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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 5, 1965

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Array Vote Socred,
Socialist, Grit
or Tory
rm UBYSSEY
whatever you
get, you'll still
be sorry
Vol. XLVIII, No. 22
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5,   1965
CA   4-3916
'Rules will apply
in fee holdback'
Mac cites regulations
in face of referendum
PATROLMEN PACK Student Christian Movement Secretary
Mrs. Ruth Duncan from Brock Hall Thursday after she
injured her leg in tumble on stairs.
By DICK TAYLOR
UBC president John Macdonald said Thursday the administration will follow university regulations if students
withhold second term fees.
"The regulations concerning
payment of fees are printed in
the calendar," he said in a
statement to The Ubyssey.
The UBC general information calendar states: "A student
whose second term fees are not
fully paid by Jan. 14 will be
excluded from classes and his
registration cancelled."
The calendar also states reinstatement after registration
cancellation costs an extra $10
on top of the fees.
"Since the university requires the fees to meet its costs,
it would not be possible for the
Board of Governors to ignore
the regulations," said Macdonald.
Lavalle
blasts
Hender
The western regional chairman of the Canadian Union of
Student took a scathing swipe
Thursday at AMS president
Byron Hender.
Ed Lavalle, Law III, said
Hender is "unaware of the key
issues at UBC and has failed
to represent the students' in-
terets."
Former AMS second-vice
president Lavalle was commenting on Hender's conduct
of the fee-fight march last
week to the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada convention.
He said Hender is out of
touch with progressive tendencies among student leaders all
over North America.
"Hender is a small "c" conservative. His concept of student autonomy involves bending to the wishes of the
administration.
"He is not forcefully articulating the student voice.
"The old concept of the student's role was more socially
oriented — the university was
seen as a place to learn ^nd
preserve knowledge.
"Now more people want to
enact their knowledge without
waiting until they leave here
with  a  dagree."
Lavalle said the student
body is responding to these
changes, but that present AMS
leadership was not.
He said the problem of effective  student   leadership   at
SEE: LAVALLE
(Continued on Page 3)
UBC remembers war dead
in Thursday gym service
UBC students will mark Remembrance Day Thursday in War Memorial Gym.
Ceremonies will begin at  10:45 a.m.
Major Donald O. Knipfel, area chaplain of B.C.
Headquarters, will conduct the service.
Frank S. Fredrickson, president of the 196th West
University Battalion Association, will  give  the address.
The "Last Post" will be sounded at 11 a.m. followed
by the traditional one minute silence.
Among those laying wreaths at the foot of the
memorial plaque will be representatives of the three
UBC officer training divisions, the Canadian Legion, the
UBC Alumni Association, the Alma Mater Society, and
the university.
Macdonald's statement came
as the AMS plans a referendum
for Wednesday on whether students should withhold second
term fees.
Registrar J. E. A. Parnall
said the situation of students
withholding fees as a result of
a referendum would be so extraordinary he would have to
ask directions of the Board of
Governors.
"It would be a political matter," he said.
AMS treasurer Mike Sommers was entirely opposed to
the idea of withholding fees.
"The administration could
retaliate against the individual
student too easily.
"Retaliate — it could screw
him to the wall," he said.
AMS president Byron Hender said he had supported holding the referendum, due to a
loophole in the society's constitution, but was against the
vote's content.
He said it was unlikely the
majority of students would vote
and that even if the referendum carried, the majority of
students would probably pay,
leaving the others open to administration sanctions.
Ed Lavalle, Western regional
president of the Canadian
Union of Students said the risks
of withholding fees was too
much to ask of the student.
As an alternative, he said he
was in favor of a proposal that
the AMS collect all fees and
use them as a bargaining weapon.
BASKETBALL ACE Steve
Spencer leads UBC in annual
Thunderbird-Grad game tonight at 9 p.m. in War Memorial Gym.
Canada's best
publishes once
No, Virginia, The Ubyssey
will not be published three
times next week.
Because the Remembrance
Day holiday falls on Thursday—normally a press day—
Canada's best college newspaper will appear on campus Tuesday only.
'Tween Classes notices for
the week must be in The
Ubyssey office in North
Brock basement by noon
Monday.
The Ubyssey will resume its
regular publication schedule
Nov. 15.
COLD COFFEE
HALF-CLIPPED
Sewer shovel blackens Brock
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
There were 54 minutes of tragedy
for coffee fiends Thursday.
A 54-minute power interruption in
Brook cut off the black stuff from the
machine and the cafeteria.
It left students in the "campus barber
shop half^clipped and forced UBC radio
off the air.
A buildings and grounds spokesman
blamed the break on a power shovel
being used to dig a storm sewer beside
the stadium.
"I feel pretty sure a cable was hit
by the shovel," said Norm Smith of
Buildings and Grounds.
He said the break would take two
lor three days to repair.
into
PETER VAN DYKE AND CUSTOMER
. .  . back to hand clippers
"We    are    feeding    electricity
Brock through other lines now."
The interruption affected Brock, the
field house and nearby temporary buildings.
AMS machines and other vending
machines were put out of commission.
Cafeteria staff were unable to cook
food, and were forced to tote up bills
by hand because electric cash registers
don't work without Freddy Kilowatt.
And in The Ubyssey office, chaos
resulted when 15 staff members crowded toward the one window.
Electricity was cut off at 1:38 p.m.
and restored 54 minutes later in Brock.
The power failure lasted slightly longer
in the other buildings. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1965
IDEAS
AT
LARGE
By BILL GRAF
A letter appearing in Tuesday's Ubyssey, signed the
Squash Club, raised, I think,
an important issue.
Namely that, since a university education is a speculative investment, the cost of
it should be paid by the speculator and not society.
And if a university education is an individual venture
for individual profit, then the
point is valid.
But who benefits ?
By far the greater beneficiary, however, is society.
• •      •
The educated individual
will return many more dollars —in the form of taxes
and other contributions —
into the economy.
In a rapidly-burgeoning
technological age, the concept of productivity is being
rapidly replaced by the necessity of more effective use
of leisure time.
Educated individuals will
be essential to society in finding creative and constructive
outlets for this new leisure.
With or without fees, a university education is in no
sense free. The student must
still pay transportation, texts
and supplies, and if he is from
out of town, room and board.
• •      •
By far the greatest loss,
however, is potential earnings.
The typical BA will sacrifice
$16,000, the MA $25,000, the
Lib,  $32,000.
Idealistically, just as we
owe the blind or deaf person
the opportunity to develop
his maximum potential for
both his own and society's
good, so we owe each individual the opportunity to fulfull
his academic potential.
To paraphrase the Squash
letter, if society has a certain sum of money available,
it faces a choice of spending
it now or investing it in higher
education in order to derive
a greater return in the future.
Just one question.
Who is the UBC Squash
Club?
'IMPRACTICAL
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
THE WHEELERS
SALES AND   SERVICE
4395 W. 10th Ave.   224-4914
HONDA SPECIALISTS
SPECIALS:
RAIN SUITS  ... $ 2.99
HELMETS $10.95
AUTO HEADRESTS 5.95
10% Down and
24 Months to Pay
Prof puts down
African equality
Democracy in the African
history professor Or. R. V.
Thursday.
Speaking on the Rhodesia
crisis, Kubicek said: "Democracy as we know it creates
more problems than it solves
in the African context."
He gave statistics showing
that 70 percent of the Southern
Rhodesian adult African population were virtually illiterate.
"In the concept of 'one man
— one vote', these statistics
don't seem very helpful," he
said.
He said the white element
in Southern Rhodesia was prepared to fight to prevent rule
by Africans.
"The number of Europeans
is increasing through immigration," he said.
"If they see it (African rule)
coming, they will fight."
Kubicek said he did not
think British prime minister
Harold Wilson would use force
to imposa full franchise on
Southern Rhodesia.
"It would be politically inexpedient because he has no
mandate to do this," he said.
He pointed out that racial
rioting in Britain indicated
support for Rhodesian prime
minister Ian Smith's policy.
"Force doesn't solve any
problems it only creates them,"
he said.
He said Wilson would have
to use diplomatic or economic
pressure to achieve his goal.
context is not practical, UBC
Kubicek  told   50   students
Phoney caller
bugs Mitchell
Will the unreal Kyle Mitchell
please hang up?
The real Mitchell, AMS off-
campus housing co-ordinator,
said Thursday someone posing
as him has been phoning
householders to ask if they
want to be on the next AMS
off-campus housing list.
All the householders phoned
are already on the list, said
Mitchell.
This new list will be available in two weeks.
"I first heard about it two
days ago," he said.
"Two landladies who knew
me phoned, wanting to know
what was going on."
Mitchell said he didn't know
where the phoney calls originated or why.
West Point Grey
United Church
4595 W.  8th  (at  Tolmie)
Rev. Wilfred Fearn, Minister
Morning at Eleven
"WHAT SHALL WE
REMEMBER?"
Evening at Seven Thirty
Film "Almost Neighbours."
8:30 p.m. KAIROS Young
Adults
ONLY
The  Record  Gallery
Specializes in Folk, Blues, and Jazz Music
The  Record  Gallery
Robson near Burrard 684-6712
10%  DISCOUNT FOR STUDENTS
PRESENT THIS COUPON
and  receive from
PETERS
ICE CREAM PARLOR
3204 W. Broadway and Park  Royal
ONE SUNDAE
of Your Choice
at half price
GOOD UNTIL NOVEMBER 13. 1965
Life In British Columbia is
Wonderful
and opportunities are  exciting for
graduating engineers —
&- COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
^^               COMPANY, LIMITED
Vancouver,  British Columbia
For Information, see your Student Placement Office.
Locarno all-stars
set tor invaders
Speed and daring meet
guile and experience when
the youthful Locarno Football League all-stars take on
the grizzled Downtown Athletics in a mid-season exhibition game Saturday.
Kickoff time is 2:15 p.m.
at Locarno Bowl on N.W.
Marine Drive.
The crack Marching Pubsters, 84 strong, will entertain between halves, and the
charming Corner Cuties will
try to keep crowd enthusiasm high no matter how far
ahead the all-stars get.
Fall Campus
RAINCOATS
C RO Y D O N
We Can   Fit  All Young Mei
in   tin'   Latest   Styles.
Regularly    $29.95
Take advantage of this
Manufacturers   Clearance
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH   WOOLLENS
549   Granville     MU   1-4649
Open    Fri.    till    9
Three of the BIG Features of
ELECTION COVERAGE
Emphasis on B.C. Interior and Vancouver Quadra.
7:00 till the Bitter End of Election Night.
STUDENTS' FORUM
The Campus "Open  Line" with Stimulating Guests.
