If the Canadian public doesn't want to see
arrangements of tire-tubes or listen to the
subtleties of creative swearing, why should it
BETH KAPLAN 6f VANCOUVER ARTISTS' ALLIANCE
public support.
— matt king photo
. the difficulties of gaining
have to do so? Programs like the Canada
Council assume a high level of mass cultural
stupidity when they arbitrarily designate
modes of artistic expression. Rather than
have  art  commensurate  with  community
demand, we have it subservient to organizational dictate.
The fear exists that were it not for the
subsidy programs, the arts in Canada would
wither and eventually die; trampled by the
insensitivity of a nation numbed by the
plastic sophistication of Charlie's Angels and
Star Wars.
Yet by propping the art community with
the financial crutches of Canada Council and
like programs, we never give it a chance to
find a direction true to itself.
Artists alliance
The Vancouver Artists' Alliance is attempting to establish this sense of direction,
but by forming what sounds like a union
bartering group, they accept the status of CC
as the ultimate arbiter of artistic taste.
In as much as CC breathes life or death into
an artistic endeavor, they become a means of
censorship and control.
By turning to subsidization, the artist
attempts to escape from or at least lessen the
risk of public disapproval. Yet it is the
response of the public and not the yearnings
of the Canada Council that should be the
limiting or non-limiting factor.
Teach-in
CANADIAN CULTURE
local artists.
—•dmund o'brien photo
government subsidization leads to confusion in funding
I learned from the Teach-in the unfortunate consequences of cultural spoonfeeding. Seeing a large gathering of artists
scribble down suggestions as to how they best
can profit from shoe-licking and back-
scratching is not a particularly inspirational
sight. When we shroud the arts in the confused webbing of an essentially political
organization, we necessarily stifle its
movement and consequently its growth.
Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 9 film feature
Cuban films present cultural allegories
From PF 5
One of the films which displays a
strong American influence in its
style, was also superbly
photographed, mostly in bush and
forest areas, and well acted. Both
of the central characters were
complex men who were driven by
their passions in a psychological as
well as physical struggle.
The other slave film was set in a
large sugar plantation a century
earlier. The Last Supper is the story
of an absentee owner who comes
from Havana to visit his plantation
on Easter Week.
Suffering from his guilt about the
inhuman treatment of his slaves he
chooses 12 to join him for an Easter
feast. After humbling himself by
washing his slaves' feet he proceeds
to get drunk with them and relaxes
the social barriers between them.
When he fails to keep his
promises the next morning, the 12
slaves attempt to assert themselves.
An almost unintentional rebellion
breaks out and eventually all but
one of the 12 are hunted down and
brutally slaughtered.
The Last Supper is the most
recent film by Tomas Gutierrez
Alea, director of Memories of
Underdevelopment. Although it
was not the most entertaining film
of the series, it is a major work
which will receive well-deserved
recognition. It was also the most
impressive picture in terms of
technical quality.
Unfortunately in an overview
such as this it is impossible to do
justice to any of these films. And in
the end I find that I've talked more
about what these films tell us about
Cuba than about the pictures
themselves.
But this much can be said. The
seven films shown by the Cinematheque were all basically well-made
movies that displayed a maturity
and talent far beyond what could be
expected after only 20 years of
development.
Already the Cuban cinema has
surpassed all others in Latin
America and is rapidly becoming a
major film culture. Cuban films are
beginning to turn up at places like
Cannes and Paris and New York
and soon they may join the general
foreign film exhibition circuit in
North America.
The great strength of the Cuban
film industry is that it is totally
controlled by one agency, the
ICAIC, and is therefore an efficiently and effectively run
operation.
But what is unique is tha.t within
this state-controlled cultural
agency, the individuality of each
artist is maintained and encouraged
within a collective.
Tomas Alea has said that,
"Individual fulfillment is not
everything. In a situation like ours
the collective achievement is just as
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Rates
2060 W. lOthi
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES.
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
process which is based on a belief in
the value of their nation and their
own creativity.
Perhaps Canada's filmmaker's,
who are still wallowing around in
confusion looking for a Canadian
style, should stop looking to the
U.S. for guidance and begin
looking to the achievements of the
cinemas of nations such as Cuba.
THE LAST SUPPER . . . slaves hunted down and killed.
important as the personal one."
"To fulfill my individual creative
needs as a director, I need for there
to be a Cuban cinema.
"Self-realization is not measured
by the level of recognition you
might achieve, but rather by the
knowledge that you are giving all
you can and the environment you
work    in    guarantees    you    that
possibility."
