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The Ubyssey Oct 22, 1965

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Array RACE RIOT
Chariot
brawlers
bloodied
Riot took over the chariot
race at Thursday's Tea Cup
Game.
The annual event between
engineering and science undergraduate societies deteriorated
into a bruising free-for-all with
the engineers receiving the
brunt of the damage.
EUS president Art Stevenson
blasted the tatics used by the
SUS during the race.
• •     •
Stevenson said he spent three
hours in Wesbrook hospital being treated for injuries after
he was hit by two smoke
bombs.
He suffered a seven-stitch
deep gash to the head, and a
possible fractured rib.
The smoke bombs weighed
about four pounds each and
were in tin centainers.
Stevenson said: "Wesbrook
hospital looked like a disaster
had hit it.
"More than a dozen engineers
and one scienceman were in
with a variety of injuries from
cuts to acid burns.
"At least four engineers received burns from acid thrown
by the sciencemen."
Stevenson said third-year-engineer Pat Meehan received an
acid burn which might result
in the partial loss of sight to
his right eye.
• •     •
Stevenson   said   one   doctor
told him the injuries were far
past the point of fun.
"The SUS showed a high degree of irresponsibility in using
acid and smoke bombs," said
Stevenson.
He said the lone scienceman
he saw at the hospital suffered
a head cut from a smoke bomb
thrown by his own society.
On the field, a fighting nursing squad made patients out of
the home ec team with a 7-0
victory in the Tea Cup football
game.
Five thousand students saw
nursing halfback Laurie Bell
make a spectacular run around
the left end for the major score.
The convert was run to make
the score 7-0 at the end of the
half.
Home ec dominated the game
in the second half, but was unable to push over for a major
score.
• •     •
The engineers won the
chariot race by a good 150 yard
margin.
The annual boat race saw the
Pubsters victorious over the
engineering and agriculture
teams.
A judge's mistake, however,
allowed the winner's prize of
four bottles to go to the agriculture squad.
A total of $1,576.46 was collected by the EUS, sponsors of
the game. The money will be
donated to the Crippled Children's Hospital.
KRASSNER
EXCLUSIVE
See: PAGE FRIDAY
—bert mackinnon  photo
MOBS MASH  FOR POSSESSION  of  chariots  during science-engineer chariot   race  at  Teacup   Game Thursday.   Usually
good-natured  contest,   race   degenerated   into  bomb-throwing,   acid-spilling  brawl,   injuring   many  participants.
THSU8YSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 16
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1965
CA 4-3916
CASCADING FOAM bathes hairy engineer at Teacup
Game boat race Thursday. Ubyssey pubsters outguzzled
the competition,  as  usual but donated  prize  to  aggies.
AMS retreats
— vote issue
opened wide
By DOUG HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
AMS  President  Byron  Hender backed down   on   the
AMS   ruling to   rip   down   non-approved   march   posters
following an emergency council meeting Thursday night.
The ruling followed the pass
ON PETITION WORDING
Council bucked
(This story had gone to press
before council's decision Thursday night on the vote-march
issue.)
March of Concern committee
members obtained 900 signatures Thursday requesting "fair
wording" for a general referendum for a National Student
Day march.
The petition stated: "We, the
undersigned members of the
AMS, request the following
referendum be submitted to the
student body on Monday, Oct.
25, 1965.
" 'Are you in favor of a re
sponsible   march   as   part   of
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: PETITION
Soccer  fans
brewing  up
Joyous brew addicts can
celebrate the 'Canadian' way
Saturday at Varsity stadium.
Burnaby Canadians invade
UBC to clash with the Thunderbirds in a regular Pacific
Coast League soccer game.
UBC's cavorting cheerleaders will be on hand to
support the Birds who are
currently tied for first place
in the Coast League.
Game time is 2 p.m.
ing of a motion giving the
wording for Monday's referendum:
"Do you wish that an orderly
academic procession be added
to the Alma Mater Society program on National Student
Day?"
The  meeting  was  called  to
consider   a   900-name   petition
submitted by the March of Concern Committee.
VANCE   REFUSED
MCC is an ad hoc group
formed after council vetoed the
march Oct. 15.
AMS co-ordinator Graeme
Vance refused the group permission to put up posters advertising its own march.
Councillors and members of
campus service club Circle K
were told Monday to rip down
all posters promoting the unauthorized march.
Hender said he retracted the
council ruling Thursday because he felt both sides of the
petition had an equal right to
advertise.
He said that the AMS will
campaign against the referendum.
NOISY   SESSION
In the noisy hour-long session of council Hender said
that the referendum could very
well become a confidence vote
for council.
The point of confidence was
batted around the council
chamber until drowned in a
confused passing of the referendum wording.
During debate, arts president
Chuck Campbell said councillors were not elected to reflect
the views of the students. He
said they were to give leadership.
"If the students vote for the
march they are saying we aren't
doing this," he said.
Students hit
for licence,
lawlessness
UBC president John Mac
donald has accused university
students of too often confusing
freedom with licence in their
demonstrations.
Addressing university officials at the University of Toronto, Wednesday, Macdonald
said: "There is a deep-seated
unrest among many students
and some faculty members with
a growing incidence of lawless-
nes.
"These people frequently
espouse meaningless causes and
overstep the law in their protest efforts."
"Somehow we are failing to
get the message across that
universities exist for the individual," he said.
"They are a bulwark against
anarchy, the kind of anarchy
that some of them (the students)
are provoking." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  22,   1965
Students across Canada
talk and teach Oct. 27
OTTAWA (CUP) — Mass
demonstrations, panel discussions and teach-ins are planned
across Canada on National
Student Day, Oct. 27.
The program is planned to
dramatize the demand for universal accessibility for higher
education.
Strong support for the Canadian Union of Students' action
program for the day is evident
is some regions, but spotty in
others.
In Ottawa the national CUS
effort will be climaxed by a
march on parliament hill from
Commie head
would allow
'opposition
By BRUCE McBAY
Canadian Communist party
leader William Kashton came
out in support of democracy
Thursday.
Kashton told 40 students at
a noon meeting in Bu.106 his
party stood for a multi-party
system of government.
"A Communist government
would allow opposition parties
to exist as long as they obeyed
the laws of Canada," he said.
He did not say what the laws
of Canada would be.
"A Communist government
would not be based on the Russian one-party system," he said.
Kashton said free higher education is a necessity in Canada
and it should be implemented
as soon as possible.
"Ten years, as stated by the
Bladen commission, is too long
to wait.
"Free education should be
the right of all students."
Kashton said the problem of
Canadian unity would not be
solved by a provincial conference as proposed by opposition
leader John Diefenbaker.
He said Canada was made up
of two nations and the problem
should be tackled by a federal
conference between French and
English representatives.
He said if French Canada
was not given equal rights it
could lead to a split in Canada,
both parts of which would be
absorbed by the United States.
Speaking about the upcoming election, Kashton said he
"would like to see a large number of progressives elected to
parliament."
He defined progressives as
Communists, New Democrats,
and others of similar principles.
BAY
Captain Newman, M.D.
Gregory Peck, Tony Curtis
and Angie Dickenson.
Plus:
A Stitch In Time
Norman Wisdom, Edward
Chapman
DELTA
October 22 and 23 only
Night Creatures
Peter Cushing
Kiss of the Vampire
Clifford Evans
Dr. Terror's House
of Horror  (Adult)
Peter Cushing
the city's four  universities.
CUS president Patrick Kenniff will address a meeting
there along with representatives of the political parties.
On the 44 CUS campuses
the success or failure of National Student Day is anybody's
guess.
• •      •
The picture varies from Nova
Scotia's plans to march on the
provincial legislature to Saskatchewan's wait and see attitude.
Newfoundland students a t
Memorial University, already
assured of free education by
Premier Smallwood, will demonstrate their solidarity with
students in the rest of the country.
New Brunswick and Prince
Edward Island students are
planning publicity and educational programs.
At Victoria University, students plan to march to a theatre for a public forum, where
political candidates, university
administrators, and government speakers will address
them.
Edmonton and Calgary students are planning the creation of an Alberta Association
of Students that will carry on
the fight for student demands
after National Student Day.
In Edmonton, students will
tape $1,500 worth of dimes to
a sidewalk to give a graphic
picture of the cost of higher
education for a student for one
year.
Students at Brandon College, Manitoba, are planning
a meeting with speeches from
all political parties, a debate
on free education and a jazz
concert at night.
• •     •
Plans for United College and
University of Manitoba are not
yet finalized.
In Quebec, the Union Gen-
erla des Etudiants du Quebec
has decided not to participate
in National Student Day.
At Loyala, the senate of the
university has cancelled classes for the afternoon.
The McGill student council
will not take part in National
Student Day.
The council took the decision to opt out of the Canadian
Union of Students program after students at Laval and the
University of Montreal declined to join with them in an education teach-in.
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McGill is currently seeking
membership in the Union Generate des Etudiants du Quebec.
Ken Cabatoff, external vice-
president of the McGill student council said Tuesday that
if McGill is admitted to the
UGEQ it will push for a Quebec student day.
He said his council did not
consider action for free education in Quebec advisable without the support of at least one
French speaking university.
Bishop College has made no
decision in the country-wide
action. Theirs was the only delegation at the CUS congress
to vote against the universal
accessibility motion.
In Ontario, students from
the universities of Toronto,
York University, and the Ryerson Polytechnical Institute
will march on the provincial
Legislature to demand an end
to financial and social barriers
to universal accessibility.
•     •      •
Organizers estimate the
march could draw 5,000 students. The marchers plan to
present a brief to education,
minister William Davis.
At Sudbury, Guelph and
Windsor, publicity programs
and discussions are planned.
At London, the University of
Western Ontario Student Council defeated the universal accessibility after their delegation supported it at the CUS
congress.
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A meeting will be held in Brock Hall
Tuesday October 26, at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
GEOLOGISTS
A representative from one of Canada's leading oil and
gas exploration and producing companies will be on
campus to interview graduate and undergraduate students in the courses Geology and Geological Engineering,
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For further information and appointment please contact
your Placement Officer.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
—Joe varesi photo
WATCH YOUR NAILS purrs one homewrecker as nurses and home ec gals viciously
battle for possession of football in Thursday's annual Teacup game. Nurses won 6-0
in dramatic  upset.
Action chairman Cruise
states stand on march
By BOB CRUISE
EAP co-chairman
Bob Cruise is Alma Mater
Society first vice-president
Education Action Program co-
chairman. He says the opinions
he gives here are not his as a
council member, but his own
personal ideas.