8:30 - 10:30 Monday Nights.
SEX AND THE COLLEGE CO-ED
Radio's answer to Ann Landers with the Young Look.
Heard through the Day.
FEATURES, NEWS AND SPECIALS
ON THE CAMPUS VOICE
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 2nd, 3rd, 4th
and  post   graduate  years.   (Assuming  4th  year  to  be
graduating year.)
On November 17, 18 and 19
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONT. THOMPSON, MAN. Friday, November 5,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
GOBS OF GOODIES tantalize happy crowds at World Universal Service Treasure Van in International House. Last
chance to buy goods from 30 countries is available today
from noon to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m.
Cuba education program
is at top of priorities
The Cuban government has
stepped up its education program since the revolution, Dr.
James Lindsay said Thursday.
Lindsay, who recently returned from a four-year stay in
Cuba as advisor to the Department of Industrial Hygiene,
said the government has made
great strides in education.
"Before the revolution,
schools were a joke," the Vancouver doctor said. "Most
people went to school for one
or two years at the most."
He described the present set
up as being "volunteers going
to the country and teaching
groups of three or four people
to write."
"The most important things
done in education are done
mostly on the primary level,"
he said.
"Most people are behind the
GO OVERSEAS'
Minister scores
security-clingers
The Canadian University Service Overseas and the
Student Christian Movement need more volunteers to go
overseas.
LAVALLE
(Continued from Page 1)
UBO has been complicfated by
disunity in the AMS executive.
'Disunity is the polarization
from Hender, who is weak on
issues and leadership, to
Cruise, who is opportunistic
on issues, but unable to deliver
inspired administration."
"If the students are dissatisfied, they should act," Lavalle
said.
"And the undergraduate society presidents should be
launching campaigns among
members of their faculties to
stir up interest in student issues."
Lavalle also complained
council was handling the don't-
pay - second - term - fees issue
badly.
"Isn't it peculiar that councillors oppose the referendum,
but haven't got an alternative
policy to offer students."
Rev. Walter Maclean, CUSO
SCM coordinator for West
Africa said Wednesday, "Undue attatchment to security
makes us satisfied with the
task we are at, the task of
eating, sleeping and getting
fat."
"There has never been a
time with a greater neeed for
people of conviction," he said.
"Students of the world are
the ones showing concern."
"The Canadian student who
cares is where the action is."
Maclean said Peace-Corp-
styled operations have been
the most successful in helping
impoverished countries.
"Our 400 volunteers have
received good acceptance
wherever they have been as
signed," he said.
Maclean contrasted the ease
of communications in Canada
with the distinct lack of it in
Nigeria.
"It is inexcusable that we,
an affluent country, give less
than one percent of our national income to others," he
said.
Hoofenanny Tomorrow Night
Totem Residence - Auditorium - 8 p.m..
John YLVISAKER and
The Royal Heirs
Folk Songs With
A Difference
NO CHARGE
I
I
#y%
I
Overseas Auto Parts
PARTS FOR THE  IMPORTED CAR
SPORTS CAR ACCESSORIES
We carry a good  coverage of
Volkswagen Replacement Parts
736-9804 2780 Alma Rd.
at 12th Ave.
10% Discount with AMS Card
SCHWEITZER
SKI TRIP!
Meeting for All Interested
Noon, Nov. 5. Buch 100
VARIETY   RENTALS
(ARNOLD'S PAWNSHOP)
986  Granville Phone  MU   5-7517
Rent a Guitar from $4.00  per  month
Rent a Transistor Tape  Recorder $5.00  per  month
Rent a  Guitar Amplifier from  $4.00  per  month
STUDENTS  .  .  .  Take advantage of this Special  Offer
RENTAL  CAN   BE  APPLIED   TO   PURCHASE
government and willing to die
for   their   country,"   he   said.
Lindsay said rationing still
existed in Cuba.
"There is a great demand for
food but each family has a
ration book for purchase purposes," he said.
Lindsay said there are several    thousand    technical    ad
visors from socialist countries
in Cuba though most of the
staff of universities are Cuban
nationals.
Approximately one out of
every 10 university personnel
is foreign, he said.
Lindsay's talk was sponsored by the Student Cuban
Friendship committee.
Out-of-town voters stay,
polling busses back away
UBC students from out-of-town apparently don't want
to go home Monday to vote in the federal election.
At least not in buses chartered by the Alma Mater
Society to take them home for half fare.
Second vice-president Peter Braund said Wednesday:
"The buses will be cancelled because only 12 students have
applied for seats."
He said the 12, all from the Fraser Valley area, would
be phoned and told if they wanted to vote they would have
to get home on their own.
The buses were due to leave this afternoon.
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices. . .
■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■ KERRISDALE  41s.t al YEW
THIS   IS  THE   ONLY
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Clinton's quality clothing keeps its
fashionable good looks long after
ordinary clothes have become
shapeless and discarded.  Enjoy the
exclusive style features and better
quality combined with personalized
service as offered by the leader in fine
clothing and accessories for men.
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 Granville
MU   1-5625
FALL SYMPOSIUM:
"Commitment and Beyond
NOVEMBER 12,  13,  14
Rosario Beach, Anacortes, Wash.
$6.50 ALL INCLUSIVE
Apply at A.M.S. Office Before Nov. 10.
Information available at 224-4044 — 5.00-7.00 p.m.
W
CSA NEWS
THE GRADUATE STUDENT CENTER. The GSC Building
has long been considered as one of the most beautiful
buildings on campus, a facility for the exclusive use
of Graduate Students. However, the beauty of this
building and its value as a place for graduate students
to eat or to relax or to entertain guests is being
despoiled by the foolish practices of a few unthinking
individuals. For example, coffee cups are being left
to accumulate in the upper lounge instead of being
returned to the dining room by their users. Newspapers are being scattered throughout the building
instead of being placed in the numerous waste paper
receptacles. It is the responsibility of individual
graduate students using the building to see that they
use it wisely, and to remind others who appear to
have forgotten their responsibilities. Don't complain
about the mess, do something to eliminate it.
GSC MEMBERSHIP CARDS: There are still membership
cards in the center office which have not been claimed
by Graduate Students. Do you have a center membership card? mwnsti
Published • Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout" ttte university,
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,   and   for payment of postage  in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blak*.
(Yawn) Fees again
This year there is every prospect of another $50 fee
raise.
President John Macdonald has said such a raise
is not inevitable if the Bladen Report is implemented,
but on the eve of the election we see no party likely
to be elected which has offered to immediately adopt
the Report.
The fee hike itself is not startling, actually. There
has been one for the past two years.
But this year, more than 1,000 students have signed
a petition asking the campus to support an idea brought
forward by AMS president Byron Hender during a fee
fight rally in September.
The idea was that students should not pay second
term fees until the UBC Board of Governors agrees to
return fees to the 1964-65 level.
Wednesday, students will vote on the referendum,
with the AMS now saying "Don't."
It strikes us that withholding second term fees is
not a particularly inspired plan. AMS sources say 75 per
cent of UBC students have not paid them, but how
long, we wonder, would even a majority of them hold
out under administration pressure in the new year if a
decision to withhold payment was made.
Nevertheless, regretfully, we urge you to support
the   referendum.
Because all indications are, unless such a mandate
for action is given AMS council, they will do nothing
to combat the fee hike.
And we don't think anyone — not even the cashniks
who want fees — want higher fees.
There are many more practical suggestions as to
how to give AMS council a position of power from which
to dicker with the board.
It has been suggested students might pay their
fees to an AMS trust fund, administered by some impartial and trusted person, as former UBC president Dr.
N. A. M. MacKenzie.
This fund oould be controlled by a referendum,
which the AMS could call at any time they thought
such a move warrented.
Advantages of the trust fund idea are many, but
at least then the board would have to deal directly
with the AMS council.
And because the fund couldn't be paid to the administration without a referendum, there would be no
chance of the AMS making some possible spur-of-the-
moment error in judgment.
Unfortunately, however, the AMS has come out
with no such positive suggestion. All the leadership they
have given is to suggest they do not favor withholding
of second term fees.
As in the case of the march, here is an opportunity
for students to give their council the direction it needs.
But unlike the march, this is no move for the benefit of students not attending UBC.
This referendum will provide the last chance we will
have to bring home to the board UBC student's position
on UBC's fees.
Since now is the time when government and administration financial planning is done, now is the time for
students to show they don't want higher fees.
That is, if they don't want higher fees.
News
Associate
City	
Photo 	
•porta
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Ron  Rlter
Aas't News _.
As** City _
Page Friday
Managing 	
Feature* 	
CUP	
George Reamsbottom
   Richard   Blair
 Bert   MacKinnon
 Ed Clark
 Dan  Mullen
Robbi West
 Al  Donald
 John  Kelsey
 Norm   Betts
_____ Mike Bolton
 Don  Hull
Those working Thursday were
Carol-Anne Baker, Joan Fogarty,
Stuart Gray, Susan Gransby, Rosemary Hyman, Kris Emmott, Karen
Wetmore, Bill Graf, and Doug
Halverson. Nobody's seen Ann
Balf, Gordon MacLaughlin or
Terry Brooks yet.
LETTERS TO  THE   EDITOR
WHERE?
Editor. The Ubyssey. Sir:
While bundling scrap paper
to be donated to the Boy
Scouts' Paper drive, we
noticed (mixed with some dead
Tartans) one tattered copy of
The Ubyssey.
On closer perusal of page
three, your clumsy attempt at
a correction caught our practised eye.
You requested permission to
correct  a  supposed  error on
the   status   of   the   UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA.
While we commend your
attempts to bolster the sagging
spirit of your Post-Primary
Institute of British Columbia,
we feel obligated to point out
that there are now TWO universities west of the Rockies—
Simon Fraser and the University of Victoria.
THE MARLET STAFF
"University of Victoria"
Ed. Note: Victoria "university" is a term sometimes applied by nearby residents to an
institution known as Victoria
College, located somewhere
on Vancouver Island.
(The latter is an area of
Canada with which B.C. normally maintains diplomatic
relations of a sort.)
Students at Victoria College
produce the Martlet, a publication based loosely on The
Ubyssey.
IN  THE EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
How about a G.I. Duck?
In a recent Playboy, Jules
Pfeiffer discussed his childhood comicbook heroes . . .
Batman, Superman, Green
Hornet, etc.
H e     mentioned  that
these   comics
often     had
Freud-
ian over tones
.   .   .   Batman
and   Robin
living   togtfn-
cameron       er,  Robin's
appearance and costume, and
so forth.
I was quite disgusted that
Pfeiffer didn't mention any
of my heroes . . . Donald
Duck and his, hers, its nephews. (I'll come to the his,
hers,  its, nephews later).
