UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 21, 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125772.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125772.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125772-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125772-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125772-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125772-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125772-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125772-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125772-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125772.ris

Full Text

Array V
iV-
•)
*,. ;  [ -e   ,.
TrVE UBYSSEY
Vol. M», No. 4 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1971
228-2301
.-#*
f
Signed off
Oh, if they only told the truth ... at least that's the idea behind Human Government's
orientation week scheme of renaming the university and its buildings. At left, main 'UBC
1' signpost on University Blvd. is renamed; below, the mask of innocence is ripped off the
mundanely-titled faculty club; and above, new name for law faculty has already provoked
response. Other signs are scheduled to go up during the week at hitherto-unrevealed
locations. Does a university, by any other name, smell quite as sweet?
—david bowerman photos
'No room'
for longtime
lecturer
UBC may be losing good
teachers due to the policy of the
English department.
Jane Rule, who has taught here
for several years, applied for a
position teaching English 305, (a
writing course for science
students) last spring.
She was told by the
department that "there was no
job available."
"Apparently the department is
staffing the course with grad
students or full-time lecturers,"
Rule said Thursday.
"I think it's too bad that a lot
of experienced people will not be
able to teach these courses as they
are difficult courses to teach and
require special skills," she said.
Rule is widely respected by her
ex-colleagues in the English
department both as a novelist and
a teacher.
M. W. Steinberg, head of the
English department committee
which established hiring criteria
when asked about department
policy said: "The department tries
to accommodate people with
. special qualifications and abilities
whenever possible but Rule's
temporary status may have
complicated matters."
Rule's main concern is that the
students may suffer.
"There should be a balance of
experienced people to help the
inexperienced or the student will
be jeopardized," she said.
Border protest planned
By SANDY KASS
The Alma Mater Society has initiated a
move to shut down all U.S.A.-Canada border
points Friday afternoon.
In announcing the move Friday, AMS
president Steve Garrod called for a mass
mobilization of students at border crossings to
stop the flow of both north and southbound
traffic.
This demonstration marks the second time
Canada-U.S. borders have been shut down by
students protesting the U.S. underground
nuclear tests at Amchitka Island in the
Aleutian chain off Alaska.
The first was Oct. 1, 1969, the date of
the first nuclear test at Amchitka, when 5,000
UBC students closed the Douglas border
crossing, supported by similar actions of
eastern Canadian universities.
However, the move is more than just a
protest against the test, Garrod said Monday.
"This demonstration is directed at the
Canadian government, calling for an end to its
complicity in U.S. military defense
agreements, and with the ultimate aim of
convincing the government to withdraw from
U.S. dominated military organizations like the
North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the
North American Air Defense Command," he
said.
Garrod admitted he is acting without
student council approval, but added he will
consult with council members Wednesday,
before any AMS money is spent.
Garrod called the situation one of
"extreme urgency" because the Atomic
Energy Commission proposed date for the
test, Oct. 2," is not binding and may be
speeded up at any time by president Richard
Nixon."
"Nixon can call for the test and it can go
off within 24 hours," Garrod said.
Garrod said the AMS will be holding a
moratorium on Friday afternoon, classes and
urged all students to attend the
demonstration.
Administration president Walter Gage said
Monday he will not call for a moratorium, but
will leave the choice of attending classes or
the demonstration up to individual students
and faculty members.
Political science department head Walter
Young said Monday his only Friday afternoon
class would be cancelled because he will be
out of town and added he hoped his students
would participate in the demonstration if it is
"well organized."
He said he was dissatisfied with the 1969
demonstration because a group of non-student
demonstrators broke from the main group at
Douglas,  B.C.   and attempted to close the
See page 9: AMS ANNOUNCES Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21,  1971
Time to act against U.S.
exploitation, says Laxer
For every dollar the US invests
in Canada to extract new oil, 71
cents returns south across the
forty-ninth parallel in the form of
profits and purchases.
"This is the kind of design that
is being made for the Canadian
economy," siad James Laxer,
NDP Waffle leader and energy
resources expert, in an orientation
talk Friday to about 250 people
in the SUB ballroom
Quoting from the Shultz
report, a U.S. government study
on American oil importation from
other countries, Laxer outlined
the ideal type of country for
resource extraction by the U.S.:
There should be a very high
level of U.S. ownership "because
then you get the profits as well as
the oil,
There should be a high
tendency of the industry in
question to buy its equipment in
the United States;
And there should be a
generally high tendency for that
country to purchase more
manufactured goods from the
U.S. in return for the sale of the
raw materials from the U.S.
The U.S., Laxer said, has an
ultimate nightmare on the subject
of oil: "What would happen if the
middle eastern countries, the
North African countries and
Venezuela all got together and
decided to boycott the sale of oil
to the United States and western
Europe until they had been able
to achieve public ownership of
their oil industries and to achieve
new terms of trade?"
The U.S. solution, he said, is
this:
LAXER
... beware energy deaf •
"There is one country, they
say, that we can count on; one
country that has the most stable
political environment in the
world.
"We make a continental energy
resources deal with Canada, and
good old Canada will provide us
with all the surplus oil we need in
case an emergency of this kind is
to occur."
And there is such a deal, Laxer
said.
Thieves 'please return
unwanted stolen goods'
Head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs is worried about briefcase
thefts in the main library.
Two students have already reported thefts of briefcases, he said
Monday.
Stuart-Stubbs said he plans on posting signs in the library asking
thieves to return to the book drops any material which is of no use to
them.
Notes, essays, eyeglasses and medical prescriptions are
important to the students who lose them, even if the thieves can't use
them, he said.
He said the library sends everything turned in to it to the lost
and found office in SUB.
Students who lose briefcases or material should leave their name
and address with the staff member in charge and then check lost and
found regularly, Stuart-Stubbs said.
Stuart-Stubbs said students who have texts or essays that they
cannot afford to lose should use the coin lockers in the library.
In September, 1970, the
Canadian government agreed to
sell 6.3 trillion cubic feet of
natural gas to the U.S. over the
next 15 to 20 years.
Greene said this was going to
create "13,000 man-years" of jobs
for Canadians, "which translated
into plain English means 13,000
jobs for one year in construction
which, when the construction is
completed, will all be destroyed,"
Laxer said.
"We are, in effect, exporting
tens of thousands of jobs."
The next step in the energy
deal will be the export of
Canadian water to the U.S., he
predicted.
The only real alternative, Laxer
said, is an independent socialist
Canada, in which profits from
resources could be channelled into
domestic processing and
manufacturing.
"In the next six months it is
important that we stop simply
talking about this issue in
university meetings and get out
and start organizing... the
people of this province and the
people of Canada to resist the
sellout of Canadian resources," he
said.
On another and related issue,
Laxer issued a call for people to
support the 6-week-old Texpack
strike in Brantford, Ont, where
65 people have already been
arrested on picket lines.
(Texpack produces hospital
supplies.)
"This is a national issue," he
said.
"If you can, I plead with you
to work on any hospital board or
anybody who buys hospital
supplies to urge a boycott of the
products of this corporation until
this strike is won by the workers
in that plant."
He said it is a matter of public
record that the company brings in
old U.S. army surplus bandages
and sells them under its own name
in Canada — without even
resterilizing the product.
"And the manager of the
corporation has a very interesting
explanation for why this doesn't
matter.
"After all, he says, these only
go to industrial sites. It's probably
only working people who are
injured on the job who are going
to have to use these shoddy and
unsterilized   U.S.  bandages."
Drug inquiry changes hands
The university's human subjects research
screening committee is examining Dr. Conrad
Schwarz's drug study after the medical faculty
committee passed the controversy to the higher
authority.
Dr. W.S. Hoar, chairman of the university
screening committee, said Monday the committee
dealt with the matter Friday without making a
decision.
He said background materials were being sent
to committee members Monday and another
meeting would be held Friday on the subject.
The medical faculty committee considered the
study Wednesday and decided it should be handled
by the more general university committee.
The committees' inquiries follow reports that
Schwarz was asking students at random if the use of
marijuana had affected their sex lives, among other
questions.
It was subsequently discovered that Schwarz
did not check first with the Committee on Research
Involving Human Subjects, which usually checks all
studies involving students for taste and physical risk.
Hoar said his committee would probably be the
one to make a ruling on the study and any appeals
would have to go to the president.
Dr. Frank Forward, organizer of the committee
on research involving human subjects, said the
matter is being "carefully examined" because it
involves "a matter of principle."
When the matter was first revealed, Forward
said: "The university is trying to protect the
individual's privacy. You can't just walk around
campus embarrassing people with personal
questions."
Forward said the university screening
committee has the power to make "additional
considerations" but did not specify what the
considerations could be.
Schwarz' study has been halted while the
presidential committees investigate the matter.
mmmmmmmmmm^mmmmm
ROYAL BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
GENERAL BANKING SERVICES
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Mgr.
10th & SASAMAT 224-4348
Can Your Home Stretch
To Include Another Child?
WHO: Babies,   pre-schoolers, through to teens,
often inter-racial, boys and girls, brother
and sister groups.
WHY: Parental stress:
Neglect situations:
HOW LONG: Temporary care lasting from several days
to     several    months    while    a    more
permanent plan is finalized.
WHERE: City of Vancouver primarily but possibly
Greater Vancouver.
IF SO: Dorothea    Guse,     Resources,    Catholic
Family and Children's Service, would like
to hear from you at 683-0281.
HOME
FOR
SALE
CLOSE TO
U.B.C.
A warm friendly family home in sunny Southlands. This lovely home was
completely rebuilt by Its building-contractor owner for his own use under a
top architect's direction.
It contains many unique features not found in any ordinary home, such as
a huge fireplace in the living room and a permanent barbecue in the dining
room; these rooms beautifully panelled with native hardwoods, and with
heavy beamed ceiling. This home contains more built-ins, cupboards, closets,
shelves and such than you ever imagined a house could have.
It has a wine cellar, zone heating (two oil furnaces), a garden designed for
beauty with almost no maintenance. It has a completely finished basement
with a beautiful laundry room, huge rec room, large completely fitted-out
workshop and storage.
