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The Ubyssey Nov 19, 1964

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 Non
illegitimus
carborundum,
THE UBYSSEY
VOL. XLVII, No. 26
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1964
CA 4-3916
—don hume photo.
TAKING MEDICINE like a man is first year Home Ec
student Jill Bishop. Medicine is oral polio vaccine and it
comes in a sugar cube. Wednesday was last day on
campus for the clinic but it will be in other Vancouver
areas in the next week.
Liberal thoughts
Our tastes jaded
by moon, Jayne
Space travel and sex will destroy man's enjoyment of
unusual things, Liberal MLA Dr. Pat McGeer said
Wednesday.
Labor slammed
for urging boycott
'Labor didn't check facts,
relied on campus puppets'
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
AMS president Roger McAfee Wednesday slammed organized labor for urging a boycott of the UBC yearbook.
The Vancouver Labor Coun-
"When man has seen the
other side of the moon and a
side view of Jayne Mansfield,
then he will not be surprised
at anything," he said.
McGeer spoke in Bu. 100 on
the role of education in society.
"Freedom, security and education in our society have developed genii," said McGeer,
a UBC neurologist when he's
not  politicking.
He said Florentine art developed in a society which
promoted art genii to come
forth. Likewise where society
encourages education, latent
genii comes forth.
"Politics is the major tool
for shaping the population's
destiny," he said.
"We shall gain on the Russians because of freedom of
the soul," he said.
"Man has developed at a
fantastic rate in the last 70
years. Man can fly around the
world now when planes have
been around for 50 years," he
said.
McGeer said Canadians have
never insisted our education
system  is the best.
"Countries such as Saudi
Arabia and Brazil are unable
to develop because of lack of
education. The poorest people
have the lowest rate of income," he said.
"It is not how much one
learns but what one learns."
cil last night condemned the
Alma Mater Society for having
the annual printed behind
picket lines and urged UBC
students not to buy the publication.
"The Vancouver Labor
Council has acted without regard to fact," said McAfee. "At
no time did the Council contact the Society but instead
relied on information supplied
by its campus puppets."
The annual is being printed
at Mitchell Press Limited.
Mitchell has been involved in
a labor dispute for two years.
Mitchell, and Evergreen
Press, the only other firm to
bid on the annual, are considered scab shops by the Labor
Council.
McAfee said the AMS is in
a tight financial position and
was  forced  to  take  the  best   ,*
offer. ;
"The difference in price between Mitchell Press and the
other local bid was thousands
of dollars," he said.
"This firm also has a picket
line, so it seems that regardless
of where the publication was
being printed locally, the yearbook staff would have to cross
legal picket lines."
Totem's news editor Marcia
Quail, a New Democrat, resigned last week after the
campus New Democratic
Youth club started a campaign
to boycott Totem sales.
McAfee pointed out the society's other major publications, including The Ubyssey's
$35,000 per year contract, are
done in union shops.
i %
H* 00
UBC union support weak
"It is interesting to note,"
he said, "that the entire trade
union movement in B.C., (approximately 221,000 members)
gives scholarships amounting
to less than $7,000 per year to
the University and all but two
of these are slated for sons,
daughters, or legal dependents
of union members."
"By comparison McMillan
and Bloedel gives more than
$10,000 per year in scholarships, almost none of them restricted as the union ones are,"
McAfee said.
McAfee said he has complete
confidence in both the annual's
editorial staff and the ,publish-
ing house. "We are also confident that the book will sell very
well," he said.
Two American firms, one in
Kansas City and the other in
Los Angeles, both professional
yearbook printers placed bids
on the contract.
So far this year sales of the
book have been slow with only
250 of the Campus Life section being sold and 350 of the
Grad  book  section.
Totem editor Scott Mclntyre
said the book must sell better
than last year (total sales of
1,200 with 1,000 left over) or
it «will be discontinued.
Roaf's head worth
$154 to architects
Council has put a price on
the head of John Roaf, president of the architecture undergraduate society.
A motion to withhold the
architecture undergrad's $154
Alma Mater Society grant
for Roaf's non-attendance of
council meetings was tabled
for one week.