Have you ever really looked at those little ducks? The
way they run around with no
pants on? And the way
they've been sleeping together for the past 25 years?
Hooo, boy.
And the way that Uncle
Scrooge keeps making more
and more money, mostly out
of  the  sweat  of the proles?
And the Beagle boys that
keep breaking out of those
crummy American jails?
And Daisy Duck keeps
feeding Uncle Donald, but
she never kisses him. What
kinda relationship is that for
young kids, eh?
And how about the fact
that Donald is supposed to be
a male, but he calls himself
a duck.
Doesn't he know that a
male duck is a drake?
Another thing Pfeiffer missed was the war comics.
The American machine
guns always went "Tacka
Tacka Tacka," while the enemy had to put up with an
obviously inferior product
that went "Budda Budda
Budda."
Their mortars went "boom"
instead    of    "whump,"    and
their grenades usually exploded with a much less
death-like sound than the
"ca-runch" made by the
American ones.
Even their planes were inferior. They made a sound
not unlike an enraged mosquito, while the American
"birds of death" (quote Captain Wan Hung, of G.I. Joe
fame) made satisfying sounds
like "Yearaaaang!!"
When enemy soldiers died,
or were toayonetted, or ate
their rice too fast, they said
"Aiiiii!!" Americans died
without a sound, and never
ate too fast.
But hope is on the way.
The new war comics are called 'Guerilla War', and
they're  great.
(See p. 7)
Now if only they'd put some
pants on those damned ducks. '■:St__r-
'.,.C.-..y0fc.:vi--:-'J:. ?.
aatf
'Unfair, Mra friltfwinji
t» whlmcrcol  review
*_KJ
INSTEP: — This week
at UBC was the greatest
for perennially blue-
breasted Byron Hender,
known about Brock as
Harmless. With the ex-PM,
Mac and the Great Trek-
kess, Harmless' profile
made the Ubyssey three
times Tuesday and once
Thursday. Overheard: "But
Harmless cutee-pie, where
did you find those flippant
white  bootees."
• •      •
INTERNAL:—Have you
noticed? The Ubyssey is
fat and friendly this week.
Editors are still reacting
to the policy of a local
downtown daily urging
readers to stop yonder lean
and hungry student radicals-editors. See the frontpage of that nasty downtown paper last Saturday
for suggestions on how to
revamp your campus rag.
Meanwhile, notice how
nice The Ubyssey is —
bask in the platitudes and
establishment-orientation.
• •      •
INDEFENSIBLE: - UBC's
library, still with stodgy
stacks, hasn't bothered to
order Tom Wolf's The
Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-
Flake Streamlined Baby.
Considering the Detroit
iron-library common ugliness Syndrome, it only
figures.
• •      •
INCONSPICUOUS:     —
Conspicuous absence of
Law Student Association
president Cowboy Pete
Hyndman from the Bay-
shore's episode accents
that group's usual disapproval of radical moves,
such as goose-stepping Hender's aggresive leadership
of the march. (What was
Peter afteu at the Blue
Boy?)
• •      •
INPUT: — Embarrassed
parking patrolmen have
finally corrected their full
circle meters at the Shrum
Commons. Faculty installation was keeping down
meter receipts by providing an hour's parking with
immediate coin return.
The campus cops managed
to leave five of the meters
unlocked. You can't pick
up a girl anywhere on campus without a parking
sticker or meter fee now.
Meters were installed at
Totem Park about a month
ago. Remember the 24-hour
ones behind the library?
• • •
INVESTIGATED* Montreal poet Irving Layton
was expected at a party on
York St. after his campus
readings Friday last. Lay-
ton didn't make it, but
about 200 other poets did.
Lay ton's poems didn't
make the papers either, but
a review of the party did . .
• •       •
IN GROUP: — Arts Prez
Chuck Campbell made a
flying start on his plans
for an AMS leadership
coup this week. Chuck
made an info release on
pinkos but got bitten by
a Red Dog and retracted
his actionable'defamation.
Chuck's power play isn't
over yet and he remains
a threat.
Cruise is an unknown
variable. Braund is still
in the ring and may have
the added punch of seven-
year power plan Lavalle.
But arsonist Graeme Vance
will incinerate Braund at
the eleventh hour and run
himself.
All these power-lusters
will be upset by an upstart
Ubssey editor. EUS has
the  details.
• •       •
INCOHERENT:   —  The
biggest news story of the
year is still oozing through
carefully-guarded, mouths.
One minor cog in the AMS
machine, a council appointee claims a Communist
Party of Canada agent has
aproached him with bribes.
The cog can't find a sympathetic ear because he's
vague on names and dates.
The target of the self-
appointed anti-subversive
is a local group that has
been known to make council look bad lately.
Said group's lawyers are
waiting with gnashing
teeth.
• •       •
IN CAMERA: — Who's
impeached? Council ran into procedural difficulties
Monday night. Hender
after a motion from cowboy followed wrong procedure. Hender told the
press the Godsent in cam- '
era motion was retroactive
to the beginning of the
meeting. Harmless was in
the hotbox and reacted
coldly. After three years,
we thought you knew procedure,  Harmless.
•      •       •
INCOGNITO:     —    The
Canadian secret service
types got busy on Ubyssey
city editor Richard Blair
last Friday and threw him
off one of the elevators at
the Bayshore Inn. Appears they don't like the
press going up in the same
elevator as Prime Minister
Pearson. As Blair walked
onto the elevator containing Pearson, the James
Bond type stuck his hand
into Blair's stomach at
which point the unfortunate editor back-pedalled his
way off the elevator.
Funny thing, Blair was.
press liaison officer for all
news media when Pearson was on campus last
week.
Friday, November 5,  1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5 pi
NOV. 5, 1965
ON THE COVER: A second look
at the pill. Photo by Dave Freeman.
Editor:   John Kelsey
Current affairs  - . _  Steve Brown
Science, the  artt   .      Al Francis
Drawings-
Arnold  Saba,   Brett  Smaill
Jeff   Wall
We used to enjoy election campaigns.
But this one, slowly
sloshing to a merciful
close,' has been a bloody
bore.
Not because of lack of
serious discussion on
valid issues; there never
has been any in recent
campaigns.
There used to be the
same endless exchange of
nit-picking barbs but at
least it was done with
style.
This time the show the
politicos present is a tawdry matinee compared to
the extravaganzas of just
a few years ago.
No more mammoth,
rowdy rallies in the
;moky Forum — just gen-
t'ile facsimiles in the for-
Tial QET, one at noon
nour yet, presumably to
snsure that the toiling
proletariat won't be
there to heckle.
No more huge full-
color newspaper ads with
Diet's frightening face
pasted on a Red Ensign—
this time the Conservatives are out-conserving
all other (and less affluent) parties with dull,
cheap little ads.
After sitting through a
choking dose of all party-
meetings, it's pointedly
obvious that most would-
be MP's are half-rate —
even the audiences know
more than the Socreds,
who have to be the worst
of the lot.
•      •      •
We don't enjoy—never
have — seeing impres-
sarios or even budding
impressarios like Murray
Farr get gouged because
they present something
bold or new that local
yokels won't take to.
Farr lost a bundle on a
small turnout for Erick
Hawkins' dancers.
And the same people
who always scream for
new and different things
are the ones who watched
TV that night.
A poem is a woman
says lecher Layton
poetry
An interview with Canadian poet Irving Layton, who
was at UBC last week to sell
his new book. Collected
poems of Irving Layton.
Interviewers are poets Dennis Wheeler, Seymour Mayne
and Wayne Nyberg.
• •       •
pf: What qualities should
a good poem have?
L: A poem should be like a
woman. It must have passion
and it must have structure.
pf: Does contemporary
American poetry have much
effect on Canadian poetry?
L: I suppose that here on
the west coast you are influenced to some extent by
the San Francisco poets. The
influences in the east are
more traditional: Eliot, Yeats,
Layton ...
pf: Who are the important
younger Canadian poets?
L: Leonard Cohen, John
Newlove, Al Purdy. I'd throw
in Seymour Mayne. Milton
Acorn.
(At this point a beautiful
brunette, elbowed her way
through the interviewers,
said — to Layton — "You're
beautiful. I want to give you
a big hug and a kiss." — and
did.
• •      •
Layton: Thank, you.
Brunette:   I'll  see  you   at
party tonight.
Interview resumes.)
pf: Why have you chosen
this year to publish your collected poems?
L: My Collected Poems are
to mark the twenty years
since my first book was published.
pf: Do you believe in civil
rights for poets.
L: I believe in uncivil
wrongs for poets.
pf: Let's move into more
exciting territory.
L: What could be more exciting than my life?
pf: Give us your views on
Viet Nam.
L: I think the Americans
cannot and should not pull
out of Viet Nam. The Americans are willing to negotiate.
If the war is going on it's
because of Peking and Hanoi.
The U.S. must show it's not
going to pull out. They must
not show any signs of weakness in that part of the world
if the growth of Red China
is to be prevented.
I am in favor of social reforms but the situation demands an immediate stalemate.
pf: Are student demonstrations irresponsible?
L: Student feeling goes beyond Viet Nam. There is a
discontent with American
life. The demonstrations are
symptomatic of a larger malaise. I sympathize with the
anguish that lies behind the
demonstrations.
•      •      •
America should listen to
the demonstrations, not now
but after a stalemate is
achieved.
As long as the U.S. maintains itself in that part of the
world, it will not fall into
the clutch of China.
I'd be more sympathetic if
I'd not lived through the
thirties. I saw the same thing
then. Eventually we made a
stand in Poland.
The country doesn't matter. What is important is that
a stand is being made. I am
confident that a  settlement
pf 2wo
LAYTON
will be made and that Red
China will be contained.
pf: What do you think
about Pearson?
L: I think both Pearson
and Diefenbaker should be
retired to B.C. to think about
their wrongs and ruminate
their past mistakes. Canada's
leaders should be young and
dynamic. Pearson and Diefenbaker are too old. They
have nothing in common
with young people.
pf: Someone called you the
Diefenbaker of Canadian
poetry. How would you substantiate this?
• •      •
L: I wouldn't try to. Unless
perhaps he was referring to
my prime-ministerial function as poet. In that case he
should have said 'Diefenbaker with a jock-strap.'
pf: What has been your
role in the sexual revoluation
in Canada?
L: Personally or intellectually?
Personally, any travelling
salesman has done more than
me.
Culturally, I have provided a persona, a mask representing what the average inhibited Canadian would like
to be. I am his wish fulfillment.
• •      •
pf: Do you think that Vancouver as a city is conducive
to writing poetry?