Here is why I am in favor
of the march from Sunset
Beach.
I am not speaking as AMS
first vice-president.
What I have advocated is an
academic procession. I personally would support any responsible orderly march to
indicate concern over student
financing.
EAP recommended that the
march to the Bayshore to give
students the opportunity to
give university presidents a
chance to explain their feeling
about "universal accessibility"
to students.
The AMS president (or CUS
president if he would come)
would deliver a brief statement to the Association of
Universities and Colleges in
Canada meeting.
I have never advocated a
"protest march to badger the
AUCC presidents".
However, on National Student Day, when the Universities
of Victoria, Montreal, McGill
and Edmonton, and three-Ontario universities are marching to Ottawa is UBC to be
considered a passive participant?
Marches do not solve complex questions. But they do
give students a chance to join
as a group with their student
councillors in expressing concern.
Student Council Monday
came out in favor of a mass
distribution of literature in
the community. Although the
itudent has to act by himself
rather than collectively (therefore it is hard to say how
many would bother) the idea
is excellent and I'm in favor
of having students who are
willing to distribute literature
in the downtown area.
Whatever happens though, I
will indicate my committment
to the National Student community and my concern over
the trends in university student financing.
PETITION   SIGNED
(Continued from Page 1)
NDP man  wants
free education
Free education for everybody is proposed by New
Democratic candidate for
Vaincouver-Quadrav George
Trasov.
Speaking to a meeting of
50 students in Bu. 204 Thursday at noon Trasov pointed
out his party's planned social   and   economic   reforms.
He said: "We must expand facilities to absorb
every girl, boy who has the
desire for hiher education."
When asked about the Bladen report he replied, "1
think its insufficient, inadequate; it's ridculous".
National  Students'   Day  program?' "
MCC chairman Randy Enomoto, said the petition was circulated because the MCC did
not regard the planned Alma
Mater Society referendum as
fair.
He said the planned referendum, outlined in a Ubyssey advertisement Thursday, was
worded to imply that a march
alone would not be part of a
responsible program.
"It gives students the option
of either having the march or
taking part in an organized
program," he said.
"The committee is in favor
of both."
Enomoto said he took exception to a statement in the two-
page advertisement which said
the AMS was willing to have
the MCC put a statement of
their views in the advertisement.
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"Byron Hender told us about
this at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday,"
he said. "The deadline was 4
p.m."
MCC members handed out
3,000 leaflets Thursday stating
their position.
The leaflet said student council had distorted the aims of
MCC.
"At no time has this committee advocated that National
Students Day program consist
solely of a march," it said.
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SLANDEROUS'
The retraction
was retracted
A UBC radio editorial blasting the ad hoc March of
Concern Committee was called "slanderous" Thursday by
committee head Randy Enomoto.
The half-minute talk, broad
cast intermittantly over campus
loudspeakers Thursday afternoon was written by UBC radio
society announcer Greg Martin.
It describes ad hoc members
as "irresponsible wierdie beard-
ies" whose "only goal is
power", and who "do not represent a spontaneous expression of the student body."
Enomoto said, "We can only
conclude after hearing the content of the editorial, that we
must categorically deny its
validity."
"The people at UBC radio
who issue such statements
seem to suffer from hysteria
and schizophrenia."
"Martin obviously did not
take the time to get the facts,
before using slander to sway
the opinions of others," he said.
Martin, contacted in the radsoc studio as he prepared to air
the editorial again, took full
responsibility for the wording.
"It is my personal opinion,"
he said.
"Paul Thiele, president of
the Radio Society, gave me permission to air it after he had
slightly changed the original
version."
Martin admitted that the message's purpose was "controversy".
"I do not deny it as being
unfair," he said.
"I also admit to being ignorant of the facts."
Later, after talking to first
vice-president Bob Cruise, Martin produced a signed apology
in which he publicly refuted
his comments in the editorial
and apologized to Committee
members.
An hour after The Ubyseey
received this signed apology,
Martin returned to The Ubyssey office and asked for the
return of the apology.
He said: "Paul Thiele told
me to retract the retraction."
Meanwhile, a second editorial
backing the AMS on its march
policy, was broadcast by radsoc president Paul Thiele.
Election
fever
hits UBC
Election fever has hit UBC.
In the coming week, students
will be visited and hear
speeches from New Democratic
Party leader Tommy Douglas,
Manitoba's Conservative Premier Duff Roblin, and representatives of the Liberal party.
NDP leader Tommy Douglas
is expected to touch on some
red-hot issues today in his talk
at noon in Brock.
"We expect the speech to include abolition of fees, the acceptance o fthe Bladen report,
and the Canadian identity today," said Colin Gabelmann,
vice-president of the UBC NDP
club.
Manitoba Premier Duff Roblin will address a students'
rally at UBC, Oct. 28.
The Conservative premier
will be accompanied by Conservative candidate for Vancouver
Quadra, Howard Green.
Location of the rally has not
yet been announced.
And representatives from the
Liberal, Conservative and New
Democratic parties will present their views on international affairs in the B.C. Hydro
Building Auditorium tonight at
8:00 p.m.
A question period will follow
the discussions sponsored by
the World Federalists of Canada.
Town for people
Canadian town planning expert Jacques Simard of Montreal will address the Vancouver Institute at 8:15 p.m. Saturday in the Frederick Wood
Theatre.
His topic is planning Downtown for People."
He's Here!
The Uncanny, Fascinating
ftp. Sam)
STAGE HYPNOTIST
Totem Park
8:00 p.m.
Sat., Oct. 23
Admission 50c
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Fall Symposium
Applications now available in A.M.S. office
Subject — Commitment and Beyond
Place — Roserio Beach, Anacortes, Washington
Price — $6.50 per person — all inclusive
Date — November 12, 13, 14
Deadline — November 10. mmsser
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and. Fridays tnrougnout tae unlrerslty
yaar by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMB
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3342.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment  of  postage  in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
FRIDAY, OCT. 22,  1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
ot instruction." -Wm. Blake.
Responsibility
If you think you're confused about the fee fight
march question, think about how confused your AMS
council is.
Thursday night, council decided they had to have
a referendum on whether students want to take part in
an AMS-directed march.
You see, council Wednesday decided they maybe
weren't sure that their decision that nobody wanted to
march was perhaps true or not.
So they announced a referendum then, although
the wording of it put in Thursday's Ubyssey wasn't
finalized until about 10 p.m. at the printers, and even
then the wording apparently was wrong.
And anyway, a 900-signature petition calling for a
differently worded referendum was gathered Thursday.
Thursday night, the council re-approved the referendum, but worded it a third way. As near as it can
be interpreted, the referendum will now ask you if you
are in favor of including a mass march in the AMS
National Student Day activities Wednesday, not instead
of the AMS activities as perhaps suggested in Thursday's  Ubyssey  ad.
There is a pretty good chance that Thursday night's
wording of the referendum is unconstitutional anyway,
since it doesn't exactly conform to the wording of the
petition signed by the 900.
For more jokes on the AMS front, consider AMS
president Byron Hender's decision immediately after
the meeting that the ad hoc group would be allowed
to post their posters pushing the march.
He decided this, despite the fact that council a few
minutes before had thrown out a suggestion they reconsider their students-should-not-march motion of last
week.
This motion, you may or may not care to remember,
was used by the AMS earlier this week as justification
for tearing down the ad hoc group's posters.
All this waffling, we feel, is a direct result of
council's inability to do what they were elected to do—
lead.
Because of some councillors' insistance that
they are not there to lead, but to reflect the whims of
the last student they talked to, some councillors continue
to bring up for consideration again and again, motions
already passed or defeated.
And through some quirk of council leadership,
these issues are discussed again and again and again,
often with decisions directly, or partially, contradictory
to their original form.
It's not that there is a crisis of leadership in the
Alma Mater Society, though. There's just no leadership.
Vote yes
Well, despite council's waffling, what should the
campus reaction be to the referendum ?
We do urge students to vote for the inclusion of an
AMS-directed march. No other way, we feel, can bring
home as effectively to the people of B.C. and Canada
student concern for the problems of higher education.
We feel sure there will be a march. Whatever the
outcome of the vote. And, without in any way casting
aspersions on the ad hoc committee, we would rather see
the march run by the AMS.
The ad hoc committee is to be commended for opening
council's eyes to the feeling on campus in favor of a
tangible demonstration of student concern.
But council has something the ad hocers haven't
got, and need to carry out the best possible march.
Money.
And the best possible march is what we want to
see.
So, vote YES to include the march in the AMS program. Don't give waffling a place to start.
'Hey! Where's  the  parade?"
LETTERS
QUEEN'S PRESIDENT
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
In reference to the treatment accorded Peter Baxter
by the Special Events Committee, the chairman of this committee should resign.
This "treatment" was in
very poor taste and inexcusable.
I don't know this Peter Baxter, and his political philosophy or otherwise makes no
difference to me.
But I DO know that this
man is a graduate of this
university, besides bearing
Her Majesty's Commission,
and for those reasons alone
should be afforded a measure
of respect.
What does the Special
Events Committee think that
UBC grads are good for—to
throw sawdust on?
BILL MacKINNON
•      •      •
LOVE THOSE CAMPS
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
You allotted four pages to a
foul   smelling  representation
of one side of the residence
story.
We violently disagree with
almost   everything  that  was
printed.
I am positive your reporters
never even came up to Acadia. Why compare the drab
conditions in the elite type
residences with our so beloved Bunkhouses?
Or is Housing trying to
write us off completely?
I know our huts won't last
long but the spirit cannot be
destroyed, trampled on, or
scoffed at. I am sure most of
the Fort Campers feel the
same way.
I agree that on rainy days
coming back from lectures to
these dingy dorms is never
condusive to lifting the spirit,
but most of the days you can
feel the pulse of this place.
Most people have their rooms
so well decorated and the prison type paint supplied by
Housing covered up that it is
a joy to live in them.
As for being lonely in a
crowd I violently disagree.
Often if you might want a
moment to reflect and collect
your thought you cannot find
such a place at least in Acadia.
I know of a lot of people
that have abandoned Totem
Park or Lower Mall to find
out about our hole they have
heard so much about.
I. SCHEFFLER
GRAD STUDIES
By DANNY STOFFMAN
Panic has developed among
the Freedom Now types at
UBC.
Now that Wesbrook has decided unmarried people can't
have the pill, they think an
unhappy trend has begun. Presumably, so the argument
goes, the Wesbrook administrator who made the decision
feels it is somehow 'immoral"
for unmarried people to have
complete sex lives.