Main floor has huge living room, den, dining room and large family
room-kitchen.
Upstairs are three bedrooms, the large master bedroom having cathedral
window and natural wood panelling.
If this type of home sounds like your cup of tea, call 266-8903 for
appointment to view. Price: $59,900.00
DANCE TO SUNSHYNE
AND SHYL0CK
FRIDAY SEPT. 24
8 to 1 A.M.
SUB Ballroom & Cafe
REFRESHMENTS
AVAILABLE
$1.25 PER PERSON Tuesday, September 21, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
SMOLENSKY ... the rice wasn't nice.
—jerry schmidt photo
'Commercial
nationalism'
masks truth
By LESLEY KRUEGER
Canadian nationalism isn't just beaver and maple
syrup, free-lance radical James Harding said Monday.
"It can also have some dangerous aspects," he said.
"It can be used to cloak a mass of contradictions within
Canadian life."
Harding, who recently received his PhD from Simon
Fraser University, was engaged in a debate in SUB
ballroom with MLA John Richards (NDP-Saskatoon).
"What is popularly termed nationalism may be a type-
of fad, which can sidetrack talk on inequality in the
country," said Harding.
"Sincere nationalism on a personal level, however, is a
different thing," he said.
He said he believes that this sincere type of
nationalism is good because it may lead to personal
liberation.
Harding said the commercial type of nationalism,
which he referred to as "Pierre Bertonish", is nothing
more than the manipulation of Canadians so that they
manufacture an artificial pride in their country.
Richards said he believes that Canadian nationalism is
an intangible thing.
"Nationalism in Canada must be defined in a negative
rather than a positive sense," he said.
"It is more a matter of not being American than
being anything definitely Canadian," Richards said.
He said he believes that since Canada is such a vast
country it is in effect not one country but many. Each of
the units may harbor its own particular pride in country
and still feel itself peculiarly Canadian.
The New Democratic Party radical Waffle group was
also discussed. Richards, a Waffle member, described his
organization.
"The Waffle faction is an attempt on the part of
Canadian socialists to forego the luxury of an independent
movement," he said. "It is a movement indigenous to
Canada with no American connections."
Harding, who is not a Waffle member, disagreed with
Richards.
"The Waffle are not really aware of the state
capitalist system, and will remain unaware of it so long as
they are part of it," Harding said.
a consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
After receiving several complaints
from the people last week about the
health food bar in SUB, I decided that
an investigation was in order.
Consumer affairs minister Ron
Basford's office may be very interested
in this situation. A number of products
are being falsely advertised as health
foods.
Instead of natural yogurt, the yogurt
in SUB is of the commercial variety. It
is made with industrial milk and tank
grown yogurt culture.
Another cause for concern is the
so-called brown rice.
I purchased a sample for 10 cents a
scoop which had a volume of 150 c.c.
The phoney health food bar
150    c.c    cooked    volume    is
Cost of rice is 1.1 cents per scoop.
approximately    50    c.c.    uncooked
Labor,   utilities   (estimated   as   an
volume.
additional 100 per cent) is 1.1c.
50 c.c. rice weighs 37.6 grams.
Cost  of paper bowl is 2.1  cents.
Retail price of rice is .03 cents per
(food services figure).
gram(14c/pound).
Profit is 5.7 cents or 133 per cent.
«s-
The grains were extremely white in
color with a light brown stripe down the
centre of some grains.
Kiyo Oyama, a Japanese graduate
student in chemistry, tasted and
identified it as white rice which has
been lightly fried.
A second opinion brought out the
fact that it was probably brown rice
which had almost but not quite been
completely milled into white rice.
To my horror I found that a surface
clump of rice had a green patch on it
approximately two square centimeters
in area.
This patch had the resemblance of a
mold but preliminary microscopic
observation by Olga Volkoff in
microbiology did hot show any evidence
of such. A culture is being grown.
At any rate green pieces of rice are
not very appetizing.
The profitability of serving brown
rice at 10 cents a scoop is enormous as
is demonstrated by the attached
calculations.
II is interesting to note that food
services thinks it is more economical to
serve rice in containers that cost as
much as the rice rather than washing the
dishes.
It seems pretty extravagant to me,
Td rather have twice the rice.
Enrolment during UBC's
winter session will be down from
last year, registrar Jack Parnall
said Monday.
Enrolment is four per cent
lower than estimated by UBC's
academic planner Robert Clark,
Parnall said.
The number of students in last
year's winter session was 20,940
and the projection for this year
was 21,100.
19,680 undergrads are enrolled
and about five hundred graduate
students are expected at UBC
later this year, bringing the total
to 20,100 students, he said.
The biggest drop has been in
the arts faculty while the faculties
UBC enrolment down 1,300;
'corporate training' cited
of agriculture, rehabilitation
medicine and science are growing
noticeably, said Parnall.
"One explanation could be the
well-known scarcity of jobs in
Canada for graduates in the field
of arts," he said.
The last time enrolment
decreased from a previous year
was in the 1952-53 academic year.
Alma Mater Society president
Steve Garrod said the university
has   become   a   vast   corporate
institute training only the
necessary technical personnel for
a modern industrial society.
"The decline in enrolment at
UBC must be looked at this way,'
Garrod said Monday.
"The university no Jonger
educates in the sense of expanding
the critical perceptions of its
students - it trains them," he
said.
He said arts students who want
an   "expanded  world  view  are
dissatisfied with just being
trained.
"The university, aside from
Arts 1, is failing to provide a
satisfactory education," he said.
The university of the future, he
said, will no longer be able to
educate students on their role in
society.
"Unless the university changes
its down hill direction, enrolment
will continue to fall because the
university will fail to satisfy the
real intellectual and social needs
of students," Garrod said.
AMS secretary David Mole
blamed the enrolment drop on a
general disenchantment with
university by students.
"People are realizing more and
more that it's absurd to drive
themselves through a maze of
exams and courses to get a
worthless bachelor of arts
degree," Mole said Monday.
"It's not true, of course, that a
degree is absolutely useless but
many people are realizing that
becoming a cog in the corporate
wheel is not a great return for a
university education," Mole said. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21, 1971
The real thing
2 years later:
shut the 49th
^ll^^its to be liberated!
I;:y|i^|||||i^if1cl marriage,    ^
a Birks diamond and 3 ktds/'f
Almost exactly two years ago today, 5,000
students blocked the U.S. border at Blaine to protest
the detonation on Amchitka Island of a 1.2 megaton
piece of nuclear equipment.
On Friday, large numbers of students will be doing
the same, this time protesting the largest underground
nuclear explosion in history.
Don't    expect
demonstration.
a    carbon   copy   of   the    1969
The first demonstration was regarded by its
organizers, a liberal (for lack of a better term) student
council, as a symbolic protest.
The students two years ago went so far as to tell
the authorities before the demonstration that only one
crossing would be blocked, giving border officials plenty
of time to reroute traffic through a nearby truck
crossing.
When small groups students blocked the truck
crossing on their own initiative, they were denounced as
"irresponsible" by the "responsible" student council.
When the carnival was over and the giant's nose
had been tweaked, students went home with a
warm-all-over feeling for more or less keeping the
protest "responsible."
This year it will be different.
For four hours on Friday, no traffic will move
through the border crossings south of Vancouver. The
blockade situation is expected to prevail across Canada.
And it will be the responsible students who will
join in the struggle.
For it is the responsible student who realizes that it
is his or her life that is affected by the Amchitka test.
We refer not only to the dangers of radiation,
earthquakes and tidal waves, but also to the
overwhelming arrogance of the rulers to the south in
planning this test in the first place.
If the "device" goes off, it will be another in a long
series of humiliations for our country. And damn it, it's
got to stop somewhere.
To give credit where credit is due, it was radicals in
the U.S. who first realized that "it's time to shut the
motherfucker down."
We intend doing that on Friday. Any other action
would be irresponsible, both to us as students and to the
people of this country.
But the struggle does not end with a four-hour
blockade of the border.
Hopefully,   the   demonstration   will   give   us the
feeling of "solidarity" or "coming together" (whichever
you prefer) that will enable us to continue the strugg1
in the classrooms and eventually, in the places where we
work.
In large part, it's up to us.
J. A.
THf MSSSY
SEPTEMBER 21, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"Copy please," yelled Paul Knox to John Andersen. Sandy Kass
wouldn't have anything to do with it. Vaughn Palmer hung around city
desk, mumbling: "Puit, was she dry."
Kathy Carney didn't like it so Lesley Krueger did two stories and
Ellen uooancn aid • I ween Classes. John Frizell came and John Sydor put
a dome over it. Ian Lindsay thought it quite funny but Randy Frith didn't.
Jinny Ladner smiled and Eleanor Boyle thought everything was neat.
"You'll learn, kid," said Ginny Gait to Pat Kanopski.
Gordon Gibson never gave the desk a reporter's list (or, the desk
never asked for one). Jocks, give him shit.
Photogs were new and mostly curly. Brett Garrett and David
Bowerman lead the boys— Bruce Bourassa, Jerry Schmidt, Garry Gruenski
and Bob Mitensen— with style.
Keith Dunbar showed as did Murray (of the big fishpond)
MacMillan.
And Mike Sasges also worked.
"I'll lead a protest march
against anyone who says
we can't start a great life  »
on a low budget and higHf
hopes. ||
It's because of our budget!
that we're buying the ring :
at Birks—probably the
best value place in town
for diamonds —and
where we can choose
from stones of different
qualities. We want to be
sure we get the quality
we pay for. And Birks
guarantees exactly that.
Birks diamonds start at
$100. We may go a little
higher, and someday
exchange it for a bigger
one. Birks will credit us
with the original price we
paid. Not a bad dealwhen
you figure that might be
10 years from now!
Life's too short not to get
your money's worth out
of it."
CONVENIENT TERMS
^©^^>fiawi)SfirfA
have thelook offoyfe
Letters
Noserings
I enclose this advertisement,
which appeared Sept. 15 in the
Sun, and challenge you to
reproduce it in your newspaper,
along with an appropriate
editorial.
