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The Ubyssey Jan 9, 1976

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Array Hardwick now bureaucrat
By MARCUS GEE
The provincial government
announced Thursday the appointment of UBC geography
professor Walter Hardwick as
deputy minister of education.
Hardwick, a member of the UBC
faculty since 1960 and until now a
director of the university's centre
for continuing education, replaces
Jack Fleming at the deputy
minister's post.
Hardwick sakiThTur"
asked on Christmas eve to take the
post and the decision to choose him
was made by education minister
Pat McGeer. Hardwick said he was
not sure if the education department would consider loosening
university and college budget
restrictions.
"We are operating in a period of
monetary instability and nobody
knows what the size of the
educational pie will be."
Hardwick called the future of
Notre Dame University supposedly
resolved by the NDP government,
"ambiguous."
Hardwick's appointment is part
of a restructuring of the education
department hierarchy under the
new Social Credit government. As
part of the shuffle Fleming
returns to his former post as
associate deputy minister in
charge of finance and administration.
Another associate deputy
minister, Andy Soles, becomes
associate   deputy   minister   in
Vol. LVH/'N£*7
j&~'rrl
UBYSSH
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1976
"     228-2301
—peter cummings photo
CAUGHT IN ACT of breaking UBC students' code of ethics set down recently by Alma Mater Society
president Jake van der Kamp, Ubyssey staffers Priscilla Goodbody and Biff Hulk retreat from photographer's
camera Thursday as they frantically try to cover up various portions of their bodies.
Jake pens student code of ethics
Do UBC students follow a code of
ethics?
The answer is yes, according to
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp.
In .response to a letfer from
Robert Young, dean of student
services at Malaspina College in
Nanaimo, van der Kamp said
UBC's "student code of rights and
responsibilities is relatively
short."
"In regard to ethics, it forbids
any student from indulging in any
form of sexual activity in the
hallways of the student union
building," van der Kamp said in a
letter to Young.
"However, to offset this
deprivation, the section on rights
allows every student to indulge in
sexual activity in any room of SUB
connected to a hallway by at least
two doors (quick getaway to"
reduce chances of embarrassment,
you understand).
"The section on responsibility
charges the building manager with
the responsibility of making
certain that every room has at
least two exits to a hallway," he
said at the conclusion of the letter.
Young wrote van der Kamp
requesting a copy of the AMS'
student code of student rights and
responsibilities   to   aid   him   in
developing a code for Malaspina
College.
When asked Thursday how he
drew up the UBC code of ethics,
van der Kamp replied: "It's pretty
obvious, isn't it?
"This guy (Young) writes me an
incredibly pompous letter," van
der Kamp said. "That letter really
called for a sarcastic reply."
Van der Kamp, refused Thursday to pose for a photograph of
him and a friend practising his
code of ethics because the request
violated the code.
"My office has only one door,"
he said.
charge of post-secondary
education and Joe Philipson
becomes associate deputy minister
in charge of schools, (kindergarten
to grade twelve).
Hardwick is a UBC graduate who
got his B.A. and M.A. in geography
here and then his Ph.D from the
university of Minnesota.
Hardwick first became involved
in politics when he was elected as
an alderman for The Electors
Action Movement (TEAM) in 1968.
He remained an alderman until
1974.
In June, 1975, Hardwick was
appointed as director of UBC's
Centre for Continuing Education.
During the past year he has acted
as a "consultant to the Universities
Council on the future of Notre
Dame University in Nelson, which
is to become a public institution in
1977-78.
Hardwick's original proposal
that NDU become a satellite of
B.C.'s three established universities has become the centre of a
controversy about whether NDU
should be autonomous.
Students face
literacy query
frustration that students are taking
the rap for someone else's neglect
somewhere in the educational
system.
"It's weird," said Phil George,
arts 1. "You go through 12 years of
school and then get to university
and flunk a test and find out you're
not literate — it's really a shock."
"Maybe it's a question of
whether high school standards are
too low or university standards are
too high," said Robin Beck, science
1.
There was general agreement
that high school English standards
are too low.
"It's so easy to pass English 12,"
said George.
And Onkar Athwal, science 1,
said he has friends who are failing
first year university English, but
received top marks in high school.
But some  students  questioned
See page 3: UBC
By SUE VOHANKA
"Do you consider yourselves to
be literate?"
It sounds like a strange question
to ask a class of English 100
students, who have all finished 12
years of high school and been
admitted to university.
But when 40 to 50 per cent of all
English 100 students at UBC fail a
Christmas composition exam, it's
a question that has to be asked.
And the students who attended
John Doheny's English 100 class
Thursday had some interesting
things to say about what people
like to call the literacy problem.
Most of the students indicated
they do consider themselves to be
literate. As one student said: "Who
doesn't?"
But then why do four out of 10
students fail a written composition
exam?
The students didn't really seem
to know, but expressed a sense of
Pat McGeer quotations
true but 'hard to believe'
By MARCUS GEE
After the ICBC fiasco, nobody seems to know what to expect from
Pat McGeer once he gets down to business as minister of education.
Look what ex-Liberal McGeer had to say about universities during a
debate on the Universities Act in the last term of the legislature
(Hansard, June 17, 1974).
"Mr. Speaker, the basic thing, I think, that has to be realized about
universities is that they're not democracies. Universities can only
function and bring value to the public for the enormous amounts of
moneys that are spent on them if they're genuine meritocracies.
"I disagree personally with many of the provisions in this act.
"I know of no university anywhere in the world that has been furthered in its own standards by the appointment of students to the
board of governmors or to the senate. If there are people who can
stand up in this assembly and tell me of universities who have
prospered in that way, I would like to know of them."
So the man now responsible for education in B.C. is opposed both to
democracy on campus and student representation in university
governance. And McGeer may have a hard time pushing his
"meritocracies" to B.C. universities, judging from the reactions of at
least two university presidents.
Simon Fraser University president Pauline Jewett said Thursday
she finds McGeers statements about student representation "hard to
believe".
"My own view is that students should take a very great role on
senate and boards of governors. They are our constituents.''
Jewett said she would strongly oppose any moves by McGeer to
curtail or limit student representation on university senates or boards
of governors.
University of Victoria president Harold Petch also said he would not
like to see student representation cut back. He disagreed with
McGeer's opposition to the provisions in the Universities Act which
guarantee student representation.
"Students operated on the board of governors and the senate and
until we had the Act changed they were not voting members. It is very
hard to really give a commitment to do anything if you are simply
there to provide an input.
"By having a vote (as provided by the sections of the Universities
Act McGeer spoke against) they (student representatives) have a
sense of responsibility."
McGeer also advocated more money for universities in his speech
about the Universities Act.
"The new (NDP) government, despite the wealth of money it has
had, has failed to produce the level of financing that can raise our
universities out of their slump — out of their slump, Mr. Speaker,
because that's what they're in."
In the light of McGeer's statement, and the 15 per cent university
budget ceiling introduced by the NDP in November, it will be interesting to see if McGeer puts the money where his mouth is and
loosens the restrictions.
Jewett said she is going to do her best to make him do just that.
"Fifteen per cent wouldn't even enable the three (B.C.) universities
to stand still." O   O   C    !
-^M**,* >-<-*,
~««^!»,     ■»<■> *VJ «$°>»^*-
Tween classes
rnaay, January y, 1976
SUBFILMSOC  presents this term (as a break
thru) a "heavy" schedule
TODAY
SPANISH CLUB
General     meeting,     noon,     Brock
351A.
SKYDIVING
Important meeting for all members,
noon, SUB 215.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Organizational       meeting,       noon,
upper   lounge, International House.
MORMON STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Modern prophets, noon, Angus 210.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Dr.   Larry  Ward on  computers  and
psychology, noon, Angus 223.
THE CENTRE COFFEE HOUSE
Classical       and       jazz       musicians,
featuring    Gavin    Walker,    8    p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
1975, that was the year that was, 8
p.m., 1208 Granville.
SUNDAY
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Music    and   dance   rehearsal,    1:30
p.m., SUB 207.
CORKY'S
CONSERVATIVE
MIDDLE CLASS STUDENTS
Juggling, unicycle and frissbee
workshop, 7 p.m., basement of
Place Vanier common block.
MONDAY
UBC KARATE (SHOTOKAN)
Practice, 7:30 p.m., Gym E, winter
sports centre.
religion   series,   noon,
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
Some diamonds
were born
to be
a cut above
and Ben Moss
has them
6 diamond bridal set in white
or yellow gold
Engagement Ring  $375
Wedding Ring  M10
Sen dfioss
de&ellers
Pacific Centre
Oakridge Shopping
Centre
MORMON STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
Institute   of
Angus 210.