If this is his opinion, they
say, he's entitled to it — but
it's only an opinion and one
not shared' by large parts of
educated society.
The anti-bureaucracy people
think the precedent will allow
every campus official to enforce his own silly little prejudice.
If they're right, it's not hard
to predict these items from the
files of the 19T0 Ubyssey:
Oct. 17: All cars without
bucket seats have been banned from campus parking lots,
traffic czar Sir Ouvry Roberts
announced today.
"We all know what immoral things went on in the old
seats," said Sir Ouv. "Bucket
seats are the only moral thing
to happen in this country since
the Durham (Report."
Nov. 10: City beauty parlors were full of natural
blondes today — wanting dye
jobs. Reason is a new ban on
blondes in UBC's women's
residences.
"We all know how immoral
blondes are," said matron
Butcha Dyke.
Feb. 9: Brock Hall proctor
has announced all candidates
but ND(P have been banned
from today's all-party  rally.
"Everyone knows capitalism is immoral and the sole
cause of class hatred," he said.
Mr. Douglas, Mr. Strachan
and Mr. Herrid'ge will replace
Mr. Diefenbaker, Mr. Perrault
and Mr. Bonner on the panel.
May 6: UBC's medical faculty will be discontinued next
term, President John B. Macdonald has announced. He said
the faculty will be replaced
by an extended dental faculty.
"We all know what immoral parts of the body doctors deal with," said the president, himself a dental graduate. "Teeth — even when decayed and yellow — are
moral.
"A healthy tooth means a
healthy body," continued the
president, tenderly stroking a
10-foot monument to a wisdom tooth beside his desk.
"By concentrating on teeth
at UBC, we hope to get to the
root of the health problem".
News	
Associate
City	
Photo __
Sports	
Ass't News
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Ron  Rlter
George Reamsbottom
    Richard   Blair
 Bert   MacKinnon
 Ed  Clark
Dan  Mullen
Robbi West, Janet Matheson
Asa't City Al  Donald
Page Friday
Managing	
Feature* 	
CUP	
John  Kelsey
Norm   Betts
Mike  Bolton
 Don  Hull
Staff party Saturday night. Details available at Ubyssey office.
Working Thursday were Kim
Richards, Bruce Benton, Pat Hru-
showy, Stuart Gray, Bruce McBay,
Dick Taylor, Brent Cromie, Betty
Lebodoff, Randy Briggs, Bill Graf,
Sue Gransby, Linda Morrison,
Powell Hargrave, Joe Varesl, Don
Kydd, Kurt Hilger, Dennis Gans,
Rosemary Hyman, Lackof Patience. (That's pretty funny Bert,
but  where are my  pictures?) ,:\•.;*■ VxV\:'\ \%.*jVN? .^ •£/'&.   VW % ,\  \Vv pt
Oct.   22,   1965
ON THE COVER: Erick Hawkins, modern dancer, as a clown.
Hawkins appears at UBC Nov.
2,  courtesy   Special   Events.
Editor:   John Kelsey
Current affairs Steve Brown
Science, the  arts   .      Al Francis
Executive       -     Rochelle  Morinis
Drawings-
Arnold Saba,  Brett  Smaill
Jeff   Wall
Page Friday predicts:
e fee increases next
year, or the year after,
unless UBC raises hell en
mass.
e  drink-ins.
O a Liberal return to
power, with nothing more
than a small majority, a
decrease in Conservative
support, an increase in
NDP seats, and the virtual
eradication of Creditistes.
Social Credit will remain
unchanged, in its own redneck way.
• witch hunts in the
United States, when large
numbers of students begin to burn their draft
cards or photostats of
them. A new McCarthy
will emerge.
O Simon Fraser Academy will castigate UBC
and a student rivalry
verging upon alienation.
e a lot of profs will
pick up Paul Krassner's
line delivered when the
auditorium audience hissed his lateness: "Is this
a throw-back to when
your mother was teaching
you to urinate and she
stood there and said hsss?
Sounds like you're practising to hold a piss-in."
O the Lions will lose
Sunday, especially with
Dennis.
O the Montreal poets
who swarmed into Vancouver this fall will
swarm out again next
spring.
O Homecoming will be
rained out—again. And
the RCMP will raid the
dances.
e women will take
over the world inside 25
years, bless their little
black tongues. Read Phillip Wylie, he's still valid.
e Magistrate Ferguson
will not give a not-guilty
verdict—ever.
e parking on campus
will get tougher than ever
as Sir Ouvry's little men
enforce their little rules
to the bloody hilt.
O male birth control
pill will flop.
O Bob Cruise and
Graeme Vance will both
run for AMS president
next spring—and lose to
an ex-Ubyssey editor.
- interview -
Sunny-side-up
Saint Realist
Paul Krassner edits The
eight-year-old Realist which
he calls a magazine of free
thought, criticism and satire.
He has edited newspapers,
written for Mad magazine,
been a contributing editor to
Playboy for four years, and
earns his living writing a
column for Cavalier magazine. The Realist produces
no income. He is 33 and lives
in New' York.
Krassner has officiated at
teach-ins and protest rallies
all over the U.S. — last
weekend, he (with Allen
Ginsberg) led the Viet Nam
demonstrations at Berkeley.
This interview was taped
Wednesday morning with
Page Friday editor John
Kelsey and Ron Riter.
Page Friday: Mr. Krassner, do you think Lyndon
Johnson is sane?
Krassner: I know there are
people in Coneress. and sen-
pf 2wo
ators, and in the cabinet who
think he's insane. There are
reporters I know who think
he's  insane.
PF: Do you think he's insane?
Krassner: Who is to judge?
I think what he's doing is
insane. If the capacity to
rationalize irrational actions
is a measure of insanity, then
Lyndon Johnson is one of
the most insane men in America. Particularly in regard
to Viet Nam.
PF: What about Eisenhower and Kennedy — they supported (then president) Diem
in Viet Nam, too.
Krassner: I think there's
a touch of insanity in any
leader who does inhumane
acts in order to stay in
power.
PF: Johnson says he's committed the US to fight in
Viet Nam and other places
in the world to stem threats
to people's sovreignty and
freedom.
Krassner: He's also said
we seek no wider wer. That's
pretty schizophrenic, isn't
it?
PF: What will be the effect of the Berkeley demonstrations?
KRASSNER: They're having some effect on President
Johnson—a negative effect,
but  it's  there.
He's reacted to it, through
his unofficial Goebbels,
James Reston.
He says this protest is prolonging the war because the
Vietnamese people think the
American people are divided.
They're right, America is
divided and there is protest,
but this is such a ridiculous
argument because, America
could wipe the Viet Cong out
just like that. What they're
doing now—I say they now,
I don't even say We any
more — is so brutal, so inhumane that I don't think
America will ever be
thought of as the same, just
like Nazi Germany isn't
thought of in the same way
any more.
PF: Do you think the
Americans are more brutal
than the French were in
Viet Nam?
Krassner: Yes, the French
didn't have conscription to
fight their war in Viet Nam.
we're conscripting people.
I don't think the French
ever used napalm either.
Not only that, but it's who
we're attacking. If there's a
suspected Viet Cong in a
village, we'll bomb it. Now
there might not be a single
Cong in there, there might
be a frightened catholic refugee. We're totally irresponsible. "We thought, there
might be a Cong in there."
PF: What's the object of
the people who are demonstrating? Do they want the
U.S. to pull out of Viet Nam?
Krassner: Definitely.
PF: A couple of years ago,
students went to Alabama
to " protest racial injustice
and now they're all protesting Viet Nam. Isn't it possible a lot of them are just
protesting for the sake of
protest?
Krassner: It's possible
there are people who get
involved because this is
where the action is. But that
doesn't make the principle
any less moral or immoral.
Someone can protest because this is the latest protest movement, but he can
be really horrified at what
they're protesting against at
the same time. After a while
motivations don't make any
difference.
There are reporters who
feel the same way about the
war as we do, but they're
still filing their phony stories. They may have the right
motivation but they're doing
the wrong thing. They're
being traitors by ommission.
PF. Have you burned your
draft card yet?
Krassner: No, I'm not going to burn my draft card
because an individual act
such as that isn't going to
accomplish anything, except
maybe land me in jail for
five years. Even if I weren't
over the draft age, burning
the draft card is a symbolic
act, really. To be a conscientious objector you don't have
to burn your draft card.
' PF: You know about this
march of concern at UBC,
the campaign for equal opportunity for education for
all. What do you think about
it?
"Lyndon
Johnson
is insane"
Krassner:   The   cause   is
nice.
PF: Can this have an effect? Do you think it will
become immediate to people?
Krassner: The people who
are marching are students
who are paying fees, so it
has an immediate effect on
their pocket books, right?
If they win, that is. But you
assume that anyone who does
something like this has at
least a vague hope of winning.
Take the Berkeley protests: ideally, I consider they
would end and the war.
Realistically, I have to view
them as an end in themselves. We're protesting, so
it makes us just that much
higher than a vegetable.
But they wouldn't even
let us protest in Oakland, so
that's becoming another issue now, the right to protest.
PF: Is that valid, that protest is an end in itself?
Krassner: It's valid in the
sense that it's contained in
the bill of rights. Freedom
of assembly, freedom of
speech, the right to petition
your government. So it's an
end in itself and also, hopefully, a means to an end.
PF: Is the right of students to demonstrate a constitutional   guarantee?
Krassner: It's a right of
people, and I understand
students are people.
PF: Do students have the
right to ask a voice in university affairs?
Krassner: Of course. The
university   i s   theoretically
run for students.
PF: But it's also theoretically run by people who
know better than students.
You pay your money, and by
doing it give them total responsibility for your education.
Krassner: With a question
like that, I come out sounding like a socialist, which
I'm not. But the board of
directors of any university
is the business community.
They're essentially big business people, the chamber of
commerce heroes, so naturally they want the best for
their vested interest. They
don't want any of these protests because, by implication
they're going against the
grain of those  interests.
PF: Is the Berkeley fight
for free speech finished, is
it won?
Krassner: No, I think it's
inter-related with what
they're on now. The right to
march to Oakland is an extension of free  speech.
PF: Would you, in your
dreams, advocate a non-
democratic state?
Krassner: The trouble with
a lot of the liberals I know,
including me, is that they
like the democracy in principle but you always run the
risk of getting a choice be
tween President Johnson
and Barry Goldwater.
PF: Insofar as labels are
valid, and you've said you
are a liberal and not a socialist, would you label yourself politically?