To me, it is representative of
the crass, irresponsible advertising
designed to brainwash the young,
to channel them into a life of the
perpetual monthly payment.
I also find it to be a direct
insult to the movement in North
America which is attempting to
secure equal rights for women in
areas of employment, wages and
the family.
It is sickening to observe the
continual equation of human
relationships (love, marriage, a
family) with money.
In this advertisement, the
diamond ring is apparently as
important as the "love, marriage
and three kids." A diamond ring
need not be (and cannot be) the
basis for a successful marriage.
I think that this company, and
the media in general, are engaged
in the full-time occupation of
degrading and insulting the human
being, as they attempt to create
the "best of all possible worlds,"
for this economy — a world of
consumer automatons.
T. G. Moody,
MedD
The ad you refer to is printed
above, though your letter will
partly stand as the editorial you
requested.
Of course, economic
considerations far more vast than
simply the monthly payment and
a diamond ring pervade human
relationships. The family itself is a
key cell in the economic system,
as is the traditional role of
women.
And here is a further thought
on the kind of ad you see above:
"We should never admire the
women in Vogue, because there is
something undeniably ugly about
women who wear minks while
others can't afford shoes — and no
amount of $20-an-ounce makeup
can hide that ugliness." (from
Liberation Now!)—Ed.
Fuck! (=fi=2)
I extend my deepest sympathy
to A Moderate.
In the Sept. 17 Ubyssey his or
her letter "Fuck," supported a
versatile syntax and vocabulary:
shove, asshole, fuck, bullshit,
crap, trip, bourgeois and pig.
These are indeed words of subtle
connotation.
Exactly what injustice our
frustrated hero was trying to
verbalize in this incoherent
diatribe is beyond me. However,
the comedy of our dumb hero's
pathetic, silent screams should not
be ridiculed. Until the writer's
powers of expression are
improved, his or her belligerence
is best served by the following
maxim: "It is better to remain
silent and thought a fool than to
speak up and remove all doubt."
Peter Kinsey
Fuck off you creep. You're
just supporting that authoritarian
bullshit with your false apologetic
consciousness. Asshole profs all
over the place coming on with
decision-from-the-top exams,
papers, threats, fake liberalism,
etc. You fucking well know
what's going on. (A Moderate).
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to:
Letters, The Ubyssey, Room
241K, Student Union Building,
UBC. Tuesday, September 21, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Uncle Les
I would humbly accept your
"Smack in the Mouth" award if the
information given to you would be
correct. The 28 out of 30 residence
maids who "don't speak English well
enough" are in reality three who
could be placed in this category.
In turn they speak one or more
other languages not only I happen to
speak as well but several of our maids
do too.
Regardless of any temporary
difficulties we may have our maids
should not be presented as
uneducated and in need of someone
to defend them, particularly since
most of them have better education #
than generally expected from people
in similar jobs. Maybe it is the
self-appointed protector of our maids
who should be given the "Can
opener" award so that all the gas
presently inflating the issue can
escape quickly and we can go back to
settle our differences as we have
always been able to do during the
past 10 years.
Leslie Rohringer,
director,
housing administration
It seems Mr. Rohringer himself
has a language problem. It appears
to us difficult to use the word
'temporary' to define 'difficulties'
which arose two years ago when
maids began refusing to put up
with a system which they
considered    unjust.    His
terminology leads us to believe
there has been such a
communication breakdown in his
administration that he can't
understand even the fluently
English-speaking of his employees.
Red bait
On Sept. 14 The Ubyssey
published the sentiments of Phillip
Resnick concerning the Amchitka
nuclear test.
If it is noticed carefully, Resnick
uses the same style of opinions as the
Soviet Russians (sic) and the Red
Chinese (sic) have for years.
For one example, he proclaims
that the U.S. has been obsessed with
anti-communism. Would he rather
that the U.S. live and co-exist with
those who have openly declared to
destroy it? Fascinating, to say the
least.
No, I am not implying in the least
that something is amiss. I am saying
it — out loud. Resnick is irrationally
anti-American, pro-communist and
nauseatingly anti-Canadian.
(By the way, if Canada were to
break relations with the U.S., it
stands to lose nothing but a measly
60 per cent or more of its economic
backbone. I believe Resnick would
concur with that.)
It is indeed very illogical and
extremely foolish to listen to or even
consider what America's recognized
enemy says that the U.S. should do
as far as disarmament is concerned.
Resnick should, therefore, locate
himself somewhere in Russia or Red
China where he would have a much
more receptive audience.
He need not tell America what it
needs to do to be blackmailed by
Russia (through nuclear devices).
Karl Marx, Lenin and Mao Tse-tung
have said enough already on that
subject.
To conclude, I agree most heartily
with the words of one great thinker.
Resnick is "either a damned fool or a
communist." I would say that he is
most likely both.
Garabed Chakmakian,
Science II
Burau
I am very thankful for your
support in The Ubyssey, Sept. 14.
As 1 pointed out, Dr. Conrad
Schwarz was my guest speaker on
drugs at Experimental College, Sept.
15. With your article against him on
your front page Sept. 14 - 16,000
copies distributed among 22,000
students — I expected a large crowd
to oppose him.
But only one UBC student turned
up.
This I call the failure of our
university. Nobody is interested in
studying the real facts and in genuine
discussions. Schwarz's questionnaire
(on use of drugs, alcohol and
tobacco) may be of limited value -^
as most such statistics are.
But this infantilist outcry against
him is ridiculous — people are less
prudish even at a kindergarten.
Can there be any more unworthy
goal for students to fight for than for
the legalization of hallucinatory
drugs? And are these students really
"young" — full of vitality,
inquisitiveness and capable of
genuine enthusiasm, Le., sacrifices?
Are they.not really suffering from
senility - most of our hippies being
overpampered kids from rather
well-to-do families?
There are still other students who
have to work many hours every night
to make a living — who have neither
the money nor the desire for
cowardly escapism by drugs.
It is a great danger for this
university that such students cannot
afford the time and money to run for
public office or actively participate
in events outside their official classes.
As for Dr. Schwarz, he will discuss
drugs every third Wednesday
morning, 8:30 a.m. But this
Wednesday Dr. H. Kasinsky begins
his program about the revolution in
biology and its social consequences,
which also takes place every third
Wednesday.
On Thursday morning at 8:30
people are invited to a discussion on
whether modern youth is suffering
from senility. For the Adventures in
Literature course, we have formed
three groups: Tuesday, 8:30 a.m.,
Thursday, 3:30 p.m, and Friday,
8:30 a.m.
All events are held in SUB 111.
Karl Burau
Human government:
What has it done?
Alma Mater Society president
Steve Garrod asked students
Sunday to take an active and
critical role in judging the human
government.
''Because the human
government is the first
radical-majority AMS in the
history of UBC, many students
will understandably be very
concerned about our
performance," Garrod said in an
interview.
"We welcome student
scrutiny," he said.
Students are invited not only
to debate the general policies and
philosophy of the AMS, Garrod
said, but also to ask: 'What has
human government done this
week?"
"And we have the obligation to
explain each activity and position
we propose."
What has human government
got to show for its term in office
so far?
Garrod listed a number of
human government projects:
0 A noon-hour rock concert
series, and a poster campaign that
said such things as: "The
fragmentation of the individual is
five courses."
0 A student-run, co-op
bookstore that did more than
$2,000 worth of business in its
first week of operation in the
basement of SUB.
Q A position paper on
campus marijuana research
presented to senate Wednesday
advocating legalization of
marijuana, release of offenders
now in prison, and proposing a
moratorium on drug arrests while
marijuana research is being
conducted on Canadian campuses.
fl) A poetry reading by Al
Purdy, the first of a number of
readings by Canadian and
Quebecois poets initiated by
human government as "a positive
alternative to our criticism of the
insufficiency of Canadian content
in courses offered at the
university."
0 A call in senate by human
government senators (Garrod and
Art Smolensky) for "a
halt to further mindless
construction" at UBC and the
development of a long-range
educational plan that would
rationalize continued building.
0 A move out of the student
government executive suite on the
second floor of SUB into a
government centre on the main
floor of the building.
£ A meeting with the men's
athletic committee in which
Garrod announced that the
human government position on
athletics "gives top priority to the
intramural program," and stated
that the program would not be
cut.
0 The opening Friday of the
human government orientation
program, with a talk on the
exploitation of Canadian
resources by NDP. Waffle leader
James Laxer, who later held a
two-hour seminar with students.
0 Organization of a student
closure of the Canada-U.S. border
on Friday to protest the
Amchitka nuclear test scheduled
for early October.
Garrod also cited human
government support for two other
programs: the women's studies
course and the registration week
activities of the Union of Radical
Social Scientists. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21, 1971
'^p^r.<"
•i» '■/
Purdy — A tired poet?
—Karen Loder
Canadian poet, Al Purdy read his poems
in the Sub Art Gallery last-Tuesday in the
first of a series of readings by Canadian and
Quebecois writers sponsored by the human
government.
No microphone was available in the
gallery. This problem coupled with the
long, narrow design of the room which
Purdy stood at one far end of caused
almost immediately a lack of
communication between poet and
audience.
Purdy donned his glasses, a new sign of
approaching old age, he said, and began his
session appropriately with "Home Made
Beer". This poem is an excellent example'
of Purdy's humour at its rollicking best.
Purdy is making beer in Vancouver. The
neighbour child sits down in the crock and
then the fun begins. His wife emerges from
the bathroom:
"Where she had been brooding for days
over the injustice of being a woman and
attacked me with a broom."
When she grabs the breadknife, Purdy
bares his breast begging her to go ahead.
She snarls:
"I wouldn't want to go to jail
for killing a thing like you."
Purdy comments in characteristic
fashion
"I could see at once she loved me
tho it was cleverly concealed."
One poem that received a particular
enthusiastic reception from the listeners
was from his Baffin Island poems, "When I
sat down to Play the Piano";
"He cometh forth hurriedly from his
tent
and looketh for a quiet sequestered vale
he carrieth a role of violet toilet tissue
and a forerunner goeth ahead to do him
honour
Yclept a snotty-nosed Eskimo kid
He findeth a quiet glade among great
stones
squattet-h    forthwith    and    undoeth
trousers
"The Irrational Man" by Wm. Barret in
hand
While the other dismith mosquitoes
And beginneth the most natural of
natural functions
buttocks balanced above the boulders"
Thus begins a truly northern experience.