CCCM
Dinner     and      meeting,      6     p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
FEMINIST KARATE ASSOCIATION
Practice,    6:30    p.m.,    SUB    Party
Room.
CURLING BONSPIEL
PURPOSE: TO DETERMINE MEN'S
INTERCOLLEGIATE REPRESENTATIVE
Entry Deadline: Jan. 16, 1976
Fee: $10 per Team
Entry Forms Available at
Room 208 War Memorial Gym
PAYMENT OF FEES
^*
THE DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, GENERAL SERVICES
ADMINISTRATION BLDG., WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS
THAT THE
Second Instalment is Due On Or Before
FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1976
GET WITH IT
Head for the hills
with skis from
•5M SH6P it*
Hexcel
FlscHEt
MWit^i?
Btl*^
Complete Line of All Ski Accessories
Featuring The Top Names in Ski Wear
10% OFF TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
336 W. Pender St. 681-2004 or 681 8423
Open Friday Nights Till 9:00
FREE PARKING AT REAR OF STORE
Hillel House
UBC
Invites You To Our
ANNUAL WINTER DANCE
Featuring "one of Vancouver's
rock and roll sensations"
BOWSER MOON
Saturday Jan. 10 1976
9:00 p.m. ■ 1:00 a.m.
Place: Sheraton-Plaza 500
Admission: $3.00
Full Facilities
500 West 12th Aye.
Information-Hillel House 224-4748
Shirley Schwartz 325-9429 (U.B.C.)
Faye Micner 327-0663 (Langara)
• that might be of general interest &
questionable therapeutic value to the
(mature?) STUDENT
• dedicated to commercially exploit the
intangible basic instincts & escapist tendencies
of its victims
• of (controversial) SEX (ahum!), (anti-)
VIOLENCE, primitive logic (i.e.: HUMOR),
& other goodies
• for the outrageous price of 75c (per show) at
the door of the SUB AUDITORIUM every
Thurs./Sun. @ 7:00 & every Fri./Sat @
7:00/9:30
• If YOU show up in person & with an AMS
CARD
Q Jan.
□
□
□
□ Feb.
□
□
□
□ Mar.
□
□
D
8-11   CHINATOWN
15-18   CATCH-22
22-25   IT'S CANDY!
29-  1   MURDER ON THE
ORIENT EXPRESS
5- 8   The Adventures of
ROBIN HOOD
12-15   THE GODFATHER
PART II
*Fri./Sat. 6:00/9:30
19-22   DAY FOR NIGHT
26-29   CLOCKWORK ORANGE
*Extra show Sun. 9:30
4-  7   EMMANUELLE
11-14   THE GREAT GATSBY
18-21   THE CONVERSATION
25-28   HAROLD AND MAUDE
CLIP AND SAVE
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Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
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Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
■•BP"
5 — Coming Events
"THE  WORLD  IS  ONE  COUNTRY  and
Mankind its citizens" Baha'u'llah
informal discussions on the Baha'i
Faith every Tuesday night at 5606
President's Row, Phone 224-7257.
70 — Services
15 — Found
MAN'S WATCH, Dec. 18th. Phone Ann
at 228-5681  to  claim.
20 — Housing
ROOM AVAILABLE in five-bedroom
house near UBC. Cheap rent. Call
224-5306.
SHARED ACC. 1 bedroom available In
large house. $95/month and utilities.
Kitchen and laundry facilities included. 277-9319.
PERMANENT HAIR REMOVAL by electrolysis. Kree Method in my home.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.
Joan Calvin.
80 — Tutoring
BOGGLED  MINDS  & WISDOM  HEADS:
Call the Tutorial Center, 228-4557
anytime or see Ian at Speak-Easy,
12:30-2:30 p.m. $1 to register (refundable).
HYPNOSIS. Learn the art, private or
group. Improve concentration, relaxation, recall, grades. A.I.H. certified.
Phone 438-3860, 8-9:30 a.m., 4:30-6:30.
personalized tapes.
25 — Instruction
PEG'S  PLACE  POTTERY
SCHOOL
2780 Alma at 12th
Pottery classes start week of Jan.
12. Morning and evening classes.
Children's Afternoons. Workshops.
Phone   now   and   register.   738-2912.
30 - Jobs
EARN $20.00 for lying in a dark room.
Come to Henry Angus, Room 13,
basement Friday, January 9 at 12:30.
50 — Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to rent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5021.
85 — Typing
90 - Wanted
WANTED TO RENT: Two bedroom
suite or house for couple with child
and dog.  228-8792.
BABYSITTER for three children, vicin-
itty 4th and Blanca, early evenings
and two afternoons till mid-March.
Phone 224-1050.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Friday, January 9,  1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
A student in the minority.
Veteran student politician Svend
Robinson resigned from the UBC
board of governors in December
over, among other things, the
administration and student
reaction to the AUCE strike.
Robinson will graduate from UBC
law school this year and begin
articling with the prominent
Vancouver law firm of Thomas
Dohm, the board's chairman.
In the following article he
reviews his past years with The
Ubyssey.
By PAISLEY WOODWARD
UBYSSEY: You've been in
student politics for five years, on
the Alma Mater Society, the senate
and the board of governors. Which
did you find the most satisfying?
ROBINSON: The AMS I found
completely frustrating. I sat on the
council for two years as science
rep and there was always
bickering, complaining — petty
childish politics. I definitely found
the board of* governors the most
satisfying. There's no question of
that whatsoever.
In each of the bodies that I was a
member of, however, I was in the
minority. On the board I was in a
substantial minority.
7'U: Then why was the board the
more satisfying for you?
R: For one thing many of the
issues we were discussing at the
board level I felt the key issues of
the university.
Things like the criteria they use
for hiring, student involvement in
tenure promotion decisions, accessibility to the university. Those
kind of things are the priorities
that I feel are important.
U: What was the matter with the
senate?
R: The senate was interesting
but it was limited to discussion of
academic matters and I felt that
many of the discussions went
round and round in circles — many
of the academics just loved the
sound of their own voices. Very
little was accomplished in senate.
U: What arjout administration
president Doug Kenny? Do you like
him? How did you find him on the
board?
R: I certainly have my differences with Kenny as far as how
the university should be run and
how decisions should be made at
the university.
U: What's the major
philosophical difference between
you two?
R: My major difference with
Kenny is that I feel change at the
university level must come about
not through faculty deciding that
certain changes must be made and
then in turn passing those decisions
on through for discussions by the
senate and so on.
I feel that students have to be
directly involved with those
changes and that the only way that
that's going to come about is by
legislative change.
U: That doesn't look too
promising at the moment.
R: That's right and Kenny feels
instead that there should be this
discussion and so on. But I say that
has failed.
U: If you don't have sympathetic
government though that action is
then stalemated until you do. Don't
you think that there should be some
sort of energy within the university?
R: Oh absolutely. But right now
within the framework of the
present legislation that we do have
there's room for tremendous
change.
The Universities Act says for
example that the board of
governors is responsible for tenure
and promotion, hiring and firing
and so on.
I believe that there should be an
affirmative action planned for the
hiring of women on this campus
and that's something I pushed for.
As a member of the board I
believed that there should be
greatly improved daycare
facilities on this campus.
U: What was the opposition to
that? No money?
R: It was a philosophical objection that that kind of thing isn't
necessary, that we want the most
competent person and somehow
affirmative action doesn't get you
the most competent person. For
daycare the objection eventually
was that there was no money but
there were other objections as
well. People should be looking
after their children and not
dumping them in daycare centres
and that sort of thing.
U: You resigned over an
apathetic student attitude toward
the AUCE strike. What should be
done about student apathy? What's
the cause of it?
R: There's a lot of reasons.
In many cases the students'
curriculum is just so heavy that
they haven't got time to get involved in student activities.
That's particularly so in the
professional faculties such as
engineering, medicine, law.
U: The engineers have time to
chant though.
R: They've got time to chant but
I mean I think that's largely the
kind of learning environment that
they're in. You know when you're
pressured with 35 to 40 hours per
week of classes involving detail
there's got to be an outlet for
frustration.
U: Given that we do want
students involved in government
what should be the incentive?
R: I think that there should be a
recognition on the part of the
university that the university is not
just a place where you learn
academic content.
There should be a conscious
decision that other things as well
should be learned at the university
and one of those things should be
involvement in student activities.
U: In what way? Do you want a
course for that?
R: Well, at the very least I think
that there should be adequate time
in a student's timetable to take
part in some of these activities.
And at the maximum I think it is
worth investigating where there
should be credit for participation in
both on- and off-campus activities.
U: Credit towards a degree?
