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The Ubyssey Sep 27, 1966

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Array A house is
not o home
THE UBYSSEY
without
a student
Vol. XLVIII, No. 5
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  TUESDAY,   SEPTEMBER  27,   1966/^ \
Housing fight
Rebel hits
spluttering
leadership
Social Credit rebel backbencher Ernie LeCours Monday attacked both his own and
the federal governments for
what he called a horrible lack
of initiative.
LeCours criticized government measures to combat inflation by postponing medicare
and money for university students.
He said they are ineffective
and avoid the real issue between big business and labor
which really causes rising
prices.
WILSON'S COURAGE
"These groups want things
free but don't want to contribute and it is time for governments to show the type of
political courage shown by
Harold Wilson in Great Britain," LeCours said.
The present measures will
only hurt the people who deserve the money — those who
can't afford doctors fees and
those who can't afford the
costs of education, he said.
LeCours also said young
people hesitate too much to
express their opinions.
RETIRE AT 55
The Socreds also advocated
the retirement of public politicians when they reached 55
years of age.
This, he said would enable
problems like automation be
solved by younger people who
grew up with them.
He said his personal plans
include pressuring the Socreds
to improve antiquated justice
procedures from courtroom to
prison, and to improve the
care of handicapped children.
—kurt hilger photo
ONCE LIBERAL FINANCE minister and now friendless
but for cofee urn, Walter Gordon mulls point at Liberal
club coffee  party in  Brock Monday.
AMS to petition
local homeowners
By PAT HRUSHOWY
Students' council Monday passed a two pronged housing
action program to combat the housing crisis.
"First of all, we want city
council to commit itself to a
three year relaxation of the
zoning by-laws in the Point
Grey - Dunbar areas," first
vice-president Charlie Boylan
said.
"Secondly we want to publicize the need for an immediate crash program to build
an adequate number of student
residences on campus."
BRIEF TO CITY
The AMS will present a
short brief to city council next
Tuesday along with two petitions — one signed by UBC
students, the other signed by
Point Grey home owners, both
asking for zoning by-law relaxation.
"There are thousands of
people who would gladly rent
to students and all we ask is
that the zoning inspectors keep
their hands off for three
years," Boylan said.
The petitions will be presented to city council by a
large delegation of students
transported to city hall by
bus.
CASE TO PUBLIC
"We have to take the case
of the students to the public,"
Boylan said.
There will be a strategy
meeting in council chambers
at noon today to organize petitioning of homeowners in
the area.
"We want any student to
come who will definitely be
responsible for gathering petitions in the areas given to
them,"   Boylan  said.
AMS president Peter
Braund and Boylan will meet
HE CAME NOT FOR GAGS
Galbraith meets bone, chokes up
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
It was the classic story of
the giant and the midget.
John Kenneth Galbraith,
noted economist visiting UBC
to give a series of lectures,
stands six foot, eight inches.
The average B.C. salmon
bone measures at two inches.
Sunday night, Galbraith
met the fishbone — and lost.
The occasion was an elite
dinner at the Vancouver
Lawn Bowling and Tennis
Club, to make final plans
for Galbraith's four-day visit
to Vancouver.
GALBRAITH
.  .  aaarrggh
Galbraith ordered fillet of
B.C.  salmon.
He took one mouthful and
choked on a bone, which then
lodged in his throat.
He was rushed to the Van-
c o u v e r General Hospital,
where he was given a local
anesthetic, * while doctors
tried to remove the bone.
No luck.
He was given a general
anesthetic. Twelve hours
later and one soggy fishbone
less, Galbraith squeaked into
a press conference scheduled
for 10 a.m. Monday,  15 min
utes  after   his   release   from
hospital. .
"Hospital officials wanted
to see if they had to take
another X-ray, so they didn't
let him out until 9:45 in the
morning," said a university
spokesman.
Galbraith gave a JMtaninute
seminar to graduate students
in   economics   Monday.
Today, he   speaks  at   12:30
p.m. in Hebb Theatre, on economic power.
His second public lecture
will be given Wednesday in
Totem Park common block at
8:15 p.m.
CHARLIE BOYLAN
. .  .  hands off
with the residence executives
tonight to discuss action with
residence students.
"I challenge the students to
come out and help their student government in his petition blitz," Braund said.
Wednesday, students willing
to petition off campus will
meet in Brock from 3:00 p.m.
to 6:30 p.m. On campus petitioning will also start then.
Thursday, students will circulate the petition at the clubs
day display in the armorry.
QUESTION MAC
Friday, President John B.
Macdonald will give a well-
coming address to students in
the armory at noon. Student
representatives will be on
hand to question him.
"We will ask — what is
the administration doing about
the housing situation," Boylan
said.
"I think he will answer our
questions."
Braund said he hoped the
administration would back the
AMS in the presentation of
the petition.
Monday, Oct. 3, a housing
crisis rally will be held at
noon at a place to toe announced. On and off campus speakers will be invited.
The next Tuesday, a delegation will go to city hall by
bus to present the brief and
petitions  to   city   council.
Wednesday, Oct. 5, a short
brief and statement will be
presented to the minister of
finance, Premier W. A. C.
Bennett.
NEW FOCUS
(SEEPAGE   5) Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,  1966
—dennls gans photo
ONLY ALMA MATER Society treasurer Lome Hudson (centre) stands with head raised
as president Peter Braund (left) and vice-president Charlie Boylan right) bow before
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief John Kelsey's onslaught during student affairs discussion in
front of the library Friday.
Arts students  views aired
Political scientist Dr. Walter
Young is organizing an ad hoc
committee to air students
views on UBC's arts curriculum.
Young, assistant to the dean
of arts, will meet with interested second, third and fourth
year arts students in Bu. 100
Thursday at 3:30 p.m.
Young said the first meeting
was for students to hear proposals for changing the Arts
curriculum, and to hear student views about the new proposals and on the existing pro-
grom.
He said, "I hope one result
of the meeting will be the creation of some kind of ad hoc
committee on the arts curriculum. It could provide a forum
for student opinion on arts,
and could be a channel of communication from the students
to the administration.
"Now we have only a vague
'notion of student opinion in
this area and for that reason,
tend to work in somewhat of
a vacuum."
He said the arts faculty is
meeting in October to discuss
a report by the dean's curricu-
Gorbage carted
Two hooligans were arrested Saturday when police sighted them carting more than
700 pounds of garbage from
a Point Grey home. City
health department officials
were  reportedly  abject.
lum committee proposing
changes in the first and second
year program.
'*The Thursday meeting is
simply to bring students into
the picture as much as possible."
No answers required'
says  UBC  law prof
Students stopped by RCMP
don't have to answer questions
even if they're wearing sandals
and a beard, a UBC criminal
law professor said Monday.
The professor, who didn't
want to be named, was commenting on the questioning of
two UBC students by RCMP
drug squad members.
The students, called beatniks
by RCMP spokesmen, answered questions about marijuana
and LSD. One admitted smoking marijuana at one time.
"These students were under
no obligation to answer any
questions," the professor said.
"They were not even obliged
to give their names or addresses."
He said police can only detain a suspect if they arrest
him on a charge.
The professor said only the
driver of a car must give his
name and address.
An RCMP spokesman Monday refused comment on reports undercover drug agents
are operating at UBC.
"You weren't really expecting an answer to that," a narcotics division officer said.
L. E. Smith, of the federal
food and drug department, said
his department and the RCMP
work together on controlling
drug use on campus.
He said there is no drug
problem at UBC.
Inter-faculty competition
for United Appeal dollars
UBC students will be asked to dig deep Wednesday
for the United  Appeal Campaign.
The campaign will be run this year as an inter-faculty
competition.
Organizers expect the new format to increase the
total coverage on campus and increase money collected.
The collection "blitz" will be held between 9:30 and
11:30 a.m. when students from each faculty will canvass
their classes.
Goal of this year's campaign is to raise the yield to
15 cents a student from last year's 10 cents.
Winning faculty receives a trophy and $50 donated by
a downtown newspaper.
r
(fet &4 0$ t/ouf TenAfoHA
Have you ever wanted to play a kook, a lunatic, a nutt? Open casting for the
most sensational play ever presented on campus —
The Persecution and Assasination of Marat
as performed  by
THE INMATES OF THE ASYLUM OF CHARENTON
Under  the  Direction  of
THE MARQUIS DE SADE
by  Peter Weiss, directed  by John  Brockington
35 mad men and women are needed to participate in this dramatic exercise
in group therapy. This could be the beginning of a great new career.
fAQTIMf T\KAC Monday, Oct. 3 at 12:30 p.m.
^/"Ol IINtJ   -    I l/V\£   -    Tuesday, Oct. 4 at 12:30 p.m.
PLACE - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
COME ONE
COME ALL
■Point Grey Service
i
Your Local CHEVRON DEALER
Ted Dash Rob Quesnel
NEW LOCATION AT 16th & DUNBAR
On your way to class — Get some Gas
Lubrication  &  Service  Specialists
Standard Oil Products
Car Washing
OPEN 7 A.M. - 11 P.M.