Soon after he has begun "the most natural
of natural functions", Purdy is set upon by
an immense variety of fierce Eskimo dogs.
Dear Ann Landers:
What would you do?"
Several people nearby me scribbled
down "Poem for Eda". Purdy wrote this
one of two actresses who lived with he and
his wife. Eda was always after him to write
a poem for her and this was the result.
She wears glasses
And    has    a    slightly    intellectual
expression
As if she'd intended to read a book
—then decided against it.
Three years ago, I attended a poetry
reading of Purdy's and rejoiced in his
humour, his vitality and his evident affinity
for the north. At the time I was sick of
"smug academica" and glad to find
someone  so  obviously  not  part  of the
The Three Sisters
Friday September 17 saw the start of a
new season at the Frederic Wood Theatre
with a production of Anton Chekhov's
Three Sisters. This is one of Chekhov's
better plays in which, typically,
atmosphere or mood, and characterization
play the major part. Taking place in a
provincial Russian city, the play centres on
the estrangement of three sisters from each
other, their loved ones, and their dreams.
The girls share in a dream of returning to
Moscow and the life they knew when their
father, a general in the army, was alive only
to find, as Soliony says, "Gypsies carry
knives; it's not safe to dream." It is a
tragedy interspersed with come die lines
which reaches the climax of futility in act
three.
Chekhov's plays are sometimes referred
to as "undramatic dramas" because in
them  he  refused  to  sacrifice  reality   for
theatricality. The mood of them is
generally doleful. For those two reasons
audiences are often subjected to long
tedious epics of Russian drama when they
see Chekhov performed. Fortunately, this
did not occur Friday night.
Although beginning too heavily to allow
for the complete development of the
mood, this production went on to provide
a reasonable interpretation of Chekhovian
philosophy. A few of the actor, notably
John Innes (Andrei) and Derek Ralston
(Kulygin-Masha's husband), would have
done much better if they had avoided a
tendency towards superficiality,
'stageiness', shallow and contrived
performances. It is noteworthy that
Stanislavsky, the great advocate of "acting
is believing" — so-called method acting —
was the director of many of Chekhov's
plays during the  period of his writing. It
was more  of that philosophy which we
needed in this production.
Fortunately there were many fine
performances given during the evening
which compensated for the lack of depth
of others. The Three Sisters, although
generally too old for the parts, gave very
sympathetic and moving interpretations to
their characters — particularly Doris
Chilcott (Masha). Peter Hawowrth, while
relying a little too heavily on his store of
technique, gave a very good performance as
the gallant yet troubled Vershinin. Both
Shirley Broderick (Natasha) and Al Kozlik
(Tuzenbach) gave good controlled,
believable performances. Robert Clothier
particularly warmed us with his excellent
interpretation of Dr. Chebutykin — lifting
the play when it lapsed into slightly duller
moments. Finally, a very nice solo
performance was given by Stanley Weese as
Waddington evokes a "maybe
yy
general atmosphere.
Last Tuesday as I sat "groking" Purdy,
words of friend of mine wrote to me
filtered through my mind. "Purdy's verse
often leaves me with the feeling that I am
witnessing the struggle of composition,
rather than a finished art form."
In the more serious poems that Purdy
read, those written recently on a trip to
Hiroshima, I felt more that I was listening
to some notes written hurriedly on the
back of napkins rather than to poetry.
As a woman, I felt definitely deep
twinges at the Punch-and-Judy role that
"Wife" is cast into in both the poems he
wrote on the way to Vancouver and
"Home Made Beer".
Purdy seemed tired at the end of the
reading. I had the feeling he wasn't very
happy with it. He just seemed to peter out.
Perhaps this was due to not placing the
sequence of his poems properly. There was
no zest at the end. Again acoustics were
poor, the room was narrow, and Purdy was
somehow off-centre.
—Brian Long
Ferapont.
One fells that the director relied too
heavily on his cast to provide excitement
rather than providing them with the type
of directing which could have resulted in a
truly virtuoso performance of Chekhov. It
is a pity that John Brockington did not
utilize this strong cast, the majority of
which were professional, in a more exciting
and creative way. He seems concerned with
pretty pictures and small pieces of
'business' — too often distracting from
whatever focus the actors have achieved.
Richard Kent Wilcox has provided a
wonderfully workable set, one which
accentuates the mood through an elegant
simplicity.
That this production succeeds is a
testimony to the strength of the
performers and the skill of the technical
designer.
—Bernard Bischoff
Canadian poet Miriam Waddington will read her
poetry in the SUB Art Gallery tomorrow, as part of
a series of readings by Canadian and Quebecois
writers. Ubyssey reviewer Bernard Bischoff looks at
her latest collection of poems, SA Y YES, published
in 1969.
Miriam Waddington's reputation has always
rested to a large degree on her love poems and her
most recent collection Say Yes (1969; Oxford Univ.
Press) offers us a liberal number of them.
Unfortunately the quality does not measure up to
the quantity; her frenzied, sobbing outpourings of
loneliness, despair, lost love and weltschmerz leave
this reader at least totally unmoved. But judge for
yourself. One of her efforts begins like this:
There used to be someone
to whom I could say do you
love me and be sure that the
answer would always be yes
there used to someone to
whom I could telephone and
be sure when the operator
said do you accept the charges
the answer would always be yes
When one reads lines like this one feels that
perhaps Waddington is in the wrong field; she would
be an enormous success writing lyrics for someone
like, say, Glenn Campbell. Admittedly the above
lines represent the nadir of the whole volume but
lines as bad or, nearly as bad, proliferate like weeds
through the book. Her form is strikingly modern;
she does desperate imitations of Hopkins:
died from spin—
-ning love upon
a spun-out spin-
-ning wheel.. .
If Waddington were simply an incompetent poet
there would be nothing more to say, but every now
and then she writes a poem or even a line that
possesses real nerves of feeling: the authentic article.
She has a gift for evoking certain images that startle
the reader into attention:
Women who live alone
beware the menstrual crone!
bird track track of crab
old age's crumbling scab . . .
and again: whole mouthfuls
of frost paralyzed
stars icefeathers
burning pillows
And every now and then even one of her love poems
achieves a quality of sincerity and cuts through to
the reader...
Let me be a drawing
wavering
on a cave wall
and you
a man who looks
at the drawing
and builds a fire
against the wing
against the night
and thinks whatever
he thinks...
It is as a collector of intricate, fragile images,
splintered still-lifes of shattered people and worlds
(what   she   calls   her   "icons")   that  Waddington
succeeds best. In the concluding poem she writes:
A Spanish factory
worker talks to me
in a street behind
the cathedral he
offers me un poco
amor the scars
on his hand his wounded
country and the black-
jacketed police; he
touches me on the
arm and other places
and the alcoholic
in the blazing square
drinks brandy confides
that fortunes can still
be made in Birminghm
but he has a bad
lung is hard of
hearing and owns
an apartment in Palma . ..
Waddington  herself seems unsatisfied with her
achievement and that is a good sign; perhaps she still
has    her   best   work   ahead   of   her.   She   says
somewhere:
I knew a certain
leaf-language from
somewhere but now . . .
When   Waddington   asks  you  if  through  the
medium of her words you can share her private
pains, joys, agonies, it is only rarely that one can say
yes. Tuesday, September 21, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
CHERNOFF'S DOME
basis for 'space rhythm' course.
—brett garrett photo
Dome makes home out of small space
By JOHN SYDOR
Behind a fraternity house at 2260
Wesbrook there exists a building comprised of
curves.
Russ Chemoff is experimenting with
structures that break away from the
conventional linear, right-angled structures
common to most buildings in Vancouver.
The structure is a geodesic dome and it is
"an experiment in the utilization of a small
space," says the second-year architecture
student.
The dome is made completely of recycled
wood and is 16 feet in diameter. This
particular size was chosen because it allows
the dome to relate with the human scale.
The structural skeleton is made of
two-by-fours while the plywood covering is
made of concrete construction forms.
"As for construction, this particular dome
requires about 125 man-hours of labour and
the cost is around $500," said Chernoff.
"Power tools were used since many angled
pieces of wood were cut but there is no reason
as to why hand tools cannot be used.
"One of the most important assumptions
from the very initial stages of the design was
that the dome should be easily built by people
with little or no building skills and that skills
that would subsequently be required could be
quickly learned," he said.
"The skeleton alone is able to withstand
loads of at least 30 pounds per square foot,"
he said. "With plywood used as sheathing, the
load capacity increases to a considerably
higher value since the framework would then
be reinforced with a shell structure."
Other equivalent domes can be attached
with little difficulty. Insulation and cedar
shingling on the dome can make it weather
resistant for at least 20 years.
The placement of the dome requires no
excavation since support is given by eleven
posts that have been sunk into the earth.
This structure could easily be used in the
Arctic where one of the greatest problems is
the setting of buildings on top of permafrost.
Chernoff said the dome is not an answer
but an experiment in alternatives.
"It    was    constructed    with    natural
surroundings and ecological balances in mind
and is primarily meant for those people who
seek an aesthetic harmony with the natural
surroundings," he said.
Chernoff will soon finish and relocate the
dome on Plant Science department land on
campus. At present he is looking for people
who might be interested in living in the
finished dome.
For people who wish to find out more
about alternative living spaces, Chernoff and
another student, Terence Lyster, are
supervising an informal credit course called
space rhythms. The Vancouver Free
University is also sponsoring a course on dome
construction.
Chernoff can be contacted at the
architecture department, 228-2779.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) - Platoons of
hairy bureaucrat blorgs huddled in a corner of
this small island kingdom today, fearful of
their lives and their very persons. Welsh
Rarebit Mole has sworn to lead the i masses
upon the lackeys with torch and sword.
Cycle report could
help the big wheels
Conditions could improve for campus cyclists as a result of a
UBC cycle club report submitted Monday to the UBC area traffic
study.