In only 20 years Cuban filmmakers have created a cinematic
vision of their nation; they've
created heroes and a mythology and
have succeeded in finding their
audience. They have done this
through   a   collective,   supportive
AT HILLEL HOUSE
Colonel Yehudah Levy
Speaks on
"A Peace Treaty And Its Implications for Israel's Security"
Tuesday, February 27 „ 12:30
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
The Ministry of Education
Physical Education Learning Assessment
is hiring students with a background and interest in Physical Education
and/or Education Assessment for a province-wide assessment of Physical
Education to be conducted April 26 to May 30. Interested students are invited
to attend an orientaton meeting on
Tuesday, February 27. 1979 at 12:30 p.m.
in Room 25, War Memorial Gymnasium.
Nominations Open For
All Science Positions
• president
• vice-president
• treasurer
• program coordinators
'• athletic director
• publications officer
• public relations officer
Nominations Close Mar. 2,
1979 - Election Mar. 7, 1979
ST
SCIENCE WEEK DANCE
WITH
"BLACK CAT BONE"
Fri., Feb. 23, 8-12 p.m.
Grad Centre Ballroom
(Across from the Armouries)
Tickets available at
SUS office - 216 Audx.
$1.00 Science Students — $1.50 Non-Science
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
WEDNESDAY,
28th FEBRUARY
TWO OF VANCOUVER'S TOP
DISCO DJ's
LARRY BAUDER
ALMOSTER
The
MID-WEEK
A trick
shot
MIX
Finally, the DJ's give you their music
and exciting mixes.
BRING YOUR WHISTLE
CONTACT A BODY
364 WATER STREET,
IGASTOWN -681-5724
Whert you're drinking
tequila, Sauza's the shot
that counts. That's why more
and more people are asking
for it by name.
TEQUILA SAUZA
Number One in Mexico.
Number One in Canada.
Page Friday, 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979 ! playwrights /sci-fi art\
New play centre
finds surprise
■><$£#J
By INGRID MATSON
A workshop production of three
one-act plays can mean an evening
of disjointed, if not mediocre,
entertainment. The du Maurier
Festival, however, was neither.
It was a presentation of two
surprisingly well-acted plays written
by new Canadian playwrights, Ted
Galay and Charles Tidier.
The du Maurier Festival of
One Act Plays
Blind Dancers by Charles  Tidier
After Baba's Funeral by Ted Galay
The Far Garden by Ian Slater
City Stage tonight and tomorrow
night
Admission $2.50
After Baba's Funeral and Blind
Dancers are clearly unlike, yet they
are related in that both portray
people who take time out to
examine the meaning of their lives,
to assess where they've been and
where they are going.
In After Baba's Funeral the
audience looks in on a Ukrainian
family gathered together at their
Manitoba home on the afternoon
of their grandmother's funeral.
The play opens with Netty and
Bill, the parents and Ronnie their
son sitting around an aluminum
kitchen table. A torn checkered
cloth covers the table and the other
furnishings in the room are casually
functional.
Ronnie has just graduated from
university with a Ph.D. and has
come from Vancouver to be at his
grandmother's funeral. The atmosphere is strained as the family,
mostly the mother, Netty, chats
about the past, grandma and local
news. When he can draw his.
parents attention, Ronnie mentions
his Ph.D.
While the conversation continues
in this manner, established patterns
of family communication begin to
emerge. Outwardly mother, father
and son speak to each other, but to
the audience it is obvious that each
person is on a different wave
length.
"Our kids they don't think like
us, that's how it had to be," says
the mother. It is a common theme,
the communication gaps within a
family, yet it is a theme Ted Galay
deals with skilfully and sensitively.
In After Baba's Funeral the story
is often sad, the characters
sometimes pathetic and humorous
at times. These moods were well
brought out by the acting,
especially Patricia Ludwick's perceptive portrayal of Netty.
Also moving, but on a lighter
tone is Charles Tidler's Blind
Dancers. The time is Summer, 1947
and the place is a "cheap but
decent" downtown hotel room in
Toledo, Ohio.
Louisa Potter and Dell Martin,
solidly played by Beth Kaplan and
Richard Newman, met each other
at a dance, got drunk and ended up
in a hotel room. The audience
comes upon them as they wake up,
hungover, a day or two later.
From   the   conversation   we
AFTER ABBA'S FUNERAL .  .  . director Jane Heyman, author Ted Galay and Karen Weiss in one act
gradually deduce they're a couple
hardened by experience. Louisa
announces that all she wants from
the weekend is a session of
"balling." But as the play continues the characters become increasingly emotionally involved.
The conversation passes from
tough, witty repartee to reminiscences and tender words.
Over-all, Blind Dancers is an
engaging play, but its beginning
and ending are somewhat weak.