WE TAKE BETTER CARE OF YOUR CAR
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
I
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
Nominations are now being received for the position
of Second Vice-President of the Alma Mater Society
Student Council. Eligibility and nomination forms
are available at the A.M.S. office (S. Brock). These
forms are to be submitted to the Secretary, Box 54,
Brock Hall. Nominations will close Thursday, September 29th, 1966.
CHARTER FLIGHT DIRECTOR:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Charter Flight Director for the A.M.S. Charter
Flight which will leave for Europe May 11, 1967 and
return August 25th, 1967. All applications and inquiries should be directed to Peter Braund, President, Student Council, Box 50, Brock Hall.
COMMITTEE MEMBERS:
Applications are now being accepted for positions
on the following Committees:
Eligibility Committee
All applications should be directed to the Secretary,
Student Council, Brock Hall, Box 54.
STUDENT-ALUMNI COMMITTEE
Students interested in serving on this Committee
are to see Mr. Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director,
Brock 252.
RETURNING OFFICER:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Returning Officer. Applications should be directed
to the Secretary, Student Council, Box 54, Brock
Hall. Eligibility forms are available in the A.M.S.
Office (S. Brock).
STUDENT UNION
BUILDING COMMITTEE:
Vice-Chairman — Mature student, experienced in
student affairs with an ability to assume major responsibilities, write final reports, etc. Applicants
should be prepared to sit on the committee for the
next two years of construction with the possible
eventuality of assuming the chairmanship.
3 MEMBERS AT LARGE:
3 Members at Large — To sit on the committee and
assume specific responsibilities and assignments. A
willingness to work steadily on the project throughout the year is required. -Preference will be given
to applicants able to serve on the committee over
the next two years until completion of construction.
Please apply in writing to the Secretary Box 54 by
4:00  p.m.. Friday,  Sept.  23.
ASSISTANT TREASURER:
Applications are requested for the position of Assistant Treasurer. This position offers valuable experience in a variety of tasks assigned by the treasurer including a seat on the Finance Committee.
Experience in student affairs and a knowledge of
of accounting fundamentals are helpful, but not
essential Please submit applications to the Treasurer,
Box 53, Brock Hall by 4:00 p.m., Friday, Sept. 23rd. T&esday,  September  27,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—blake   ford   photo
FRESH FRESHETTES were thrown in Lower Mall lily pond
Sunday   after   they   attacked   referees   in   the   residence
football game, on Frosh Day, Sunday.
McGill regulation
brings chemist here
A difference in retirement
age rulings between UBC and
Montreal's McGill University
has brought an internationally
known biochemist to Vancouver.
Dr. F. H. Quastel, formerly
director of the unit of cell metabolism at McGill, has joined
UBC department of biochemistry.
He has achieved an international reputation as a neuro-
chemist studying chemical
changes in the human brain
between infancy and maturity.
Quastel was forced to leave
McGill because of that university's retirement age of 68.
UBC's retirement age is 65
but staff can ibe reappointed
after that on a year to year
basis.
Quastel brings with him
an eight-man team of two senior research associates and six
graduate students.
His work is supported by
grants from Canada's medical
research council and other medical research organizations.
Temporary quarters are being readied for the team in
Wesbrook. It will move into the
Neurological Research Department of the new health science
division as soon as the buildings are completed.
Medical dean Dr. John McCreary said addition of Quastel
and his team will strengthen
the graduate studies program in
his faculty, .attracting more
graduate students.
Quastel's present team includes students from India,
Morocco, Singapore and Taiwan.
H. QUASTEL
too old at 68
Cans block rooms
so  no  SUB  sex
UBC's student union building
will contain two quiet rooms—
but they're accessible only by
going through the lavatory.
The bathroom entrances are
to discourage heterosexual activity, _ said SUB chairman
Lome Hudson.
Men have different smells
than women," Hudson told a
Ubyssey girl reporter. "Women
would not want to lie down in
a room with men around."
Hudson, who is also Alma
Mater Society treasurer, says
co - educational resting rooms
look had to parents.
"You wouldn't want men and
women using the same cans,
would you?" Hudson asked.
MUST START SOON'
Unity for SUB urged
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Alma Mater Society treasurer Lome Hudson Monday called for students and councillors to unite behind the Student Union Building.
"It's only a matter of weeks
now," Hudson, acting SUB
chairman, told student council, "and at this stage we
should unite. Any delays are
just   costing  money."
He said: "Construction costs
are rising five per cent a year.
That's a matter of $500 a day
for every day that we delay.
"It is inevitable that we
build a SUB someday. We obviously cannot continue in
Brock. Right now we have an
excellent site; I challenge anyone in North America to produce a better site for a student
union   building.
"If we leave this project for
the students 10 years from
now, they will probably have
to buy land.. We have a 60-
year lease oh our site, and the
administration will soon begin
a policy of forbidding further
leases of university land," he
said.
If built now instead of in 10
years, Hudson said, the building would represent a saving
to the students of "hundreds
of thousands  of dollars."
"The statements in the
Ubyssey that SUB is a $5 million white elephant are inaccurate,"  Hudson said.
Land policy blackmail,
NDP member charges
New Democratic MLA Dave Barrett Monday labelled
the Social Credit government's endowment land policy
blackmail.
Barrett, a member of the
NDP's provincial executive,
commented on a statement last
week by Attorney - General
Robert Bonner.
Bonner said B.C.'s three
public universities will receive no money from the Point
Grey endowment lands until
Premier W. A. C. Bennett gets
his Bank of British Columbia.
"This is cheap blackmail.
The attorney-general is showing his pique at losing Point
Grey to the Liberals," Barrett
said.
Barrett claimed the delay in
endowment lands development
is an attempt at revenge.
"Bonner is attempting some
form of ill-defined revenge by
blaming Ottawa's delay on the
bank for lack of action on the
endowment lands," he said.
The Victoria government
wants to combine endowment
land income with income from,
a downtown Vancouver Bank
of B.C. building.
"My reaction is one of contempt for such pettiness," said
Barrett.
Liberal leader Ray Perrault
called Bonner's statement a
preposterous suggestion.
"Premier Bennett is the architect of all UBC financial
problems," Perrault said.
Perrault said it was ridiculous that the B.C. government,
with a surplus of approximately $70 million last year, must
invent excuses to delay univer-
stiy help.
Perrault said he is willing
to stage a public debate with
Bonner on the steps on Brock
over misuse of the endowment
lands.
The cost of SUB to studtnts
will be about $3 million. Total
cost of the building will be
over $6 million, he said.
Vice-president Charlie Boylan said a referendum should
be held to assess the proportion of the student body opposed to SUB.
In other business, council received a report from former
first vice - president, Bob
Cruise, delegate to the Canadian Union of Students' seminar on Identity and Anxiety
in the Academic Community.
Cruise said the seminar
dealt with causes of anxiety
among students and the method of resolving them.
He suggested that a nonstructural form of student administration similar to the nonstructural debate of the seminar might help council to avoid
"bureaucratic baloney" and
deal with problems at once instead of waiting for them to
become crises.
The present housing crisis
might have been foreseen six
years ago if we had asked the
right people," Cruise said.
"The question of form and
function is directly applicable
to this council," said another
delegate, Brian Plummer, spe-
come pressing?" he said.
"You have form, but you
know your function?" Why
are all these ad hoc committees necessary to get anything
done? Why are you unaware
of these crises until they become pressing," he asked.
ROBERT BRUCE
On Campus Bulky
Knit Sweaters by
Noon Hour are hot
4445 W. 10th
near Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at Mackenzie
YOU HAVE A BETTER CHANCE
OF SURVIVING AN ACCIDENT
IF
YOU'RE DRIVING ONE OF
THESE
WITH
THE SEAFORTH HIGHLANDERS
OF CANADA
UBC DETACHMENT
RECRUITING TONIGHT
TUESDAY, 27th SEPT.
UBC ARMOURIES - 7:30 P.M. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout tho university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review;
and Focus, a weekly news magazine of world university affairs. Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS).
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc 24; Focus, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
SEPTEMBER 27,  1966
Who can refute a sneer ?
-William Paley, 1785
Crisis and action
There'll be some action on the housing crisis.
The plan is to ask homeowners to sign a petition
to be sent to city council with a housing brief, all aimed
at re-opening now-illegal suites in the university district
for three yeats while more residences are built.
To work, the action plan needs massive student
support and hard work both on and off campus.
Student councillors will spread around the campus
all this week gathering and organizing that support.
The organizing shouldn't be too hard a job for council — just as in past years, the whole impetus for the
action program comes from students who are not on
council.
As in the past, and most notably last October when
students literally dragged council on an action march of
concern for higher education, AMS service station bureaucrats sat and mused while the crisis developed.
The Ubyssey has spent a large portion of its news
space these past two weeks detailing the housing shortage.