Cycle club representative Wren Green said the recommendations
of the report "could turn the cycle fad into a valid long term
transportation system."
Green said cyclists are no longer an insignificant group of
commuters.
"Facilities are urgently needed and long term campus planning
committees would do well to consider the findings of the report for
the benefit of all."
The report is the result of a study made over the summer with a
$6,000 Opportunities for Youth grant.
UBC's cycling population has been grossly underestimated,
Green said. The study estimates more 2,000 bikers are on campus.
Development of recommended cycle routes and campus
facilities would double the number of students using bicycles. A
corresponding decrease in car traffic by seven per cent would reduce
congestion.
Mail questionnaires showed that bicycle paths are needed on
University Boulevard and on Southwest Marine Drive from Forty-first
Avenue, Green said.
Conveniently located, lockable parking areas also are urgently
needed.
An analysis of costs and benefits showed a favorable return on
installation and maintenance costs, he said.
FUTURE SHOCK IS NOW
Industrial   Urbanization   is   increasing   at   fantastic   rates.   Alvin
Toffler, author of FUTURE SHOCK states that in 1850 there were
only 4 cities with a population exceeding 1,000,000
By 1900, there were 19.
But by 1960 the number had increased to a phenomenal 141 cities.
This accelerated growth in population density exerts extreme
pressure for change which intensify current social problems: drug
dependency, inadequate education, mass unemployment, poverty
and pollution.
Who will solve these problems?
We cannot afford to wait for somebody else to take the initiative.
We as individuals must start taking action now.
But to effect constructive action, it is essential that we train and
develop our human potential to provide the necessary skills and
leadership.
We must prepare ourselves to cope with the challenge of change.
Are YOU prepared?
FUTURE SHOCK IS HERE!
Do you care?
What are you doing to develop yourself?
Personal development and leadership are the keys to positive social
change.   We must act NOW!
FREE SEMINAR- Everybody Welcome- Thurs. 12:30-2:30 p.m.
Education Dynamics Center
University Square
2162 Western Parkway, Vancouver 8.
SOc/o
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAURANT
U.B C. Village, 2136 Western Park Way
There%
no doubt
her mind
When it comes to choosing the right sanitary protection, there is no doubt in her
mind. She uses Tampax
tampons and has, right from
the start. They were developed
by a doctor, so she knows
they're safe. And they give her
the protection she needs.
Tampax tampons are
softly compressed to give
better absorption. And they're
the only tampon that comes
in three absorbency-sizes:
Regular, Super and
Junior. Because they're
internally worn, there
are no bulky pads, pins or belts.
So she's free to dress the way
she wants and do what she
wants, every day of the month.
Use Tampax tampons,
without a doubt.
Right from the start...
DEVELOPED BV A DOCTOR
NOW USED BY MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.  ONTARIO Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21,  1971
Montreal welfare group
ends seven day sit-in
MONTREAL (CUPI) - An occupation of the
Rue St. Denis Welfare Centre by the Greater
Montreal Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee
ended Monday after Social Affairs minister Claude
Castonguay accepted the group's demand that he
meet them Sept. 28 to discuss their grievances.
The sit-in, which began Sept. 13, was called by
GMAPCC to protest the inadequacy of present
welfare rates and allowances.
About 65 persons occupied the regional
welfare office on Rue St. Denis and promised to
vacate the premises "only after definite word from
Quebec City" came confirming the Sept. 28
meeting.
The GMAPCC presented a list of five
"non-negotiable" demands detailing the unfair
treatment afforded to welfare recipients under the
current system and calling for reforms to correct
these injustices.
GMAPCC spokeswoman Jo Edwards pointed
out that present welfare practices discriminate
against the welfare recipient.
"Government studies show that our children
are literally being slowly killed through
malnutrition," she said. "Every day our own
emergency services run by poor people must feed
Bring the kids ...
Parents taking the women's studies program
will not have to hire babysitters, the program's
co-ordinator said Monday.
"We are offering baby-sitting for participants
from 6:30 to 10 p.m. on Tuesdays," said Anne
Petrie.
"The children will stay in the SUB council
chambers and will be supervised by parents who will
each help one evening," she said.
The parents must bring everything their child
needs — sleeping outfit, food, diapers — and
instructions for the care of the child, said Petrie.
Stack films shown
Daily films and slide shows will highlight a
program to introduce new students to library
facilities, librarian Lynee Maclver said Monday.
The shows will be used to acquaint new
students with the location of the branches and the
use of card catalogues and books, Maclver said.
A tour of the main stacks will follow each film
session.
The information program also includes
afternoon tours of the main library and booklets at
main desks in each library for those who wish to
explore on their own, she said.
The audiscan, a tape of the film presentation,
will help with orientation, she said.
hungry people left starving by the government.
"When these people are taken for emergency
assistance they are given a mere $15 which is
subtracted from their next month's allowance. This
gives them less money to live on next month."
According to Bill 26 (the Social Aid Act),
families or individuals will be given aid "on the basis
of the deficit which exists between needs and
income available."
But this is not being implemented by the
government in practice.
The present welfare rate under Bill 26 for a
family of four is $123 per month. According to
Montreal diet dispensary figures, the minimum
monthly requirement "for the maintenace of a
family as a unit and the preservation of the health
and self respect of its individual members" is
$148.63.
Quebec's rate is 21 per cent below this figure.
GMAPCC is asking for a 30 per cent increase, thus
raising the amount for a family to $ 159.
Single "employable" individuals also suffer
under the present welfare system. The total
assistance given to unemployed individuals without
families comes to a mere $75 a month.
GMAPCC requested an immediate reply from
Castonguay's office to two of the demands: that
emergency assistance given to welfare recipients not
be deducted from future cheques, and that the
minister set the date to meet with GMAPCC
representatives.
The minister agreed to meet the group but gave
no definite date. He also rejected the group's other
demand.
The protesters vowed that they would not leave
the Rue St. Denis office until a confirmation date
was received.
Finally at 1:30 p.m. Monday, the occupiers
received the telegram from the Social Affairs
minister confirming the Sept. 28 meeting.
Meanwhile, the GMAPCC has been using
guerrilla tactics to emphasize its point. In the
affluent sections of Montreal, Westmount and Notre
Dame De Grace, members and sympathizers donned
white sheets and Stars of David and invaded
synagogues during the Jewish high holidays.
During the high holidays synagogue sheets are
sold at a going rate of $40 a seat. The demonstrators
said they wanted to emphasize the point that people
on welfare are not going to be able to attend
synagogue services because of a lack of funds.
Professional people who sympathize with the
goals of the GMAPCC are also going on rotating
hunger strikes until the group's demands are agreed
to by the Social Affairs ministry. McGill social work
professors are participating in the hunger strike.
Castonguay and five cabinet ministers will meet
with GMAPCC representatives in his office at 10:00
a.m. Sept. 28. The press has not been invited.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE THREE SISTERS
by Anton Chekov
September 17-25 - 8:00 p.m.
Directed by JOHN BROCKINGTON
Settings by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Costumes by KURT WILHELM
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
|    AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES  ]
FUTURE PLAYS
Nov. 5-13 PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD by Synge
Jan. 21-29        THE BIRTHDAY PARTY by Pinter
Mar. 10-18       THE DUCHESS OF MALFI by Webster
Box Office    •    Frederic Wood Theatre    •    Room 207
•Support Your Campus Theatre
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads arc not accepted by telephone and ate payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m.. the day before publication.
Publications Offce, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
Dances
11
C A M P Tj S DANCE FEATURING
Sunshyne and Shylock Friday.
Sept. 24 8 to 1. $1.25 per person.
Refreshments available SUB Ball-
room and cafe.	
POLKA PARTY. FRIDAY. SEPT.
24, at International House. 8:30 -
1:00 a.m. Food and great refreshments. $1.25 per person.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
13
WOULD ANYONE WHO SAW
where my wire wheel went when
it fell off my sportscar on Marine
Drive, or anyone who found it
afterwards please phone Glen at
435-9453.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED FROM B.C. RE-
search (or near it) to McKenzie
Heights or any bus route, after 2
p.m. Mon.-Fri. 266-6952 after 3:30
p.m.
Special Notices
15
ASTROLOGER & GRAPHOLOGIST.
Personality, aptitude and profes-
sional counselling. 738-0207.	
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
Dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00, your cost $125.00.
Two years parts guarantee. Carky,
Sony, Sansui, Dual, A.G.S., Akai,
Warfdale. Phone Peter, 732-6769
for savings.	
CANADA STUDENT LOAN NOTICE
Schedule 2 Confirmation of Enrolment must be completed and returned to the bank before 29th
October 1971 to maintain interest
free status on your Canada Student Loan. jr
—Courtesy of Bank of Montreal
MORE FROSH HAVE BEEN MAR-
ried after Undercut than any other
campus event.  (Sat., Oct. 2) SUB.
AQUA SOC SCUBA COURSE
Monday, Sept. 20 and 21
Outdoors Club  Room  in   SUB
MUSICAL THEATRE INFORMAL
fun evening for old and new members of Mussoc Thurs. Sept. 23
at SUB. 207-209 8:30  - 1:00 a.m.
HOMEMADE WINE. 6 BOTTLES 6
weeks. All equipment included.
Complete kit guaranteed $6.75
postpaid. Send money order today.
Wineco, Dept. 1P9, 670 King East,
Hamilton, Ontario.
Travel Opportunities
16
POTTERY CLASSES JUST OUT-
side the gates. Register now for
courses beginning Sept. 20, 12 lessons, 12 wheels, 12 students. Call
Huyghe School of Pottery. 224-5194
or 733-3019	
STUDENTS: UNIVERSITY CHAR-
ter Calgary to London Sept. 30
$125 or best offer. Call 731-8349
anytime.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
URGENT: EDUC 332 TEXT AND
organic chem 230 text. Phone 263-
8552.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
KHARMANN GHIAS. A SELEC-
tion of three Mercedes Benz 180,
190, & 220. Allgas Hillman '63. excellent cond. Volvo 544, a real
good one. Austin 1100. Very economical. V.W. one 68. 69 & 71
Super Beetle. Jaguar MKY for the
connoisseur. Studebaker 1950. fully
reconditioned. Priced 25-500. And
many more for the student's bud-
get. Ph. 873-1608.	