L: It's not conducive to
anything. It's too pleasant.
Why write poetry when you
can make love? Montreal is
cold. You are always blowing your nose and running
out for cough medicine.
That's something to write
about.
pf: But B.C. has the high-
ets suicide rate in Canada.
L: Has it? Wonderful! I'll
come out right away. I suppose everyone commits suicide because they're bored.
I think Vancouver is a
wonderful place. I've recovered some of my boyhood
nostalgia. I feel young again.
pf: Especially when pretty
young girls hug you.
L: Then I feel childish.
war
Diefen-
baker-
backers
By TOMMY WU
We   are   a   Diefenbacker-
backer.
Why?
Because it's camp.
Camp, in case you haven't
been around, is the term for
something that is so far out
it's in. Like mom's home
cooking. Or Blackhawk
comics.
That's why, in Canadian
politics,  Dief's our man.
And we mean it. Honest.
We're staunch Conservatives. In an age when the
majority are sprouting sandals and wild ideas, we just
hanker to return to government  by compromise.
Except for one thing. No
compromise with this: Pearson's flag has got to go.
We grew up under that
Red Ensign, darn it, and we
still remember it waving
proudly over us as we
walked to school. We can
remember humming The
Maple Leaf Forever as the
Union Jack in the corner
smiled almost benevolently
down.
That flag is ours. Camp it
may be, but we want it
back.
Like mom's home cooking. Or the Boy Scouts. Or
Blackhawk.
Socially, we like taking
our girl to movies and hold
ing hands. Wows 'em every
time. "Like, it's so . . . something!"   they  say.
And guess what. We're
virgin. Just like in the movies. Sure, it's camp, but
what a bombshell that is to
drop at a  party.
It's like dada or something.
So, vote Tory. We mean
it.
inside
argument     pf 7
art     pf 5
books  pf 6
cinema  pf 4
comment   pf 4
interview     pf 2
interview     pf 3
jazz      pf 5
music  pf 6
opinion     pf 3
poetry     pf 2
poetry . pf 8
this week  pf 1
war     pf 2
Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1965 Comic
By GABOR MATE
Dr. Goebbels, Hitler's
propaganda minister, published comic books depicting
brave Nazi youth protecting
virginal Aryan maidens
from lecherous fat old Jews
who were forever insistent
upon defiling the pure Aryan
blood.
The purpose of these comic books was very basic, yet
extremely effective. It is
very easy to channel the
flow of a child's thoughts
and reactions in a desired
direction if the process is
begun early.
The child whose first reading was colorful picture-
booklets about evil Jews and
good Nazis probably retains
traces of anti-Semitism to
this day. Rational arguments
that he may have heard in
later life will have had less
effect on him than those
early comic books.
Dr. Goebbels' lesson was
not lost on the Communist
governments that replaced
Nazi rule in eastern Europe.
During the Korean war, for
example, there appeared delightfully illustrated children's booklets telling a stirring saga of Korean and
Chinese Communists heroes
and imperialist American
villains.
The courage, loyalty, humanity, and wisdom of the
Communists was exceeded
only by the cowardice, bestiality, and stupidity of their
detestable Yankee enemies.
No wonder the Communists went from one resounding victory to the next! In
the comic books, that is.
It is encouraging now to
realize that the Americans
are determined not to be
outdone in the struggle to
poison  children's  minds.
Numerous publications
form the introduction to the
political education of many
an   American  youngster.
Some of these carry the
anti-Communist fight to a
ludicrous extreme. A few
years   ago   a   Joe   Palooka
comic book told a gruesome
tale of international espionage and Communist subversion as fat Humphrey was
abducted by Russians and
taken to Moscow for torture
and  questioning.
(It is with great satisfaction that I am able to report Humphrey's success in
outwitting and eluding his
captors.)
In the centre of a Mickey
Mouse book last year there
appeared a page-sized advertisement for "the American
way of life". It pictured an
old Chinese peasant plowing
his field with an ancient
wooden plow pulled by a
decimated ox.
"THIS," proclaimed the
bold red type, "is THEIR
way of life. And THIS is
ours." The next picture
showed a happy group of
youths in a shiny new car.
"Don't let them," exhorted
the ad, "impose THEIR way
on us."
It is fortunate for the war-
comic trade that the Vietnamese war has become so
serious. America has not
been involved in a major
conflict since Korea.
Now once more tall,
white, brawny American
heroes can defeat short, yellow,   treacherous   Orientals.
Regardless of the rights
and wrongs of U.S. policy in
Vietnam, the instilling of
hatred in the hearts of kindergarten and primary
school children can only
harm the United States.
The basis of a free society
is freedom to make a rational choice. To conjure up in
the minds of children savage
Communist bogeymen is to
destroy their freedom to
think rationally.
There exist reasonable
arguments on both sides of
the Vietnam controversy,
but the child weaned on
these vicious comic books
will not have the power to
be  reasonable.
Ample proof was provided on Art Linkletter's children's interview show not
too long ago. An eight-
year-old was asked what he
disliked   most.
"Communists," was the
reply. "A Communist is a
horrible creature, worse than
an animal," he concluded,
amidst the enthusiastic applause of the adult audience.
The members of the audience presumably read comic
books when they were children.
WHEN TOMORROW DIES
fc?«QMM
ONE (SOLD STAR FOR STRIKE FORCE
ONE... ONE ASSIST FOR OPERATION
FOUR-FLUSH/ NOW 'FESS UP, SOYS
...WASN'T COMFORTABLE HAVING-
THOSE NASTY VCS BLASTIN&AWAY
AT A BUNCH OF DUMMIES DRESSED
LIKE PARATROOPERS... INSTEAD OF
AT YOU? HEH HEHHEHHHH!
interview
UBC's own home-movie
maker, Larry Kent, seems
to get his shoestring efforts
into international film festivals and come out winning.
He's made two already. Bitter Ash and Sweet Substitute.
Larry's third feature.
When Tomorrow Dies, cost
$120,000—not so shoestring.
Its world premiere is Nov.
24 at the Lyric theatre.
Here, be talks with Page
Friday editor John Kelsey.
•      •      •
pf: Where'd you get the
money,  $120,000?
Kent: I have backers.
pf: Who?
Kent: I can't say, but
they're all Vancouver men.
pf: Is Tomorrow a sexy
show, like Bitter Ash and
Sweet Substitute?
Kent: Well, the story concerns a woman of 35 who
has a teenage daughter.
She's been married 15 years
and suddenly discovers life
is kind of dull. She has
nothing exciting to do, her
husband seems to be losing
sexual interest in her. She
comes back to UBC, meets a
prof and takes him as a
lover. Meanwhile, Her daughter is running around telling her not to do it, with
this liberal attitude, like it's
all right, but just don't. So
this woman has sexual fantasies, and, well, you know.
pf:  Who plays her?
Kent: Pat Gage. Neil Dain-
ard is the professor, Doug
Campbell is the husband and
Nikki Cole is the daughter.
pf: Did you shoot it all in
Vancouver?
Kent: Right.
pf: Is it good?
Kent: Very good, the best
I've done. (Sweet Substitute,
Kent's second film, was second at the Montreal film
festival, honorably mentioned in New York, and was invited to be shown in London and New York invitational festivals.)
pf: Why is the premiere
in Vancouver?
Kent: I still feel tied to
the campus because I got my
start here, and I'm sentimental.
pf: Always?
Kent: Not always.
pf: But it sells tickets.
Kent; Right. And you better write down that I laughed. <laughs  again).
pf: What will you do with
this one? You sold the last.
Kent: It goes to New York;
we'll sell it. Several worldwide distributors are interested.
• •      •
pf: What happens next?
Kent: I want to do a big
feature film. We've gone
from $5,000 to $15,000 to
$120,000. Now, I want to
spend somewhere between
half and three-quarters of a
million.
pf: Who are you dickering with for that amount,
Larry?
Kent: My backers here.
We can get government
money if the Liberals  win.
pf: Why the Liberals?
Kent: They've promised
$10 million to Canadian
film-makers. We'll get a
slice. My backers coughed
over $100,000, they could
get more if they wanted to.
In effect, they said here's
your  chance,  produce.
pf: Have you?
• •      •
Kent: I've produced. They
like it. But it's up to the
audience, it really decides.
pf: What about this premiere?
Kent: The mayor, Rita
Tushingham, all the wheels
in town will come. Black
tie.
pf: Who wrote this one?
Kent: Bob Harlow (head of
UBC's creative writing department) from my idea. I'm
co-author, producer, and
director.
pf: Are you paying people
this time?
Kent: Everybody, all 200
of them.
pf: Is Tomorrow a realistic
film,  like the  others?
Kent: -It's realistic. Oh,
there's fantasy in it, but it's
basically a straight dramatic
story, still real.
• •      •
pf: Are you an artist?
Kent: If you call people
like Erick Hawkins artists,
I'm not. I'm an entertainer,
with something to say, with
an interesting story to tell.
I'm not interested in being
an artist or not, I'm interested in making a film.
pf: Are you a Canadian
artist, are you making a contribution   to   Canadian   art?
Kent: I'm not interested
at all in art in Canada. It's a
lot of c-—p, if you ask me.
A lot of bull. I'm interested
in my work and most art
is dull and boring. These
are entertainment contributions.
pf: Why do you like films
so much?
Kent: It's the only thing I
can do. If I didn't make
films, I'd be a bum. I enjoy
it. I'm really all here when
I'm  making one.
• •      •
pf: Do you care about
awards at all, or just money
and films?
Kent: I care, all right.
I'm enough of an egotist to
like awards and recognition
but it's the audience that
really counts. Some artists
say 'I do it for myself only'.
I want the audience to enjoy it, be moved by my films.
Otherwise, I'd throw them
into a corner of the base
ment.
I guess I'm exactly the opposite to what a so-called
artist should be.
pf: Do you anticipate censor trouble?
Kent: There may be a few
scenes, you never can tell.
I'm frank and honest in film,
and my films always deal
with a sexual motif. I try
not to compromise, but I
never think about the censor. I think only about the
audience, so I don't know
if I'll have any trouble or
not.
pf 3hree
Friday, November 5, ,1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 ANNUAL
BARNACLE  BALL
SEMI  FORMAL
3 BARS and DINNER
HMCS DISCOVERY - NOVEMBER 13th
9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Tickets AMS and Armouries - $4.00 CPL
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& POWER AUTHORITY
requires
ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL and
CIVIL ENGINEERS
for its expanding activities
There are excellent opportunities for graduates to obtain
a variety of training and experience in many locations
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Please consult your bulletin board and our brochure
"Engineering the Future" for background information
and description of B.C. Hydro's diverse activities and
engineering career opportunities.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS: Nov. 8, 9, 10 & 12
We are looking forward to discussing your career plans
with you and in exploring how your interests and talents
could be best utilized in this rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an appointment time through the
Student Services Office.