Residences have been full since July.
Rump council did nothing but rump.
City alderman and acting mayor Halford Wilson
early last week suggested a brief to the burghers of
Vancouver requesting the relaxation of zoning laws.
Council managed to ignore his suggestion.
Councillors only took their leadership role Friday,
when students massed in front of the library told president Peter Braund, first vice-president Charlie Boylan
and treasurer Lome Hudson to act on housing — specifically to write that brief and get it to the city.
After a hard weekend, council came through and
Monday night accepted the plan.
But, as Braund admitted to the meeting, council
again did not lead, it followed.
It's trying to lead now, taking the first few halting
steps.
The students who in the past led council must now
help it lead.
Then maybe there will be some action to solve the
housing crisis.
Dear dean...
You ask for letters about pre-registration and registration in general.
Registration this year was, for us, joy abounding.
We did it on a nice, sunny day early in August,
without rush, with consideration and care, retaining
all our dignity and aplomb.
We suggest other faculties besides arts and science
try the novel experiment and also pre-register their
their students through the summer.
You might streamline the bumf further by taking
mail-order registration from students working ten
thousand miles out in the far toolies.
If the forms are okay, simply let them pick up class
cards when they arrive on campus.
If the lost soul in question needs counselling, his
form will show it and you can send it back unsigned.
Do not understand this as approval of the courses
arts offers, or of the regulations governing what one may
and may not enroll in.
We remain irate about language requirements.
We are still mightily annoyed by huge classes, bad
professors and the lecture system of teaching.
We dislike courses keyed only to examinations and
abhor those IBM marked farces some of your professors
use for examinations.
But we're glad you thought to ask for student
opinions — strangely, few deans and other university
officials think this a wise procedure.
And we'd applaud if you would ask for student
views on things more important them registration procedure — such as teaching, course content, curriculum
revision.
Artlessly yours,
BY GABOR MATE
Roman legions fight druids
Through the miracle of
stuporvision we bring you
news of the first century
A.D.
J. Christ, a young Galilean carpenter, said today his
followers would soon outnumber the beetles in the
world. The Roman papers
carried mocking headlines:
"Is Christ More Popular
Than The Beetles?"
Deanius Ruskus, Roman
secretary of state, said he
can't understand why the
people of Britain are not cooperating with the Roman
forces operating on the island.
"Don't they realize," asked
Ruskus, "that we are there
only to protect their freedoms. The DC (the Durid
Cong) has to be stopped," he
continued, "or soon the barbarians will overrun Rome
itself."
Fred Jones, a Carthaginian
soothsayer,   predicted   televi
sion will not be invented for
at least two thousand years.
There were incidents again
today, on the Syrian-Palestinian border. The Syrians have
vowed to "drive the Jews into
the sea." Observers do not
foresee an early end to the
conflict.
The international conference to ban the crossbow
broke down at Geneva yesterday when the Parthians
refused to sign the partial
test ban treaty. Both the
Romans and the Parthians
will continue to experiment
with the weapon. The proliferation of the crossbow
could mean the end of civilization as we know it.
The lions in the Forum are
dying of starvation. "I just
hope," said their keeper,
"that someone will invent a
new religion to persecute, or
soon Rome will be without a
popular   tourist   attraction."
Malcolm F. McGregor grad
uated with honors from
Athens university today. He
majored  in  modern  history.
In Rome the beatnik fad is
spreading like wildfire. Roman beatniks have short, hair,
refuse to grow beards, do not
smoke hashish, and wear shoes
instead of the morally correct Roman sandal. "It is
outrageous," commented
Husheus Puppeus, owner and
director of the Morally Correct Roman Sandal  Co.
Young Athenian theologians have revealed they no
longer think of Zeus as an
old man with a beard, on top
of Mount Olympus. They are
known as the "Zeus is Dead"
theologians.
There will be an increase
in the parking fees at Ubysia
College. 'If students can afford to drive their chariots to
school, they can also afford
higher parking fee," said
Janus Macius Donaldus, the
college rector.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Homeowner backs students
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
My husband and I have
been homeowners in the West
Point Grey district for many
years.
We were very angry to
read the comments of a Mr.
Reilly (caretaker) of an apartment block on West Tenth
and a Mr. Kennedy of the
homeowners group at the presence of UBC students in our
district.
We would like to make it
known through your paper
that we personally do not feel
this way and very much enjoy
having the UBC students return to our area each fall. I
think we can speak for the
majority of taxpayers in West
Point Grey.
We deplore caretaker Reil-
ly's blanket statement that
"students are filthy". How stupid and ill considered.
Thank you for allowing us
to air our views.
A long-time Point Greyer
Registration
The Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
This year for the first time
in the history of the Faculty
of Arts, my colleagues and I
registered students in August. We saw 1,418 people during the period of pre-registration and, from our point of
view, the operation went well.
Academic counselling was
spread over a longer period
and was, I believe, more carefully done; bunching during
the regular period of registration was pretty well eliminated.
The object of the exercise
was to make registration as
efficient and as painless as
possible for the students.
Would any students who
have suggestiionss and constructive criticism to offer
have the kindness to write to
me? If there is a better way
of doing the job, I want to
know  about it before  plans
are laid for  1967.
Hoping to be spared letters
that say only: "Registration
still stinks" or (to dream a
little on a sunny day) "Registration this year was, for
joy abounding," I am,
D.   M.   Healy
Dean  of  Arts
Poor taste
Editor, The Ubyssey, Six:
I have always admired The
Ubyssey and have felt some
wee pride when the paper
from my university has won
transcontinental awards.
However, I have felt sometimes that your desire to fill
space exceeds the bounds of
discretion. One such time was
last year when a drug squad
raid  netted   some   arts   stu
dents, another was when a
Ubyssey girl reporter lied to
a health services doctor in
order to obtain a prescription
for birth control pills.
The thing to remember,
ladies and gentlemen, is that
The Ubyssey is read by a
great many landlords and
ladies who are only too glad
to seize upon your headlines
as proof of UBC students' decadence.
If anyone else sends in instructions on your last moments in an atomic holocaust,
I ask that they might be attached to a Buchanan lavatory where the plagarists of
outhouse literature will
spread it around the campus
in a week.
John S. Gregg
Education 3
The mists of antiquity
Reprinted from The Ubyssey
of September 25, 1956.
University housing officials
are helpless as hundreds of
out-of-town students pound
Vancouver streets to find accommodation.
The lack of student living
quarters has forced officials to
issue an appeal to Point Grey
home owners for help and to
press further negotiations with
the provincial government.
A. R. Baird, university housing board secretary, reported
15 new concrete suites opened
this fall for married students
at Acadia camp.
Their construction was financed by married suite rental
profits, and they replace 11
condemned dog-houses which
were earlier doomed to scrap.
Construction is now underway on a new $60,000 woman's
dormitory at Fort Camp scheduled to open July 1. This will
partially look after 88 girls
now cramped together in the
Youth Training Centre on
Acadia Road.
But nothing further can be
done until the provincial gov-
ernmtnt  makes  its  proposed
$2 million allotment for housing facilities.
This is not expected to come
for at least five years, due to
the immediate necessity for a
new arts building and a new
medicine building. Dr. Gordon
Shrum, chairman of the housing committee, has estimated
it will be eight years until his
committee will have access to
government funds.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing Richard Blair
Newt Carol Wilson
City Danny Stoffman
Photo Powell Hargrave
Page Friday Claudia Gwinn
Focus George Reamsbottom
Ass't City Rosemary Hyman
Ass't News...Pat Hrushowy, Anne BaK
Ass't Photo Dennis Gans
Reporters were Tom Morris, Rod
Wilczak, Val Zuker who was
sniffed at and found different,
Bryce Howard, Mary Ussner,
Val Thom, Mary Schiller, Peter
Duschinsky, Ron Simmer, Verna
Hill, Kathryn Keate, Linda Hol-
den, Anthony Scott, Norman
Gidney, Jill Green, Kathy Hyde,
Heather Macintosh, Blake Ford,
John Appleby. Sports-men were
Jim- Maddin, George Roberts,
Hank Pakasaar, and Margaret
Fair-weather,    Ann   Balf. Tuesday,  September -27,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
EDUCATION SPECIALIZING IN STAGNATION ?
Science seminar probes
communication lapse
Focus interviewed Father
G. F. McGuigan ot the department ot Economics. Father
McGuigan is one ot the participants in the Science Symposium which is to be held at
Rosario Beach this weekend.
The Theme of the Symposium is Cross Currents in Communications.
Focus: I understand that
the title of your talk at the
science Symposium is entitled "Technological Patterns and Bias in Communications." That sounds terribly formidable. Could you
explain briefly what you are
going to say on this topic?
Father McGuigan: Would
you mind if I answered that
question by first telling you
what I think about the symposium itself and its general
theme? I'll return to your
question  later.
Focus: No, not at all.
Please go ahead.