1958 FORD, EXC. COND.. SNOW
tires  with  studs.  Cheap.   261-5909.
1963 VALIANT 4-DOOR. GOOD
shape. $600. 224-0486.	
1964 ANGLIA DELUXE. VERY
good shape $400.00 or best offer.
Phone 224-9684 ask for room 11.
CHEV. 64 IMPALA, GUARANTEE.
Rebuilt- engine, power brakes,
steering. Excell. condition. 228 3196
ask for Sadia. $900.00.	
'65 MINI COUNTRYMAN REBUILT
engine, real good condition $350.
255-5613.
Auto Repairs
24
GET   YOURSELF   FIXED   UP   AT
Undercut   '71!   Sat.,   Oct.   2,   SUB.
Motorcycles
25
INTERESTED IN BUYING TWO
small scooters with gear. 675 W.
14th evenings or weekends.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
STEAMBUBBLE GRAPHICS FOR
posters at student (not mamooks
ripoff), prices; and photography
services. John or Nick at the
Steambubble. third floor Lassere.
almost anytime.
Dance Bands
33
Scandals
37
GASTOWN'S A RIOT BUT THE
Gastown Saloon's pretty cool. Tally Honks playing there next two
weeks. No entry fee, just $1.00
worth of garbage. 137 Water Street
Ph.  683-9469.	
PEDAL YOUR ASS FOR $89.95?
See the Wheeler Dealer at the
Cycle Center, 2320 W. 4th, 731-5531.
Photography
35
ytty Hens! ano gutter
Cameras!
NFB
Still
Photography
Contest For
Photogs
Under 25  . . .
Full  details at —
3010 W. Broadway
736-7833
Typing
40
TYPING—321-3319—AFTER 6 P.M.
Rose — 20 years' experience.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, manuscripts, essays,
etc.  Mrs.  Troche, 437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART   TIME   TYPIST   REQUIRED
for   booking   agency.   Phone   688-
7274.       	
MEN WANTED
to become volunteer "uncles" to
boys (ages 10-15) who need a male
figure in their lives. This involves
regular contacts and outings with
the boy — usually 3-4 hours per
week minimal. If you are interested in helping a fatherless or
troubled boy. please phone 733-
8111 — Mrs. Olive Johnson, Volunteer Coordinator, Children's Aid
Society of Vancouver, B.C.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POTTERY CLASSES
Beginner, Interm, Advanced
POTTER'S3* CENTRE
Wheelwork, Glazing & Firing
To Start September 20th
Phone 261-4764
Tutors—Wanted
64
VOLUNTEER TUTORS NEEDED
BY THE CHILDREN'S AID
SOCIETY
If you can help a child in any of
these    areas    —    Math,    French,
Physics,     Biology,     Chemistry    —
please   phone   733-8111.   Mrs.   Olive
Johnson,     Volunteer    Coordinator,
Children's Aid Society.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
3' x 5' DESK, $20. OTHER FURNI-
ture, dishes, towels. blankets,
clothes size 9. 224-0581 or No. 3,
5658 Dalhousie.	
ROSIGNOL STRATOS SKIS 207CM
plus bindings, $85. Herchung boots,
size 7%, $50. Jim, 224-0942.	
MEN'S BICYCLE 27", GOOD COND.
$20.  224-9271 after 4.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM NEAR UBC
gates for male student. $55 month.
Separate entrance. 224-9319.	
LOTS OF ROOM FOR A GOOD
time at Undercut '71. Oct.  2, SUB.
FREE RENT IN PRIVATE HOME
for experienced carpentry ■ work.
Call 263-5020 or 263-4227.	
MEN ONLY. NEAR GATES. PRI-
vate entrance, phone, etc., ready
now — no cooking, sorry. Phone
224-7623. .	
ROOM, BOARD & SALARY FOR
girl student in exchange for approximately 2% hrs. help a day
and babysitting. Private room
with own bath & TV. Easy ac-
cess to UBC.  Phone _266-5763.
MALE WANTED TO SHARE BED-
room with same in large apartment.  Kits.   $60.  733-9326.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FOR FEMALE
in exchange for baby sitting services. Ten minutes from campus.
Private room & bath. All facilities
of house available. 263-4764.	
THE SIGMA CHI HOUSE OFFERS
you: largest rooms, comfortable
lounge areas, colour TV. Newest
house on campus. Excellent food.
5725 Agronomy Rd. Phone 224-9620.
ROOM. BREAKFAST. DINNER
for 2 women students, non-smokers: single rooms, $95 per month.
10 min. walk from campus. Phone
224-6963.
Furn. Apts.
83
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT   SPECIAL
3  Rooms of  Furniture
From  $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278   Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
Accommodation
Other Cities
87 Tuesday, September 21, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
AMS announces moratorium
on Friday afternoon classes
From page 1
truck border several miles east of
there, without AMS approval.
"There should be no doubt in
anyone's mind that the test itself
is complete insanity," Young said.
Gage had no comment on the
test but urged all UBC students to
remain north of the border, and
keep the demonstration peaceful.
Garrod said the AMS hopes to
block the Peace Arch crossing,
Pacific Highway truck crossing
and Sumas crossing with the
support of students from
Vancouver City College, Simon
Fraser and Notre Dame
Universities, and Selkirk, Douglas
and Malaspina community
• colleges.
The University of Victoria
student council announced
Monday that it plans to block
entrances to the city at the
Blackball and Canadian National
ferry terminals and at the airport.
Garrod said telegrams were
sent Friday to all major Canadian
universities to make the border
closing a nation-wide student
effort.
He added he expects positive
replies from all during the next
few days.
Garrod said transportation will
be arranged for all UBC students
attending the border
demonstration.
Buses will leave from the SUB
loop throughout Friday noon, and
will take students to and from the
demonstration.
Further details on Friday's
.schedule will be available in
Thursday's Ubyssey.
Speakers scheduled include
Garrod and UBC political science
professor Phil Resnick.
The proposed U.S. blast is a
test of the Spartan anti-ballistic
missile warhead, which if used for
American defense, would explode
incoming  missiles  aimed  at the
U.S. over Canada, Resnick said
Monday.
"We must put an end to this
defense alliance with the U.S.,"
Resnick said.
"This alliance has put the
Canadian government in a pretty
dubious position. Officials have
not endorsed the nuclear test, but
have been pretty careful not to
attack it, either," he added.
Garrod said the Canadian
government is hesitant to
withdraw from the alliance
because "they have over $3
million invested in maintaining
it."
Garrod said the border-closing
demonstration is timed for Friday
to coincide with Nixon's
conference with Japanese emperor
Hirohito in Anchorage, Alaska
this weekend.
The AMS hopes to make radio
contact with the Greenpeace crew
during Friday's events at the
border crossings, he said.
The Greenpeace is a 72-foot
converted halibut fishing boat
which is tranporting members of
the Don't Make a Wave
Committee to the test site in an
attempt to force the Canadian and
U.S. governments to halt the
blast.
Gwen Mallard, Scientific
Pollution and Environmental
Control Society projects
committe chairman, called nuclear
weapons "a hideous crime against
humanity," and gave SPEC's full
support to the AMS endeavors.
"Canadians just get turned off
by American military policy,"
said Anglican United campus
minister George Hermanson.
Hermanson is organizing the
Amchitka Now tiooth in the SUB
lobby calling for students to add
their names to protest telegrams
being sent to Nixon.
A telegram was sent Monday to
Nixon with over 6,000 names on
ACADEMIC ORIENTATION EVENING
Wednesday, September 22nd, 7:30 p.m.
An evening of information on various academic services and
procedures at U.B.C. President Gage will address students.
Coffee and Refreshments
EVERYONE WELCOME
International House
224-4535
AUTHENTIC INTERNATIONAL
HOT LUNCHES
AT INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
MONDAY        Italian Spaghetti and Meat Sauce
Jewish Chicken and Rice Soup
TUESDAY       East Indian Lamb Curry and Rice
French Canadian Pea Soup
WEDNESDAY Greek Shish-Ke-Bab
French Canadian Pea Soup
THURSDAY    European Barbecued Chicken or
Souvlaki and French Salad
European FasouliaSoup
FRIDAY Yugoslavian Cevapcici with Pilaf
European FasouliaSoup
Also available will be open-face sandwiches with a choice
of filling.
Hot Lunches 85c        Soup & Bread 45c
Sandwiches 35c and up
it, and Hermanson said he would
like to continue sending telegrams
with just as many names until
such time as the blast is either
halted or carried out.
Garrod said he hopes there will
be no trouble at the borders and
called for a policy of peaceful civil
obedience  for all demonstrators.
Grad student senator Art
Smolensky said Monday students
are the logical people to
demonstrate    against    the    U.S.
military domination of Canadian
foreign policy.
"We students are the future of
this country. If we don't attempt
to stop this thing now, we may
not have a future."
Beautiful      /a
clothes. . .'a
for
beautiful
people
LE CHATEAU
"Is Where It's Happening"
776 Granville 687-2701
GESTALT
AWARENESS GROUPS
STARTING IN OCTOBER
For enquiries phone
Allan Cohen-687-8106
John Mate-731-7971
While They
Last
89.95
WHEELER DEALER
CYCLE CENTER LTD
2320 W. 4th
731-5531
NOTICE
LATE PAYMENT OF FEES
A late payment fee of $25.00 additional to all other fees will be
assessed if payment of the first instalment is not made on or before
September 24. Refund of this fee will be considered only on the
basis of a medical certificate covering illness or on evidence of
domestic affliction. If fees are not paid in full by the following
date, registration will be cancelled and the student concerned
excluded from classes. First instalment — October 8, 1971.
If a student whose registration has been cancelled for
non-payment of fees applies for reinstatement and his application
is approved by the Registrar, he will be required to pay a
reinstatement fee of $25.00, the late fee of $25.00, and all other
outstanding fees before he is permitted to resume classes.