NEW YORK
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Phone    224-3202
for intelligent, responsible
leadership —
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Look! look! see! see!
3  little men on TV
By ROBIN  JEFFREY
Look!  Look!  See! See!
See Webster and Collins interview Doug Leiterman on TV.
They were a bit like the Bobsey twins
Kicking Dick Fouts in the shins.
But really, for them, they were awfully polite,
And only when they interrupted each other did it appear
there'd be a fight.
That "7 Days" isn't perfect they pointed out quite rightly,
But at least, unlike them, "7 Days" isn't nightly.
There is no news value to Ursula Andress's bottom —
We've all got 'em;
The skit on the Pope should have been banned,
And the Catholics who laughed are eternally damned —
By Webster and Collins;
Cutting back and forth from "O Canada" to "God Save the
Queen"
Was offensive to many — as "The Star-Spangled Banner"
would never have been;
And "7 Days" interviewers mumble —
A legitimate grumble —
They're almost as difficult to understand
As exiled Scots who talk like a bagpipe band;
And finally there's "7 Days' " editing —
That doesn't take much discrediting,
But still, experiments in this field are good,
And maybe one day when these things are understood
We'll be able to get Collins and Webster without sound,
And then maybe after three or four years of tests underground,
We'll be able to get these two little bundles of Id-eo
Without the video.
Ah, yes!
Look! Look! See! See!
See "Webster and Collins interview Doug Leiterman on
TV-
Collins and Webster fill up the screen,
Webster and Collins — color them green.
Non Megitimus carborundum, Wail
cinema
By  GRAHAM  OLNEY
At last Ward Fletcher has
been initiated into the movie
critics' fraternity. In last
week's Page Friday, an irate
Adda Radunz, probably in
an   apoplectic   fit,   wrote   a
Graham Olney was The
Ubyssey's and Page Friday's
film critic for three years.
Bui nobody called him
names personally — he
wrote as Ethel Bloomsbury.
letter to the editor with the
soliary purpose in mind of
roasting  Fletcher.
The letter brought back
sweet memories to this ex-
movie  critic  of  those  won-
|1 4our
derful brickbats reminding
you that you were not forgotten by your admiring
public.
The trouble with Adda
Radunz' argument that she
first says Fletcher is an incompetent critic and then,
instead of proving that point,
immediately starts nit-picking, complete with frothing
mouth, on a few inconsequential details.
Miss Radunz is not proving Fletcher incompetent.
She is merely expressing a
difference of opinion. She
likes Kramer — Fletcher has
reservations.   So what?
I would suggest if there
is an underground dissatisfied with Fletcher's standard
of writing, they elect a professional to prove it.
Not an incompetent.
Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,   1965 Mingus makes cool blues
a savage shout with sparks
By  ANGUS  RICKER
Charles Mingus is back.
So are the adjectives unpredictable, controversial,
and eccentric which inevitably crop up in describing
the  jazz bassist.
The 1961 Mingus swing Into Vancouver produced these
highlights:
• A would-be B.C. Lion
was punched in the nose for
alleged inattentiveness.
• A concert at UBC was
halted to collect admission
from Auditorium standees.
"Everyone pays to hear jazz"
remarked Mingus, somewhat
democratically.
• Some of the most compelling jazz ever heard here.
Mingus is held in high regard as an avante-garde
jazzman. Leonard Feather
writes of Mingus' music:
"Some elements offer a
sharp and piquant contrast,
with clearly defined folk-
music  roots and   a   savage,
shouting, blues-derived intensity. Not for complacent
ears, Mingus' music is the
prototype of a new and vital
jazz generation of the 1960s
just as Parker and Gillespie
were of the 1940s."
However the music and
the man are inseparable.
And Mingus' appearances at
the Blue Horn this week
have been marked by a continual disregard for audiences.
Stream of consciousness
dialogue and music that alternates between pop art
happenings and the straight
put-on leads one to question
if Mingus has any sense of
professionalism.
No serious jazz fan can
stand a steady dose of snidery phrased tunes like Melancholy Baby and Cocktails for
Two.
Mingus is playing at the
Auditorium today at noon.
The student-musician reaction could spark some
great jazz.
For some sort of sparks be
there early.
LONNIE HILLYER
. . . with Mingus
Jans Birthday — Nov. 14-Bring Gifts
Things seen on London scene
.■"":•'.»>»>'■
By   IAN   WALLACE
The magic title capitalizes
on current booms in Anglomania eccentrla and includes
such notables as pop men
Peter Blake, David Hackney, Allan Jones; and op
arters Bridget Riley, Jeremy
Moon, Richard Smith; plus
standard sculptors Phillip
King   and   William   Tucker
LONDON: The New Scene,
Vancouver Art Gallery lo
Nov.  28.
whose structures are sure to
boss art shapes in future.
The new scene is largely
mixture of U.S. imported op
and op ideas with British
showmanship and comedy.
The result is A Hard Day's
Night on canvas, a self-
conscious eccentricity, off-
the-cuff painting.
This cheerful carnival of
radicals features Peter
Blake's poster paintings ad-
vertising celebrities Bo
Diddley, Lady Wrestler Miss
Pearl Stud, also heroes Red
Starr, the good guy, and
Lord X, the villain.
Not to be missed is goofy
David Hockney whose
bloopy shapes outline his
underlying satire and overlying humor. A typical artist
who swings with society by
masking his underlying seriousness with court jester's
outfit.
Painters Richard Smith,
Bridget Riley (op), and>-Jere-
my Moon (hard edge) try to
push their styles as far as
they can go, but such introverted geometric imagery
cannot be pushed, its classic
power lies in restraint.
The real noteworthies of
this exhibit, sculptors Phillip
King and William Hucker,
resist this showmanship and
concentrate on their plastic
expression of lyrical hard-
edge shapes in the mood of
U.S. painter Ellesworth Rel-
ley and late sculptor David
Smith.
King and Tucker, taking
the limelight from kingpin
sculptors Moore and Chad-
wick, seem to benefit more
from and add more to the
enw U.S.-London exchange.
The New Scene might be
ephemeral but it is exciting.
7805 Windsor
COMMERCE
-ENGINEERING
- SCIENCE
Shell Canada Limited
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
TO INTERVIEW STUDENTS FOR
Regular Employment Nov. 15, 16, 17, 1965
Summer Employment Nov. 18, 1965
INTERESTED DEPARTMENTS
SUMMERS
Exploration
Producing
Manufacturing
REGULAR
Exploration
Gas
Producing
Manufacturing
Marketing
Accounting and  Finance
Specific information can be obtained from our posters and your
Placement Office.
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes.
Friday,  November  5,   1965
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 9 Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Fall Symposium
Applications  are   available  in  the AMS Office
Subject:    "Commitment and Beyond"
Place:    Rosario Beach, Anacortes, Washington
Time:    November 12, 13, 14.
Cost:    $6.50 all inclusive.
Deadline:    November 10th.
MI'M
MOT AW,
At some stage a young girl
realizes she's a young lady. Oh,
there may still be lollypops
now and then, but they're very
apt to be mixed up with roses.
At that point she often
seriously considers a product
she's been only mildly
considering: Tampax internal
menstrual protection. The
benefits of added freedom, poise,
security loom larger. She
finds out more about it—learns
that there's a silken-smooth
container-applicator that makes
insertion sure and easy.
One day she buys a package.
She removes one tampon and
studies it. What a neat little
solution to the problem! And
made of pure cotton, of course.
The direction folder seems
very explicit. And she
remembers that Tampax has
millions of users. She joins them.
And shortly thereafter, she's
the friend who pooh-poohs the
doubts of others.
For Sale
Varsity Outdoor Club
SKI CABIN
on Mt. Seymour
Suitable for Large Group.
One-half mile from tows.
If Interested Contact Mr.
Bruce Ward at YU 8-5742
Come To
University Hill
United Church
Sunday, November 7th
11 a.m. 'A GOING CHURCH'
Rev. Harold L, MacKay
2-5 p.m. "OPEN HOUSE"
at 1868 Knox Road
Come and meet the Mackays
7 p.m. University Young
People's Meeting — "THE
SEXUAL REVOLUTION"
Dr. Reg. Wilson
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1206 Granville
presenting
Don Crawford
Nightly
Bella rl«\* i
8
| a(    I In
llIII'll
tonight!!!!
res. 731-8722
jazz   at  the   blue
horn-362 J w. bwv.
TAMPAX   INTERNAL   SANITARY   PROTECTION   IS
MADE ONLY BY CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORA-
TION LIMITED. BARRIE, ONT.
Bird Calls  follows
Road Runner tradition
books
By JEFF WALL
Varied and extensively-developed characters are the
central motive of IBM 707,
whose Bird Calls — Student
Telephone Directory 1965-66
was released earlier this
week. Although the plot
lacks depth, the work on the
whole is an improvement on
707's last work.
Bird Calls, by IBM 707. Published by Alma Mater
Society, UBC. 216 pages,
soft cover, with supplement section.
The book starts slowly,
picks up in the D's with
exotic references which produce swirling, incense-clouded, sometimes iconographic
atmosphere. 707's memorable
phrase "Sonia DeGrandmai-
son 1 Arts 1798652" evokes
images of a Bohemian lyricism, in direct contract to the
harsh, rather angular
rhythms advanced by "Mel-
vin Debriske 2 Science" or
further on, "George Kropin-
ski" or, on the same page
"Klaus O. Kraumbholz 2
APSC 5045633".
• •      •
As the work moves into a
more complex idiom, toward
the crux of the rather morbid
determinism expressed so
completely in the statement
"Andrew Oksakovsky 2 Sc
6476640", we find an almost
Kierkegaardian pessimism
making itself felt later in the
same chapter with "Andrejs
Panteleyev 7 SC 6901602".
Soon after, 707's pace accelerates until he bogs down
again, though only slightly,
in a labryrinthine preoccupation with Far Eastern mysticism, under whose spell he
becomes enamoured with descriptions such as "Satoshi
Uchida 5 UNCL 8667621"
and then completely startles
us with the statement "Henri
Vanzylledejoh 1 Arts 897-
2651".
He brings the book to its
close with the words "E. R.
Zyblut 7 SC 9974571". This,
however, is an interesting
statement in itself, for it indicates a basic change in
707's point of view. In his
last work, arden readers will
recall, he left us with "Duncan S. Zoerb 1 FOR, Charlie
Lake, B.C."