Roaf, who has not attended a meeting since the beginning of term, will be given until next week to defend
his actions before Council.
Kappas see
no reason
for action
Kappa Sigma fraternity will
take no action against a member charged with illegal possession of liquor.
The 20-year-old Kappa Sigma member was charged by
RCMP after he was found with
a bottle of beer near Fraternity Row on Nov. 8.
The fraternity has been indefinitely suspended by Inter-
Fraternity Council.
But a spokesman for Kappa
Sigma said Wednesday:
"There has been no discussion of any action against the
student in the fraternity.
"He has taken enough abuse
in other ways."
The case has been remanded
until Tuesday.
While Kappa Sigma is under suspension it may not hold
any social functions, although
it may have frat meetings.
The matter is also under investigation by the IFC disciplinary committee.
JOHN DIEFENBAKER
.. . not expedient
UBC Tories
back John,
sort of . .
The UBC Conservative
Club today defeated a
motion expressing lack
of confidence in party
leader John Diefenbaker.
But it didn't want to.
The majority of students present voiced disapproval of Diefenbaker
as a leader, but decided
it is not politically expedient for a university
club to attack the National Conservative leadership at this time.
The club also passed
a motion to suppress
their Fulton for Federal
Government movement
at the annual provinical
Conservative convention
this Saturday in Burnaby.
The Conservative club
executive Monday passed
a motion urging provincial Conservative leader
Davie Fulton to return
to Federal politics.
"This does not mean
our resolution will not
be discussed. It probably
will be because of the
play given it by the
downtown press," said
president Rod Mackenzie.
"It does mean, however, that we, as a club,
will not bring it to the
floor of the convention,"
he said. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19, 1964
^«»fe.      In-Cir
Com k^   c^:
—fred ogden photo
PROUDLY DISPLAYING entire Simon Fraser Academy
Physics department is UBC graduate student J. F. O'Hanlon.
O'Hanlon and another grad student are setting up undergraduate classes in a room in UBC's Hennings Physics
building.
Rog boycotts BCSF
for boycotting Roger
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
Will they or won't they? Neither Roger
agree for sure.
B.C. Student Federation
president Hardial Bains says
there will be a debate between
himself and AMS president
Roger McAfee in front of the
library at noon today.
McAfee says there won't be
any debate because he won't
be there.
The debate involves the
BCStE"s proposed student-run
bookstore.
' The debate was originally
scheduled for last Thursday,
but Bains and the BCSF didn't
show up.
McAfee did.
"They agreed to be there,"
he said, "and they weren't."
,  McAfee   said   he   has   other
commitments for today.
The BCSF says it will circulate a petition advocating
establishment of a non-profit
bookstore before next September at the debate—if there is
one.
Council asks administration
'Clarify attitude
and send money'
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student council wahts a policy statement on athletics from
the administration before acting on a recent Men's Athletic
Committee financial report.
nor Hardial will
The report predicts athletes
will need another $38,000 per
year by 1966 if UBC is to rejoin the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
Council wants the university
administration to clarify its
philosophy on athletics, with
a view towards asking the administration for an increased
grant.
(The administration presently gives $10,500 out of a total
athletics budget of $90,000.)
Council discussed the relative merits of asking students
for more money. At present
$4,20 out of an AMS fee of $29
goes to athletics, but to raise
$38,000 the per-student fee
would have to be upped $2.25.
"I don't feel the AMS should
give more money to MAC from
discretionary revenue — we
can't afford to," AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell said at Tuesday's Council meeting.
"The only way we can get
more money is to raise the
AMS fee by means of a referendum or general meeting
vote, and I doubt very much
whether students would support this proposal.
"We must get the students,
the administration, and MAC
together for a comprehensive
discussion of athletics."
Telephone 681-2004
336 West Pender St.
VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
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November 20-28
STUDENT PERFORMANCE
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 7:30 P.M.
Tickets: 75c
International  success,  starring  Joy Coghill
and Waller Marsh, with large student cast
BOX OFFICE: Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre
First vice - president Bob
Cruise said the only conceivable revenue source at present
other than the students is the
administration.