R: Yes. Gaining credits is the
major aim of 99 per cent of the
students on this campus. And if
they felt that taking part in some
kind of activity on campus that
they could get credit and that
there'd be time for it, they'd be
more willing. I still have questions
about this though, because you
might get people involved for the
sake of racking up six credits or
whatever.
The biggest failure I see of the
university is not in the students
that are here at present but in the
students that aren't getting here.
A fundamental failure of the
education system is that too many
kids from the lower- and middle-
economic classes aren't getting
here.
U: How is that the university's
fault?
R: The university isn't actively
encouraging students to attend.
U: You'd like to see workshops
and seminars sponsored?
R: The university has to take the
initiative in this. It must find out
why the vast proportion of students
right now are from upper middle
and upper class backgrounds. And
once the causes have been investigated the university should be
taking the lead in changing it.
I think that the next big push by
students has got to be for representation at the departmental
level. I have no doubt about that
whatsoever.
I'm not going to be around for
that but I hope that's where
students are going to decide to
focus their energies.
U: What would you like to see
happen at the departmental level?
R: Well right now students are
represented to a minimal extent on
only a few committees and only
because they had to be by virtue of
a senate motion which was passed.
U: What are some of those
committees?
R: The curriculum committee,
the student faculty liaison committee — committees of that
nature.
I think that students should be
involved at all levels of the
departments, of the faculties and
of the university as a whole.
Student involvement in tenure
promotion decisions, hiring and
firing decisions, adjudication of
marks, finances. Those are the
areas that students are specifically
excluded from.
U: You and the NDP. We all take
it that you're going to go into
politics.
R: I hope to.
U: How do you want to do it? Do
you want to run provincially first?
Civically? Federally?
R: Well that's a difficult question
to answer. I'm very involved with
the NDP now as a member of the
provincial executive and the
federal council of the party. I
suspect that if I had a choice of
where to start out that I'd prefer to
start out in provincial politics. I'm
interested in both provincial and
federal politics. It's a matter of
where constituents ask you to run.
U: Do you think you'll be an NDP
candidate four years from now?
R: I would like to be.
U: Do you think the NDP will get
in, next election?
R: Yes, I have great confidence.
—peter cummings photo
SWINGING SIGNS, which are also easy to read, have, now been
installed on campus. Markers are reversal (actually 90 degree shift) of
idiotic formerly horizontal signs, which kept local chiropractors busy.
UBC puts grammar ahead ot ideas, students say
DOHENY ... he tries
From page 1
the validity of the criteria UBC
uses to measure literacy.
Nancy Owens said she wondered
whether writing an essay could
prove a person to be literate.
"Especially if you have to write
the essay- in two hours under
pressure," added another student.
But the students seemed to be
more confused by what they
perceive as an attempt to separate
language from ideas in the way
English is taught.
George said: "It (writing)
should be a means to an end and
not a means in itself."
But there is a feeling among the
students that UBC is more concerned about the correctness of
grammar and sentence structure
than about the ideas conveyed in
writing.
"They want the different standard at university," said Sveinn
Magnusson, arts 2. "They want
something fancy, something
university standard. The important thing is to have it correct
and according to the rules."
"It's a really snobbish language,
university language," said George.
The students by no means
dismiss the importance of being
able to speak and write coherently,
however.
"A full command of the English
language can only be useful," said
Athwal. "Language is a system
and there are rules to it and you
have to obey those rules."
But Owens said she thinks there
is more to writing than simply
following rules of language.
"The purpose of writing is to put
your ideas across."
And the students said that UBC's
way of measuring literacy neglects
the importance of ideas as it dwells
upon correctness of structure.
Owens said she thinks the insistence upon correct grammar
could encourage students to express simple and easy thoughts
when they write essays, instead of
trying to deal with more complex,
subtle concepts which are harder
to express.
"By trying to get the perfect
exam, they're killing ideas," she
said.
Magnusson agreed: "You can
see it in the tests, in the subjects we
are given. All the subjects we got
are very boring."
He said the neglect of ideas and
thinking is encouraged "by giving
us things to write about that we
don't want to write about."
The first part of the Christmas
composition exam was a 300-word
essay to be written on one of
several topics including:
• wit;
• you have been invited to speak
at your former high school. Write
an essay addressed to the
graduating class on the reality of
university as you have found it to
be;
• and what is the most important
quality a scientist should possess.
The students did offer some
ideas on how the teaching of
grammar and writing could be
improved at all levels of the
education system.
Athwal said he doesn't think
educators give students enough
practice in essay writing.
Beck agreed, and said she thinks
students should "study grammar
by reading other works rather than
memorizing terms."
George said he thought "subjection to other essays" by
students is a good way of teaching
grammar and writing. He said
Doheny ensures that students in his
class do read essays by other
students.
Another student said she never
learned any formal grammar at all
in high school. "I think it would
have helped at least if we'd had
some in grade 12."
Beck pointed out that the amount
and method of teaching grammar
varies tremendously from teacher
to teacher. She said it should be
taught by showing students how to
use different parts of the language,
rather than through memorizing
the names of grammatic components. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 9, 1976
AUCE strike sans winners
UBC's first strike is now
over and in retrospect it was
a sad, bitter affair with no
winners.
Sure the Association of
University and College
Employees received some of
its major demands in the new
contract but sex
discrimination still exists
between the salaries paid in
different unions.
Besides, look at all the
abuse they . took in the
process.
Some might consider the
UBC administration winners
considering they probably
saved a bundle by being so
obstinate to the union's
demands.
But they lost a lot of
credibility during the
negotiations, especially at the
beginning of the strike when
they steadfastly refused to
guarantee students would not
be academically penalized for
observing picket lines.
The administration later
made the guarantee but not
before the confusion they
generated at least
contributed to many
students deciding to ignore
the strike lines.
Initial statements issued
by UBC administration
vice-president       Chuck
Connaghan and the
information services team
about the strike were totally
disgusting because of how
they confused the issue.
And that confusion only
served to weaken the strike
in the early stages and
strenghen- the
administration's position in
the negotiations. Dirty pool.
But from The Ubyssey's
point of view the most
distressing part of the strike
was student reaction. By
crossing picket lines en masse
students effectively broke
the AUCE strike because the
university   kept  functioning.
Ideally, if students refused
to cross the strike line and
put pressure on the
administration from off
campus to settle the dispute
an agreement would have
been reached in a much
shorter time.
As it was, the
administration was under
little pressure to settle. They
managed to keep the
university open and even
conduct some of the
Christmas exams while
AUCE was on strike.
In addition the
neanderthal, revolting actions
of some students against
picketers   was   nothing   less
than sick. Strikers were
sworn at, driven at and
thrown at. Admittedly these
jerks were in the minority,
but it really makes you
wonder what goes on
sometimes in this university.
The lack of sensitivity and
compassion displayed by
students as a whole can
probably be explained by
their refusal to understand
the issue and consciously
take     a     stand.     AUCE's
demands weren't
unreasonable and their strike
was perfectly legal.
Students are not some
particularly godly interest
group which can just ignore
something as serious as a
picket line. It's the height of
arrogance and repugnent
behavior.
Some day, marks willing,
each and every UBC student
will leave the grassy gates of
this campus and go forth into
the real world (maybe even
into a union). You won't be
spoiled or pampered and the
work might be harder than
reading a book or
regurgitating facts. The
sheltered life of UBC often
obscures what's happening
outside here.
Losing out on the valuable
lessons to be learned from
this strike, students are
definitely losers in this whole
affair.
WUL, AH   WUZ,     JUS'     T^VlM'
TA    CHANGE     ™UH  G(EEK£>	
Letters
AUCE
support
lam one of the few people at this
university who was thoroughly
dismayed by the overwhelming
lack of understanding or support
that was given to the library and
technical workers who went on
strike last month. Considering the
high degree of conservatism of the
student body at UBC, this lack was
not at all surprising.
The workers at this institution
are not our slaves and we have no
right to demand uninterrupted
service from them. If they demand
an end to discriminatory and
unfair wage policies why do we not
support them?
Will we not wish the same for
ourselves when we graduate?
After all, most women, regardless
of their position toward feminism,
will seek equal pay for equal work.
Further, how many students at
UBC will be willing to start work at
a base rate of $760 per month?
(This is the new base rate, not the
one before the strike.)
A more specific objection has to
do with the audacity of the many
student library workers who
crossed the picket lines of the very
union that, amongst other things,
was fighting to raise the students'
wages.
Students were under no threat of
losing their jobs if they respected
the picket lines and the most
money that a student would have
lost in the five-day strike period
was around $40. (Students can
work a maximum of 10 hours per
week at $4.16 per hour in the
libraries.)