• •      •
Even though he has apparently set himself to writing
one book per year, 707 still
strives for a degree of technical excellence. One will recall with delight the Byron
Hender fiasco which he forced himself into in his last
book. After a careful scrutiny, no such literary blunders, however engaging, are
in store for 707's public this
time.
The main criticism found
with Bird Calls was its somewhat odd lack of soulfulness,
pf 6ix
of the pity of the human predicament, as is found in the
work of some of his contemporaries, notably Tuum Est
and Totem. IBM 707 has retained his objectivity, it is
true, but he has lost much of
his compassion.
A final word, on the technical end. While the typography is essentially the
same as 707's last work, the
cover design is a distinct improvement over the mundane
affair managed last time.
Summing up, It would
seem that this book has a
definite appeal for a humanistically-oriented reader, be
he one to whom the distinc-
t i v e 1 y objective approach
used by 707 and his methodical, calculating style has
more appeal than it has to
this reviewer.
For the movie buffs, Otto
Preminger is reported interested in Bird Calls movie
possibilities. Preminger has
another epic in mind, and
Bird Calls, with its unique
casting possibilities, should
convert to the screen easily..
musie
BUD
and
TRAVIS
By KRIS EMMOTT
"Do you know what's the
saddest sound in the whole
world?" asked Travis Edmonson.
'It's what you hear when
you're all alone in a dark
apartment at night and somewhere there's a tap dripping, and it's calling this
name over and over—'Mort?
. . . Mort? . . . Mort? ..."
That's the offstage humor
of the folk-singing duo, Bud
and Travis, who entertained
at the homecoming dances,
and are now appearing at the
Bunkhouse.
Onstage, their wit changes.
After their opening number
at the Bunkhouse Monday
night Bud and Travis began
singing snatches of parodies
("Sailors for trail or rent")
until Bud got a laugh by
crooning, "It's so lonesome in
the saddle since my horse
died ..."
Their hands are fascinating
to watch, whether lightly
touching the strings, strumming the blues sound, smashing out chords with harsh
swipes or moving so fast in a
breakneck rendition of "La
Bamba" that the eye can't
separate the motions.
Small wonder that they've
played to standing-room-only
crowds ever since they got
together.
Between shows they sit
down to talk.
Bud Dashiell: 36, married,
father of two little girls, B.A.
from the Los Angeles Arts
Center and a veteran of
Korea. Travis: 33, graduate
of the University of Arizona
and grandson of Colonel
Travis of Alamo fame.
"I think folk-music is a
good idea," said Travis. "At
last teenage music is getting
lyrics that make sense. You
can listen to it without losing
your mind."
•     •     •
"Most of that stuff has
been said many times before," disagreed Bud. "It
doesn't make all that much
sense. "The answer is bio win'
in the wind,' what does that
mean? Me, I'm annoyed with
fads. Take that thing, 'Eve of
Destruction.' That's pure rubbish."
"What about Dylan?"
"We disagree,"  Bud said.
"Let Travis go first."
"O.K.,"    said    Travis.    "I
think that when Dylan grows.
up he'll be a very brilliant
poet."
"Bob Dylan hasn't a dog's
chance of ever being a brilliant poet," Bud sneered.
"How old is he? 22? And he's
said all he knows. He's on a
four-lane highway to oblivion. I give him five years."
"Where will he be after
that?"
"In an institution."
'You   think  he's   a   little
crazy?"
"We're all a little crazy."
Bud on weirdie-beardies:
"People that will jump on
any cause and protest for the
love of protesting just shut
me down."
What about Mario Savio,
leader of the Free Speech
Movement at UC Berkeley
and chief agitator of the 1964
riots there?
•     •      •
"I'd like to smack him in
the mouth," from Bud.
"People like that just like to
see authority squashed. I
can't relate to it, the way
they think. I don't see how
they can really believe that
stuff!
"How can Savio justifly
places like Hungary that the
Communists  crushed?"
"Oh, you think it's the
duty of the U.S. to protect
places like Viet Nam from
Communism?"
"No, not duty — but we
have a policy and we've got
to back it up. The U.S. is sort
of a big brother to all these
places now. And I'd rather
fight 'em in Viet Nam or
Korea than in California."
"Right," said Travis. "What
these Savio types don't see is
it's a war to stop more war.
Let's face it nobody WANTS
to fight ..."
"... but somebody's got
to do something," Bud concluded.
Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,  1965 Council waffles on
By BOB CRUISE
AMS has been rapped for
waffling on the fee question.
However, we should examine the steps taken so far.
On Aug. 11, student council presented the Board of
Governors with a strongly
worded brief, prepared by
the fee increase committee.
It contained this motion:
AMS . . . (2). protests the
recent increase (3) demands
the President and Board of
Governors treat the present
increase as of a temporary
nature, and (4) demands the
president and Board of Governors publicly adopt and implement a policy of gradual
reduction of fees.
Thus council refused to
accept last summer's tuition
increase.
Council also asked the
board to press for direct governmental aid to out-of-town
students. Top priority was
given to removal of first
year fees as an incentive to
high school students.
When the Board of Governors failed to make a positive reply to the AMS brief,
student council recommended students hold back their
second term fees.
The Board of Governors
has not replied to the brief.
It has not said whether
fees are to return to last
year's level (which AMS regards as a ceiling).
Some have criticized the
"fee-fighters," saying they
put too much emphasis  on
argument
CRUISE
fees when the real costs are
to women and out-of-town
students. This is not true. The
focus this year is on fees,
since it is a tangible and
real cost.
Also, it is senseless to talk
of increased aid if fees continue to rise a corresponding
amount.
AMS Monday stated it
was not in the interest of
students to withhold fees.
Several students (and one
student councillor) have suggested fees be paid . . . but
to a special AMS trust fund.
In this manner, the Board of
Governors will be forced to
deal with the students' elected representatives. Also, no
student will be "on the hot
seat" for not paying fees.
Fees would be paid over
as soon as a satisfactory reply to the AMS brief had
been received.
It is often argued "Go
after the government, not
the Board of Governors."
The government has the
money to increase student
aid. But the university administration is in a better
position to deal with the government than students.
The "fee fight" this year
is only the first step, in a
long range program of edu-
reform.
Its impact upon public
consciousness and the political arena has been considerable. With continued student
support it will hopefully
lead to the genuine democratization of post-secondary
education at all levels.
Feel Like Going to
Different Dances
? ?
•     •
You can dance to the
Latin and Modern Rhythms of
THE SOUL MATES  — FRIDAY
THE MOON LIGHTERS — SATURDAY
AT THE
8th ANNUAL
INTERNATIONAL
FALL FAIR
UBC ARMORIES 10:00 - 1:00 a.m.
Students Only $1.00
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction   Paper   Backs
New and Used
BETTER  BUY  BOOKS
4393 W. 10th Ave. - 2'24-4144
We beild an ear to undergraduate money
problems of all kinds, from setting up a savings
account, to budgeting, to discussing your financial
future. Any time we can be of help ...
ROYAL BANK
SPECIAL     EVENTS
presents
Charlie Mingus
Quartet
CHARLES   t r
MINGUS      :
iiU^Lvrb      '
d
50c
NOVEMBER 9th AUDITORIUM
DYLAN THOMAS'
0:30 P.M.
on North American Tour
UNDER MILK WOOD
North A
PERFORMED  BY:
The Kaleidoscope Players
Tickets at AMS - $1.00-$1.50
Watch for Bud and Travis returning to campus next week.
Time   and place to be announced.
Friday, November 5,   1965
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  11 Acorn moons
on lanterns
Poetry reading by Milton
Acorn .. . Thursday noon ...
Bu. 219.
By DENNIS WHEELER
Milton Acorn is not a proletarian poet. He is naturally
concerned with the problems
most obvious to him, but
nevertheless he has a feeling
for all he writes. A feeling
which goes beyond the superficiality of political concern.
He compares his moon to
another; the other being a
paper lantern where his is a
solid force, a rock of singing
steel. The crystal cut which
faces plane to plane, the
simple slice opening a world
beyond:
"like a toy sailboat on
water"
f'and   his glance  of swift
mercy".
And yet methodical in context.
There is a sensuality in his
simplicity which rings afterwards  in the minds  of the
audience,   as   evident   in,   To
Conceive of Tulips:
"Heartswell in the mind,
presence of purple ... to
dream of swallowing a color,
warm ice cream and peace
under the navel."
Acorn deserves attention.
He has something to say and
is honest and straight-
forward in saying it.
A Career
in
Iron Ore!
IRON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA
a.£t&.~A
AND
QUEBEC NORTH SHORE AND LABRADOR RAILWAY
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Career opportunities are offered in
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► METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT,
IRON  ORE  COMPANY  OF  CANADA,
SEPT-ILES,  P.Q.
Our representatives will be pleased to meet with you when they visit your campus on
November 16,17
IMPERIAL
€sso
SERVICE
MARKETING
(Sales, Merchandising and
Operations)
Students Graduating with a
Bachelor or Masters degree
in
IMPERIAL OIL LIMITED
Has Vacancies In 1966
in the following departments
Engineering
Commerce
Arts   (General)
Science   (General)
Agriculture
1966
all branches
MANUFACTURING
(Refining)
Students Graduating with a
B.Sc. or M.Sc. in
1966
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
1967
Chemical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
PRODUCING
(Production and Exploration)
Students Graduating with a
B.Sc. or M.Sc. in
1966
Engineering — all branches
Honours Geology
Geophysics
Honours Mathematics
1967
Geological Engineering
Engineering Physics
Honours Geology
Geophysics
IN ADDITION, PERMANENT AND SUMMER VACANCIES ARE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS UNDERTAKING POST GRADUATE STUDIES IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND
CHEMISTRY IN THE RESEARCH DEPARTMENT AT SARNIA, AND IN THE PRODUCTION RESEARCH
AND TECHNICAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT IN CALGARY.
OPPORTUNITIES   FOR   REGULAR   EMPLOYMENT   ARE AVAILABLE IN THE CHEMICAL PRODUCTS,
PIPE LINE AND COMPUTER SERVICES DEPARTMENT
Our Representative, MR. R. G. INGS, will be on the campus on
NOVEMBER 8th, 1965
to make interviewing appointments for students enrolled in the above
courses who are interested in filling the advertised vacancies.
MR. INGS will be located in the Student Placement Office on the West Mall
Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,   1965 Friday, November 5,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   13
FOREGROUND
Computer tackles
admin, problems
The rapid spread of higher
education in the 1960s has
made the task of university
administration an increasingly
complex one.
Computers, already used
extensively for simplifying
decision-making processes in
the business community, may
provide a solution for the problems of university administrators.