• •   •
Father McGuigan: I think
the fact that the sudents
themselves organize these
symposia and the choice of
theme for this particular
symposium—Cross Currents
in Communications — are
very closely related. It
seems to me the symposia
are an indication of a keenly felt need on the part of
students to relate the various parts of what has come
to be, especially in recent
years, a fragmented intellectual life. They have lived
their intellectual lives in
hermetically sealed sections.
The stress of modern life
which demands that they
see total pictures or patterns
in order to form decisions
bothers them in a way that
it never bothered their elders. Many of the better students are becoming exasperated by conclusions which
are the logical end products
of a specialized disciplines
but are seemingly unrelated
to  one  another.
• •   •
Focus: Is this something
new?
Father McGuigan: No, I
suppose it's not really something new. But so long as
we lived in a society where
the amount and variety of
information was manageable,
specialization presented no
real practical problem but
when the' speed and amount
of information increases
greatly I think we have not
only a quantitative problem
but also a qualitative problem.
Focus: You mentioned
earlier that the topic of the
symposium,   Cross   Currents
in Communications, was particularly well chosen. How is
this related to what you
were saying?
•    •    •
Father McGuigan: The
students were extremely perceptive in choosing this topic.
There is some sort of a conflict between increasing specialization and increasing
speed of communications and
information processing. They
are aware of and sensitive to
the great effect that speeded
up communications and its
concomitant, increased amounts of information, are
having on their lives. There
is an information explosion
Science symposium ... a
must for UBC students . . .
is from Friday to Sunday. Application forms at Academic
Activities or AMS offices.
you know, just as much as
there is a population explosion—perhaps they are related.
Focus: Do you think that
this information explosion
has affected the teachers and
the students in the same
way?
• •   •
Father McGuigan: No, not
quite. The older generation
unlike the students they
teach, are to some extent immunized against the personal
insecurity and general confusion and uncertainty that an
uncontrolled flow of unclassified information creates. The
older generation received
massive innoculations of
ideology as a normal part of
their academic training and
this always lingers. Indeed
such ideologies provided the
very framework of their instruction as well as provind-
ing them with a secure framework for their personal
lives.
Focus: Wouldn't this be
more true of the social sciences than of the physical
sciences
• •   •
Father McGuigan: Yes, I
suppose it would be. The
physical sciences left magic
and alchemy behind much
sooner than the social sciences were demythologized.
In fact, I think, demytholo-
gizing still has some distance
to go in the social sciences.
When the end of ideologies
comes this is just as hard and
confusing for the professor
as for the student. He is
blasted and buffeted by
wave after wave of new information and intellectual
innovation  as  much  as  the
student. Only the professor
has at least something to
hold on to even though his
hold may be threatened. The
student hasn't even been provided with this. All he is
told is that ideologies must
go. Everyone knows that
such structured ideologies
with their deduced and received doctrines in that form
are obsolescent and increasingly feeble as techniques
for coping with and controlling environment. Structures whether those of Marxism or Liberalism for example, or the structures of
politics such as the parliamentary forum, were in fact
media of communication just
as masks and taboos are in
tribal societies. But they
were peculiarly biased media.. As information exchanges they were relatively
inefficient. They were useful to provide frameworks
of security and some control
over the unknown when
communications were slow
or lacking. But some frameworks are no longer stable.
They have become variables
themselves. The fact of
change itself is about the
only thing we can count upon
in this respect.
•   •    •
Focus:       How    has    this
change come about?
Father McGuigan: It came
about gradually but most
noticably when information
exchanges became electrified. Increased information
and rapid feed back can reduce the need for these
structures to some extent.
Structures prevented flow of
information between disciplines. Authoritarian power
structures whether in government or education along
with deductive theory filled
in the gap where information was lacking. The point
is that now we have too much
information—at least more
than we can handle. We
have to develop some technique of handling large
masses of information for decision making. Decision making centers have become suffocated with great blankets
of information. We know all
about feed back but we don't
do much about it. The great
percentage of information
available must be rejected
because it can't be processed.
Focus: So then, with all
this hew information thrust
upon us in its great quantiy
and variety, decision making
is paralyzed.
Father McGuigan: Yes,
that's right. With this increase in variety of information come whole new ranges
of alternatives for action.
Older decision making models simply can't cope with
such a rich variety of alternatives.    The multiplication
Continued on page nine
SEE: MORE
tox
Focus salutes
Walter Gordon
THE DAM SONG
There are seven wonders in this world,
Their names are known quite well,
From Babylon Gardens to the States the
ancient stories tell,
But now the greatest wonder is the folly
in our land,
They sold us down the river with the
new High Arrow Dam.
Four miles up from Castlegar,
The Columbia will be dammed,
And the water that they store there
controlled by Uncle Sam,
This sets my mind to wondering just
what the state will be,
Of the big Columbia River from the
Rockies of B.C.
We could divert the Kootenay,
Into Columbia Lake,
By way of Thompson River and on down
thru Hells Gate,
We could build a mighty complex of
factories all our own,
And manufacture Canada's ore while
foreign countries grow.
It's not that we're ungrateful,
We've never been before,
Been trying to stand up by ourselves
since 1864,
And so upon this issue we all should
take a stand,
Canada for Canadians, it's our God given
land.
IS THIS LAND YOUR LAND OR IS
IT THEIR LAND?
THIS LAND WAS MADE FOR YOU
AND ME!
"The Dam Song" written by
Fraser, Irving, Guthrie — sung
by  Skip &  Joe, Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,  1966
w^rt—taill the
patient line
By PETER  CAMERON
Sometime in the future, in
some different kind of society,
people will wonder how our
society could toe controlled so
completely toy p o w e rf u 1
groups, and yet look so democratic.
The university is an excellent example of a controlled
institution — "a mechanism"
(as Clark Kerr, president of
the University of California,
called it) "held together by
administrative rules and powered toy money." Yet people
feel that since this is supposed
to be a democratic society, the
universities can't be antidemocratic institutions.
If business men control the
university, it must toe because
they were put there democratically, and surely they must be
under the influence — on all
important matters — of at
least the faculty, if not the
students.
The trouble, as far as the
students and faculty are concerned ,is that this isn't what's
happening. In fact, it is the
businessmen who create the
context in which academic
decisions are made.
As far as the administration
is concerned, however, the
problem is not that the whole
process of academic inquiry is
being compromised. The problem is that students and faculty are getting upset about
this,   and   are   becoming   in
creasingly difficult to "administer" in a manner appropriate to the businessmen-
board members.
This is where the Duff-
Berdahl Report ('University
Government in Canada') comes
in. It gives a series of very
specific instructions on how
to facilitate the top-down flow
of power, while at all times
giving the impression that the
university is toecoming more
democratic.
The report doesn't recommend changing the anti-democratic nature of the university,
it merely shows how the same
anti-democratic institution can
be made to work more efficiently and less obviously.
At a superficial glance, the
report looks good. It appears
to recommend that a minority of the board of governors
should be faculty members.
At present, members of boards
of governors in Canadian universities tend to be either
businessmen or lawyers who
serve business corporations—
with perhaps a token "distinguished Canadian" (like
Professor Penfieflield, O.M.
at McGill) thrown in to give
the board a little class.
As Duff and Berdahl put it,
the boards are "somewhat too
homogeneous in memtoership."
The report proposes that in
addition to academics .other
people besides representatives
of   big   business   should   be
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allowed on the board—even
students who could elect a
rector to represent them,
dation of the report — and
this looks good is reform of
the academic senate to eliminate the pesky non-academic
members and to make the
senate into "the central educational forum that it should
be.
The report makes many
other suggestions, but an examination in detail of these
two important and, at first
glance, appealing recommendations will reveal the
whole approach of Duff and
Berdahl to university reform.
First the senate. In a summary of the report, it looks as
if the senate is to be purely a
faculty body. It turns out,
however, that it actually includes people other than the
faculty, and that only certain
faculty   members   can  belong.
The non-faculty people include members of the board
of governors. "It seems to us
not inappropriate, if senate
members be equally welcome
on the senate." Get it? But
that's not all. The senate
should also include the "ad-
ministrataive   group" —  the
president, appointed by the
board; the vice-presidents and
deans, appointed by the president.
Let us do a little arithmetic.
The report suggests that the
number of members for the
senate of even a big university should be not more than
50. The administrative group
of a big university could
"total up to 20." Add three
members of the board of governors to 20 members of the
administrative group and express as a percentage of a
group of 50. Answer: 46 per
cent.
It's difficult to take seriously the report's claim that this
46 per cent wouldn't dominate the senate. As the report
itself says: "An opinion at
some of the strongest universities was, in effect, that 'senate had the power but lacked
the "guts" to use it.' When
we asked why, the commonest answer was that the 'administrative group' on senate
(president, vice - presidents,
deans) is predominant and
tends to speak with one
voice." (page 9).
Again, from the report:
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dents will have every opportunity to influence educational policy through their ex-
officio membership of the
senate. Finally, the president will chair the senate.