The outrageous and unconscionable actions of these
student library workers is such
that I hope they break their legs as
they rush to pick up the retroactive
pay cheques that were won for
them during the December strike.
If you bite the hand that feeds
you too often, it will forget about
you, and we'll be back to $2.50 per
hour again.
Richard Hunt
arts 4
Art
In reply to the Nov. 20 accusations of Margaret Annett,
former chairperson of the AMS art
gallery committee, as a former
member of both budget and
finance committees, I feel it proper
to set straight certain of her
"facts."
The budget committee did not
chop her budget from $4,500 to
$2,500 as she appears to believe.
The second budget draft, the first
one to authorize funding of the art
gallery committee, allotted $3,850,
later reduced to $2,500 and then
raised to $3,000 when the budget
committee realized the art gallery
committee had grossly overspent
its budget.
Budget committee was never
"ignorant" as to the operations of
the art gallery committee. Budget
committee was only ignorant of the
flagrant waste practised by the
committee in the operation of their
art show. Only too quickly did
budget committee realize this
waste.
At no time was it ever intimated
to either SUB management or
budget committee that Margaret
Annett would resign to work on an
exhibition elsewhere. The correct
sequence of events was that, when
the art gallery committee members asked for the resignation of
the chairperson, she dismissed the
committee.
AMS council then restructured
the committee less Margaret
Annett.
Budget committee at no time
authorized $4,500 to the art gallery
committee for expenses. Budget
committee has no power to do so.
Budgetary allocations were only
passed by council in early
November, long after Ms. Annett
claims the art gallery was granted
the $4,500 "in the spring."
Ms. Annett claims budget
committee never met during the
time of the show in mid-
September. This is strange since
her submission, which flagrantly
attempted to conceal unauthorized
expenses, was made at that time. I
have the submission on file in my
office. Furthermore, there is, and
only ever was one budget committee, meeting during spring,
summer and fall.
Lastly, budget committee did not
"unilaterally cut" anyone's
budget, let alone that of the art
gallery committee. Budget
committee has power only to make
recommendations to council, not to
authorize alleged budgetary expenses.
Admittedly, the AMS had legal
grounds to refuse payment of the
unauthorized expenses of the art
gallery committee. However, after
holding the invoices for quite some
time and freezing the accbunt of
the committee, I finally authorized
the expenditures. Since the AMS
has an obligation to support the
operations of its subsidiary
organizations, a refusal to pay
could jeopardize the ability of
other clubs and undergraduate
societies to make duly authorized
expenditures, thereby severely
constraining their flexibility.
Dave Coulson
AMS treasurer
No. 2
I earn my living as a turret-lathe
operator in a machine shop. The
money I spend for my books, letters, stamps, etc. come from my
wages. I work eight hours per day
in the shop. On my off-days,
Saturdays and Sundays, I send
letters all over the world. I only
average between 150 and 200 letters these two days. I have been
doing this for the past 15 years.
I reiterate: My father GOD, and
I have NOT received one red cent
— in our 30-odd years together —
for our efforts through the mails;
nor do we wish any compensation.
Our only aim in life, is to let people
THE UBYSSEY
FRIDAY, JANUARY 9, 1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
NiaTroonm, Iddav Normt, Eggr Ortsgn, Hjno Rageurps, ucreb Ughba,
Jnho Ceni, Suans Yorsb, Lermreei Snobro, Rice Vain Greb, Naen Ceallaw,
Brain Brbdagi, Neja Dralnal, Trober Tdetoi, Hheetra Klwra, Tatm Gnki,
Icelrah A'diner, Tpere MnmgiCus, Nusas Xdnraelae, Seylipa Ddoowwra,
Erggg Snmpohto, Marcus Gee, Flor Rumaer, Use Knovaha, Sicrh Roniag,
Gdou Tshroun, "and Ryga Cluo were the only aliens who survived the crash
of the Interspace explorer Brian Murooney II, when it crashed on an
inhabited planet in the distant System SRL-A256(B) lliii in the year 4672
A.D	
know that GOD exists in this form
in our lifetime, here, on earth.
Our mailing list is taken from the
Editor and Publisher Yearbook.
This numbers about 1,500 editors of
daily newspapers in the United
States. We cover almost all daily
newspapers in Canada, Great
Britain, Australia, much of Africa
and other parts of the world, we
cover almost all college and Negro
newspapers. Also, a few hundred
weekly newspapers from various
states. Our mailing list totals
almost 3,000 names.
The response has been sparse —
not as good as we would have liked
it. But there are editors, who,
through the goodness of their
heart, plant the seed of hope in
countless numbers of humans, so
the light of salvation will shine
more brightly. I pray, you are one
of these editors or publishers.
With my warmest regards, I
close this letter. My father, GOD,
forwards His endless love as I
remain,
Prayerfully yours,
Eugene Changey
18416 Mapleboro Ave.,
Maple Heights, Ohio 44137
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K.
Because of the AUCE strike
before Christmas The Ubyssey was
forced to cancel publication of its
last issue. We received a number of
letters concerning the provincial
election and our stand on the issue
which unfortunately could not be
run before Dec. 11. They are now
out of date and won't be run.  filmfilmfilmfilmfilmfilmfilmfilTnfilmf
Peckinpah again
By JEAN RANDALL
This is a Sam (boom, squish,
aieeee,) Peckinpah film. Unlike
the other master of ultra-violence,
Stanley Kubrick, Peckinpah's
films border less on the area of
science fiction, and more toward
realism. One needs only to project
The Killer Elite
Starring   James   Caan,   Robert
Duvall,
Arthur Hill
Directed by Sam Peckinpah
Playing at The Bay and Richmond
Square —
iO\ears into the future, and take a
slightly pessimistic point of view,
to fully enjoy the impact
Peckinpah intends.
The plot is based on a newspaper
interview with a CIA official who is
asked to divulge whether or not the
CIA subcontracts to private intelligence agencies. The official
denies any knowledge, but also
says that if he knew of such private
companies he would not admit to it.
Going on the assumption that there
are Such private organizations,
Peckinpah lifts the lid on the dirty
world of legalized murder.
James Caan and Robert Duvall
play two buddies who are under
hire to COMTEC, a private company which is occasionally under
contract to the CIA, to protect
defectors to the U.S. Since both the
bosses at COMTEC and their
employees are in primarily for the
money, the predictible result of
sellouts to the other side for higher
pay begins the usual routine of
doublecrossing and shady deals.
Duvall shoots Caan in the knee
How c»e^GD fepAi UW-2PM 	
Welcome
to Mainland!
BOOK SALE
'/s OFF
ALL BOOKS
ALL BOOKS ON SALE
INCLUDING
HARDCOVERS & PAPERBACKS
As all Hardcover Books are reduced from 20% to
80% off original publishers' prices, we offer an
additional 1/3 off our Bargain Prices for this sale.
MAINLAND
BOOKS
1148 W. GEORGIA ST. - Free Parking Alongside
812 PARK RD. RICHMOND
Open Daily Including Sunday — Both Stores
and elbow near the beginning of the
show, so the first half hour is the
heroic struggle for recovery by
Caan, with Collis — Arthur Hill
doing his best to convince Mike —
Caan, that he'll be a cripple for the
rest of his life. Caan puts in one of
his better performances as the cool
head who bides his time until he
can pay the S.O.B. back.
One thing that makes Hill's
performance worth mentioning is
that he is from Vancouver, or West
Vancouver to be exact. Hill's
stuffy, rigid style of acting is a
sharp and effective contrast to the
boyish charm of Caan.
Even if the film has a realistic
basis, it is not one that should
shake up people as some of the
earlier Peckinpah films are noted
for doing. There are too many
humorous oneliners delivered
amidst murder scenes, and even
the murders are filmed in slow
motion adding a touch of fantasy to
what's happening.
Make an
appointment
with us today
And start your
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Moisten rim of 8 oz. stemmed glass with
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Pour l'/2 oz. of Old Bushmills Irish Whiskey. Add 1 tsp.
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of whipped cream. Serve and watch the smiles.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
SCAPINO!
by Moliere
JANUARY 16-26
(Previews - Jan. 14 & 15)
8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets: $2.00
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE • ROOM 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 9, 1976 PF
TItts week PF features Bruce Baugh and
Angela Baumgartel talking with popular
jazz pianist Dave Brubeck.