"At some campuses, there is
a hidden athletic fee in the
registration fee."
"The university already contributes substantially in
coaches' salaries and equipment," he added.
Councillors chase
Plato in togas
Togas are the latest style
on campus.
Or so it would seem.
All Arts councillors, members of Academic Activities
Committee and International
House will be wearing togas
on Monday.
Toga Day was instituted
in an attempt to attain the
academic atmosphere of
Greek culture.
All students are invited to
join in and wear a toga.
Beer bottle bunged
BUNGHOWYA (UNS)—Government sources at this small
African outpost report a native
uprising was quelled after a
short battle. Natives were protesting short beer rations during screech day.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
^ ft * X"     m A   ' ^
—don hume photo.
ENGINEERS' CAMPAIGN to unclog troublesome intersection
of Wesbrook and  University  Blvd.  includes  a  couple of
not-so-official signs.  Redshirts want corner rounded  off,
and   Wesbrook   made   one-way   into  C-lot   in   mornings.
Keep on going,
Quebec advised
UBC students decided Wednesday French Canada hasn't
gone far enough.
Students attending a debate
between Debating Union and
Club Creditiste in Brock Hall
voted against the resolution:
French Canada Has Gone Too
Far.
The debate was argued positively by debating Union members David Wilder and Tom
D'Aquino and negatively by
Creditistes Barry Cooper and
Murray Farr. Chairman was
Dr. C. W. Eliot of the classics
department.
"The demands of French
Canada have placed Canadian
unity in danger," Wilder said.
He called Real Caouette a rudderless demagogue.
Creditiste Cooper paralleled
the French-Canadian fight for
freedom with the Negro fight
for freedom in the 19th century.
Murray   Farr,   a   Creditiste
and former student at Bishop's College in Quebec, said:
"The only reason English
speaking male students at
Bishop's take out French girls
is to have a good time and get
from the French girls what
they can't get from the English ones."
Following the debate a vote
was taken in the packed
lounge. The motion was defeated.
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Free Parking at Rear
McAfee details progress
of first months for AMS
By JOHN KELSEY
This is the year of the student survey.
AMS President Roger McAfee's progress report tabled
in council Tuesday contains
details of three separate surveys—the Student Means Survey, a survey on married students' housing, and a residence
survey.
The report also covers progress on the Student Union
Building, Higher Education
Promotion, and a study on the
bookstore.
Here's a recap of McAfee's
report:
• Student Means Survey: A
second brief will arise from
this survey for presentation to
the government. It will be a
profile of the scholarship winner and money borrower.
• Married Students Housing Committee is examining
complaints of inadequacy in
married accommodation and
will meet with an administrative committee when the survey is complete.
• Residences: "Undertaking
a thorough study of existing
residence conditions with a
view to presenting a report
outlining exactly what students feel is wrong with the
existing system."
Fifteen nailed
by RCMP radar
The sneaky black box
struck for the second time in
a week Wednesday.
RCMP radar caught 15
speeding students on Chancellor Boulevard.
Average fine for speeding
offences is about $25.
• Student Union Building:
The four finalists in the architectural competition have
been selected, and the final
design will be announced in
early January.
Construction of SUB will
begin next summer.
• Public Relations: Spending its time informing the paying public of the university's
doings, and said McAfee, doing rather well.
• Publications: Appointment
of a full-time publications
manager has brought about a
distinct increase in advertising revenue for student publi
cations as well as maintaining
financial records.
• Bookstore: The AMS is
undertaking, in co-operation
with the faculty association, a
study of the UBC bookstore.
For the first time, the possibility of a student-run store is
being investigated.
• Travel Department: The
annual charter flights to Europe are again flying, with a
$30-$40  fare reduction.
• Student Activities: "To
date there have been 635
campus events, of which 73
have been major events, 31
major events off campus, and
51 auditorium events."
AMS pushes express bus
from Oakridge to campus
A letter requesting publicity of the express bus service
to Forty-first and Oak has been sent by Student Council to
B.C. Hydro.
Nursing president Wendy Woodland said the bus is not
drawing enough passengers, probably because enough students don't know the route.
Hydro official have threatened to discontinue the service, she said.