Krassner: I'd call myself
a humanist, and not a socialist, but little else. I'm opposed to labels unless they
change my behavior, and
"humanist" will, "socialist"
won't. A lot of Marxists
would feel more comfortable
about me, even if I never
changed a word of what I
say or write, if I'd call myself a Marxist. It's the political version of a mother
wanting to know if her boy's
going to marry somebody
Jewish.
PF: The U.S. says it's protecting the whole free world
"I'm  not
burning  my
draft   card"
from the Communist world.
Do you think there's any rational basis for this fear of
communism?
Krassner: It's not a fear,
it's an obsession. But my
point is that an innocent
Vietnamese kid who's just
been burned by napalm
doesn't give a shit about the
free world, because they're
the ones who've just spilled
this napalm on him.
PF: Do you think the two
ideologies of capitalism and
communism can co-exist?
Krassner: This is the basis
of the whole conflict. We
won't grant the Vietnamese
people the freedom to elect
the Communist government
—if that's what they want.
We can't conceive the possibility that in certain parts
of the world communism
may be a better way of running a country than free enterprise.
PF: Is communism a threat
to the American way of life,
assuming the American way
of life is worth saving?
Krassner: No, I see the byproducts of anti-communism
as a threat to the American
way of life, the witch hunt,
for example. Like, there's a
neowitchhunt starting now
about the anti-draft movement. The minute that happened, you know, some sen-
to PF seven
see: more Realist
inside
argument     — pf4
Art    ..    pf6
background    —    pf3
books    .      pf6
cinema  pf7
interview        — .__ _...     pf2
opinion     . ...       -         . pf3
poetry            - pf6
two  columns            pf5
whimsy     -    pf7
■f<m><i 6
T HE      U B Y S-S E Y
Friday,   October   22,: 1965 Water, water everywhere
Hamilton   in  Washington
dickering  for  California
By PAT HORROBIN
It was Alvin Hamilton — squint-eyed, shrewd-
eyed agrarian radical turned economic determin-
ist — speaking on behalf of Canada early this
year in Washington, D.C.
He was addressing a very private, somewhat
startled gathering of 20-odd key United States
congressmen, including the majority and minority
leaders of both the senate and house of representatives.
They wanted to discuss water.
And Hamilton, Diefenbaker-years' minister
first of Northern affairs and resources and then
of agriculture, sent along to the meeting and by
the Pearson government, talked turkey instead.
He told them the United States had a detailed
inventory of U.S. resource assets and needs, the
five-volume Paley Commission report commissioned in 1952 by President Truman, and he suggested they read it carefully.
He told them according to the Paley report
and its 1963 refinement, Resources for America's
Future, by 1980 the United States' industrial
machine will be 20 per cent short of the strategic resources needed to maintain present growth
rates.
He told the congressmen, who had asked Canada to Washington primarily to discuss the $100
billion Parsons Plan which would spend $30 billion in Canada to divert annually to the U.S. and
Mexico 120,000,000 acre-feet of water now flowing into the Arctic via the Yukon, Peace, Athabasca, Laird and other rivers that under this
plan the United States would get $360 billion to
$400 billion each year in increased productivity,
a very good return for a one-shot over-all expenditure of $100 billion.
He told them both the Paley report and resources for America's Future forecast that by 1975
continental United States will be running out of
iron, lead, zinc and uranium and will need increased imports of energy, particularly natural
gas and oil — not to mention water, for industrial
purpose.
Then Hamilton told them Canada has plenty
of those things, including one-third of the world's
fresh water.
And that she isn't giving anything away.
"Either you'll sit down and bargain with us
for use of our resources or some day you'll have
to send an army in to take them with us," Hamilton said.
Canada is interested in getting a few things in
return, he told the legislators, and mentioned
just a couple he has in mind:
Control over Canadian industries, and another
crack at drawing up a treaty on the Alaska
Panhandle.
He talked of possible Canadian limitations on
resource-export, and quoted from page 228 of the
final Gordon Commission Report a recommendation that there might be merit in requiring exporters of ores, concentrates and other semi- processed commodities to obtain export permits good
only for a stated period.
But there is another Canadian viewpoint,
Hamilton said.
"Namely, if something worthwhile is put on
the barrel-head, Canada might be interested," he
said.
A congressman from Chicago (Yates) shot out:
"What do you want this time — California?"
Hamilton told them Canada is interested in
mutual advantage, in deals such as the Columbia
River treaty in which Canada could have developed 17 billion kilowatt hours of hydro power
by going it alone, but by working with the U.S.
produced 37 billion kilowatt hours, the extra 20
billion to be split with Canada getting 27 billion
and the U.S. 10 billion.
"If the U.S. had insisted on all the extra 20
billion KWH we could have diverted to the Fraser River and they would have got nothing," he
said.
He went on to explain that Canada does have
a lot of water, but it would be unwise to consider
water alone — it must be considered as part of
a package with minerals and energy. And asked:
"'Surely if 120,000,000 acre-feet would add $360
billion to $400 billion annually in U.S. gross
national product, then we should expect a big
share of that increase?"
In an internal Conservative Party document,
Hamilton has appraised present Canadian arguments on water-usage.
The first is the Gen. A. L. McNaughton approach in which Canada will refuse to give any
water at all and will in theory force investment
and industry to come to the water.
"This ignores the alternative open to the
U.S.A. (using atomic power to change salt water
to fresh water) and in any case is a long slow
growth for Canada," says Hamilton.
Paley report tells all...
By PAT HORROBIN
The Paley Report makes for
diverting reading, right from
its title: " 'Resources for Freedom' — The President's Materials Policy Commission Report."
It's interesting when it gets
to Volume Five, much of which
deals with Canadian resources
and legislative
climate for investment.
And the subsequent commentary o n
the Paley Report, released
by the U.S.
National HORROBIN
Security Resources Board six
months later in December,
1952, runs a photo-finish second
for insights into U.S. economic
aims.
The whole thing seems to
come out to:
The U.S. economy needs resources — where and how will
it get them?
The report and subsequent
commentary are laced through
with observations that underline the American need. Some
extracts:
"So well have we built our
high-output factories, so efficiently have we opened the
lines of distribution to our remotest consumers that our
sources are weakening under
the constantly increasing strain
of demand." (Paley Report,
Vol. I, p. 1.)
"The first (difficulty) lies in
the profound shift in the basic
materials position of the United
States — the worsening relationship between our require-
mnts and our means of satisfying them.
"A second is to be found in
the difficulties encountered by
other high-consuming nations,
particularly in Western Europe,
which stem from the depletion
of their own resources coupled
with the weakening or severing of ties with their colonics.
'A third lies in the rising ambitions of the resource-rich but
less developed nations, especially of former colonial status,
which focus on industrialization rather than materials export." (Paley Report, Vol. I, pp
1-2.)
"If complete world peace,
confidence and prosperity were
to bless the world tomorrow,
the materials problem would
surely not vanish nor necessarily become less severe —: for
if all the nations of the world
should achieve the same standard of living as our own, the
resulting world need for materials would increase to six
times the present already massive consumption." Paley Report, Vol. I, p. 3.)
"By the midpoint of the
twentieth century ... we had
completed our slow transition
from a raw materials surplus
nation to a raw materials deficit nation.
"... Accordingly the United
States has used up its resources
considerably faster than the
rest of the free world. With
less than 10 percent of the frse
world's population and 8 percent of its land area, The
United States consumes close
to half the free world volume
of materials." (Paley Report,
Vol. I, p. 6.)
"We believe that the destinies of the United States and
the rest of the free non-Communist world are inextricably
bound together. This belief we
hope will color everything we
have to say about the Materials
Problem. It implies, for example, that if the United States
is to increase is imports of ma-
erials it must return in other
forms strength for strength to
match what it receives." (Paley
Report, Vol. I, p. 3.)
"Wherever technical assistance is extended in these fields,
th United States should seek
assurance that the recipient
country will promote conditions favorable to developing
such resources as may be discovered." (Paley Report, Vol. I,
p. 74.)
"The Mutual Security Agency (referring to above recom-
to PF seven
see: more Paley
The second is Hamilton's own idea to treat
water, energy and minerals as a package to bargain for a "large share" of the American $360
billion to $400 billion increase in industrial
wealth which the diversion of 120,000,000 acre-
feet of water would spur.
By implication of his appearance on Canada's
behalf at the Washington meeting, it is also an
argument enjoying some currency in Liberal
policy  circles.
Hamilton calls it the Growth Exchange approach.
"It has precedent in the European Steel Community, the European Common Market, our (Tory)
national oil policy and the Columbia River sharing of downstream benefits," he said.
The third alternative is to sell water by itself, rather than considering Canada's resources
as a package for bargaining.
Hamilton estimates Canada could ask $8 billion a year for use of the 120,000,000 acre-feet
diverted from the Arctic-flowing rivers.
The McNaughton no-sale of resources fails in
what Hamilton terms the nationalist development
category; Canada would have to provide most of
the capital for investment and find markets for
the increased production.
"This approach would be possible but slow,"
he said last fall in a speech at the National Conference on Canadian Goals, held at Fredericton,
N.B.
"It would have the opposition of the majority
of our major business groupings and hence, the
press," Hamilton said. "In times of slow-down
the labor groups would probably get vociferous.
"In the long run it would probably give us
more control over our own economic destiny."
On an across-the-board North American resource policy bargaining power would be with
Canada, the former resources minister believes.
"Certainly from Canada's viewpoint it is better to bargain with all our energy forms as a
package, rather than have each segment of energy
resources sold off individually," he said.
"On a package deal the weight of advantage
shifts sharply to our side."
And he foresees that the United States, which
will face in the decades ahead the problem of
having a stable source of supply in a world of
much political instability, will see the advantage
of having a stable Canadian resource base.
To decide which policy to adopt, the spokesman has put forward a three-part program of
action which prime minister Pearson pledged
on May 21 to consider and comment upon.
• A study of Canadian water demand to the
years 2000, 2050 and 2100, based on present estimate of total Canadian water as
810 billion gallons per day.
<American figures forecast a United States
demand of 700 billion gallons per day by
1985 and 900 billion gallons per day by the
year 2000. The United States at present has
650 billion gallons available per day.)
• General decision of where new Canadian
industrial complexes should be located.
• Joint United States-Canada study of resources on the North American continent in
order to evaluate gains or mutual advantage of resource-sharing.
pf 3hree
Friday,  October  22,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 - argument -
Muse calls AMS
By JAMIE REID^
What you are about to read is not true — but only the
situation has been changed lo protect the guilty. The characters do n°t exist.