Dave Brubeck was in town December 15th
for a concert at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
along with his sons Darius, Chris and
Danny, and Paul Desmond. It was the first
■tour for Brubeck and sons with former
Quartet member Desmond, who had been
with Brubeck since the forties. Angela
Baumgartel, a jazz disc-jockey at CITR,
and I managed to take an hour of Dave
Brubeck's busy schedule to talk with him in
his room in the Hotel Georgia. The intelligence and integrity of Brubeck are
apparent even in print; what is perhaps not
so apparent is his warmth and geniality,
which left a deeper impression with Angela
and I than anything else about the interview.
The other aspect of Dave Brubeck that we
can't put across here is his tremendous
ability as a musician; but anyone who heard
the two generations of Brubeck with Paul
Desmond run through material from Take
Five to some of the compositions of
Brubeck's sons will attest to the fact that
Brubeck's talents have in no way been
diminished by the passage of the years.
PF: At what age did you start in music?
Dave: Oh, I don't know. In our family you
just start playing, like other kids start
walking.
PF: Were your parents into music?
Dave: My mother was. I didn't 'study
formally withher. She practised all the time
so I learned a lot just from listening to her.
She believed in pre-natal influence when
most people didn't know what it was. She
believed that the child could hoar before it's
born so she practised eight hours a day.
You're getting all that, and then as'soon as
you were born you're put in a cradle next to
the piano, and she kept playing. So either
teaching or practising maybe eighl hours a
day, and then the last thing I"d hear at night
would be her playing, so . . .
PF: So it's in the blood then.
Dave: Maybe not the blood, but the brain!
PF: What sort of an influence did Darius
Milhaud have on your music?
Dave: Well, I hope a lot, or I've wasted my
time. Knowing him was a great influence,
just being around him. Most of what I
learned was just through osmosis.
PF: What was he like?
Dave: Well, he was undoubtedly the
greatest composer in the amount of work
he's done since Mozart. He had the greatest
technique of any man in Ihe world since
Mozart, maybe even as great as Mozart.
With all this technique at his disposal he still
liked jazz musicians, and jazz, and though!
that we were contributing as much as
European composers.
It was great for our ego lo have him say,
"Keep being a jazz musician, because this is
valid. Composition is also valid, but they're
both valid. Don't give up jazz for composition, because what you're doing is
important: and if you're going to reflect
America, don't do like most composers, and
come over here to Europe and study and just
go back home and be a copy of Europe.
Because especially if you're a jazz musician
you'll have a chance of being an individual."
PF: You've done a couple of classically
influenced large scale pieces, combining
jazz and classical influences. Was Milhaud
an influence on this sort of undertaking?
Dave: Only in the sense that he would
have encouraged that sort of thing when I
was a student of his. I sent him the first two
pieces. One was called "The Light in the
Wilderness", which was a two-record set,
and he liked that very much. He was living
in Paris, and he wrote back that he thought
that it was fine. The second piece I sent him
was "The Gates of Justice", where I used a
cantorial tenor in the part of the Old
Testament, and the baritone was singing
some Old Testament things, but largely
Martin Luther King. You had these two
types of music: Negro, and I tried to use a
very Biblical style — what I thought would
work with the text, musically.
There's a great similarity between the
Negro and the Jewish culture in that they
were both treated largely the same way,
only the Negro more recently, but very
similar. And at the time there was a lot of
dissension in some of the major cities of the
United States, where the synagogues were
being bombed. The American Hebrew
Council had asked me to write this piece that
they thought would help bring into focus the
similarity of the two people.
I'm always getting hooked into things like
this, thinking it'll actually do some good,
and realizing that you get on these social
things where you're trying lo say something
and no disc-jockey who's going to keep his
- job long on a commercial station will play it.
Even most people - symphonies don't want
to put it on. They're hoping to entertain their
audience, rather than make them think.
I've written another piece called "Truth is
Fallen", where the symphony orchestras
actually asked me to change the title. One
symphony orchestra played it three nights,
and over my head they used the title
"Truth" without "is fallen". So this is the
kind of prejudice you run up against when
you try to do something social. People tell
you, "Don't do that. People don't want to
think.'-' People were angry with me over
that piece.
Then after Watergate, the same parts
where people1 in the audience would be
furious with what I was having the singer
say. or the Star Spangled Banner out of tune,
they finally understood it. But it was too
late: So when you do this kind of thing it isn't
popular. No record company wants to touch
it. and the average radio station, unless it's
a very good, high calibre, interested in
public affairs station, won't play it, and you
don't have a dream of seeing it in an
average record store.
PF: Are you working on any large scale
pieces right now?
Dave: Oh yeah, two more. And now I'm on
the kind of opposite approach. Now the
country's scared, and 'all afraid of
everything falling apart. Then you try and
pick them up again. So I've written a very
patriotic sort of flag-waver called "They AU
Sang Yankee-Doodle", which was commission^ by the New Haven Symphony for
the Bicentennial. And then tomorrow 1 leave
lor Honolulu, where they've commissioned
me lo do a piece called "The Song of
Bethlehem'. which is a Christmas cantata
which is> just lull of joy.
I heard our local church do it without the
symphony orchestra last week. For the
Episcopalians to stand up and cheer in
church alter a cantata -- I've never seen
anything like it. lt was so full of what should
happen in churches. They were shocked at
first, but the> got into it, and at the end they
were just, screaming for joy. They're so used
to having t heir church so dreary. I love Bach
and Handel: those are the best things that
happen. But a lot of the other music is pretty-
dreary -   there's no life.
I had a real festival going in thai church.
To have won over the Episcopate, which is
the wealthy church in our community, and
have them approve was really a triumph
and that's what I wanted to do.
PF: You're on the road again with Paul
Desmond. What's it like to be playing with
him again?
Dave: It's really new. The set-up we're
using now we just got started these past four
concerts, with Paul Desmond playing with
my children and myself. Usually it's been
Paul Desmond, Gerry Mulligan, Alan
Dawson, and Jack Six. We've done a tour of
Europe together, and a tour of Australia and
Japan. Paul said he liked the way Danny
and Chris and Darius played, and I had
never thought he'd want to be in that
situation. He just told me today that he
really likes playing with my sons.
That's great. Because it would look like
I'm setting that up, but it's all just the op
posite. My sons came to me and asked me if
they could play with me. It's not the father's
idea to get this going. I just let it happen.
Now when Paul says he loves playing with
the kids — that's a thing we were just trying
out this week, but it's something we could do
all over the world too.
PF: How is the repertoire chosen?
Dave: There's nothing there that
everybody doesn't say they'd like to play.
Like the first night, I didn't know how I was
going to program il. I told Paul, "I want you
on from the beginning because the audience
will certainly want to see you." So I had all
Ihe things written out that Paul and I would
do together, and then I was going to bring
ihe kids on. But Paul said, "No, I'd rather
you open with the kids, and then bring me
out".
As a leader, you try not to have anything
set in your mind. You put something
together, so that if no one else comes up with
anything you still have something. Then you
see the reaction to everything. The leader is
the guy who I think has to adjust the most, or
you can"t"be a leader.
PF: Have vour sons had an influence on
your music?
Dave: Oh. a lot. Sure. With the kids. I can
tell you this, that if I had the audience today
to work with when I was playing years ago
I'd have gone a lot different direction, but
everything I wanted to do experimentally,.
the times weren't right for it. So when the
kids say they'd like to do this and that J j»y:.
"fine". I can callthings thirty years *>lii~.
like Ihe last Downbeat Review said' how
great the arrangement of "The Way You
Look Tonight" was, and I wrote that thirty
years ago.
Right today I'd have, to work pretty "hard
to play it again, so I figure we were sofar
ahead, that's what's going on now, and what
the kids are doing, isn't a big change. They
talk about "free music". Well we didn't play
free music for thirty ye.afs. We did in forty-
six, and nobody would listen: they.thought
you were crazy. So when the icids tell me.
today, "Let's play something free", my
mind goes right away, it just won't work,
because when I used to do that the audience
didn't know what was going oh.
The audiences are better now. .1 had the
most avant-garde group there ever was. It's
because the guys in it were all way ahead of
their time. Like Bill Smith, he teaches at the
University of Seattle in Washington, he's
almost the father of avant-garde clarinetists
in writing, and he was in the group. Paul
I X'smond was in the group. Cal Jaegger was
Ihe drummer. Bob and Dick Collins, who
vent with Woody Herman, were in the
group, and Dave Van Kreet on tenor
saxaphone. who went with Kenton. We were
all kids together, and we wrote this fantastic
book that people just weren't ready for.
PF: Your sons seem to have added a lot
more electronics to your music. Has this
pulled in more of a younger audience, and
how has your older audience reacted to this?