The buses leave the stadium on East Mall at 2:30, 3:30,
4:30 and 5:30 p.m., go past Brock, the Ponderosa and out
Marine Drive.
Photo-Soc presents . . .
COLOR    PROCESSING
Film on the revolutionary new
"KODAK RAPID COLOR PROCESS"
Mr. Gordon Hughes, Kodak Technical Representative will speak about printing color negatives.
Mr. Hughes will bring along a demonstrator model
of the new rapid color processor.
Thursday Noon - Buchanan 204
All Welcome
1965  Graduates
Chemistry, Bio-Chemistry
and Food Sciences
CANADIAN BREWERIES LIMITED offers opportunities to BSc and MSc
graduates to work with a well-balanced team of recent graduates and
experienced scientists on challenging research and development problems
arising out of the company's long term development program. This work is
carried out in the company's modern research and development laboratory
in Toronto using the latest equipment and techniques under highly qualified
and experienced supervision.
We are a Canadian owned and managed company represented nationally
by the Carling, Dow and O'Keef e branches and have substantial international
holdings in the brewing and malting industries. (See Canada Careers Directory for more background information.)
Our technical employees are encouraged to participate in scientific organizations. Generous company-paid insurance benfits are provided and all our
employees participate in a contributory pension plan. Top salaries will be
offered to qualified graduates.
Our Representative will be on the campus
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30th
and will be pleased to discuss career opportunities with interested applicants. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Ix>c. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
. Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1964
Poor athletes
UBC athletes have a penury problem.
The way to solve it is to stay clear of Canadian
competition.
Last year UBC pulled out of the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Association men's division.
Reasons for the withdrawal were lack of competition
and excessive travel costs.
The WCIAA, with teams from universities as far east
as Manitoba, has demanded we get all the way out
or all the way in.
All the way out means no women's competition.
All the way in will cost the university $38,000 more
a year.
It would be ducky if we could play teams that
recognize the same flag (ha), sing the same anthem
(ha) and are Canadian.
But it would be unrealistic to suggest we find the
extra cash within the university.
We're currently paying $90,000 a year for athletics.
Students pay $4.20 a head. The administration
grants $10,500 plus coaching and building maintenance
costs.
Neither can afford to pay more.
Economics make it imperative, then, that we stay
away from our Canadian brothers.
There is adequate U.S. competition for men's teams.
Women's teams would have to be satisfied with local
competition.
UBC students have never been wild athletic spectators.
We couldn't lose much at the gate by not playing
Canadian teams.
We have nothing like the Carleton versus University
of Ottawa football rivalry.
Before their big annual game — in which the teams
battle each other for a panda bear—students steal things
from each other, engage in hate weeks, and generally
raise hell.
We might as well recognize our Canadian isolation
and wait for Simon Fraser Academy and Victoria College to approach competitive size.
Until that day comes, with possible increased gates
and enthusiasm, we might as well play U.S. colleges.
; U.S. teams may not mean much in the rah- rah
department, but it's cheaper and more sensible.
Swallow who?
We see that the local Conservative club has come
out — conservatively — to get Davie Fulton back into
federal politics.
The club, which strongly supported Fulton's return
to B.C. politics only two years ago, now says that Davie
is uniquely talented to help resolve the French-English
dialogue.
Whether this means he (1) speaks French, (2) supports the Maple Leaf flag or (3) flubbed it in B.C., we
aren't exactly sure.
Probably, however, it is the Conservative way of
saying that the Canadian people can't be expected to
Swallow John forever.
At least we hope so.
EDITOR: Mike Horsey Attention all oversexed staff mem
bers!  Don Hume, noted art director
News  Tim Padmore   and Int Stud 100 scholar, points out
M,.,„-  „ i-_«t M,tl,.„.    disarmament has only been accomp-
ana*"n9  - Janet Matheson    Ushe(J    twlce_each  \lme    after  pa
City  Tom Wayman    world  war.   What   that's  got   to   do
with anything- is exceedingly doubt-
Art  _ _  Don Hume   fui,  but  don't  forget  the  real-jelly-
c„_*., r.nI.n. D.im.hntinm    bean-type   meeting  at   noon   today.
sP°rts   George Reamsbottom    Sfnff     Tynn    c„rtiR    Jonn   a^^
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts    Al   Birnie.   Carol-Anne   Baker,   Bob
Wieser,  Linda Morrison, Paul Wood.