So smoothly has run this machinery
Without single taint of chicanery
(An achievement indeed, to go so long,
In these vicious times, without doing wrong)
Brave Hender, however, won't rest on laurels.
"True," he says, "I've preserved my morals,
But my bold heart, by doubt, grave doubt, is tossed.
This good has happened at terrible cost.
My virtue I fear, future poets may sing,
Occurred by virtue of not doing a thing.
I therefore conceive a bold, useful plot
To aid each beggarly students lot ;
And if in council, I can push my plan,
I'll prove myself useful, and in short, a man.
He Called  to the council, and bade them all,
To appear well-dressed in the appointed hall.
And one by one in their order appear
Undergrad presidents, well-dressed, eyes  clear —
(Except for the bleary eyed chief engineer,
Recovering with pills from effects of two beer).
Heroic Hender now strides to the light.
He raises his voice, hardly tinged with fright.
He sees in the future a secure career,
And benignly calls his followers near.
Cuts into council's confused bemusing,
Beginning with something they find amusing,
And then straight away begins to beseech
They hearken in silence to Presidential speech.
"We need, you all know, some powerful issue
And to himself he adds, "Of tissue".)
"To provoke some action from the masses,
Bind together disaffected classes,
And divert from thinking of all the ills
Caused by the famine of birth control pills."
(Now holds he fire, calmly waits for applause.
Obedient Councillors pound their paws.)
And one terrible threat that each student sees,
Is and has been, yearly raising of fees.
Abolition of fees shall be the cry,
Paint me signs to strike each student's eye,
We'll save this holy place, God bless her,
By withholding fees in second semester!
And now the Councillors in earnest gasp —
They see the keys of power in their grasp.
Strain as they will, they cannot withhold
Applause from a plan will save them gold.
Politic Hender needs to say no more.
All that remains is to delegate chores.
Hoarding himself for future contribution,
In case their might be some small retribution,
Introducing speakers, and wearing masks.
He is careful discreet, aware of his roles,
Sensitive to vacillations of the polls.
But now in the midst of the great hubbub,
Arrives a message from the Faculty Club.
Engraved in gold, to Hender from Heaven sent,
An invitation to dinner with the president ,
To glaring heights of glory and of fame.
And he went inglory, but returned in shame,
to PF seven
see: more verse
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mindn ... If you've never
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why not drop in and rum
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774 UranvilU
Up  Half o  Block from Birk's Clock
EMPLOYMENT NOTICE
To all students who will be  seeking
employment on  graduation
REGISTER   NOW
For Fall and Spring Interviews
at Placement Office
Student Services Office — West Mall
Wherever you re heading after graduation, you'll find one of Royal's more than 1,100
branches there to look after you. Meanwhile, anything
we can do for you, here and now ? Drop in any time.
ROYAL BANK
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes.
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   October   22,   1965 INEPT: Cece (Dick
Tracy) Paul, commandante
of the campus Gestapo, has
been upset for at least a
year now because the university rejected his hush-
hush request that the patrol be armed — with
GUNS! No fooling.
One of his super-striped
sergeants was bossing a
traffic jam last weekend at
the Lower Mall booze
dance. Hot- rod speeds
straight at sergeant. Sergeant waves arms frantically.
Hot-rod swooshes past,
nearly knocking sergeant
down.
Just as sergeant gets
turned around, hot-rod
pulls a 'IT and zooms back
at him through the intersection. Fearless sergeant
reaches for his gunbelt and
pulls out—yes!—his foot-
long flashlight, he hurls
it at the car along with an
urgent request  to stop.
Flashlight flies through
open window into car's
back seat. Result: Dick
Tracy's boys have no guns,
and one of them hasn't got
a flashlight any more, either. Don't you feel safer?
• •     •
INCOHERENT: — AMS
wheels snidely figure
"those weirdie-beardie ad
hoc march finks" won't
get a city permit for the
big parade. Guess who's
already got one?
• •     •
INKY: — Sun photog
Ralph Bower got some
shots of the Nurses-Home-
wreckers grid girdle Thursday — but what you see
in the evening edition
won't be the truth. Square
in the middle of the background is a large, muddy
Engineer, upon whose
sweatshirt is engraved
"Sciencemen Eat Shit".
Now you'll know what
the artist painted out, just
like he paints out the
"Cartings" and the "O'Ke-
efe's" on the lacrosse players.
• •     •
INGRATES: — Law Un-
dergradsoc's grade - three
"in-group" was so upset
that their episode with the
Frosh queens was exposed,
they put up a 35 cent reward for the guy who leaked it to the press. Keep
hunting fellas — but don't
ask any o fthe queens. All
they have to say about the
party is, quote: "It was a
stodgy bore," and "It was
OK if you like getting
pawed."
• •     •
INTIMIDATED:— Who's
got the little red car the
engineers  were   so proud
pf 5ive
of? Science? Aggies? No,
Virginia, the Education un-
dergradsoc. What are they
going to do with it? Nothing. They're scared, says
Big Red Wheel Art Stevenson.
• •     •
INTRIGUE: — Amid the
hopelessly confusing fuddle going on between the
AMS council, the Education Action boys, and a
bunch who call themselves
the ad hoc or the Concern
committee, looms The Case
of The Juggled Type.
AMS wheels Peter
Braund and Graeme Vance
souped up the keen full-
page advertisement you
read here yesterday and
sent it to the printers.
At 8 pm. two shadowy
figures, both with long
hair, one female, one an
unshaven man slink into
print shop.
"Change this ad," the
unshaven one orders. Ad
is changed, so instead of
reading "the organized
program of action" (the
student council plan) — it
then read: "the half-hearted council program."
Vance was irate when he
saw it — and told the
printer to change it back.
"That's the third time
tonight I've changed the
ad," said the printer.
Vance says he doesn't
know who the mystery
"editors" were. Ad hoc
spokesman Gary Taylor
says he doesn't know anything about it. And so does
another anti-AMS ad hoc
wheel, who has long black
hair and who, as of Thursday afternoon, had not
shaven for some time.
• • •
INUNDATED: — Overheard while walking down
the ditch which B & G has
constructed on the saucer-
shaped C-lot sidewalks:
"The trouble with the
Monsoon is that it always
comes in the middle of the
rainy season."
• •     •
INTIMATE: — Bob and
Byron both chased Brunette at Leadership Conference. Bob like Brunette.
Byron liked Brunette.
Look, look. Byron got
Brunette.
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(     )   REGULAR (     )   SUPER (     )   JUNIOR
Friday,  October  22,   1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Name	
(Please print)
Address	
City Prov	
Page 9 #*%
1
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12th and ALMA
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Peter, Paul and Mary's Latest
Wayne's
words
wail
By DENNIS WHEELER
Wayne Nyberg, Arts IV,
knows what is wrong with
machine writing. He knows
the love of words and sounds
in play with thought.
There is a spinning in a
poet's mind and the trick of
poetry is not to get on the
wheel, but to try . . . and
whether or not you are
knocked down doesn't matter because it's the attempt
that produces the effect.
Participation in the orality
of it is the necessary tone to
This week's poetry reading
was by Wayne Nyberg in Bu.
102 Thurs. noon.
paint the otherwise hollow
words created in the mind of
the poet.
Nyberg's Owl may be on
verge of a trend in poetics—
a combination of poetic relationships to experience of
a standard organic nature.
It's alive and you want to
hold the hand and wing of
the owl . . . clumsy and twisting as it is.
There is an integral unit
of poem and life. He lives in
his words and his words are
experiments with the life he
has — and its relation to all
the things about him.
Nyberg's poems are not
fragile. They present structure which wants you' to inhabit and produces a suction on your conscious mind.
What is a poetry reading
and what is a poet? Answers
to such questions are personal and can come only
through exposure to the
source. This does not mean
only the exposure to the
written word but also means
a return to the source of
sound and the fury of language, oral semantics.
art
Plastic axes
dream frenzy
UBC art
m
By IAN WALLACE
A group of eight younger
artists: Iain Baxter, Claude
Breeze, Brian Fisher, Ann
Kipling, David Mayrs, Gary
LONDON
THE NEW
SCENE
loft:
PIANO  by   Richard  Smith
NOVEMBER 3-28
Vancouver Art Gallery
Nairn, Marianna Schmidt,
Jack Wise.
A few cryptically engaging words:
We look outside ourselves
to the world of optics/vision
Beyond Regionalism, now
on in UBC's Fine Arts Gallery.
(Nairn, Fisher) where we
must submit to the visual
process on the level of the
painting itself, subject less.
The act of seeing devoid of
nostalgia.
The freedom is not of the
imagination, but of the release of the psyche from
memory.
Baxter's nervy common objects, isolated from their
utilitarian e n v i r o nment,
molded into plastic reliefs,
become as uncommon and
enigmatic as a death mask.
Plastic landscapes invite
fondling, plastic axes, plastic
bagging paper steaks: synthetic esthetics.
Romantic trips to the beyond within.
(Breeze, Mayrs.) We look
into the maps of their faces
for signs of the elusive self
within, that slips out of focus
at the moment of recognition,
of the cold horror. The body
image — reflections of the
contortions of the absurd
flesh, and dream frenzy.
Re Jack Wise's map trips
to the imperceptible unknown: infinite relationships
of twisting stars and sinews
calling intuitive forces to be
revealed.
Marianna Schmidt's geo.-
morphic people, animals,
automobiles assume the,
shape and texture of the
earth itself, and the union
brings joy.
books
Why shoot
the teacher?
By ROBB WATT
The wind moaned through
the cracks around the windows. Unseen snow hissed
across the dark panes. In
the night the young teacher
paced between empty desks
agonized with desire. Beneath him, in his rooms, she
was in his bed, warm, full,
alive. Out of the storm she
had come; out of the prairie
night, fleeing blindly the long
years and a cruel, brutish
husband. Now, in his bed
alone with a woman, for the
first time in so long his loins
ached he knew he knew he
knew if he went to her she
would have him. She asked
only to give, to be needed.
His body groaned he must go
to her.
But that was not Max
Braithwaite's style—then or
now. Then, he paced the floor
all night, and relinquished
the harried woman to the
husband who didn't care that
his wife had spent the night
with the teacher, but who
would kill her if anyone
found out. Now, in Why
Shoot The Teacher, he writes,
"God domn his paltry, dirt-
encrusted soul!"
Not a very profound or
original line, but Why Shoot
The Teacher is not a pro-
Why Shoot The Teacher
(McClelland and Stewart,
$4.95) by Max Braithwaite.
found book. It is honest.