Under the auspices of the
Bladen commissioners, Richard W. Judy, Associate Professor of Economics and Computer Science at the University of Toronto, and Jack B.
Levine, a graduate student in
Operations Research at Toronto, compiled a report on the
potential role of computers in
university administration.
The following exerpts are
from that report:
In December, 1964, the Bladen Commission commissioned a pilot study to investigate
the feasibility of a system
simulation computor.
This report concerns that
effort. Its purpose is to relate
the feasibility of building a
system simulation model for
the University of Toronto and
similar institutions.
The model simulates university operations over a time
period of any length.
Loaded into the computer,
the model accepts descriptions
of the university's structure
and statements of the levels
of activities that the university
is expected to perform.
With these inputs, the model
computes the resulting resource requirements of staff,
space, materials, and money.
It is unfortunately true in
most universities that decision-makers lack vital information about the resource im
plications of alternative programs.
Estimates of the number of
future applicants are often of
dubious reliability.
The costs of expanding various courses of study are frequently unknown.
The informational vacuum
within which they are expected to work disturbs many university decision-makers.
They must make major decisions and program and planning on the basis of fragmentary and inadequate information.
In concrete terms, information deficiency means excess
capacity here and shortages
there; it means unsubstantiated budgets; it means emergency appeals for funds; it
means that the educational investment is not paying its
maximum dividend.
The outcome of the pilot
study indicates that the construction of a universiy simulation model is feasible and
that the resources required to
design, program, and operate
it would be modest.
The anticipated advantages
of a simulation model to university planners and decision
makers are several:
• Better knowledge of the
cost consequences of alternatives should improve decisions
and reduce the number of unfortunate surprises in university planning.
• The use of a computerized university simulation
model should make possible
more accurate and substantiated statements of financial
requirements to legislative
bodies and other sources of
funds.
Heightened    credibility    of
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these statements should facilitate the flow of finances.
• New data collection efforts are expensive.
It is not unusual, however,
for new reports to be initiated
in the absence of clear evidence that their results will
be worth the effort. With the
simulation model as an aid, it
should be possible to evaluate
the potential benefit from additional information.
• Because of a paucity of
information, an impending
decision of any consequence
in the university is likely to
initiate a search for data de
novo. Each time it occurs, it
places a new burden on deans
and departmental chairmen as
they strive to supply the requested information.
The university simulation
model, because it systematically would bring together
and analyse information relative to a broad class of problems, should reduce this burden of tedious and repetitous
paperwork.
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A leading member of the Ottawa press gallery recently wrote that the voice of Howard Green had been
badly missed in the last Parliament. Both as an Opposition member and later as a ranking Cabinet Minister,
he was esteemed by members of all parties. Canada
needs men like Howard Green in Parliament.
ELECT
HOWARD GREEN
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CANDIDATE
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Chevron Standard
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CALGARY, ALBERTA
Offers Careers In
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
Campus Interviews On
November 8  9 & 10
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
ENGINEERING — Chemical, Mechanical, Civil
—'Permanent and summer employment in engineering.
HONOURS GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
(Options 1, 2, 3)
—Permanent and summer employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
GEOPHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
PHYSICS and GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
HONOURS PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
Arragenments for Personal Interview may be
Made Through the
UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE. Page  14
THE        UBYSSiEY
Friday, November 5,   1965
Los Angeles
Philharmonic Orchestra
with
ZUBIN MEHTA conducting
Barber - Mozart - Strauss
One Performance  Only
Tuesday, November 9th at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets on Sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre
630 Hamilton Street   :-:   Phone 683-3255
Students may reserve seats by phone at $1.00
(Present AMS card at box office for tickets)
Sports
at UBC
FIELD  HOCKEY
UBC hosts the Pacific
Northwest College women's
tournament for the first time
this weekend. Twenty-one
teams from Washington, Oregon, Idaho and B.C. have entered the tournament to be
played on the fields behind
the War Memorial Gym.
UBC p.lays University of
Victoria at 2 p.m. Saturday.
All games will be played
regardless of weather.
FOOTBALL
Meeting at Wolfson field
Nov. 11 at noon for team
photos. All must attend.
SWIMMING
The aquatic class of the
school of physical education
and recreation is sponsoring
the 15th annual inter-high
school championships at
Percy Norman Pool Nov. 12
and 13. Five hundred entries
from 40 schools will take
part.
Plan now for an
EXCITING CAREER
in
COMMUNICATIONS
with
B.C.TEL
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Nowhere on the continent are there greater rewards for
University graduates than in British Columbia. Register now
at your Student Placement Office for an interview with a
British Columbia. Telephone Company representative and
discover the exciting and rewarding opportunities in the field
of communications.
Management training opportunities are available in:
ENGINEERING
MARKETING and SALES "
DATA PROCESSING
GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Our interest is in graduates in Applied Science  (Electrical,
Mechanical and Engineering Physics); Commerce and Science
(Mathematics and Physics).
B.C. TEL ®
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
FOR
THE
BIRDS
By
GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Sex. Free. New.
These three favorite catchwords of Madison Avenue
image makers will undoubtably be overworked by UBC's
starry eyed athletic department this term and next.
Athletic officials here have started a movement to make
varsity basketball and football the two priority sports on
campus:
No, we are not about to see the long awaited implementation of athletic scholarships, merely an increase in the
barrage of phony promotion and publicity gimmicks.
Compared to the North American norm the two sports
to be designated top priority operate at a level much below
that of at least five of UBC's so called minor sports —
rowing, field hockey, sailing, soccer and rugby.
The first three varsity teams sent representatives to the
Tokyo Olympics, while soccer and rugby compete quite successfully in conferences which are the best in North America.
The football and basketball Birds play the most minor
of American colleges.
And almost all of the athletic office's energy may now
be directed towards publicizing basketball and football.
Keep up with Simon Fraser
The reason? Athletic officials feel we must go all out
to keep up with Simon Fraser Academy.
Well, the wind may blow and the snow may fly at
UBC but Simon Fraser will become an oasis in the barren
inter-collegiate  athletic   waste  of  Western   Canada.
UBC had its own way for 50 years, including access
to the largest centralized population in Western Canada
and the largest university enrolment from which to draw
support and finances. And now we have the incentive of
competition from an institution which places a sensible
value on the role of athletics at a university.
When schools like Harvard, Yale and Notre Dame are
able to reach the peak of excellence in both athletics and
academic achievement no one can say sports interfere with
the educational role of a university.
Actually administrators at these institutions would
probably admit quite readily that athletics have helped their
academic development considerably.
Nothing works better as a public relations tool in bringing back alumnae to a college than sports, if they're developed and promoted properly.
Alumnae flock back
At the University of Washington, and many other American schools, Alumnae retufh in thousands on the weekends
to take in the "big" game. All most alumnae really want is
an excuse to return to their old alma mater. They have
breakfast with their team, talk to the profs who take advantage of the opportunity to tell them how much the old
school could use a few extra bucks, then take in the game.
Often they attend a post game dance and spend the whole
weekend on campus.
Think the Lions make money?
The University of Washington, expecting a capacity
crowd of 60,000 for this weekend's game with Washington
State sold their last 2,000 end zone seats at $6 per.
But this will never happen at UBC as long as administrators try to sell, yea, even con students and alumnae into
buying a substandard product.
Let's be sensible, improve the product first, even if it
means implementing an athletic scholarship program.
1966 ARTS GRADUATES
MALE and FEMALE
(Any Field)
If you like research and have the ability to   think for
yourself,
If you have an enquiring mind, a disciplined curiosity,
If you  have  an  aptitude for critical  investigation  and
evaluation,
If you can penetrate deep into a problem and still maintain a breadth of vision,
If you have enthusiasm and drive and can "stick with it",
If your academic standings are really good,
If you are a Canadian citizen and a career in Ottawa is
for you — then,
Contact the Placement Office now for an application form
And arrange for an interview with a representative
of the
COMMUNICATIONS BRANCH
NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
Ottawa
On Campus November 10th and 12th, 1965 Friday,  November  5,   1965
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  15
MOTH KILLER'S club will not be taking tips from Thunderbird soccer goalkeeper Bruce
Ballam who claims he's more concerned with killing off eleven Carlings this weekend.
Bal lam leads Birds into Callister park Sunday at 2 p.m. for clash with Columbus
Carlings  of Coast league.  Win  could   propel Birds into first place.
Rugby mix-up
hurting UBC
By DOUG MOSER
UBC rugby is suffering from the Vancouver Rugby
Union's formula for scheduling games.
Under   this   formula,   first
division teams from last year
have been split into two sections with several new teams
equally divided between the
sections.
As a result, the Thunderbirds are meeting less than
adequate opposition, having
scored 81 points to nine
against in winning three
starts.
On the other hand, the
Braves, traditionally UBC's
second team, have suffered
substantial defeats against
such first" class clubs as the
Meralomas and Kats.
Such one-sided games are
detrimental to exciting — and
interesting competition.
The anomaly is that while
the Birds could easily qualify
for the playoff between section leaders, they are automatically excluded because of
forthcoming conference games
with American colleges.
At the same time, the fast
improving Braves are already
eliminated from the playoffs
because of fixtures against
Vancouver's best in the early
weeks of the term.
The Thunderbirds are noted
for their attractive style in top
class rugby and the Braves
with a few more weeks of
playing together could provide equally exciting competition.
SPORTS
Editor: Ed Clark
Grid  Birds
fly  south
The UBC football Thunderbirds take their 1-4-2 record south to the San Francisco Bay area this weekend.
The Birds meet the University of Santa Clara Saturday afternoon in their second-last contest of the 1965
season.
Coaches, players, cheerleaders, and a few Bird supporters leave tonight for San
Francisco.
flWU*
ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON.
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
Card.
336 West Pender St.
681-2004
UBC THUNDERBIRD Ken.
Ronalds, will be in action
against Maillardville Carlings.
in exhibition hockey game
Saturday at 8:30 p.m. in
Winter Sports Centre.
Rugby action
All UBC rugby teams play
at home this Saturday.
The Birds host Rowing
Club at 2:30 in their first
game at Varsity Stadium.
Braves tangle with Blue
Bombers at the same time
out at Wolfson Field.
Vino soccer bog
could be Birds'
stepping stone
A vino flavored bog with a colorful history in Canadian
soccer could be the setting for UBC's Thunderbirds to open
their  Cinderella-like-play  for national  sports  fame.
The Birds battled for three years to gain entry into the
Pacific Coast Soccer League only to finish last in their first
season in the Coast League the past year. But now they
can move into sole position of first place in the PCL with a
victory Sunday at Callister Park.