Mart Crowley's
SUB FILM SOC
presentation
ams students
50c
general public
75c
FRIDAY 24 & SATURDAY 25
7:00 & 9:30
SUNDAY 26-7:00
SUB THEATRE
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
□       i
Ju
OO
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
Name	
Residence
Address	
City	
Phone: Home Office -
Occupation __ __ 	
Age      Married n Divorced Q      Male □
Separated □  Never Married n Female □
Date first licensed to drive —      	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes D No Q (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended? 	
Are you now insured?	
Date current policy expires .
This  coupon  is  designed  solely to  enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile - -
Make of automobile	
No. of cylinders 	
Horsepower-   -
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv...
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area —.
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
Days
..Miles.
Yes Q NoQ
Car No. 2
Days
..Miles
Yes D No D
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
FPR UBC 26
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21,  1971
'Tween classes
TUESDAY
ANARCHIST GROUP
General meeting, 8 p.m., SUB 224.
KONG FU CLUB
Unarmed   and    armed    combat,    4:30
p.m.. SUB ballroom.
CANOE CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB  125.
CROSS COUNTRY
Practise,   4:45    p.m.,    War    Memorial
Gym.
BOWLING  CLUB
Organization  .meeting,    noon,    Buch.
104.
AQUA  SOC
Beer night, 8 p.m., SUB 215.
FENCING   CLUB
General  meeting, 8 p.m., Phed  Gym
A.
' NEWMAN   CLUB
12:30 p.m., music room of St. Mark's
College.
VOC
12:30 p.m.,  Henry Angus 104.
ORIENTATION
Phil Resnick and tfick Betts on Canadianization, 12:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
PRE-MED
Information     meeting,     12:30     p.m.,
Wesbrook 201.
WEDNESDAY
TAEKWON-DO    CLUB
General meeting, 4:45 p.m., SUB 125.
GERMAN   CLUB
Organizational  meeting noon,  IH 402.
New members welcome.
STUDENT  LIBERALS
Executive meeting   noon,   SUB  105-A.
SAILING  TEAM
Meeting noon, SUB 113.
NEW YORK
FORMAL WEAR
All the latest styles in Tuxedos
— Dinner Jackets —
Suits inc. Edwardian style.
Dinner Jackets in all styles and a
large variety of colors. Flair Pants,
Lace Dickeys, etc.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
Rent The Best For Less
4397 W. 10th 224-0034
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
presents
ANNUAL BUFFET/DANCE
on 25th September at I.H.
6:30 -Appetizers
7:00 Dinner with dishes
from many lands
9:00-1 Dance to
MOONLIGHTERS STEEL BAND
Adm. Stud   S2 25
Faculty & Comm   $3.25
Dance only $1.50
Tickets at I.H.
BUY LOW-SELL HIGH
The Day You Sell Your Car
could very well be a
"Black Friday"
BUT NEVER-EVER WITH USED
VOLKSWAGEN
TRYTOBUYONE-
without any doubt a new V.W.
is your very best investment
Margaret Zittier at
Kirkpatrick Volkswagen
IN KERRISDALE
Your nearest Volkswagen Dealer
will tell you why
Phone me personally at 266-8391
or at home 277-0848
LINDY'S
"King of
Corn Beef"
featuring buffet
STUDENT DINNER
HOURS: 3 p.m - 7:30 p.m.
cabbage rolls
meat balls
chicken
knish
macaroni
potato e latki
cole slaw
dills
potatoe salad
bread & butter
All for '1.95
3211 W. Broadway
738-2010
EXPERIMENTAL  COLLEGE
Dr. H. E. Kasinsky discusses modern
biology and modern society, 8:30
a.m., SUB 111.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Meeting,   noon,   Ang.    104.    Everyone
welcome.
MATURE  WOMEN  STUDENTS
CUE   executive   meeting,   noon.    Mildred Brock Room.
VARSITY   DEMOLAY
Meeting, noon,  SUB 215.
JUDO CLUB
Team  practices   Monday,   Wednesday.
Thursday, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. New
members welcome.
ONTOLOGY
Dale Maranda Discusses Man, You're
Alive, noon, Bu. 216.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Academic orientation evening, 7:3C
p.m. to 10 p.m. Information for new
students on various academic ser
vices and procedures. President
Walter  Gage will  address meeting.
MEN'S   TENNIS  TEAM
Tryouts at 4:30 p.m. on courts behind winter sports centre. Open to
all  tennis  bums.
ANGLICAN-UNITED  CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Informal supper, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran
campus centre.
HUMAN   GOVERNMENT
Canadian    poet    Miriam    Waddington
reads her work at noon. S/UB art gallery.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
Meeting noon, Aut. 24.
ORIENTATION
Sheilagh Day speaks  on women  and
UBC.  noon, SUB   ballroom.
T-BIRD  MC   CLUB
Meeting noon, SUB 115.
THURSDAY
SKYDIVING
General meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB 111,
PHOTO SOC
Organizational   meeting.    12:30    p.m.,
SUB 245.
AIESEC
Meeting for Economic and Commerce
students    wishing    to    work    abroad
next summer  12:30 p.m., SUB 105A.
CUSO
Show   on   International   Development
issues.  7:30 p.m.
JAPAN SUMMER   EXCHANGE
Meeting for all interested to plan for
Club's Day, the Spring Exchange and
next  summer's  exchange.   12:30 p.m.,
SUB 224.
UKRAINIAN   VARSITY   CLUB
Annual   general meeting   12:30   p.m.,
SUB 213.
T-BIRD   WARGAMERS
Organization and practice. 12:30 p.m.,
SUB 130.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Hesse.   3:30   p.m.,   SUB   111.   Is   Our
Youth   Suffering   from   Senility?   8:30
am., SUB  111.
CHEERLEADING
Tryouts. 12:32 p.m., SUB 205.
JUDO  CLUB
Election of club officials. SUB 117.
AQUA   SOC
General meeting. 12:30 p.m., SUB 125.
Come to the weekly meetings of the
U.B.C.
CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Every Wed. at 12:30
SUB 224
Everyone Welcome
A17 YEAR
OLD BOY IS DEAD
BECAUSE HE THOUGHT
HE COULD FLY
SOME TRIP!
In Emergency at Vancouver
General Hospital, scenes like this are
repeated many times throughout
the year.
Doctors and nurses can tell you
about them. So can kids lucky enough
to survive. Kids who thought they
could fly or were invisible to traffic.
Kids who discovered more than they
bargained for when they took a "trip"
on LSD, turned violent on "speed",
or went into a coma from an
overdose of heroin.
Every year, kids die or are
physically or mentally crippled because
they don't know what drugs can do
to them or won't listen when they're
told. If you're a parent, you owe it to
your children to be informed. If you're
a teenager, you owe it to yourself.
Life's too precious to waste
on drugs.
For more information, mail this coupon:
... |2     GOVERNMENT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
$K   COUNCIL ON DRUGS, ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO
''f:'' ''' Hon. D.L. Brothers, Q.C., Minister of Education-Chairman
Government of British Columbia
Council on Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, British Columbia
Please send a free copy of "GET IT
STRAIGHT - some facts about drug abuse.'
Name	
Address.^ Tuesday, September 21, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
SPOR TS
Football scholarships /illegal'
By JOHN TWIGG
Financial assistance being
offered to football players by a
group calling itself the
Thunderbird Alumni Assoc, could
be illegal, physical education
department director Bob Osborne
said Monday.
Osborne said the money, which
has not been awarded because
there are no suitable recipients,
could be illegal because the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate
Athletic Association bans all
unauthorized financial assistance
to players.
"It could be 'ultra vines' but
I'll have to withhold judgment
until I see all the details,"
Osborne said. "But it's very clear
any money not officially
established is illegal in the eyes of
the WCIAA."
He said a monetary grant,
whether a scholarship or bursary,
must be approved by the senate to
be legal. The money offered by
the association has not received
senate approval.
Meanwhile, UBC Alumni
Association director Jack Stathers
said the financial assistance "is
not at all a part of our operation."
He pointed out that the name
Thunderbird Alumni Association
is   different   than   UBC  Alumni
Association, but admitted some
people could be confused by the
similarity in names.
"Alumni are free to do
anything they like as long as they
don't use our name," said
Stathers.
The offer of financial
assistance is being made by a
group of former UBC football
players under the leadership of
Don Vassos, a 34-year-old
Vancouver stockbroker.
"We feel there are probably
football players on campus who
might not be able to come out
and play because of financial and
other problems," said Vassos
Thursday.
He said the money, about
$2,000, was collected from other
former football players who are
interested in helping the UBC
team form a nucleus of strong
players.
He said no money had been
awarded this year because no
players could be found who
passed the university entrance
requirements and were in need of
financial assistance.
"If the football team improves
(because of the grants) we can go
back to the Alumni Association
and ask for more money," said
Vassos.
'Gears battle 'trees
TIME: Thursday, noon.
SCENE: Forestry common-room.
Sixty red-clad 'Gears' invade the 'Trees' hideout chanting, "We are,
we are, we are "
Their object, to wreak havoc and steal a couch from under
'wooden' noses.
Their purpose, to seek revenge for the cancellation of the chariot
race which went up in smoke.
Harvey Kirk, world renowned Forester, said after the incident:
"There I was all alone in the common-room when in walked this
motley horde of chanting engineers.
"I was very frightened to say the least.
"And then they proceeded to remove the furniture. Well, I just saw
red.
"I got so mad I ran from the room and summoned help and a
full-scale battle developed. Why, those guys were even throwing
punches.
"To cut a story short, our'trees' effectively routed the enemy and
the 'gears' sulked back to their building."
Henry Gear, leader of the insurgents, said later that the 'gears'
"only wanted to stir up some friendly rivralry.
"We wanted the 'trees' to think again about having the chariot
race.
"And we promise that there won't be any foul play or unfair
tactics by our team this year."
Calm returned to the Forestry common-room, but feeling was still
running high.
"We'll show those 'gears' who's boss," one Forestry type said.
A spokesman for the Engineering Undergraduate Society said:
"The EUS executive had nothing to do with the action that took place
at the Forestry Building.