It is the memoir, for 1933,
of a young man teaching the
three R's to 24 unwashed
ragamuffins in the proverbial one-room schoolhouse on
the depressed prairies. More
important, it is undistorted
by the caricaturizing and
ideallizing quality of nostalgia, so often fatal to memoirs.
It is difficult to evaluate
this book in literary terms.
Braithwaite does not pretend
to be creating anything of
moment. He is simply telling his own story in his own
way, without blandishments
of technique. That the story
is at least an indication of the
great and undeniably significant depression, and that the
presentation is at least honest, if not brilliant, are the
two virtues on which the
book must stand or fall.
Braithwaite's prose style is
unsteady at best. Time and
again bright, light vignettes
fall with a heavy thud on
lines straight out of high
school composition. For example: "Thus ended the one
and only social event which
I attended during my stay at
Willowgreen   School."
The 20-year-old Max in the
book is unspectacular enough
to be real, yet fresh enough,
outspoken enough, and self-
critical enough to be entertaining.
Like too many Canadian
unknowns, whose appeal is
through simple, homespun
realism, Braithwaite writes
in a vein of inverted esoter-
ism, full of "Ontario stoves",
"Bennett buggies" and "Anderson carts". Nothing terrible sensitive or significant,
but something wholesome,
ruggedly individual and, as
Farley Mowat would say,
Canadian, about Why Shoot
The Teacher.
SCENE FROM Harold Pinter's "The Collection," to be
shown at the Freddy Wood Oct. 28-29 at noon, tickets
25c. This is this year's first all-student production. Directed
by Michael Irwin.
Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  22.   1965 — cinema—
Ship
shape
show
By WARD FLETCHER
Ship of Fools — Some fire
amongst the ashcans, at the
Capitol Theatre.
Ship of Fools is not a great
film, yet some electricity
shoots out  from the screen.
This fire created by Si-
mone Signoret, Vivian Leigh,
Oscar Werner and Lee Marvin can almost compensate
for the horror of Ladies
Home Journal existentialism.
Simone Signoret plays a
Spanish contessa who must
return to Germany from
Latin America. She has heart
disease and lives on drugs.
Scenes which focus on her
anguish and her relationship
with the ship's doctor (Oscar
Werner) are moments of brilliance. They converse with
their eyes for the most part.
I wondered how the director was able to combine
such scenes as these with
such disasters as take place
between the artist and his
girlfriend, and the Jew who
'becomes upset when a German refuses to admit him to
the captain's table.
Vivien Leigh has some excellent scenes when the camera focuses on her problem
of finding an identity in old
age.
Oscar Werner overacts in
the final scenes which show
his death on board the ship
during a storm, but with
Simone Signoret his acting
reaches a level where I could
feel the suffering and believe he was not consciously
acting.
Spanish, German and Jewish figures in the film are
melodramatic types who live
on the*level of Tales From
the Vienna Woods.
More   Realist
from PF two
ator goes on television and
says "communists." The
irony is that the Hell's Angels, a motorcycle gang
which disrupted the Berkeley demonstration, were
once called Communists.
Now, they're patriots.
PF: Are you a patriot?
Krassner:     Yes.     Even
though   the   protestors    are
called traitors, I think we're
the patriots and the administration is traitorous.
PF: Are you an isolationist?
Krassner: No, because an
isolationist is like those 32
people who watched that
woman be killed in New
York. I might in effect be
an isolationist because I'm
a-coward, but I believe there
is a responsibility to interfere in a situation like that.
PF; How do you like Vancouver?
Krassner:   Sunny-side  up.
<i*tr<48S(.
whimsy
More  verse
from PF four
Our Hender, brave Hender, was seduced to imbibe
Of alcohol, that infamous bribe.
Turns the mightiest men against their tribe.
Hender, once a lion, now a kitten meekly mews
While crafty Macdonald an argument pursues.
"Let's hear no more  of demonstrations,
"Safety lies in  quiet  delegations.
"(Please, please, don't dredge up slime.
"This is hardly the moment, hardly the time."
"And now he says in most courteous voice,
"Draw papers, proposals — but don't make noise,"
And now again — logically, lucid, clear
He instills in Hender's drunken heart, some fear.
Of that rampant awfulness, that lawlessness
Would change society,  its total flawlessness.
Blames  Berkeley  for bringing  alive
The flames of Watts in 1965.
But yet, tho' he tries, he cannot fix
The blame on Berkeley for Detroit of 46.
But in his rapture, cries so long and loud
Hender's head is obscured by cloud,
His shoes untied, his hair berumpled
Hender bends, withers, and is finally crumpled.
The inflaming brandy his head befuddles,
In confusion he almost puddles.
Spotting fear on Hender's face,
Macdonald deigns to show his grace,
Speaks more softly, offers him a drink,
Subsides a while to let Hender think.
Drunken Hender, draws himself full height
Strives to bring Macdonald into sight,
Murmers quelquechose polite
Finally musters   a   bombastic   platitude
Regarding some eternal gratitude,
Then suddenly sensing his stomach ill,
Rushes outside and heaves up all his principle.
More   Paley
from PF three
rnendation) commented, 'As a
matter of policy technical assistance projects are favored
in cases where arrangements
exist or are planned to follow
up technological surveys with
(he necessary development of
facilities.'
"The Mutual Security Agency warned, however, 'We shall
need to guard against any semblance of 'requiring' underdeveloped areas to develop
their raw materials to supply
the United States market.' It
added: "If the Commission is
right with respect to our imperative need for supplies of
materials,   we  do  not  possess
the superiority of bargaining
power that the tone of the Commission's report would suggest.
"The Department of the Interior considers the entry of
United States technicians into
foreign exploration fields to be
rm advantage by itself, in that
it increases our knowledge of
world resources and it enables
trained men to demonstrate to
foreign governments and individuals the desirability of development and thus achieve
the aim of the Commission's
recommendation." (Commentary by chairman of U.S. National Security Resources
Board, p. 77.)
j)f 7even
NEWMAN MASQUE
swing with
Blues Upmen Combo
Fri., Oct. 29, 8:30  p.m.
(Newman Center)
Couples   1.50
Single   1.00 Costumes
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction   Paper   Backs
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12:30 - NOON
OCTOBER 28 - 29
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OCT. 29 to NOV. 6
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Fridays —  Tickets:  $2.75 Shows:   8:15.   10:15,   12:15
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NOV.  10 to 20
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Campus
fashions
1965...
For every event on your Homecoming
Calendar .... from pep meet to the
football game, from the Frostbite regatta to family hockey, from the opening day luncheon to the Homecoming
Ball . . . the Bay Homecoming Fashion
Show features a 'look', a 'fashion' for
fun in '65! Make a note of the time
and place on your engagement list now!
Tuesday, October 26th . . . at
12:30 p.m. in Brock Hall, with
fashions modelled by 19 6 5
Homecoming Queen candidates.
Commentary by . . .
Randine Conlin and
Colleen Sardonne
the
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1 Friday,   October   22,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
FOREGROUND
Economic, ethical grounds
for abolition of tuition fees
The following is an excerpt
from the AMS brief to be submitted to the annual meeting
of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada at
the Bayshore Inn next week.
The brief is entitled The
Case for Elimination of
Tuition Fees.
It was written by UBC student Carolynn Tait, Arts III,
secretary of the CUS western
region.
This excerpt spells out the
two main bases of argument
for elimination of fees — the
utilitarian or economic argument and the ethical grounds
for abolition.
•      •      •
On university campuses
across Canada, students are
suddenly questioning the Canadian educational system in
abnormally loud and undefer-
ential tones.
Topics of student concern
range from the total role of
education in our society to
localized administrative problems. Interest is concentrated,
however, in the area closest
to the heart of modern man—
money. This unprecedented
flutter of student concern with
the financing of higher education stems primarily from the
29th Congress of the Canadian
Union of Students held this
fall in Lennoxville, Quebec.
Most discussion about the
elimination of tuition fees at
the university level can be put
into two categories. Discussion can be couched in relatively objective economic
terms, with the proper tone of
scientific detachment; alternatively arguments for or against
the abolition of fees can have
an ethical orientation—they
made their appeal to an individual's moral values.
It is easier to consider first
the economic issues involved
in the eliminating of student
fees, for these have been set
out and explained extensively
in the Canadian Union of
Students' brief to the Bladen
Commission on the Financing
of Higher Education.
Essentially the argument for
the abolition of student fees
is utilitarian. It sees education
as a practical investment in
human resources, especially
the resource of human intelligence. It sees the education
of this raw intelligence as a
means to expanding the country in a concrete, material
way.
The ability to pay for thic
education and a host of environmental conditions are involved as well. By using the
arbitrary standard of the ability to pay—a standard which
is analogous to admitting only
blue-eyed people to the institutions of higher learning —
our society is squandering its
scarce human resources. On
this basis the Union brief asks
that the society, or its instrument, government, assume
more of the costs of education.
The brief chooses tuition fees
as the first cost to be assumed
because it is the most universal and most obvious payment
which society can make for
educational services.
X     •      •
The strongest rationale for
the existence and perpetuation
of student fees is the belief in
the public mind that the
money to rim the university is
simply not forthcoming from
any other source. But there is
no evidence that the economic
resources of the Canadian provinces are not equal to the
cost of free university tuition.
Simply by giving top priority  to  education,  Newfound
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land, the poorest province, has
managed to eliminate first
year fees at its new Memorial
University.
When we consider that the
federal government of Canada
is spending millions of dollars
on its Centennial project,
when we consider the vast
sums of money being spent on
weapons of destruction, when
we examine the budget surpluses of such provinces as
Alberta and British Columbia,
the arguments that the economy cannot bear the costs of
eliminating tuition fees seem
taudry indeed.
•     •     •
The ethical issues involved
in the elimination of tuition
fees are somewhat more nebulous than their economic counterparts and much more
fraught with emotion.
Perhaps the issue which
transcends all other ethical
questions concerning the abolition of fees is the still-prevalent belief that anything which
smacks of the spirit of the
entrepreneur is good; anything that hints of direct government control is bad. This
accounts for the position of
some who believe that loans
and bursaries are a preferable
means of creating universal
accessibility to post-secondary
education.
Such attitudes can only be
attacked with a reiteration of
the old maxim that WE are
the government; it is not some
mystical, malevolent entity
which exists to curtail our individuality and freedom.
Certain other concepts are
pertinent to this section of the
paper. One is the fact that
our educational system lacks
continuity. It provides free
education until twelfth grade
then suddenly requires tuition
fees. The point at which the
fees begin seems to be set arbitrarily.