Dave: Well, there again Bill Smith was
the first guy to use prepared tape and
electronic things. The first guy to use
.■vwithesizers, but you wouldn't even know
about it. The first time I heard of electronic
synthesizers was through Bill Smith, and
they weren't even making them here. He
had an Italian one. So to be technical, let's
just say that the audience has changed
enough now so that what my children are
doing I don't mind doing.
If you really knew what we've done, then
you wouldn't think that there's anything new
that's going to startle us much. Believe me!
The old Octet, which is the group I'm talking
about, was way ahead, and we must
recorded the most commercial things. I've
got albums that nobody would release.
They're still not released. Because people
didn't want what we were doing at the time,
and I know that we were way ahead.
Now, I know if I released them they'd say
I'm copying somebody. For instance, the
other day my bass player asked me if I knew
a tune called Alice in Wonderland, and he
says it's a great tune. And I said, "Yeah,
how do you know that tune?", and he said,
"Bill Evans recorded it". So I said, "Well,
when did Bill record it?", and he said, "Oh,
sometime in the sixties", and so I said,
"Well I recorded it in 1949, and that's the
first jazz waltz, that started the whole thing.
"Then I got a fake-book from Berkeley
School of Music, and it had "Alice in Wonderland, as recorded by Bill Evans off the
such-and-such record".
If you're too far ahead — like Miles and
Bill Evans started doing Someday My
Prince Will Come, and we'd done that five
years before, but people all think I stole it
from them. And they want to believe that.
They don't really want to dig out the source
of so much we did. The last Downbeat was
saying that we copied from Max Roach, I
tokl. Joe Morello on the phone, and he
laughed so hard he couldn't answer me.
Those stories: they said we'd been playing
at a place with Max and were copying down
everything. I said "In the first place, you're
blind. Gene Wright couldn't write anything
down if he had to. At the time I couldn't read
or write music, and Desmond wouldn't have
cared.. And yet, right up to the last Downbeat fliey're still trying to get their licks in
against this group, which really did so much
new, and it's very amusing to me. Somebody
. someday will research, and see when we did
'things, and really do it right, instead of guys
;JHSjfietting on this kick against people who
' have been successful.
In the beginning the critics built me up,
■ then they tore me down. Eventually it will
: go Ml cycle, I hope. The wheel is just at that
point where I'm seeing over and over the
new younger kids who would say "Gee, The
Nice did this, Emerson, Lake & Palmer did
this, but I think it goes back to something
Dave did twenty years ago." I don't say I'm
a great player or anything, but J do say that
we had ideas that are now around, and we
had them first.
PF: What do you think of electric jazz
musicians like Herbie Hancock and Chick
Corea?
Dave: I like Chick on acoustic piano
tremendously, and Herbie on acoustic
piano. . .
PF: What about their electric stuff.
Dave: I was hoping to avoid that. I went to
Chic's last Carnegie Hall concert, and it
proved what I thought I was going to see.
The first half they were playing electronic,
very good response. The second half they all
went acoustic, and it was way better. So
those kids wouldn't have been there unless it
was for the first half, and the second half,
because they were there, they realized how
much better it is without all this electronic
nonsense. Although I shouldn't really call it
"nonsense", but they dug the acoustic more.
And I do too, because they're all masterful
on their instruments, each guy. They're
smart enough to know how to get past the
record companies, how to get to the public.
I went through the same transition
myself. I had only done original compositions for years. When we didn't have any
audience at all, I went through four or five
years where I didn't write another note, just
played standards, I got a following, and then
I could no back to where I was before. I
think, I hope, that this is what Chic is doing,
and Herb.
PF: Who do you listen to right now?
Dave: I write all day long, so I don't have
time to listen. Bach, and Stravinsky — I just
relistened to the Rite of Spring last week.
That to me is one of the great modern
compositions. And I love Debussy, Ravel,
Satie, Bartok, Milhaud.
PF: Do you write anything that comes
into your head?
Dave: I'll be writing on the plane all the
way to Honolulu, working on the score, or
I'll be composing. I've written five very long
pieces, most of it in the time I used to waste.
Friday, January 9, 1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 3 Spring brings thrifty entertainment
By ERIC IVAN BERG
Just ask yourself where, on a
pinchpenny student budget, do you
think you can find the greatest
moviegoing bargain in B.C. for
lowest appreciable prices? Well
you need look no further than our
own SUB Theatre in the bowels of
that cracked concrete egg called
SUB. For it is there that those
hardworking students dwarves and
film projecting elves of UBC's
famous Film Society every
campus weekend present their el-
cheapo but excellent SUBfilmsoc
film screenings.
So for those who want to save
money and who doesn't nowdays?
Here is a brief preview of the
lineup for the SUBfilmsoc Spring
Presentation. , Leadoff is this
weekend's finely styled' Roman
Polanski film, Chinatown.
Chinatown (1974) is Polanski's
beautifully filmed period set-piece.
It is a murder mystery detective
story set in 1939 which incorporates
all the delightful details of
Hollywood's waning nostalgia
craze.
Jack Nicholson stars as a slow
paced Sam Spade type, a gumshoe
detective who gets most of his nose
nipped off by the heavies for
noseing into other people's
business. Fay Dunaway, with an
almost glacial elegance co-stars as
a recently widowed heroine hiding
her past from him. John Huston,
plays the frightened widow's
homicidal father with convincing
and paternal passion.
Next film on deck in SUB-
filmsoc's spring schedule is Mike
Nichols kinky cult film and antiwar hit Catch 22 (Jan. 15-18). This
savage war satire is adapted from
Joeseph Heller's bestseller
paperback following the comically
desperate attempts of WW II
Bombardier Capt. Yosserian
played by Alan Arkin to obtain a
combat discharge on the grounds
of mental insanity.
Unfortunately the twenty-
second catch is that while by
trying to stay alive and escape the
hell of war by faking insanity, you
prove your good sense and sanity.
Therefore you are sent back into
combat. The rich sources for black
satire which Heller drafted are
recruited almost flawlessly by
Nichols though the film cannot
keep pace with the novel. Catch-22
remains one hell of a laugh in one
hell of an unfunny situation.
While SUBfilmsoc's next
scheduled show, Candy (Jan. 22-
25), may strike out as a gang bang
of the porno-chic variety it has
some "socially redeeming value."
Candy, the "sweet young thing", is
played by the oral gymnast Ewa
Aulin, who disappeared after the
filming and hasn't been seen since.
Marlon Brando, Richard Burton,
Charles Aznavour, James Coburn,
John Huston, Walter Matthau and
Beatle Ringo Starr are all part of
Italian director Marquand's gung-
ho cast of candy nappers.
After fanning Candy SUBfilmsoc' chugs along with Dame
Agatha Christie's murder mystery
thriller Murder On The Orient
Express (Jan. 29th-Feb. 1st).
Hollywood's speedy Sidney Lumet
directs this slick star-studded
classic adapted from Dame
Agatha's bestseller by screenwriter Paul Dehn. The casting
budget alone ran into the several
millions.
Albert Finney is the legendary
Christie hero, superdetective
Hercule Poirot, zeros in on this
cast of exquisedly guilty looking
upper-crust suspects and
miraculously nabs the murderer.
In this "whodunit", the suspects
are portrayed by such stars as
Ingrid Bergman with an Academy
Award winning performance),
Lauren Bacall, Sean Connery,
John Gielgud et al. For Christie
fans and for detective mystery
nuts of all assorted flavours this
one is a must.
After murder comes mayham aj
SUBfilmsoc next presents a classic
old film of that famous bow and
arrow variety. Errol Flynn, the
cinema's original sexual athlete
stars as the lusty Robin Hood (Feb.
5th-8th) in the first color remake of
the classic Douglas Fairbanks
film. Its the same famous old tale
retold with all the Merry Men of
Sherwood chasing after the lovely
Maid Marion, Olivia Dehaviland.
Sir Basil Rathbone wades into the
frolic as the heavy Sherrif of
Nottingham.
A very heavy cleanup hitter,
Francis Ford Coppola's Godfather
Part II (Feb. 12th-15th), is the next
film in the SUBfilmsoc spring
order. This Academy Award
winning picture is technically an
even better picture than the
Godfather Part I. Coppola, with his
co-screenwriter Mario Puzo, the
author of the original book, has
welded together a fine film,
machine gunning the myth that
Part II remakes are never as good
as the original shows.
Al Pacino plays the mighty
Mafia Don Michael Corleone with
an icy menace and ruthless use of
mob   power.   The   updated   plot
revolves around his gang warfare
with a Jewish criminal mastermind
named Hyman Roth as played by
Lee Strasberg.
Robert de Niro in a cameo flashback role as Michael's young
father is absolutely stunning with
his cold-blooded convictions.