The play ends quite suddenly. It
begins with a racy dialogue of
poetry which, while beautiful,
seemed unnatural coming from a
hungover, working class couple.
Charles Tidier, a published poet, is
making his transition to
playwrighting with the debut of
Blind Dancers.
After the show the audience was
invited to stay and comment on the
quality of the plays. This is part of
the   du   Maurier   Festival's   new
program whereby the audience provides feedback for the writers,
directors and actors.
About half of the audience
stayed and made comments which
ranged from remarks about the
"immorality" of Blind Dancers to
discussion of certain incongruous
scenes or actions in the plays. There
were also some well-deserved
compliments. If you're a live
theatre buff, this year's du Maurier
Festival is worth seeing.
Sci-fi art work fails critical approval
By KERRY REGIER
Unfortunately Ian Summers' new
collection of pictures Tomorrow and
Beyond: Masterpieces of Science Fiction is
mostly concerned with material that is no
more art than either a corn flakes box or a
Ford ad in Playboy magazine.
Summers has arranged some 300 pictures
in a full-color quarto volume and subdivided
them into various categories: aliens, symbolism, spacecraft and humor. The works
themselves are diverse and imaginative. This
quality of imagination is the binding string
for the whole book. It is a tenuous one, for
few of the paintings deserve more than a
glance.
Tomorrow and Beyond: Masterpieces
of Science Fiction Art
Edited by Ian Summers
Workman Publishing Company, N.Y.
Most of 'the paintings are book or
magazine covers or ads, minus the overprinting. The object of these paintings is to
get the casual passerby to notice the book or
magazine. The covers are meant only to be
seen for a few moments at most before
buying the book. The results are a welter of
garish and grotesque paintings with no
subtlety or depth whatever.
A perfect example is the cover of
Tomorrow and Beyond which depicts a
Gargantuan insect emitting a ray from its
proboscis that strikes a reclining woman who
is laughing hysterically. All this in a brightly
colored Candy landscape of scintillating
green, blue and violet.
Another problem with the commercial
origins of the book is that many of the
paintings leave a large blank space reserved
for the title or advertisement. Remove the
advertisement as Summers has and you just
have an overbearing blank space which
overbalances the rest of the painting.
Summers' concept of organizing the works
under headings of various sorts seems a good
idea at first. However, there is little to tie any
of the pictures together in their groups and
often they simply do not fit and seem randomly placed.
A fine example is a picture of an Aztec by
Carl Lundgren. Even the title Aztec should
give the author a clue that this painting has
nothing to do with SF.
Much of the imagination shown is the
result of application of a formula such as the
Big Complicated Spaceship In Orbit or All
Women Have Big Boobs. One such picture
might be interesting, 300 are silly.
Despite the masses of drivel in the book,
there are a few fine paintings in it. Among
the best is one of John Schoenherr's
illustrations to Frank Herbert's great novel,
Dune.
Stilgar and his Men depicts the rebel group
and their leader in a night scene cloaked in
flowing robes and deep shadow. Odd and
evocative Badlands-style caves suggest the
mysterious nature of their organization.
Stilgar himself stands facing the viewer, a
vertical pillar of power in a predominantly
horizontal picture.
Stilgar and his Men is one of many pictures
which have been trimmed, sometimes to the
point that only a detail remains. There is no
excuse for this, especially when Summers
does not state which pictures are trimmed.
Nor is there any excuse for the incredible
number of typographical errors.
Altogether what Summers has done is to
gather those aspects of science fiction which
people most criticize and put them all in one
book. Its crass commercialism, cheap
trickery, complete lack of anything
resembling intellect, shows a thorough-going
futility of purpose all in one volume.
The best part is that it is printed on
heavyweight enamelled paper, bound and
sewn together in signatures like the best
books so that this book will be just as unpalatable 50 years from now as the day it was
printed.
— boris vallejo
Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 11 classical music\
VSO main series lulls audience to sleep
By KERRY REGIER
The Vancouver Symphony Main
series program was a sleeper for the
most part despite their rendition of
Hoist's The Planets, which was a
very noisy show piece.
Norma Beecroft's Improvisa-
zioni Concertanti No. 3 opened the
show. This bit of Canadian noise
was made possible by the existence
of a Canada Council grant. They
will not support an orchestra
financially unless they play a lot of
Canadian works. This means that a
Canadian composer can scrawl
anything on a sheet of scrap paper
and be reasonably certain it will be
played.
Beecroft's work is such a piece. It
is a little concerto-like work for
flute and two tympanists versus
orchestra, each vying for the
loudest sound.