"We regard it a svirtually
the most important task of the
president to preside over the
senate . . . From the chair of
the senate toetter than anywhere else, he can focus the
discussion of academic policies,, can guide them in the
light of his full knowledge of
any external factors involved"
. . . (page 45, my emphasis,
although the whole quote is
pretty sinister.)
As a further control, the
Senate would not be open to
all members of the faculty.
Only Full or Associate professors would be eligible (except for three seats). Younger facultly members are generally the most enthusiastic
about changing things, and
the least intimidated by pressures from the administration.
The report not .only recommends that they be ineligible for the Senate, but also
that they not be permitted
to vote for "three or four
years." The reason given is
that "two or three years are
needed before they can size
up either policies or personalities."
But if the report ended
there, the younger members
of the faculty would obviously feel they had no part in
the decision-making. (Duff
and Berdahl know this: the
"junior members should feel
that their voice can be heard
somewhere in the government." And "it is good for
the junior faculty to feel that
they will soon have at least an
elector's say in the university
government."
Therefore, the report allows
the younger members three
seats that they can vote on
all by themselves. Just like
the grown-ups. Only the
grown-ups get to elect eight
times as many members.
And remember that the
younger faculty aren't a minority group. "Faculty below
the rank of associate professor
already form such a high percentage of total faculty (and
their percentage is likely to
(Continued on next page) Tyesday,  September  27,   1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
...more Duff-Berdahl
increase) that if they formed
a 'youth lobby' and voted accordingly, the 'gerontocracy'
would change to a government by juniors. This would
inevitably give the impression that the senate was not a
responsible body." (Page 29-
30).
Duff and Berdahl are very
concerned about responsibility. But unlike our old high-
school history teachers, they
feel that responsible government and democracy are mutually exclusive.
It is obvious that Duff and
Berdahl don't feel that the
reformed senate will be too
hard to handle. Consider
this quote.
(1)   on    the     Nominating
Committee (page 31):
". . . it is important that
nominations should be made
in the name of the senate and
not of the president, and that
the committee themselves
should report to the senate.
The members of such committees may well be exactly
those whom the president
would have chosen. But any
of the committee will carry
more weight with faculty if it
is a senate committee and not
a president's committee."
Now on to the board of governors. The report's recommendation that a number of
faculty members ("not exceeding 25 per cent") be on the
board doesn't sound so wonderful if they have to be elected from Duff and Berdahl's
emasculated senate.
The report makes it quite
clear that the reformed senate
will have eliminated most of
the trouble-makers. "The case
for faculty representation on
the board depends on other
reforms, especially on the existence of a body such as the
kind of senate that we advocate, which could elect responsible representatives to
the board." (Page 22.) Remember now, how Duff and
Berdahl use the word 'responsible'.
ty participation is the following: (page 21) "Of course,
the senate occasionally elects
a professor who proves difficult on council. Yet even he
learns pretty quickly that
there are two sides to questions, that money is not limitless and that some decisions
must be taken quickly without endless consultation and
delay."
The real reason why the
report recommends faculty
participation is to give the
board—still dominated by the
non-academic elements—control over academic policy.
At the moment the senate is
nominally in charge of academic policy, while the board
is just supposed to take care
of financial matters.
This isn't working. The report points out several times
that the boards often influence
academic decisions. "Already
boards are taking actions
relevant to educational policy,
and already senates are expressing views with fiscal
consequences. The sensible
course must be to recognize
this fact and to make sure
that the two bodies are
brought into a relationship
before either body adopts an
Immutable position." (Page
27). In other words, legalize
the board's power by putting
a few 'uncle Toms" from the
faculty onto the board.
But what about the report's
recommendation that students
be allowed to elect a rector to
represent them on the senate?
I think this has to be understood in the • context of
Duff and Berdahl's concern
for student interests. In the
92 page report, there are 2V2
pages devoted to students—
in Part B of Chapter 9, other
Forces Inside and Outside the
Universities.
In the introduction, Claude
Bissell tells us (twice, as a
matter of fact) that the faculty and the administration
consitute "the entire university community." The trouble
is that students refuse to accept this, and the report sets
out to. develop ways of channelling their discontent
"constructively."
"The issue then, is not
whether to welcome or stifle
this new wave of student
sentiment, but rather how to
develop channels into which
it can flow constructively."
(Page 65.) Well, maybe not
constructively, but at least it
can flow someplace where it
won't disturbe the status quo
too much—like some sort of
faculty-student committee.
"The student member must
be chosen in some fashion by
their peers and not by the administration, for their independence in both fact and appearance is crucial to the success of their role. There is, of
course, a danger that choosing
students in this manner will
produce intransigent types not
amenable to rational dialogue.
But this risk is greatly lessened if the joint committees are
set up during a period when
there are no student crises occurring on campus." (page 66).
It's not a question of letting
them participate, but of making them think that they're
participating.
With this background, I
think we have to approach the
report's proposal of an elected rector with scepticism. Just
who would be eligible to stand
for election? Would the candidates all have to be "responsible"? Would they be nominated for us by the reformed
senate and only voted on by
the students. The report doesn't answer these questions, but
it gives us good grounds for
suspecting the worst.
One final comment on the
Report. Many people have
been encouraged by what Duff
and Berdahl call "our major
premise", i.e., "that universities need windows to the outside world." Indeed, the Report uses the phase "window
on the world" repeatedly
throughout the book (eg.,
pages 19, 20, 58, 72.) They use
it, among other things, to imply that the Board of Governors will be open to a greater
variety of people.
It is interesting to note that
Clark Kerr (in the Uses of the
University, page 29) uses the
same phrase to describe the
way his Board relates to the
outside world. (In the preface
to the Duff/Berdahl Report,
the authors express their gratitude to Kerr among others,
for "advice on points of fact".)
Kerr also describes, at some
length, a kind of university
where industry has not only
moved onto campus, but into
people's heads. "The university and segments of industry
are becoming more alike. As
the university becomes tied
into the world of work, the
professor — at least in the natural and some of the social
sciences — takes on the characteristics of an entrepreneur."
(op. cit. page 90). "A professor's life has become, it is said,
'a rat race of business and
activity, managing contracts
and projects, guiding teams
and assistants, bossing crews
of technicians, making numerous trips, sitting on committees for government agencies,
and engaging in other distractions necessary to keep the
whole frenetic business from
collapse)." (op. cit., page 43).
"The producion, distribution,
and consumption of knowledge
in all its forms is said to account for 29 per cent of gross
national product." (page 88).
The phrase that Duff and
Berdahl are so fond of is nothing to make anyone optimistic. At Simon Fraser, there is
a particularly obvious example
of the university-relationship
to the outside community. A
Shell gas station has been built
square in the middle of the
best view from the campus,
and the new men's residence
has been named "Shell House."
One of the Board of Governors is quite proud of this. "I
have connections with Shell,
and I, myself, led the negotiations. Shell came up with an
offer far better than that of
any other oil company. They
also gave $15,000 extra on the
condition we called the residence 'Shell House'." At Simon
Fraser, students know very
well what a 'window on the
world' open on — it's a gas
station.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,  1966
Focus editor needed
It's your coffee house
By LARRY GREEN
Where can you hear
LSD, the Beatles, Vietnam, and the use of
four - letter words discussed on stage all in the
same night?
Where can you get on
stage and discuss these
things (or anything else)
yourself? Where do they
have poetry one night,
movies on another, and
folksinging on the third?
•   •   •
Where can you 'hear
talks by special speakers on guerilla warfare,
the university, and
alienation in our society?
Most important of all,
where can you buy coffee for only a dime on
a Saturday night? The
place is the student operated Advance Mattress
Coffeehouse a t Tenth
and Alma.
•   •   •
Although many students from UBC, SFA
and Vancouver City College are now involved
with the operation, the
Coffeehouse was originally the brainchild of
last year's Ad H o'c
March Committee.
Three   of  them,   con
troversial Consensus editor Peter Cameron,
Chancellor candid ate
Randy Enomoto, and
U to y s s e y columnist
Gabor Mate still play a
leading role in the running of the Advance
Mattress. Other student
leaders in the Mattress
are CUS chairman Daph-
ney Kelgaard and last
year's popular AMS
first vice-president, Bob
Cruise.
• •   •
The Coffeehouse is
now open six nights a
week. Tuesday night,
beginning next week,
will be Forum Night,
when invited guests
from UBC, SFA, and
elsewhere will speak on
a wide variety of topics.
Wednesday night is
poetry night, when Vancouver's finest young
poets read their own
works.
• •   •
Thursday night is the
students' own tolab-
night, when anyone who
has anything to say
about anything is given
six minutes on stage to
expound his ideas.