Following the Godfather, one of
the finest films that SUBfilmsoc
has offered to UBC students in
years. It is the famous French
director Truffaut's Day For Night
(Feb. 19-22). In the film-within-a-
film format Truffaut himself plays
a director of a studio film crew
shooting a tragic love story called
Meet Pamela.
Four "film-in-process" shooting
montages complete the audience
fascination with the film. In these
scenes Truffaut gleefully shows the
magic special effects and directorial wizardry that goes into
making modern motion pictures.
Suspense is created in a series of
completely unplanned disasters for
his volatile crew of unstable actors.
One of the best performances
turned in during this film's battery
of great acting performances is by
Valentina Cortese. She plays
Severine an aging actress turned to
drink and debauchery and so
forgetful of her lines that she
verges on a nervous breakdown.
Stanley Kubrick's post-
Orwellian horror story Clockwork
Orange (Feb. 26-29) makes its
debut in SUBfilmsoc's lineup.
Clockwork Orange is a troubling
look at a drugged and violent
future where the question asked
that if a man chooses evil over
good then what right have we to
"cure him," conforming him to
"good behavior?"
Malcolm McDowell plays the
"Droog nyet punkie" Alex who
gets his rocks off on Beethoven and
ultra violence. Patrick Magee
plays the vengeful writer who is
beaten insensible by Alex's
"Droog" gang while Alex rapes his
helpless wife to the tune of Singing
In The Rain.
Emmanuelle (Mar. 4-7) is an
elegantly well photographed fuck
film. Just Jaeckin directs this
sizzling southeast Asian fandango
of flesh and fun. It is well edited,
well scored (hit song Emmanuelle
sung by Pierre Bachelet) and well
produced. As for well acted I must
leave that to your discretion.
The lovely Sylvia Kristel is
Emmanuelle. Alain Cuny plays the
aging poet of love who tries to
convince her that her mind is the
See PF6: FILMSOC
SKI CROSS COUNTRY
world's  most  delicious coffee liqueur
Page Friday, 4
THE       UrVYSSEY
Friday, January 9, 1976 By ANNE WALLACE
After our Christmas extravagance most of us as students
return with an entertainment
budget somewhere between small
and nil. And so, a few en-
tertaining.inexpensive     ideas . . .
Here on home ground, the UBC
Fine Arts Gallery will be showing a
collection of French art contributed by local collectors. "L'art
Francaise" will open to the general
public on January 8 and will run
until January 26. Gallery hours are
Tuesday until Saturday, 10:30 to
5:00. No charge!
• Tomorrow, Cultural Funk will
present a mellow evening of music
featuring local musicians. Performing will be Jane Mortifee from
Jacques Brel, Solomon Skye
pianist and guitarist and also the
composer of much of the music to
he performed, Charlie Bill former
bass player with High Flying Bird,
and Geoff Eyre who's a
drummer with Hans Staymer
Band. All are accomplished
musicians and promise to make it
an evening of good relaxing entertainment. The concert wiil be
held at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre, 1895 Venables St.,
starting at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are
$2.00 at the door'.
Also at the East Cultural Centre
this weekend is the third concert in
a series by Days, Months, and
Years To Come, the Cultural
Centre's new music ensemble. This
week's concert will feature the
music of composers Rudinske,
Barlett, Mayr, Rzewski, Berio and
Morel. Concert time is 9:00 Sunday
night, and tickets are two dollars.
Something different will be
showing at the Cultural Centre
tonight. They will be presenting an
"Art Deco" fashion show. This
show will feature clothing for men
and women created between 1920
and 1935. Over 50 formal and informal fashions will be shown —
everything from Paris designer
fashions to home-made clothing. It
should be an interesting look into
the past. Tickets are only $1.50 for
the show tonight at 8:00.
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ENGLISH
TITLES
Shows:
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Varsity
■ 224-3730«»
4375 W. 10th
Every "Monday at Eight,"
Pacific Cinematique shows a film
from their international film
series. This newest series is entitled Woman as Star. This
Monday, January 12, the film is
Morocco starring Marlene
Dietrich, Gary Cooper and Adolphe
Menjou. This 1930 film is filled with
all the intrique of that decandent
period and the romance of the
French Foreign Legion. This
movie is a treat for all old movie
freaks. That's showing at VECC.
Tickets are $1.50.
If you would like to share with
Vista any of your favorite spots
that provide inexpensive and interesting entertainment, drop in
and see us at The Ubyssey office in
SUB.
M
STUDENT SUMMER JOBS
WITH
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS
Application forms for 1976 summer
work with the British Columbia
Provincial Government available at
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
PONDEROSA ANNEX "F"
JAN." 12 to JAN. 16, 1976
9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Daily
Student Referral Office
Employment Programmes Branch
British Columbia Department of Labour
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
If you are an engineer this
chair could be yours.
This is where you could find yourself if you become a
Maritime Engineering Officer in today's Canadian Armed
Forces. The Master Engineering Control centre of one of our
new DDH 280 Destroyers.
No boilers. No stokers. No sweat!
The power within these beautiful ships comes from jet
turbine engines. The machinery that heats, cools, ventilates
and provides water throughout these ships is the latest.
Maritime Engineering Officers on these ships work
with some of the most sophisticated equipment in the
world...with expertly trained men who are as proud of
their work as they are of their ships.
If you're studying engineering, think about
this Officer's job. It's a very special one. It could
take you anywhere in the world!
Directorate of Recruiting & Selection, National Defence Headquarters
Box 8989, Ottawa, Ontario K1A0K2
Please send me more information about opportunities
in the Canadian Forces of Maritime Engineers.
GET
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Friday, January 9,  1976
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 musicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusicmusic
Cult trio playing folksy sounds
By JOHNINCE
Their cult is growing. New
Year's Eve saw them win new
converts at the City Nights
Theatre. To whom am I referring?
The Pied Pumpkin String Ensemble.
Pied Pumpkin is a group of three
local musicians. As their earthy
name reflects they are into a
country-rock sound. But their
music is not the country sound
heard on CJJC, but freak country
music. Their stage comments
indicate the type of person their
music is reaching. "Deep country
people, the kind of people who
come and visit you and leave a ring
around the bathtub," says one of
the trio.
The three musicians have extensive musical backgrounds.
Their instruments are all
acoustically oriented: violin,
mandolin, dulcimer and acoustic
guitar.
Joe Mock, a quiet, mellow man
onstage, has been on the Vancouver music scene for a number
of years, at one time heading his
band Mock Duck. He plays guitar,
is steady on rhythm and displays
his talents with some extremely
capable leads.
Rick Scott, the front man of the
group, is not only an expert at
making his dulcimer produce
beautiful sounds but also at
making the dulcimer itself. I found
his dulcimer playing fascinating.
His music on Wednesday evening
was the  core of the group.   His
Film Soc
From PF4
most sensuous part of her body.
The best part of the show and
certainly the most sensuous part of
the film is in its fluidly
photographed and romantic
Bangkok location. The name of the
real star of this SUBfilmsoc erotica
is the photographer, Richard
Suzuki, with his talented eye for
the lush.
The most overblown production
budget of 1974 was the lavish
production, The Great Gatsby
(Mar. 11-14), a box office disappointment which tried to cash in on
the late nostalgia craze. Nevertheless, Gatsby is stylish and
carefully manicured. with some
very pretty Hollywood faces such
as Robert Redford as Gatsby and
Mia Farrow as Daisy. Jack
Clayton directed this production
and so any gushy opulence is his
fault.
The plot remains the classic F.
Scott Fitzgerald tragic romance of
Gatsby and Daisy. It is still a
gorgeous film to watch but one
which falls far short of the advanced billing of its mammoth
publicity campaign.
One sure hit in the SUBfilmsoc
lineup is Francis Ford Coppola's
one man tour de force as the
producer, writer and director of
The Conversation (Mar. 18-21). A
frightening post-Watergate condemnation of our modern society is
recorded in this suspenseful plot
about a professional electronic
eavesdropper with a bout of conscience.
Gene Hackman stars as Harry
the supersnoop who will . go
anywhere and bug anything in
order to carry out his wiretapping
invasion of other people's privacy.
Last in. this cinematic batting
order is the Hal Ashby melodrama
Harold and Maude (Mar. 25-28).
This is a sentimental journey of a
20-year-old youth named Harold
(Bud Cort) in search of himself.
The film is a comic lark with a
semi-tragic ending guaranteed to
wet your nappies much like Love
Story did.
Pied's Sheri Ulrich
driving- tempo on the dulcimer
created interesting cord
progressions and simultaneously
gave an almost drum-like beat. He
is also strong on vocals.