After the audience had dutifully
applauded Christoph Eschenbach
joined the orchestra for Beethoven's Second Piano Concerto.
This is a relatively lightweight work
for Beethoven and presented few
interpretive problems.
A common fault with the VSO is
a tendency to employ too large an
orchestra in works where a small
group would be more effective —
such as this delicate concerto in an
almost Mozart-like style. Despite
this, Akiyama kept balance with
Eschenbach's piano and never
overpowered the soloist though a
significant loss of detail was
evident.
Eschenbach's playing was almost
exemplary. Never slipping into the
sentimentality that Beethoven often
warned against, Eschenbach spun
the music out into a lovely and light
lyrical filigree. But sadly, Eschenbach never rose above this and
missed the deeper thoughts of the
concerto altogether, with the result
that it became a bit dull.
One beautiful Greek urn might
make a fine display, a roomful
would bore; and so it was with
Eschenbach. He failed to bring the
variety of imagination to the music.
The real showstopper in this program was Hoist's The Planets.
Each movement suggests the
astrological counterpart of the
individual planets and their
associated characteristics. For
example, Mars symbolizes the fear
and heartlessness of war.
Akiyama never got beyond the
most superficial aspects of the
piece. For example, Mercury was
called the "symbol of mind" by
Hoist. For Akiyama, there was no
mind in Mercury, but a Walt
Disney sort of clumsy light-
footedness, a la the Dance of the
Hours scene in Fantasia.
Mars was just a big noise to scare
the children with, though many
people breathed easier and wiped
sweat from their foreheads when it
was over. -
Unintentional levity came during
the penultimate movement with
Uranus, the Magician .-Don Adams,
tympanist, accidentally threw a
drumstick at a cornetist who
rubbed his head for the rest of the
concert. Adams failed to recover in
time and spoiled part of one of the
big, complex drum flourishes in
that movement.
At the movement's end, the
audience apparently found it more
worthwhile to discuss this event
than to listen, and the first five bars
of the ethereal Neptune mystic
movement disappeared in the
general melee.
This program was most instructive. The Vancouver Symphony is not yet a world-class
orchestra, although aspiring, and
this evening showed some of the
reasons why.
Hi
GtuH&eTwcC
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
r'UULIC
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228-61 2 I
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1 :00 - 3:00 p.m.
*K
S"l UDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS            $,   25
J      I
THUNDERBIRD
l
WINTER
v   SPORTS CENTRE
NOTICE
Tuition Fee
Income Tax
Receipts
Available
FEB. 21, 1979
Dept. of Finance
General Service
Admin. Building
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
TOUCH-DISCO
10   WEEKS    GROUP
LESSONS  $35
Contact:
DANCE CITY
927 Granville St..
Vancouver, B.C.
- Phone: 685-4383
Classes start Feb. 26
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GRANVILLE ISLAND - 685-4735
Page Friday, 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23, 1979 vista
By ALICE THOMPSON
Take this weekend to explore the
arts with the Poetry Centre and our
local art galleries. Tonight is the
first showing of the Vancouver
Poetry Centre's seven benefit
readings at the Italian Folk Society
Centre, East 12th at Slocan St. The
evening begins at 7:45 with readings
by internationally acclaimed poets
bill bisset, Victor Coleman, Steve
McCaffrey, and B. P. Nichol.
These wild and crazy guys will be
presenting an evening of pure
theatrics, accompanying themselves
with rattles and even stranger sound
effects.
PORK   LIFT . . . talented
Canadian spoofs language.
There will be a band and after the
readings, live music by the Mike
Beddoes and Gary Kramer Group.
Tickets are only $6.00 at the door.
A series ticket for $36.00 is also
available which includes this
reading and the other six, plus entrance to next five Writing In Our
Time discussions with the writers
featured in the series.
The Emigrants Duo with
Leonard Perucci play on Sunday at
Brittania Community Center, 1601
Napier St., in an evening of Spanish
poetry, theatre, film and song. The
event is sponsored by Chilean
Popular Unity and Canadians for
Democracy in Chile. Donations are
^fc/nfiea-R
Educational Center
Call Days Evenlnfi I Weekends
University Village Bldg.
4900 25th Avenue N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105
(206) 523-7617
For Information About Other Centers
In Major US Cities & Abroad
Outside NY State
CALL TOLL FREE: 800-223-1782
$4.00 for what promises to be a
special event.
Les Grands Ballets Canadiens
will be presenting Carl Orff's spectacular Carmina Burana tonight
and tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. in the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre. Also on
the program are various works by
great choreographers. "Do You
Love Me?" is the question asked by
Mallie Bowman and Company.