Friday nights are left
open for anyone to come
in and do anything they
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want, "from folksinging
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EPSILON
TUESDAY
SEPT. 27
CHI
SIGMA
ALPHA
DELTA
PHI
PSI
UPSILON
WEDNESDAY
SEPT. 28
DELTA
UPSILON
ALPHA
OMEGA
TAU
ZETA
PSI
THURSDAY
SEPT. 29
PHI
KAPPA
SIGMA
ZETA
BETA
TAU
PHI
GAMMA
DELTA
FRIDAY
SEPT. 30
KAPPA
SIGMA
PHI
DELTA
THETA
SECOND FUNCTIONS
OCT. 1
6-8:30
PHI
KAPPA
PI
LATE
8:45-
11:30
SIGMA
CHI
OCT. 2
DELTA
KAPPA
EPSILON
ALPHA
TAU
OMEGA
OCT. 3
ZETA
PSI
ZETA
BETA
OCT. 4
PSI
UPSILON
DELTA
UPSILON
OCT. 5
KAPPA
SIGMA
BETA
THETA
PI
OCT. 6
PHI
DELTA
THETA
PHI
KAPPA
SIGMA
OCT. 7
PHI
GAMMA
DELTA
ALPHA
DELTA
PHI
PURE VIRGIN WOOL
'•»il.redb»
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at is the
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It is a sort of "state of mind" you
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You develop a touch of flair too because
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Look for the Woolmark on the label when you •hop. CSS-M Tuesday, September 27,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
-/^
wKm
More  Communication
COMMUNICATION
Continued from page five
of specialized committees to
process information, sort out
alternatives and explore
them is a sign of the information explosion.
Focus: Is there any way
out of this dilema? If anything the trend seems to be
in the other direction—toward greater profliferation
of specialities and the accompanying growth of researched facts to support
them. Specialized bibliographies become a burden for
both the student and the
library. In medicine for example, the student's training
is apt to be obsolescent before he finishes his training.
We are being given lots of
food but are dying of starvation — simply because we
can't absorb it or digest it.
Some way or other we have
to learn some techniques of
copdng with this mass of
specialized information. If
four years isn't enough, why
v should ten years be enough?
\ twenty?   We   must   be
a some principles to en-
us to  control  this   in
formation — principles that
are common to all disciplines.
Father McGuigan: There
seems to be no question but
that specialization is increasing at the undergraduate
level. However, if it is any
consolation, such proliferation and fructifying is natural. It is a sign of a stage
of final maturity for the old
structural system. Senility
and death come next. Youth
doesn't like the smell of
death. They are afraid of
it. They are first to notice
the loss of vitality in their
teachers. Teachers notice it
ten years after it has happened. By the same token
it is the students who also
sense the presence of new
life.
Focus: I'm not sure I follow you. How is this related
to the problem of information and  communication?
Father McGuigan: I'm just
feeling my own way in this.
You see the evolution of material nature is from the
simple to the complex. The
final complex embodies more
information   than  the  prev-
iouh simple and undifferentiated form.
Focus: From what direction has the simplification of
science and the blending of
scientific disciplines come?
Father McGuigan: Again,
T don't pretend to be an expert in these matters. I'm
only testing these ideas myself. I'm just an economic
historian and orthodox economics has been perhaps the
most isolated discipline of
all, but from what I read
it seems that information
theory can provide at least
some of the answers. It may
well provide the broad gauge
form of generalization of
the processes of information
exchange, that will serve to
unify both the social sciences within themselves and
the physical sciences with
the social sciences. It is apparent that the raw undifferentiated power of reason is
common to them all. After
all, the pricing system, for
example, is an information
exchange system — perhaps
the most wide spread one in
the world. From what I can
gather the social implications of the  cybernetic  ap
proach have been very clearly perceived in the Soviet
Union and that cybernetics
may be modifying traditional
Marxism by its analysis of
learning process and autonomous behavior. The reverse
may take place vis a vis
western structure—economic
structures in particular. You
see—and this is part of the
point that I want to make—
a critical break through in
modern thought has been the
recognition of the anti-
entropic process by which
multiplicity is ordered and
patterned into higher unities
—in this process there is a
reduction in available energy
which may be accompanied
by increased complexity of
structure and by an increased
span of autonomous functional activity. This order or
patterned relation between
entities is called a system.
The ordered pattern of relations is "information."
Focus: Do I understand
you to say that there is some
relationship between patterns of economic action, for
instance, and patterns of information.
Father McGuigan: Yes. In
my talk I hope to show that
certain ordered relations of
patterns of communications
arise    in    connection    with
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FOR STUDY CR PLEASURE
Book through . . .
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Phone 224-4391
certain technologies. These
technologies of themselves
are information systems or
c o m m unications systems.
These systems establish the
limits or the framework
within 'which the logic of
our economic or political or
social decisions are valid.
Within some degree the logical and real historical patterns are identical. This is
what interests me as a historian. What happens though
when we change from handicraft, man, horse and water
power to steam — to electronic? If you look at the
course of the Industrial Revolution for example you can
observe a lag—they tried to
patch up the old system to
accommodate the new technologies as they arrived. Our
problem is that the present
new technology is characterized by rapid information
flows—but we are trying to
handle it with mechanical
means, i.e. mass production
techniques — with the principles of a steam economy or
even a handicraft economy
—all of these are based upon
the principle of increased
specialization. We try to cure
the situation with more and
more massive doses- of capital to improve and extend
old fticiljities—build bigger
and bigger libraries and hire
more and more people; Bigger
and longer assembly lines.
Good Heavens, they stopped
making and assembling automobiles that way years ago.
Why do we insist upon teaching students that way? We
are getting further and further apart rather than closer
together.
TAKE
TWENTY
AT
TEN o.dock
Nightly
(except Sat.',
at the
Lutheran
Campus
Centre
University
& Wesbrook
WORSHIP & FELLOWSHIP
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in  Technique
and Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at 2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
10% Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
Vogue Flower Shop
2197 W. Broadway 736-7344 Page 10'.-. THE    UBYSSEY Tuesday, September 27, 1966
Are You Aware of
These Upcoming Events
Planned for YOU?
FROSH NIGHT Thursday, Sept. 29 is the date for hilarity and fan. Dave
Brock will relate his celebrated anecdotes of UBC, the Frosh Queen and Ugly Man candidates will be introduced, Tom Northcott will entertain. Time is 7:30 p.m. in the Brock
Lounge. The admission is absolutely Free!
FROSH RETREAT Sept. 30 to Oct. 2 marks the dates of the annual Frosh
Retreat held in sunny Howe Sound at Camp Elphinstone. There's fun and frolic as well as
some serious discussion. Come and meet your fellow frosh, student leaders and professors
on an informal basis this weekend away from home. The program includes:
(1) Lectures and discussions by such prominent campus names as President Macdonald, Dr. McGregor, Dean Healey, Peter Braund (Pres. A.M.S.), Charlie Boylan (1st
Vice A.M.S.) and representatives of the various clubs and organizations available
to you on campus.
(2) Open Forums.
(3) Folk Singing.
(4) Sports Activities.
(5) Sat. night dance to the sensuous sound of the "Brave New World."
Cost for this weekend is only $7.00 including transportation, lodging and meals, but
hurry, limited accommodation and applications are going fast. Pick yours up in the
A.M.S. office. Deadine Wednesday noon! There will be a meeting this Thurs. 12:30 in
Buchanan 106 for those who have had their applications confirmed by phone.
FROSH FASHION SHOW At noon, Oct. 4 in Brock Lounge come
and see the Frosh Queen's modelling the latest in REVEALING Fashions. The Ugly Men will
be there too. Admission will be 25c.
FROSH RECEPTION If you are not interested in dancing to a Big Sound,
then at least come to see the crowning of the Frosh Queen and the Ugly Man awarded his
loot by a BUNNY. Big name entertainment on Saturday, Oct. 8th at the armouries. Tickets
going on sale soon at the A.M.S. office. Price - just $2.75 couple. Tuesday, September 27,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  11
—derrek webb photo
LUNGING AHEAD, UBC Junior Varsity ball carrier  drags  three Everett  Wildcat  tacklers
with him  in Saturday game at Wolfson  Field. Outweighed,  inexperienced  Jayvees
fought back from 20-0 halftime deficit to respectable 20-12 final  score.
Lumberjacks win
on late field
goal
The Thunderbird was the chief deity of B.C. coast
Indians, and was accorded the place of honor atop their
famous totem poles.
But ;TJBC's football Thunderbirds fell from glory Saturday at the hands of Humbolt State College's Lumberjacks
who lopped them off their perch in the waning moments
of their game Saturday at Areata, Calif., to escape with
9-7 win. —	
sChief hatchetman for the
^mberjacks was Mel Oliver,
whose 37-yard field goal with
2:21 to play in the fourth
quarter sent Bird hopes crashing down.
Wrestling
coach
optimistic
The search for
strongmen at UBC is
continuing.
And for wrestling
coach Paul Nemeth, it's
apparently going well.
A1 though Nemeth's
Thunderbird squad lost
four regulars through
graduation, the appearance on campus of several promising first-
year men gives his
hopes for UBC's best
team ever.