"We neither planned nor supported this raid/'
Vassos  said  he   realized   the
WCIAA had ruled that students
on athletic scholarships are
ineligible to compete but charged:
"Kids in Edmonton and Calgary
(at the University of Alberta) are
getting the same financial help."
UBC football coach Frank
Gnup said if a group of people
want to give out money to people
who happen to play football that
is fine with him, but he has
nothing to do with it.
He said there is no danger of
UBC becoming a "jock college"
because it is offering athletic
scholarships and bursaries.
"They (Vassos and his friends)
were going to give the money to
two high school kids but they
weren't accepted into the
university," said Gnup.
He said the two students, who
happened to be good football
players, achieved 59.66 and 59.44
per cent but registrar Jack Parnall
would not bend the entrance
requirements (60 per cent) to
admit the two players.
"I've been here 15 years and it
never became a jock college," said
Gnup. "As far as I'm concerned, it
never will."
He said any assistance should
be made on the basis of need and
not athletic ability.
"The grads that have donated
their money feel there is very
little school spirit at UBC," said
Vassos. "A good football team
could generate this feeling."
Team
notices
VOLLEYBALL
The men's volleyball team is
looking for new players. Anyone
interested in playing for the Jay
Vees or the Varsity team are
asked to appear at the tryouts
Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
6:30 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. in
the War Memorial Gym.
TENNIS
If your racket is tennis, bring
your talent to the courts behind
the Winter Sports Centre any day
this week at 4:30 p.m. New faces
will be most welcome.
SWIMMING
All men or women who are
interested in swimming with the
Thunderbird team are asked to
show up at room 25, War
Memorial Gym at 1 p.m.
Thursday.
UBC BOWLING CLUB
(Organizational) Meeting
Tues. Sept. 21 12:30 Buch. 104
Bowling will be Monday evenings starting Sept. 27 and possibly a Wednesday league
will be formed if the Monday league is full.
For further information call WALTER (the secretary) at 228-8225.
New Bowlers Welcome
Find someone who needs you — we need lousy bowlers!
Soccer birds tie
The UBC Thunderbird soccer team held the Inter-Italia squad to a
scoreless draw in Pacific Coast Soccer League play Sunday.
Only 400 soccer fans turned up at Empire Stadium to watch the
league opener for both teams.
Goalie Greg Webber, Maurice White and Tony Mayor were
standouts for the 'Birds.
Coach Joe Johnson was pleased with his team's performance
although he was upset over having two goals called back.
Bert Smuthers and White had goals called back within a minute of
each other - one for an indirect free kick which ended up in the goal,
and then for an offside.
"We were satisfied by gaining at least the one point out of our
first game, considering we have so many new faces," said Johnson.
Men's Intramurals
The Intramurals has 54 teams
entered for football.
Softball has 28 teams so far.
Unit Managers: preliminary
rounds for touch football start on
Thursday, and for softball, on
Wednesday.
Tuesday at a glance. St. Andy's
and Pharmacy are coming on
strong this year. Let's hope they
can take a few trophies.
Tennis    and    badminton
deadlines are today.
Jock's: rumor has it that
you are going to lose your
trophies if you don't get some
bodies out.
*V.
UBC KUNG FU CLUB
Presents TODAY Sept. 21st
A demonstration of Choi-Lee-Fau style
of Kung Fu (Martial Art)
UNARMED and ARMED Swordor Staff) TECHNIQUES
ADMISSION FREE
4:30 P.M.
ALL WELCOME
SUB
BALLROOM
Wed. Sept. 22 - Informal Biscussion on City
Arthur Erickson, Architect
Informal Supper 5:30 • Discussion 7:00 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTER
Liberation and Learning
A Weekend at Cultus Lake, Oct. 1-3
David Mole, Human Gov't — Ward Gasque & Others
Maximum cost $6.50 Phone 224-1614 for infor.
An Anglican—United Campus Ministry Event.
WELCOME BACK
VOLKSWAGEN
MERCEDES VOLVO
Hans, Jack, Joe, Werner and Peter are looking forward to serving you again
this year. Drop in and see the renovations we made during the summer.
We've got even more equipment than before and naturally will quote on
any repair work.
SOMETHING NEW:—Ask Hans about trading your car in—he's looking for
exceptionally    good    VW's    right    now.
SALES and SERVICE LTD.
8914 OAK STREET (at Marine) Phone 263-8121
"QUALITY WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED" Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21, 1971
When is a building
not a building?
When it's a
department head's
power trip ...
The politics of capital
expansion at UBC.
By Mike Sasges
F
I or every winner, there's a loser.
And the biggest losers and winners can
be found in groups where people vie for
positions of power where they can
influence other people's lives.
One such group is UBC's senate.
Certain men and their faculties have lost
prestigous positions — perhaps only for a
time — because the senate was dissatisfied
with a report on academic building
priorities.
Senate voted last Wednesday to bounce
a report from the senate committee on
academic building needs back to the
committee because the critieria used in
selecting building priorities was incomplete
and unclear.
Many people on senate were obviously
unhappy with the committee's
recommended priorities.
One such person is mineralogy professor
Harry Warren.
Warren is one of the original Great
Trekkers who has been on senate at various
times for over 30 years.
"The committee didn't appreciate the
position the geology department is in,"
Warren told The Ubyssey.
The geology department has raised
around $2 million from private industry
for a replacement for the department's
46-year-old building, he said.
"The university said we can give you
about $900,000 and now we need another
million above that," Warren said.
He said the department has offices in
one building, labs in another and lecture
halls in a third building.
Warren said he believes his department
presented a good case to academic planner
Robert Clark's office which evaluated all
criteria for the committee.
Speaking about one of the qualitative
criteria, the department's relevance to
society, Warren said: "Nearly all the people
in B.C.'s mining industry come from our
department.
"And the mining industry pays a very
large part of the federal and provincial
taxes."
Warren considers his department a
winner.
"The committee will realize the position
Senate: an empty chamber that shot blanks.
of the department and act on it," he said.
The committee's chairman, however, is
forestry professor Harry Smith, and four
members of UBC's board of governors —
Walter Koerner, Paul Plant, Richard Bibbs
and John Liersch — are forestry men.
A big loser this time around is Philip
White, dean of the faculty of commerce
and business administration.
The committee gave first priority to a
new building for White's faculty which
now shares the Henry Angus building with
four arts departments.
White, as student senator Stan Persky
says, will now have to regroup his forces
and his strategy.
White, who speaks and dresses like a
London banker, was on the defensive
during the senate debate on the
committee's report.
The major attack on him came from
Cyril Belshaw, chairman of the
anthropology and sociology department.
In a letter to all senators, Belshaw said:
"When the Henry Angus building was built,
it was with the possibility of the
construction of an additional office-type
wing attached to it. If it did turn out that
commerce truly needed more space than
this whole building (an argument not yet
demonstrated), might it not be more
economical to the university to construct
such a supplementary wing?"
R
Uelshaw said the calendar lists 60
members in the faculty.
White said 75 plus 3 post-doctorate
fellowships.
Belshaw said there were 130 faculty
offices in Henry Angus.
White said there were 123.
"I find the whole debate on the
proposal extremely frustrating because of
the lack of information to make a
judgment," said Belshaw.
Lack of faculty offices were given a high
rating for building priorities by the
committee.
Belshaw's department had asked for a
museum. He said a research and teaching
museum, but the committee was acting on
the premise Belshaw wanted a display
museum.
And since the federal government
announced in July that it would fund the
construction of the Centennial Museum of
Man, the committee took the department's
request for a new building off its priority
list. The number four priority is now up
for grabs.
Applied science dean W.D. Finn said he
wanted two new buildings. He got only
one-for his civic engineering department.
linn, the Pierre Elliott Trudeau of the
senate, was a member of the 18-month-old
committee.
He knows the meaning of power—he
admits to having a "vested interest" in
getting buildings for his faculty while on
the committee.
Finn's a loser because the odds are
stacked against him — his faculty's received
all it's going to get.
And he said in senate he would be
agreeable to combining the two
departments of mechanical and civil
engineering in the recommended new civil
engineering building.
Belshaw may be a winner if the
committee takes a second, more agreeable
look at his department's request.
And for Belshaw victory would be a big
thing — he lost power when he chaired a
committee that studied the educational
future of the university.
The ensuing mild recommendations in
the Belshaw Report were damned to hell
by the conservative majority on senate -
and so apparantly was Belshaw.
The third building priority is a new
north wing for the biological sciences
building for labs and lecture halls for the
botany and zoology department.
Nobody at senate seemed to contest this
point.
Those departments should do all
right.
Administration president Walter Gage
lost this one — but only for a time, mind
you.
UBC Reports, the administration's news
sheet, gave the report full and praiseworthy
copy - something flacks don't do unless
they are sure their bosses are behind them.
c
''lassies department chairman Malcolm
McGregor is a staunch conservative
administration supporter who helped plan
a banquet for Gage last year.
McGregor, knowing Gage's mind, voted
against sending the report back to the
committee.
Gage apparently was expecting an easy
victory - a few well-timed jokes and some
procedural motions almost accomplished
it.
He told senate after it voted to refer the
report back to the committee that he
would like the report "right away".
As students, since we have no power
and no way to gain power, we're^ neither
losers nor winners.
Perhaps we are losers because the office
of academic planners calls us enrolees —
not women, not men, not students — just
enrolees.
We're just pawns in a giant power play.
On the other hand perhaps we are the
winners because of our representation on
the senate.
Two student senators, Art Smolensky
and Alma Mater Society president Steve
Garrod called for a rejection of the report
because no long-range plan for UBC exists.
"The buildings are irrelevant," said
Smolensky.
But the biggest losers are the people on
senate who, like the buildings they wish to
construct, are irrelevant.
The senate has no control over its
committee's report - it must turn the
report over to Gage who gives it to the
board of governors to make these
recommendations facts.
The board holds the bank account in
which the funds for UBC's $60 million in
annual business comes from.
And it's not a joint account as some
members of senate would like it to be.
But then, as academic planner Clark
said: "It's all a political act."

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125772/manifest

Comment

Related Items