Shari Ulrich on violin and vocals
is the melody of the trio. She plays
the fiddle with a fierce intensity
and produces a controlled but
piercing wail. She has an excellent
vocal range, although her voice
has a harsh, almost masculine
sounding tone.
The group plays well together.
They are "tight" to use the rock
music vernacular. They play like a
speeding tricycle each wheel
spinning round at a different rate
yet each heading in the same
direction. On one level the music
feels its way into you so that you
want to stand up and do some shit-
kicking hootenany. On another
level their music is an intellectual
and emotional experience as their
vocal harmonies intertwine and
their instruments paint colourful
musical canvasses.
New Year's Eve was a bit of an
experiment at the City Nights. It
was a dance hall setting in a
building designed as a movie
theatre. The first eight rows were
removed so us folks could get up
and boogie. Rick Scott explained to
the audience that only eight rows
were removed because each seat
had eight bolts attaching it to the
floor.
The moment the group hit their
first note, there was an explosion in
the vicinity of the impromptu
dance floor. However, there was
not enough room for all those who
wanted to dance, to do so comfortably, without assaulting those
nearby. People who did not take
their chances on the dance floor
were frustrated by an obstructed
view of the stage and were perhaps
a little annoyed at spending a New
Year's Eve relatively sober in the
cramped quarters of a City Nights
seat.
It was a Freakers Ball, but the
ballroom atmosphere was just not
there. However, it was good fun to
watch all the people, complete with
their war-painted faces, pantomime games, and appropriate
"freak" costume.
Pied Pumpkin has cut an excellent album entitled The Pied
Pumpkin String Ensemble.
Although the energy which
emanates from their live performances is missing on the LP,
the high quality of their music is
present. All the cuts are composed
by the group. Refreshingly, the
group has avoided the commercial
record industry and is distributing
the record by themselves. One can
arrange to get the LP by phoning
879-1201 or 685-2579. It's only $5.00.
Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 9, 1976 Page 11
Ombudsman
gets his
back
A compromise has been reached
between student ombudsperson
Moe Sihota and Speakeasy on the
use of SUB office 100A, which both
claimed.
Both Sihota and Speakeasy, who
wanted to use the office for
counselling, took their cases to the
SUB management committee,
which decided the office would be
shared by both.
Sihota, who was elected as
ombudsperson last October over
Speakeasy member Graham
Nicholls, claimed the office, which
his predecessors had used to increase their accessibility to
students. The office had been
allocated last April to Speakeasy.
"Our policy is to make the best
possible use of available office
space, Alma Mater Society coordinator Nadine McDonnell said
Thursday.
Sihota will use the main floor
office from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.,
and will be available in his upstairs
office, SUB 226, from 3 p.m. to 4:30
p.m.
"I have really extended myself
to co-operate," Sihota said
Thursday. "I have to be accessible
to the students."
Sihota said he has had to counsel
many first-year students with
problems with prerequisite
courses.
"FIRSTOF THE NEW YEAR"
The UBC Athletic Social Club
DANCE
SUB Ballroom - Jan. 10 - 8:30-12:30
LIVE MUSIC
FULL FACILITIES (REDUCED PRICES)
Tickets-$1.50
What you'll be doing and where you'll
be doing it five years from now
depends on many things... but if
you'd like to cash in on your team
spirit, and financial services interest
you ... read on.
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• The Royal Bank operates a
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We need enthusiastic,
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We offer a 9 month Training Program leading to Branch Administration
and eventual opportunities in a variety of specialized areas, i.e.
Personnel, International Banking, Corporate Finance, etc. Qualifications
include MOBILITY throughout the Province of B.C.
Interested graduates are invited to submit resumes by January 23, 1976
to T. W. (Terry) Kehler, District Employment Officer, 1055 West
Georgia, Vancouver, B.C. Forward through any one of our branches.
Selected students will be advised in writing and requested to arrange
suitable interview appointments through the Campus Placement Office in
anticipation of our on campus visits February 25th and 26th.
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THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
FREE SATURDAY NIGHT LECTURES-UBC
SPRING LECTURE
PROGRAM
January 10
Donald B. Webster
Curator, Canadiana Section,
Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto
CANADIANA
January 17
Prof. Gunnar Dybwad
Professor of Human Development
Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass.
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENTS IN THE
SOCIAL REHABILITATION OF THE HANDICAPPED
January 24
Prof. Noam Chomsky
Department of Linguistics
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Cambridge, Mass.
HUMAN NA TURE: THE LINGUISTIC EVIDENCE
January 31
Prof. Vladimir Krajina
Department of Botany, UBC
ECOLOGICAL RESERVES IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
February 7
Mr. Pierre Juneau
Special Policy Adviser to
the Prime Minister of Canada
CANADA: UNITY AND DIVERSITY
February 14
Dr. Virginia Trimble
University of Maryland, College Park,
Maryland
COSMOLOGY - MAN'S PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE
February 21
Dr. David Laidler
Department of Economics
University of Western Ontario
RECENT EXPERIENCES WITH INCOMES POLICY
AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR CANADA
February 28
Dr. Gerard Piel
Publisher
Scientific American
S&ENCEAND THE CITIZEN: THE SCIENTIFIC
AMERICAN AND ITS WORLD PUBLIC
March 6
David Ablett
Senior Editor
Vancouver Sun
PARLIAMENT VS. CONGRESS
^ A JOURNALIST'S LOOK
March 13
Dr. Douglas T. Kenny
J" President, UBC
THE UNIVERSITY ON THE FRONTIER
March 20
AN EVENING WITH
HARRY AND FRANCES ADASKIN
Vancouver Institute lectures are held on Saturdays at 8:15
p.m. in Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre at the University of British Columbia.
Admission to lectures is free and the public is invited to
attend.
■clip for future reference l
ATTENTION ALL UBC SAILING
CLUB   MEMBERS!!
YOUR CLUB MEMBERSHIP CARDS AND YOUR JERICHO SAILING
CENTRE CARDS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. PLEASE COME AND PICK
YOUR CARDS UP AT THE MEETING ON WEDNESDAY, JAN. 14th,
AT 12:30 IN SUB 200 (PARTY ROOM). WE WILL BE DISCUSSING
THE PURCHASE OF A NEW FLEET OF BOATS, SO, SHOW UP FOR
ONCE, WILL YA? N Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 9, 1976
Cap council
flips on fee
position
The Capilano College administration is again collecting
student society fees from all
students after the college council
overturned an earlier decision
ending the practice.
The council decided Nov. 18 to
stop collecting student society fees.
Before the decision, fees were not
mandatory because students could
apply for a refund but rarely did.
The student society was forced to
collect society fees until the Nov. 18
decision was reversed and the
original system was reintroduced.
Student society president Bill
Bell and council member Peter
Powell clashed over the implications of the policy reversal in
interviews Thursday.
"We have not reversed our
position," Powell said.
"The fees are still not mandatory. They are collected as part
of the registration fee and students
can apply for a refund. It was the
administratively sensible way to
do it."
But Bell said "the fees are now
mandatory and are to be paid at
registration."
Bell said students could claim a
refund after registration if they
wanted, but said he did not think
many would.
Students could choose whether
they wanted to pay fees at
registration after the Nov. 18
decision, and about 60 per cent
decided to pay.
The student society protested the
council's move, and was planning
to sue the council before the
decision was reversed, Bell said.
"The lawyer said we had a
strong case, and that was probably
one reason they (the council)
changed their minds," he said.
Bell said he thought "some of the
council members didn't know what
they were doing until the protests
started."
"The people who were most
strongly opposed to mandatory
fees now say that the council's
latest decision is what they wanted
all along," he said.
"Three people voted against the
proposal because they didn't think
the fees would be mandatory
enough. They didn't think students
should be able to get refunds if they
didn't want to pay student society
fees."
PIT CABARET
Sat., Jan. 10
Dance to
DISCO
Tickets -$1.00 each
Available from AMS Co-op Bookstore
and Information Desk S.U.B.
8:00 p.m. to Midnight
PROBLEM: YOU'RE BURNING RUBBER
ON THE SLOPES AND WIPING OUT
AT THE END OF THE PEN.
SOLUTION: Register with the UBC
Tutorial Centre, 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.,
Speak-Easy. Fee $1. They'll find you
a tutor. For information call
228-4557 anytime. Fee refundable if
no tutor is available.
A programme of the UBC Alumni Association
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For More Information
CAMPUS WIDE DANCE
featuring:
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date: Fri., January 9/76
place: SUB Ballroom & party room
time: 8:00 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
full facilities
advance tickets @ $1.50
@ AMS Ticket Office,
Engineers Undergrad Office
Agricultural Undergrad Office
January
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