This is perhaps the point at
which to remind ourselves
that it was only a little over
a century ago that this same
controversy existed over the
payment of tuition fees for
secondary education. We lack
any historical perspective if
we cannot see that the radical
idea today is an accepted
necessity tomorrow.
YOUNG MEN
LANDMEN
A representative from one of Canada's leading oil and
gas exploration and producing companies will be on
campus to interview graduates in the courses Law, Commerce and Business Administration for regular employment in the Land Department on the following dates:
NOVEMBER 1 AND 2, 1965
For further information and appointment please contact
your Placement Officer.
TEXACO    EXPLORATION    COMPANY
CALGARY ALBERTA
SUITE 616, BURRARD BLDG. • 1030 W. GEORGIA ST.
MU 3-7207
Hours: 9 A.M. to « P.M. daily incl. Sat; Mon. to S P.M.
OF DBESS SHIRTS
6.95 to 9.95
Every shirt style which is correct for the
business and social world will be found
neatly presented in our stock. Included
are more collar styles than can be printed
in this announcement. The gentleman is
urged to make his personal inspection
immediately. Two Stores to Serve Y00
Kark %Xmn Utin.
GENTLEMEN'S APPAREL
545 GRANVILLE   MU 1-9831
cHIt? (gag Slate £>l?0p
FOR YOUNG MEN
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550 GRANVILLE
!JJ.lUJUiaAJLftJLQJLflJLgJ. Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October   22,   1965
Koerner grant
$14,000 for 1965
UBC has received  $14,000 from  the Leon  and Thea
Koerner Foundation.
The money was part of the
foundation's $16,000 grant to
higher education this year.
Simon Fraser Academy received $2,000.
Babes,  bands
both come home
The most beautiful girl on
campus will be crowned
homecoming queen Oct. 30
at the dances held in the
armory and field house.
Bud and Travis will sing
at both dances. Brick Henderson and the chessman will
enterain at the armory and
Lance Harrison and The Accents al the field house.
Tickets are $4.25 at the
AMS office.
The dances are from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. and couples may
change buildings after 11
p.m.
Groups of 12 or more
couples may reserve tables.
WHY
GET WET?
Let   the   Boys    at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
serve you with
3>hssL CbsdivcMj,
anywhere   on   the
CAMPUS
Phone    224-3202
WHAT'S HOT.. ?
Sweaters?   Now   there's
where the action really is.
Lamb's wool V-necks
from Australia (saddle
shoulders of course) at
$16.95 - V-neck bulky rib
pull-overs from England —
blue mix and mustard
brown are BIG $22.50
But thats not all! jac-
quard "shags" in cardigans
—brown tones $18.95.
Come in and check out
my pace-setting sweaters.
4445 West 10th Ave.
near   Sasamat
2906 West Broadway
At Mackenzie
The largest part of the UBC
grant, $5,000, went to the Sherwood Lett Memorial Fund to
provide scholarships for graduate and undergraduate students.
The other $11,000 was distributed among the Asian studies department, the Dorothy
Somerset Scholarship, the law
faculty and the publications
program, with $3,000 going to
the grants in aid fund to assist
individual students.
Since its inception 11 years
ago, the foundation has distributed $861,000.
It was founded by Dr. Leon
Koerner, retired president of
Alaska Pine and Cellulose.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
it TRADES
it RENTALS
it TERMS
it REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
Confidence   is   assurred    in
CONTACT LENSES
Have them expertly fitted at a reasonable price by:
MU 3-1816      LAWRENCE CALVERT     705 Birks Hdo.
Flowers for Homecoming!
Show your A.M.S. card
for   10%   Student   Discount
The Secret to a
Successful Evening
HER CORSAGE from
Wayhsdo
ShsJiwoojdL
Broadway at Alma Rd.
3691 West Broadway
OUTERWEAR HAS A BRIGHT NEW LOOK!
Warm - Smart - Reasonable
Now Is The Time For Your
Duffle Coat or a
Wide Wale Corduroy Campus Coat
ALL COLORS - ALL SIZES - 29.95 - 34.95 - 39.95
RICHARDS & FARISH LTD.
786  Granville  St.       Phone  684-4819
"EVERYTHING IN COLLEGE GEAR IS HERE" Friday,  October  22,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
BUSTY CHEERLEADER gives
another the view at Teacup
Game Thursday noon. The
top one's looking over
shoulders of the crowd in
the  infield.
Rugby 'Birds
invade UofA
The rugby ^Birds', taking advantage of a bye in their city
league schedule, will travel to
Edmonton tMis weekend.
A meeting between the. two
clubs last year at Wolfson produced a 14-3 victory for the
Thunderbirds.
UBC is confident of a repeat performance Saturday in
the capital city.
Coach Brian Wightman will
take 15 players on the trip.
Last year's star fullback
Mike Cartmel, recently injured
against Blue Bombers, is out
running again to get back in
shape.
At Wolfson field Saturday,
Totems and Tomahawks kick-
off at 1:15 p.m. against ex-
Gladstone and Georgians II respectively.
The Braves, taking advantage of a league bye, will hose
Meralomas in a 'friendly'
match at 2:30 p.m. in an attempt to even an earlier loss
in league play.
Vamps want blood
The vampires in white will
be at it again today.
Students who were not able
to bleed during blood drive
week will have the opportunity
again from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30
p.m. in the armory.
SPORTS
AT
UBC
WOMEN'S INTERAMURALS
Swim meet results — first
Education—17 points; second,
P.E. II—16; third, Gamma Phi
Beta—12.
Individuals — Dallas Hurdle
—Wi points; Donna Bishop,
Nancy Culter and Penny Jones
—5.
WEIGHTLIFTING
Keep fit contest Sunday at
noon, UBC stadium. All amateurs welcome.
TENNIS CLUB
Has the use of the indoor
courts in field house on east
mall, from 8-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Open to all students at
$3 per annum. Faculty and
staff $6 per year (single) and
$10 (double).
Graduate students will share
field house with UBC Tennis
club. Call Dr. G. V. Parkinson
local 3112 or Miss June Barnish
local 2757.
IH planning
fall festival
International House is holding a fall fair Nov. 5-6.
The two-day fair will toe held
in the UBC armory and will
include display booths of many
countries.
A special feature Nov. 6 will
be the Oriental fashion show.
Lieutenant-Governor George
Pearkes and Mrs. Pearkes will
welcome students at the official opening 7:30 p.m. on Nov.
5.
Admission is $1.50 for adults,
$1.00 for students and 50 cents
for children.
Forum today
An open forum debating
National Student Day action
will be held a noon today in
front of the library, it was announced early this morning.
FOR  THE BIRDS
BY   BOB   BANNO
Birds press Bruin play
For the past two years,
UCLA Bruins have dominated
the U.S. college basketball
scene with their fast break
and tenacious zone press.
In the 1963 U.S. college loop
final, UCLA simply outclassed
talented Duke. And in last
year's grand finals, they completely befuddled Cazzie Russell and his giant Michigan
mates, running their way to
an undefeated season and
their second straight NCAA
championship.
In the crowd at both games,
quietly observing, was UBC
Thunderbird mentor Peter
Mullins.
Although Mullins introduced UCLA-style basketball
to UBC last year it was mainly a desperation move to
counter what he thought
would be a team weak in talent and depth.
This year's Birds are anything but weak in talent and
depth.
And Mullins is not only
staying with the run, run, run,
style that worked so well for
him as a compensatory move
last year, but he is expanding on it.
"Last year, we zone-pressed
only after we scored. This
year, we're going to press
every time we lose the ball,"
he said.
"And to counter plays specifically   designed   against  our
press, we plan to employ two
zone presses instead of one."
This year's Birds should
start the year zone pressing
in mid-season form for five of
last year's regulars, all familiar with the system returned.
They are guards Ken McDonald and Alec Brayden,
forwards Bob Barrazuol and
Mo Douglas and center Steve
Spencer.
And all five, according to
Mullins, have improved considerably.
To hold their starting jobs
they will have had to improve, for this year's rookie
crop is probably the finest
ever seen at UBC.
Forward John Olsen, three-
time B.C. high school tournament MVP; former MEI superstar Ed Studerman and New
York Yankee bonus baby Ian
Dixon are all capable of cracking Mullins' starting line.
Fine prospects up from last
year's freshman team are 6'6"
center Jack Turpin, guard
Neil Murray and forward John
Klassen.
And although Mullins' jubilation has been tempered
somewhat by the loss of starry
Neil Williscroft, who wants
to spend more time on academics, the Birds coach exults
in the realization that practically the entire team returns
tically the entire team returns, once again, in 1966.
University Hill
United Church
Invites   students  to   attend
church This Sunday,
Morning   and   Evenmg
11   a.m.   Morning   Worship
Sermon:   "WHY  GO   TO
CHURCH?"
Evening 7 p.m. — Anglican
Service  of
Evensong
Speaker Rev. Tom Barnett
National S.C.M.  Secretary
Social hour and discussion
afterwards
Come and join us.
VARIETY   RENTALS
(ARNOLD'S PAWNSHOP)
986 Granville Phone  MU   5-7517
Rent a Guitar from $4.00 per  month
Rent a Transistor Tape Recorder $5.00 per month
Rent a Guitar Amplifier from  $4.00  per  month
STUDENTS . . . Take advantage of this Special Offer
RENTAL CAN  BE APPLIED  TO  PURCHASE
The RAPID SYSTEM Is Here!
JUST IOAD
AND  SHOOT
The First Easy-Loading Camera System with Film-flattening
Plate for Sharper Pictures.
I so-Rapid   IF   Kit   Camera aV=r2^aSBs  W\      The  Fu,,y  Automatic
(shown above) Battery, 4 ffitfS^MkW\      f*omat-9apld       Kit
flash    bulbs   and    1    roll
16.95
B&W  Rapid
film
^fjPRpW   And    At   Last
CllV Agfa Color Films
^Rn^r        Are Available
^•^r Canada.  Of
Special Interest to 35mm, 127 &
120 users; AGFACHROMF. CT18
For sharper brighter colors than
you have ever seen before.
(shown   left)   Also
Includes  flash   &
Deluxe
Case
49.95
Kerrisdale Camera
2170  W.  41st
AM 6-2622
Hannays Cameras
2289 W. Broadawy
RE 8-5717
PIMM'S
NQ 5 has a
Canadian
Whisky
both are absolutely delicious!