UBC will be playing Columbus Carlings, Canadian
champions two years ago, and the darlings of Vancouver's
large Italian community.
And the Birds will be counting on two veterans and a
raw rookie to lead them to a win.
Jim Berry and Dick Mosher, who propelled. UBC into
the PCL by topping the Mainland league in scoring two years
ago with 21 and 19 goals respectively, arc the stalwarts of
this year's team. Both Mosher, who is second in PCL scoring
with four goals, and Berry, who has turned to stopping goals
at a fullback position, are strong candidates for all-star
honors.
•        •        •
The rookie is goaltender Bruce Ballam who has played
like a veteran. The Birds haven't lost in four league and
three exhibition games this year. Ballam, whose prize possession is a pair of fast, deft hands, has been in the nets for
all of UBC's matches.
The varsity squad is in second place, one point behind
Vancouver Firefighters, who play Saturday against a tough
St. Andrews team.
Should  the Firemen  lose,  Sunday's  game  will be  the
most critical of the year, UBC coach Joe Johnson claims.
Game time is 2 p.m.
BANQUET HALL FOR RENT
GREEN ACRES GOLF COURSE
504 $6 Road,  Richmond
HALL AVAILABLE  FOR
BANQUETS - MEETINGS
WEDDINGS - PARTIES
Catering  Also  Available
Phone 278-0416 for Information
Pimm's No.1 has a Gin base
Pimm's No. 5 has a Canadian Whisky base
(both are absolutely delicious!)
Two things about Pimm's: easy to
serve, and a taste you'll enjoy.
Just pour into a tall glass and add
ice and fill up with your favourite light
mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to
make the traditional Pimm's, famous
throughout the world. But don't bother
unless you're in the mood.
A new generation is rediscovering
Pimm's.. .and enjoying every moment
of it.
DRINK
PIMM'S
simply because you'll enjoy
the taste ol it.
II. CORBY DISTII.LKKY LIMITED, CORUYV1LLE," CAN.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Cohtrcbk Page   16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 5,   1965
7WEEN CLASSES
'Necessary evil' debated
DEBATING UNION I
Resolved   that   literary  cen- |
sorship   is   a    necessary   evil.
Noon today, Bu. 217.
• •      •
EAST ASIA SOC
Slides and talk on mainland
China, particularly Peking.
8:30 p.m., 3306 W. 15th. Bring
your own refreshments.
• •      •
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting noon today, hut 0-12. All are welcome.
• •      •
DIEF SPEAKS
Special return buses for Diefenbaker Speech League leave
Brock 11:30 a.m. today.
• •  •
LOWER MALL CULTURAL
COMM.
Motif '65: Variety Show and
Hootenanny at Lower Mall
Ballroom, Sunday, Nov. 7, 7:30
p.m. Admission free.
• •      •
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General meeting for all members, Monday noon, Bu. 223.
• •    •
GAMMA DELTA
Meeting noon today in Bu.
2201. Pastor Meyer speaks: "Is
our Bible complete?"
• •    •
FROSH COUNCIL
All frosh wishing to play
intramural basketball meet in
Bu. 2202 at noon today. Attendance compulsory for membership.
• •      •
U.N. CLUB
Current affairs discussion,
upper lounge, I.H., Monday.
All Welcome.
Seminar — "Problems of
Underdevelopment", Saturday,
Nov. 13. Apply Box 13, AMS
office.
Squire
Traditionals
In a Variety of Patterns
and Plain Shades
$6.95-$8.95
41st at Yew
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Guest speaker Mr. Walling.
Topic: "The opportunities and
responsibilities in Probation
Work." Monday noon, Bu. 202.
• •      •
FINE ARTS GALLERY
At Lasserre 104. Dr. Shuichi
Kato of Asian Studies speaks
noon today on "What Does
Chinese Art Mean for the
Chinese."
• •      •
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Last minute tickets available
for "A Month In the Country,"
(all perf's $1) and "The Grande
Ballet Classique de France,"
(Giselle) 75 cents, Monday, Nov.
8 at Special Events office.
• *      *
UBC MUSIC DEPT.
UBC Wind Ensemble Concert,
8 p.m., Brock Hall. Music of
Shostakovich, Franck, Rimsky-
Korsakoff.  Admission free.
UBC LIBERALS
Grand Deachman, Liberal
candidate in Van. - Quadra,
speaks today noon, Bu. 205.
• •  •
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
"High cost of dying", Mr.
Francis of Simmons and McBride, Monday noon, Bu. 104.
• •      •
VCF
Meeting in Angus 110, noon
today. Rev. Walter McLean on
the topic of "Christian Service."
• •      •
UNIVERSITY QUAKER
GROUP
Meeting for worship, 11 a.m.
Sunday, in Buchanan Penthouse.
• *      •
EL CIRCULO
Miss Robinson of the Spanish
department speaks on South
America, noon today in Bu. 204.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office:  Brock  Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost k Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26.
224-3242.
LOST — SATURDAY NIGHT ON
Campus, Gold Waltham Watch,
engraved R. Kocher. 988-7003.
Reward.  Sentimental value.
LOST. Chem. 102, lab. book. Outside
Chem. 270 Tues. Please contact
Kemp Edmonds. AM 6-51163. Urgent.
ONE BROWN wallet on Wednesday. I.D. urgently needed. Reward.
Phone 224-9744 after six or contact Dwight Botnen at the Totem
Park.
LOST, One Zoology Lab Kit. Either
in Westbrook or Ponderosa. If you
have found it please phone CR 8-
9249.
LOST. Economics 200 Text. Urgently
needed for exam. Contact Perry
at  261-1809.
LOST. Small brown leather holder
with identification cards, AMS
card, library card, charge plates,
driver's licence. If found return to
AMS office or J. Large, CA 4-0313.
FOUND. One Parker Pen outside
Woodward Library, Tuesday. Owner please call 224-9746, Frances
Leach,   Totem   Residence   (48S).
LOST. One reversible raincoat beige
on one side, laminated blue on
other.   Phone  Trina at  224-9972.
FOUND.   Shoes   (good).   Phone   526-
5640.  Fri. night only.	
FOR SALE. 1956 Pontiac, 4-dr. sed.,
6-cyl., std., real good condition.
Phone Ken  at  224-7230  after  5.00.
53 HILLMAN in good condition.
Ask for Bob at 224-1570 after 7.00.
p.m.
1960    VW    DELUXE,
$875. TR 9-3649.
excel,   cond.,
'56 PONTIAC 2 DR. HARDTP V8,
radio, auto, excellent condition.
Phone   Alex   after   6,   TR  6-1811.
MUST SELL, '61 RENAULT GOR-
DINI, good cond., $450. Phone
Brian Bruser, 224-9001.
1952 CHEV . '54 motor, new front
tires. Excellent condition through
out. Phone Don, FA 7-5000.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters k Repairs 43
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, 220
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
TYPING OF ALL KINDS DONE
at Home. Call AM 1-8887 after 5.30
ask for Miss Garland or Miss
Elliot.
Typing
49
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED,
70th and Granville. Phone 263-4530.
FOUND. Round silver pendant, Mexican,  C lot.  Phone WH 2-8721 eve.
Spacial Notic—
13
THE FABULOUS MR. BARRY,
hypnotist exceptional. One more
hilarious show. Fri., Nov. 5, Totem  Park,   at 8:30 p.m.
GOT A CAMEL you want saddled?
A wife you want lead? Need a gift
for your dog or mom? Try Treasure Van — all week long in International House  — 12  p.m.  on.
TWO SEATS available on charter
to Europe at Xmas. Phone Susan
224-5332 or Mrs. Smith 681-8581.
3 weeks; leaving Dec. 19, 2350.00
return.
'TWIRP DANCE (the lady is requested to pay), Nov. 6, Dance
Lounge, 8-12 p.m. 50c per person,
$1.00   per  couple.	
THIS IS IT! Fall Fair '65 tonight
and Sat. Official opening tonight
by Lieut.-Gov'r. 7 p.m. Armouries.
Tickets 50c-$1.50. AMS Office or
International  House.	
SCHWEITZER SKI TRIP!! MEF.T-
ing for all interested—noon, Nov.
5,   Buch.   100. 	
Transportation
14
URGENTLY NEEDED, RIDE from
West End for 8.30's. Ph. 224-5556
after 6  p.m.,   Gary.	
RIDE wanted from Lynn Valley.
M. W. F. Call Maureeta at
922-5507.
ONE DRIVER, preferably a srirl,
needed for car pool to UBC. Vicinity 13th to 22nd streets In West
Vancouver. Leave at 7:00 a.m. and
return at 5':30 p.m. Phone 922-2070.
Wanted
15
INTERIOR TEACHER NEEDS History 201 notes for Winter Sup.
Buv or  Rent.   Call   874-7173   eves.
IF YOU PLAY BANJO OR BASS
and you want to form Folk Group
phone TR 4-5328.
AUTOMOTIVE   fc  MARINE
Automobiles For Sal*
21
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
'Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West Van.
PS:   New  outlet   coming   close   to
U.B.C.
COMMISSION AGENT TO SELL
Charter and Group Bus Trips —
phone MU 1-7545,  Mr.  Parke.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—THE MOST USE-
ful book on the campus. Student
telephone directory. Now available. Limited number. Buy Tour's
Today—Only   75c.	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you have a good
driving history you qualify for
Allstate Insurance's good driver
rates.   Call   Ted.   Elliott,   224-6707.
PARSON'S USED FURNITURE
MART takes pleasure in announcing a greatly enlarged store to
serve vou. Also beer bottle depot
at rear of store. (25c per doz.)
Kitty corner frcm liquor store.
3207   West   Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
ONE UBC jacket in excellent condition. One year old. Recently dry
cleaned.   Phone  Bob,  AM  1-1878.
Rooms
81
ROOM for a UBC girl with three
other girls. Furnished quiet and
comfortable. Please phone 224-3692
on 14th and Alma carpool. Every
day.
Room & Board
82
ROOM and BOARD for 2 girls. One
block from the gates. Phone 224-
7748.
The Handiest Book
on Campus
THE    UNIVERSITY    OF
BRITISH    COLUMBIA
011\ 1 / vjrlkl.iiLkj
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
1965 - 1966
GET  YOURS  TODAY
Present Pre Sale Tickets To Publications
Office, Brock Hall
Cash Sales at Book Store
Publications Office, College Shop, etc.
r~
y/'/f
things gO
better,!
wwith
Loke
Worldly studies a drag?Take time out for the unmistakable taste of ice-cold Coca-Cola. Lifts your spirits,
boosts your energy...
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
Authorlied    bottler   of    Coca-Cola   under   contract    with    Coca-Cola    Ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED

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