The Birds finished in
third place in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association, two points behind
champion University of
Saskatchewan and one
point behind the University of Alberta.
The wrestlers' season
opens Nov. 19 with the
UBC Invitational Tournament  here.
Nemeth is still looking for wrestlers in all
weight classes, especially in the 200-pound-and
up heavyweight division.
Workouts start at
4:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday in
the wrestling room in
the Varsity Stadium
grandstand.
Practice sessions
Thursday and Saturday
start at 1 p.m.
Oliver also led a 77-yard
scoring march which put Hum-
bolt on the scoreboard late in
the  third  quarter.
Lumberjack quarter back
John Dotson capped the drive
with a one-yard sneak, but
Oliver missed the conversion,
and UBC led 7-6.
Earlier, 6,000 spectators had
seen UBC grind to a touchdown just before the end of
the first half.
Halfback Paul Danyliu
swept his own right end for
the score, and Glen Brandt
converted.
Throughout the third period
UBC held the Lumberjacks on
the ground and smothered
their passing attack — Hum-
bolt passers completed only
two of 10 tosses all afternoon.
Meanwhile, UBC rolled into
scoring territory several times,
but was frustrated toy penalties.
Bright spot in the Bird's
demise was quarterback Dick
Gibbons, who completed 14 of
23 passes.
Alberta gets
ominous win
SASKATOON (CUP) —The
University of Alberta Golden
Bears shrugged off pre-season
problems and made a solid
bid for their fourth consecutive western college football
championship Saturday by
trouncing University of Saskatchewan Huskies 21-0 in
Saskatoon.
The Bears, who have 22
rookies in their squad and
weer upset 22-6 last week by
Waterloo Lutheran University, all but put an end to any
Saskatchewan 1966 title hopes.
The Huskies have also been
beaten this season by the University of Manitoba Bisons
and University of Calgary
Dinosaurs.
Soccer Birds
build a nest
in second place
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds scored in both halves
Saturday to defeat Burnaby Villa 2-1 in the opening game
of the Birds' Pacific Coast League season.
The  win gave UBC second
Intramurals
Softball
swings ouf
Men's intramural softball
begins at noon Wednesday
with the Ramblers 1 pitted
against Kappa Sigma  1.
Other first-round games are
Engineering 2 vs. ZBT, Law
vs. Engineering 3, Physical
Ed. vs. Kappa Sigma 2.
Think you
can manage?
Students interested in football but lacking time or ability
to play can still be a part of
UBC's program.
Teams require managers
who like travel and want to
help. Head manager Bob McGinn (261-1878) has details.
place in the PCSL with a game
in hand. The two points places
them just behind Victoria, who
have three points for a win
and a tie.
VALDAL SCORES
UBC opened the scoring Saturday midway through the first
half when veteran inside left
Ash Valdai took a well-placed
free kick from Bob Johnstone
and easily beat Villa goalie
Allan McLeod.
Villa tied it up just before
the half ended when Norman
McLeod missed a penalty kick
only to be awarded another because of a second UBC infraction.
THOM CLINCHES
Veteran halfback Harvey
Thom culminated a series of
crisp UBC passes to beat the
goalie approximately twenty
minutes into the second half.
This goal went unanswered as
a somewhat sporadic UBC defence held tight.
"It was a very good first
game and a nice one to be finished with," said coach Joe
Johnson.
Johnson said he was happy
with the way all 14 of his players performed in the game.
ALEXANDER and AXELSON
Wish U.B.C. Students
A Successful Term and
Invite You To See
Our Complete Selection of
'A- Classical # Popular 'h Folk
and "& Jazz   Recordings
also
Radios Record players
Tapes and Tape Accessories
COMPLETE  REPAIR SERVICE
AVAILABLE TO ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT
107O
Discount with Presentation
of Student A.M.S. Card
Serving U.B.C. Students
for Over 20 Years
Alexander & Axelson Appliances
LTD.
4558 W. 10th Phone 224-6811
Want to row?
Become a crewster
UBC's crew is recruiting.
UBC rowers have scheduled an organization meeting
for room 211 in Memorial
Gym Thursday at 12:30.
Teams will represent UBC
at Los Angeles in May and
in Toronto's Pan American
Games in July. Two eight-
man shells need to be filled.
55cc HONDA
Step    thru    with    windshield
Almost New $186
VARSITY CYCLES
CA  4- 1034       4357 W  10th
Come on strong!
Give a girl a whirl in Forward
Fashion Sport Coats and Slacks.
There's a thrust in the shoulder, a
lean line of lapel that they fall
for. The Daroff Personal Touch does
it with tapered-trim design, a custom collection of fabrics and proud
tailoring. If you get hounded, surrounded, you'll have to figure out
how to send a girl home reluctantly, but firmly. You'll need this
technique while enjoying all 'Botany' 500 Forward Fashions. Sport
Coats from 49.50, Slacks from
$25.00.
,&***
4445 W. 10th
near  Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
d*  Mackenzie Page  12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 27,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Frug stimulates debate
DEBATING UNION
Resolved that the Frug is a
Sexual Substitute. Noon today
in Brock.
• •    •
FOLKSONG SOC
Pat Rose and Ann Mortifee
perform noon Wednesday in
Brock. Admission 15 cents.
• •    •
GERMAN DEPT.
Nathan der Weise by Gott-
hold Ephraim Lessing in German Oct. 7 at 8 p.m. in Freddy
Wood. Students $1 and adults
$2.50. Tickets from box office.
• •    •
SKATING TEAM
First practice Thursday at
6:15 p.m. in the Winter Sports
Centre. New skaters welcome.
• •    •
PHYSICAL ED.
Physical education majors
orientation program at Memorial Gym Oct. 1, from 1 p.m. to
midnight. Tickets $1.25.
• •    *
ORCHESTRA
Practice in Music 104 at 7
p.m. Thursday. Violinists especially needed.
• •    •
MARKETING CLUB
Report on Esso Tiger campaign by Mr. T. Thompson, of
Imperial Oil Ltd. today in Ang.
215 at noon. All welcome, including non-members.
• •    •
YUKON TORIES
Organizational meeting of
the Yukon Conservative Student Federation in Bu. 2201,
Thursday at noon. Guest speaker Dr. J. P. Hibberd, President
of Yukon P.C. Association.
• •   •
VIETNAM DAY
Membership meeting noon
today in Bu. 204. Elections.
• •    •
JUDO CLUB
Organizational meeting noon
today in Math. 100. Regular
practices Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in App. Gym.
• •   •
BOWLING
Organizational meeting in
Ang. 214 Wednesday noon for
all persons interested in bowling. UBC team selected from
league.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting of executive noon
Wednesday in BE. 359.
• •    •
CIRCLE K
Drivers and riders needed.
Apply in BE. 156.
• •    •
THEATRE DEPT.
Actors wanted for Red Magic,
a three-act play. See notice in
green room, downstairs Freddy
Wood.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting noon today in Bu.
1221 for interested persons.
• •    •
SCM
Meeting noon today in BE.
350 for old and new members.
Discussion of booth for Clubs'
Day.
• •   •
PRE-DENTAL
General meeting for all interested Wednesday noon in Bu.
204.
• •    •
FINE ARTS
Prof. Elliott Weisgarber, of
the music department, will present a recital of traditional
music for the Shakuhachi at
noon today in the Fine Arts
Gallery.
• •    •
IH
Margaret Konantz speaks on
West Africa Today at 8 p.m. in
International House.
• •    •
MATCH CLUB
General meeting Wednesday
noon in Math. 204. New members welcome.
Fund established
for dead editor
TORONTO (CUP)—A special memorial fund has been
established in memory of
Larry Greenspan, last year's
new editor of the University of Toronto's student
newspaper,   The  Varsity.
Greenspan, who died in
a level-crossing accident in
Chatham, Ont. this summer,
was a graduate of University College.
nostagia
for this-|^:p!a«ei
".yes yeatxjito'to'o*
rvm&
m  ig
Only;
&ti
SEAFORTH
Seaforth Highlander's UBC
detachment parades today at
7:30 p.m. in Armory.
• •    •
COMMERCE US
Swing to the Epics, the Centaurs, and the Shockers plus a
go-go girls Saturday in the
Armory.
• •   •
SCM
Fall camp Friday to Sunday
at UBC Forestry Camp, Haney.
Topic is Ethical Dimensions
with Prof. Willmott, Rev. J.
Shaver and Dr. Ian Kent speaking. Register BE 350.
TYPEWRITERS
SPECIAL.    STUDENT    RATES
3 Months $18.00
All  Makes, Standard or portable
Consolidated  Typewriters
Ltd.
534 W. Pender   MU 5-6371
MAUD: I'm just admiring your
new high-neck sweater with the
Raglan sleeves that are designed
on angle to make your chest look
broader than it really is.
DON: It's a honey. Made by
Byford and designed by Hardy
Amies.
MAUD: Amies! He's world
famous for his styling knowledge.