Two things about Pimm's: easy to serve, and a taste you'll enjoy. Just pour into a tall glass
and add ice and fill up with your favourite light mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to make the traditional Pimm's, famous throughout
the world. But don't bother unless you're in the mood. A new generation is rediscovering
you
Pimm's . . . and enjoying every moment of it
ing
L/KIINK   rlM/Vl b — simply because you'll'enjoy the taste of it.
H. CORBY DISTILLER V LIMITED, CORBYVILLE, CAN.
Xbis advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. Page.16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  October   22,   1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Tommy sounds off
New Democrat party boss Tommy Douglas speaks in
Brock Lounge noon today. Douglas is running for re-election
in Burnaby-Coquitlam.
A  short  film  Le   Pelerin
IH
Perdu. IH noon today.  Everyone welcome.
Record session 8:00 p.m. Friday. Admission 25 cents.
UBC  LIBERALS
Campaign    meeting
Monday Bu. 212.
noon
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Arleigh Fitzgerald and
Bishop O'Grady's Volunteers
noon Friday Bu. 204.
VCF
Dr. John Ross speaks on Who
Are We? noon today Angus
110.
DEBATING  UNION
Forum debate: Resolved that
The End Is Near. Noon today
Bu. 217.
• •      •
BIOLOGY CLUB
Slide show and membership
meeting noon today in Bi. 2321.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Guest speaker on Drug Addiction Monday noon, Bu. 202.
WUS
Treasure Van meeting noon
today, Bu. 317.
EL CIRCULO
John  Macdonald  speaks  on
Cuba, noon Bu. 203.
INDUSTRIAL
• •      •
MANAGEMENT SOC
Color film on application of
PERT in the polaris development. All welcome. Noon today Angus 207.
QUAKERS
Meeting   for   worship,    Bu.
penthouse 11 a.m. Sunday.
GAMMA DELTA
Meeting Friday noon Bu.
2201. Topic: The Problem of
Salvation in non-Christian Religions — Dean Richardson.
• •      •
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
All interested meet in Bu.
223, Friday noon.
ARCHAEOLOGc CLUB
Film "The Living Stone" Bu.
204 Friday noon.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Inquire at IH for tickets to
"Street Car Named Desire" at
Metro Theatre Friday 8:30 p.m.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
All interested in volunteer
work at Oakalla meet Mr. Watt
noon Firday Bu. 205.
UBC fish  men
off to A-Blast
Two  UBC fisheries  experts
will join a scientific team taking part in an American nuclear
test on an Aleutian Island later
*     this month.
Dr. Norman Willimovsky,
head of UBC's Institute of Fisheries, and research associate
A. E. Peden, left Monday for
Amchitka Island, the underground explosion site.
■*" They will assess the seismic
effects of the test on marine
organisms.
The test is being conducted
by the United States department of defense to determine
a possible difference between
natural and nuclear shocks.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting    for    all
noon Monday.
members
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK
Meeting Friday noon back
room women's gym.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Fireside, Sunday 5:30 Lutheran Student Centre. Dr. Old-
ridge on "What Makes a
Luther" noon Monday Bu. 104.
NEWMAN CLUB
Alti Fitzgerald, sildes and
discussion 'Northern Mission'
7:30 Friday Newman Lounge.
FINE ARTS GALLERc
Prof. Iain Baxter will "How."
Pep meet needs
guppie  gulpers
The homecoming committee is offering a free lunch
Thursday noon at the pep
rally in Memorial Gym.
There are problems, however. You have to catch the
five fish before you eat them
— live. First prize is $50.
Interested students may
apply before 2 p.m. Wednesday to the Homecoming office in the basement of south
Brock.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office: Brock  Hall,   Ext.  26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost fc Found
11
WOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 2«,
224-3242.
POUND — SHEAPFER PEN on the
path from "C" Lot, Monday, Oct.
18. Phone 224-7214.
TAKEN BY MISTAKE at Totem
Park Dance Oct. 15, 1 Navy blue
duffle coat. Could owner please
contact YU 8-8500
FOUND AT PHI DELTA PLEDGE
Party pair of girl's glasses. Phone
929-1575.
FOUND — 2 ENGLISH TEXT books
In Ladies' washroom of Educ. Bid.
Call 255-9198.
FOUND — TEXTBOOK "Selected
Prose — T. S. Eliot", AMS Publications (Ubyssey) Office, Brock
Hall.
FOUND.  3 Text Books.  Call at the
AMS Office, Brock Hall.
LOST — ON MONDAY, ONE CUFF
Link with initial "A". Phone 266-
0745,  ask for  Norm.
HELP!! DESPERATELY NEED
money and papers in red wallet
taken from Wesbrook Tues.
R.C.M.P. have been notified CY
S-3184.
WOULD THE GIRL WHO PHONED
Sunday re: lost bracelet please
phone   again.   AM   1-9423
LOST — ONE BROVV.N LORD BUX-
ton wallet. Tues. aft'n. wallet and
papers valuable. Please phone 922-
6908 after 6 p.m. 	
LOST—STERLING SILVER bangle
last Friday. Phone Ann  224-9766
FOUND — LADY'S GOLD WRIST
watch.   U.B.C.   Health  Services.
FOUND — MAN'S DARK-RIMMED
glasses in South Brock, October
19th. Call at Proctor's Office in
Brock  Hall.
LOST IN THE ENTRANCE HALL
or in front of Library, oh Wed.
night, Ladies Turquoise and Gold
"bracelet" watch. Great senti-
FA 7-2472.
LOST — BRIEFCASE IN BROCK
Wed. Oct. 20—Richard Vaughan.
AM   1-2467 —  1826   W.   62nd Ave.
Special Notices
13
ATTENTION! RUMMAGE SALE to
be held in Acadia Camp Hut 85,
Sat. 23, 2-5 p.m. Come out to
browse or buy.	
BOB LUNDGREN -^ PLEASE come
to Coordinator's Office on Thursday or Friday noon about your
application for Games Room Supervisor.
IT'S HERE "COMPLETE GUIDE"
to Chem. 101 Labs. Your Experiments will be easy with your new
Chem. 101 Guide. • This book is
written as your experiments should
be written up. • Shows how to
work    calculations    step-by-step.
• Complete with theory, procedure, data, calculations and discussion.
• If you would like the rewarding thrill that Chem. Labs can
bring drop into The College Shop,
Brock Extension, for your complete guide to Chem. 101. Labs.—
$2.50.  ___
ANOTHER STOMP IN THE COM-
mon Block (lower mall) Tonight
9-1 with  the fabulous  "Accents"
INDIAN VANDALOO, ANYONE?
Try it—at International Fall Fair
'65. Nov. 5-6 Armouries. Tickets
50c-$1.50. AMS Office or int'l.
House.
BLOOD DONOR CLINIC FRIDAY,
Oct. 22 Armouries 1:00 to 4:30 p.m.
Get out and bleed.
Wanted
15
SENIOR EDUCATION STUDENT
urgently requires housekeeping
suite in West Point Grey area for
herself and two-year-old. Both
absent 9 to 5 weekdays. Call
Toby  733-7686  evenings.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
1959 TR 3 HARDTOP, TWO HEA-
ters, Michelin tires, new engine,
radio,   other  extras.   AM  1-3616.
53 HILLMAN HDTP. excellent condition.  Best  offer.  CA 4-6521.
FANTASTIC! '54 FORD 4-door, automatic trans., V-8, $125. Call 224-
6804 after 3.30 p.m.	
1960 MORRIS 850 "MINI". GOOD
condition, Colour Red. Phone: RE
8-4401   evenings. 	
1959 NASH METROPOLITAN —
Tremendous condition. New paint
1ob.   RE   3-2686. 	
'59 VAUXHALL VICTOR DELUXE.
Nice condition. Will do 35 mpg.
Priced for quick sale. Mr. Wagner.
WA-2-4111  or YU 7-0164.
1961 TRIUMPH HERALD SPORT
convertible, radio, heater, mechanically perfect, good top, immaculate.   John   581-1157.
Motorcycles
27
'64 HONDA 55c.c. SPORT ONLY
2,350' miles like new 1195. AM 1-
6279.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters ft Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, til
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone MB
1-SS22. 	
EMPIRE ARISTOCRAT PORT-
able, 1959 model, $25. Phone Dave
Young, CA 4-9853.
Typing
43
TYPING     (HOME),    ALL
Mrs.  Wood  985-5086.
KINDS,
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
views, Notes typed on electric machines, A R D A L E GRIFFITHS
LIMITED, 70th and Granville.
Phone   263-4530.
EXPERT   HOME   TYPING.   Essays,
termpapers,   theses.   Prompt,   efficient    service.    Reasonable    rates.
Mrs.   L.   More,   RE   1-7496.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
"IT
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cabs
Ltd.,   701   Beach.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents.
Ben's Carpet Centre
UBC   STUDENTS   SPECIALS   9x12
rugs   $29.50   up.   Desks   and   bookcases, $9.95-$23.95. Open Fri. 'til 9.
Cor.  4th & Burrard.  RE  1-8913.
Rooms
81
SINGLE OR DOUBLE accommodation. Large room, use shower,
washer, dryer, kitchen, lounge.
$65 single, $80 double. RE 8-3440,
2741 West Third.
ROOM* FOR MALE STUDENT —
Piano available for practice —
Kitchen privileges — reasonable.
4453 West 12th Ave.
QUIET, RADICAL, COMFORT-
able room and breakfast with
three other U.B.C. girls. Upper
year girl preferred. Near 10th and
Alma.  Phone 224-3692.
Significant Recordings at sensible
prices. Each Nonesuch Record enjoys
the most advanced engineering techniques, a fine virgin vinyl surface,
unusual covers of artistic merit, and
comprehensive  notes
$3.75 each mono or stereo
A wide selection of fine  recordings available from the
*   RENAISSANCE *   BAROQUE
*   ROMANTIC *  CLASSICAL and
*  CONTEMPORARY PERIODS
Come  in  and   pick-up  your  copy  of
the Nonesuch Demonstration Album
only $1.98 mono or stereo
10% DISCOUNT WITH PRESENTATION OF
A.M.S. CARD
Alexander & Axelson
APPLIANCES    LTD.
4558 W*tf 10th Av*. Phofl. 2244611
things gO
better,!
wwith
Loke
@M&
r-
Once more unto the fridge, dear friends. Take time
out for the unmistakable taste of ice-cold Coca-Cola.
Lifts your spirits, boosts your energy...
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identity only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd. —
v /
Authorized   bottler   of   Coca-Cola   under   contract   with   Coca-Cola    ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED

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