This original theatre work will be
presented February 23 and 24 at the
Actors' Workshop, 280 E. Cordova
at 8:30 p.m. Admission is by donation.
Hellen Keller's biography, "The
Miracle Worker", will be presented
by Carousel Theater at the Vancouver East Cultural Center.
Tonight is openin night, and the
show will run until March 24. Show
times are Tuesday to Saturday at
8:30 p.m. with a 1 p.m. matinee on
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday.
As a city, Vancouver is supposedly an art wasteland. Not so! And
here to prove it are three galleries
out of the many in town with vital
displays of contemporary Canadian
and American art.
At  the  Vancouver  Art  Gallery
1145 West Georgia Street is Stella
since 1970. Frank Stella is an
American artist and one of the
leaders in abstract art today. In this
show, is his Polish Village series, his
Brazilian series and his Exotic Bird
series.
In the Brazilian series the large
canvases with geometric protrusions and use of relief break painting out of the square flat format
and explore the grey area between
painting and sculpture. Stella uses
colour to emphasize the relief and
give his pieces even more of a projection towards and away from the
viewer.
His Exotic Bird series takes this
concept of relief and colour
through a transformation. In the
Dove of Tanna using honeycomb
aluminum, Stella creates the same
exuberance, gaudiness and
opulence that he discovered in a
book on Exotic Birds several years
ago. His exhibition will be on until
March 4th.
At Artcore 848 West Hastings in
the building next to the British Columbia & Yukon Chamber of Mines.
There is a small sign on the door
and Artcore is up the stairs visible
through the door.
Works of a large variety of artists
are in silkscreen, oils, acrylics,
gouache, printmaking techniques
and embossing. There is a
lithograph by James Rosenquist
that demonstrates his use of
Billboard painting techniques to
make comments on Contemporary
American Mass Culture. A photo-
etching by Jennifer Dickson A Por-
I —alice thompson photn
FRANK STELLA . . . show at VAG is one of the many exciting
cultural events this weekend including tonight's sound poets
reading at the Italian Folk Centre.
trait of Bianca 1972 illustrates her
our where her piece seems to glow.
The work illustrated in the
photograph is 'Porklift'. a 1976
silkscreen by Canadian artist Alexandra Haeseker. This piece reflects
Haeseker's interest in the figure-
ground relationship. She frequently
uses floating figures to create an
ambiguous and visually disquieting
superb control of light through col-
image such as in an exhibition ot
hers titled The Unique and Amazing Adventures of the Legless Boy
discussed in Chatelaine. 'Porklift'
also demonstrates the sense of
humour found throughout
Haeseker's work. The Artcore exhibition will be on until March 1st,
Monday to Friday, 9:30 to 5:30.
iinin.a.nminii
FRAMS
CABARET
This Week
INFINITY !
SCHOOL DISTRICT 88
(TERRACE)
Applications are inviied ("or teaching positions to be effective September 1, 1979. Vacancies are expected at all levels though not necessarily in all speciality areas. Known vacancies include Primary, Imtermediate, Library, English, Girls' P.E., Industrial Education.
Senior Business Education.
Interviews will be conducted at U.B.C. on March 12, 13, 14 by District 88 personnel.
Students who wish to be interviewed please sent a completed application form (available
at the Canada Employment Centre on Campus) and completed resume directly to the address below. Notification of interviewing arrangements and the interview times will bear-
ranged by the Canada Employment Centre.
Mr. M. Bergsma,
Director of Instruction,
School District 88 (Terrace)
Box 460,
Terrace, B.C. V8G 4B5
Friday, February 23, 1979
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 13 VOLUME DOES IT!
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30 TITLES TO CHOOSE FROM
ANDREW GOLD - JONI MITCHELL - ORLEANS - BREAD - BEACH BOYS
- BLACK SABBATH - DOOBIE BROS. - DEEP PURPLE - AMERICA -
ALICE COOPER - LED ZEPPELIN - RUTLES - BETTE MIDLER - LEO SAYER
- RANDY  NEWMAN   -   GARY WRIGHT  -   SEALS  & CROFT  -  JAY
FERGUSON - MANFRED MANN'S EARTH BAND
• 1002 PERSON TO PERSON - AVERAGE WHITE BAND -
2-L.P. SET - 4.99
• 701 DON JUAN'S RECKLESS DAUGHTER - JONI MITCHELL -
2-L.P. SET - 5.99
• 7000 WORKS, VOL. 1 - EMERSON, LAKE & PALMER -
2-L.P. SET - 6.99
• 9001 LOVE YOU LIVE - THE ROLLING STONES -
2-L.P. SET - 5.49
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144
Page Friday. 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 23,  1979

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