DON: I like the way it fits.
MAUD: That sweater makes you
look like I want you to look.
Feel that man-size ribbing and
those one, two, three, four, five,
six sexy leather buttons.
DON: I am. I am!
MAUD: Anyone who understands
quality in sweaters, knows
Byford. They're British.
this exclusive, made in England,
at better stores
everywhere.
BYFORD DESIGN CONSULTANT: HARDY AMIES
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost ft Found
11
TOTE BAG, BOOKS, LEFT IN
wrong car. Please phone Janis at
733-9292.
LOST FRIDAY. DAMEX WRIST
Watch. Brown strap. Scratch on
glass   face.   Call   Greg   224-3902.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
stole by briefcase with initials
J.R.D. on the end please return
what he couldn't sell to near the
third  level stack  entrance.
SWITCH TOPCOAT IN BOOK
store cafe have green Croyden.
Contact   Bill   Pronse   733-1876.
FOUND: MONEY IN THIRD
floor hall of Buch. Ext. on Mon-
day  at  9:30  a.m.   Phone   224-3156.
LOST—ONE SET CAR KEYS, IN
Bu. 102 Maybe. Volks, Ford and
pen   knife.    Call    Bob    988-3496.
Coming Dances
12A
3?
YES, 3!
THREE GREAT BANDS!
AT CAMPUS A GO' GO, YOU'LL
dance to the soul sound of:
JASON HOOVER AND THE
EPICS! And to the Liverpool
sound of: THE CENTAURS! And
you'll dance to the band that
WON the giant band contest
(eighty-six bands entered) at the
I960 P.N.E.: THE SHOCKERS!
Plus 3 gorgeous a Go 'Go girls
(including Miss Vancouver!) ALL
THIS WILL BE AT CAMPUS
A GO 'GO THIS SAT. NITE IN
THE   ARMOURIES!
Special  Notices
13
RUGBY DOUGLAS PARK (22nd
and Heather) Sunday 10:30, Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30 Beginners
welcome!	
* • ALL CHEM. 101 STUDENTS • *
Now on sale, "Complete Guide to
Chem. 101 labs." Limited supply.
Only $1.96 at College Shop, Brock
Ext. 	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone   Ted Elliott,   224-6707.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FROM CAPI-
tal Hill for 8:30 classes. Call
Susan  299-0158   after  six.	
TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS?
—Lease-A-Honda, $28.95 per mo.
Includes helmet, insurance, service.  Phone 682-7912.
CARPOOL WANTED FOR 9:30's
from 41st and Granville. Phone
Heather  263-3320. .__
RIDE WANTED FROM GOVERN-
ment Road. Lougheed area for
8:30*g.    Phone   Fran   939-7151.
TRANSPORTATION URGENTLY
needed for student in wheelchair
from Nanaimo and 12th. If interested please phone George
Starcevic, 876-2387 to discuss payment   and   other   details.    	
UPPER LONSDALE DELBROOK
Area, N. Van. Carpool wanted
willing to drive one day a week.
RIDERS   WANTED.    LEAVE    UP
per Lynn Valley via Upper Levels
or   Queens   Road,   Mon.   to   Fri.
For  9:30  lectures.   Phone   988-0138
NEED RIDE FROM NORTH VAN
401—Lonsdale corner 8:30's. Call
988-1325   after   6   p.m.
URGENT: RIDE M-F 9:30-4:30 12th
Arbutus,   733-9726.	
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY
16th & Burrard. Can drive 1 day.
Phone  733-4620.
RIDE wanted from 12th & Granville
M-W-F for 9:30's, returning at
3:30 — Phone RE 6-0989 after 9:30.
RIDE   WANTED   FOR   9:30   CLAS
ses  from   vicinity of  4th  &  Macdonald   also   5:30   return.   Phone
Barry   731-2563   after  7.
RIDE WANTED. 33rd AND MAC-
kenzle. 7:45 a.m. (approx.) and
5:00 p.m. Please phone B & G
switchboard (2171) or Melanie 266-
9989  after 6:00  p.m
CAR POOL WANTED VICINITY
of Broadway and Clark. Phone
876-3693.
Wanted
15
WANTED: SEWING MACHINE,
good condition for basic home
sewing. Will pay about $40. Mrs.
Assimakos.   RE   1-4951.
Travel Opportunities
16
WANTED BY TWO CHARMING
girls. Ride to Calgary. Friday,
October 7th. Will pay for gas.
Phone Cathy 224-9982 after 6:00
p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1959 MGA 1600. REAL LEATHER
Int'r. Mech. Good cond., had new
clutch and brakes. Here is your
chance to freeze through the winter real cheaply. Eves phone: RE
1 8503, Early  a.m.   or  eves.
VW 1965 DELUXE, RADIO, GREY.
$1,495.00. Phone George, CA 4-9900
5-6:30  p.m.
'51 METEOR FOUR DOOR, GOOD
runing condition, new tires, excellent transportation, $150. 224-
7116.
AUTOMOBILES FOR SALE
1964    MORRIS    1100.    EXCELLENT
condition.    Phone   WA   2-7684.
'56 HEALEY, GOOD CONDITION,
$650 or offer. Dave 224-9073. Phi
Delt   House.    224-9073.
'57 VW DELUXE, LOW MILE-
age. Only 48,000. Pert. cond. Fire
Engine Red.  224-5289 after 6 p.m.
CLEAN '59 VOLVO. MECHANI-
cally sound. 6 new tires. Radio,
heater, ph. 433-3622 evenings
& weekends. 2960 Nanaimo. $600.
Ask  for Bruce.
GEORGEOUS RED 1964 VOLVO
544.   Phone   6:00   733-2839,   $2000.00
1960 RILEY 1.5. VERY NICE CON-
dition, 224-4188 after six. $650
cash.	
'65 CORVAIR MONZA. 4spd. Bkt.
seats, Radio, W.W., Deluxe In-
terior,   etc.   224-5979.
LEAVING COUNTRY. MUST SELL
two cars. 1965 Rambler Classic.
770 Hardtop. Fully equipped, 7,800
miles. $2695. 1965 Isuzu Belle. Deluxe. 8,000 miles, $1,595. Telephone
228-8577.
Motorcycles
27
FOR SALE — 1954 SUNBEAM SI
SOOc.c. Best offer takes. Phone
CA 4-3591 after 6 p.m.	
'66 HONDA 250cc SCRAMBLER.
Two helmets, windshield, only
3800   miles,   $599.   922-3497.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters  ft  Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY
students. Summer Essays typed.
(Summer Essay Specifications
maintained) ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED. 70th & Granville.   263-4530.
ATTENTION PROFESSORS. FUL-
ly experienced in the typing of
your papers, theses, or books.
Electric typewriter. Call Inger
at   987-4186.      	
STUDENTS—WILL TYPE YOUR
essay, thesis, or term paper at
reasonable cost. Electric typewriter.   Call  Inger  at  987-4186.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
CLERK-TYPIST WITH GENERAL
business experience. Required by
AMS publications office. This is
an 8 months per year (Sept.-
April) position, so it is especially
suitable for the wife of a senior
student or staff employee. Applicant should be in the 21-35 age
group, without children, and be
available for at least two terms.
Call manager of student publications,    224-3242.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FOR SALE: 1964 TRIUMPH CON-
vert. (Spitfire) Radio, Economical
steal at $1150 or offer. Ph. 224-
6857.
SKI BOOTS—LACKNER OF AUS-
tria. Size 10 as new. Bryce 921-
9082. eves.
1960 ANGLIA, RADIO, 4 - SPEED,
good   shape   $425.   FA   1-9461.
WOMAN'S BIKE. EXC. COND. $30
or best offer. Phone Mary at 224-
1264.   C.C.M.   3   speed.	
FOR SALE
NOTE Publishing Business, Now
well established at U.B.C, Gross
Sales $2,400.00 ANNUALLY; Ideal
for Commerce or Business-minded
Student; Terms available; reply
to Box 255, Postal Station ''&"
Vancouver 1, or RE 8-9661 (after
6 p.m.).
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office. Brock Hall.
PURE COCONUT OIL — UPPER
Tenth Barbers tc Toiletries. 4574
W.   10th.
Rooms
81
ROOM OR ROOM AND BOARD
for 3 students in West Vancouver.   WA   2-6578  after   4:30.
TWO ROOMS PRIVATE HOME,
prefer medical or Sr. graduate,
male student. Non-drinker, non-
smoker. 4453 West 12th Avenue.
Terms to be arranged.
NEAR CAMPUS:         SPACIOUS
rooms for   two   women.    Private
bath, entrance,    etc.    $35    each.
Phone 224-6389.
Room ft Board
82
ROOM   AND   BOARD   AVAILABLE
for one girl phone  266-8581.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
FURNISHED SUITE 13th MacDON-
ald   to   rent   733-9603.	
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE
Apartment. Close. Reasonable.
Phone   Carol   736-4829.

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