Asst. City  Lorraine Shore    sunfink   Vaux,   Robbi   West,   Corol
Asst.  News   Just Miss  Munroe    Smi,th'   Richard Blair   John  redSun-
workwanter   Kelsey,   Robin   Russell,
Associate  _  Mike Hunter    Sharon    Rodney    and     Sheri    Galen
_. Vesalius,   Provincefink Terri French
Associate    Ron Riter   and    paperless    Timesfink    Valpy.
Vagazine  ._ Dave Ablett   Drink is the only aswer, <
Jeff Wall's UBC
Why Sylvia, you've been pinned.
:>WifV ,"VSm*  •iV^*J$V«*A*»'i U> .-£
The Looking Glass
UBC's commuting woes
are crying for solutions
By CAROLE MUNROE
Commuting to UBC day after day produces symptoms
like those of a cancerous disease.
It really doesn't matter
where you are coming from
—anywhere in the Lower
Mainland will do. After all,
it's the last four miles that
take the time (sometimes as
long as 45 minutes) because
all the routes eventually become four narrow channels
into the campus.
• •    •
At first you are mildly annoyed by the traffic situation,
but very enthusiastic about
prospects for improving it.
Ideas teem from your brain
and prompt you to action.
So you write emotional letters to the editors of The
Ubyssey and the downtown
papers, carefully outlining
the problem and your unerring means of improving it.
Passionate pleas also fly
westward to government ministers and MLAs.
Sometimes silence is your
only reply.
• •    •
But sometimes the government does make a statement.
You ask for wider roads.
They tell you they are busy
building bridges in the Interior.
You ask for one-way traffic
during rush hours. They tell
you to be thankful that the
speed limits on Marine were
raised, although you know
they might as well be 10
mph for all the good it does
Then they say—can you
believe it? — that Marine
Drive was built for tourists
anyway.
That cuts you down. Face
it, you just can't reason with
a remark like that.
• •    •
Now your tactics change,
or rather, dissolve. Often the
whole traffic subject just
gets dropped. Or you might
make an effort to do a little
backseat bitching as you wait
in a lineup that's slowly moving homeward.
Or you might entertain
yourself and your fellow car-
poolers with a little game
called "Find A Tourist On
Marine Drive". The winner is
the first one to discover an
isolated tourist among the
masses of students. But after
a couple of days of fruitless
searching you even drop that
game.
• •    •
So here you are in mid-
November.
You decide that you might
as well stop complaining because it's obvious that nothing is going to be done this
year. You face the fact that
your day is going to begin
and end with a half-hour
crawl around Point Grey
from now until the end of
April.
And then you console yourself with the thought that
there's really no use in hurrying to the campus for a quick
coffee in Brock before classes.
You'll just have to stand in
'.another.'line.'anyway:. v.v. v.'.
LETTERS
Sinful story
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We object strongly to your
handling of the story about
the porter who had too much
to drink near the residences.
Putting the story on page
one, even without the man's
name, has caused the Housing
administration and this individual a great deal of em-
harassment.
What can one porter, drunk
or sober, do to a girl in an
area surrounded by tall residence buildings and hundreds
of males and females.
It is not this so much as the
general tone of the article
and it's page one display that
we object to.
RESIDENCE GIRLS
V     V     "*•
SUB gets a name
"Fort Fubar" is a red-blooded name for SUB which rings
with melody. It acknowledges
our past and su g gests a
friendly atmosphere. "Fubar"
connotates action—strength
—greatness!
To make the building distinctive, it should be painted
a bright red, and for aesthetic
beauty, a twelve-foot sculpture of Lady Godiva would
be truly impressive. (The Engineers will provide a Nurse
model).
B. V. D. ALLEN
Engineering II.
Artisan a good rag
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Being an Artsman (and
proud of it), I object to the
reference to our paper as a
"sick and sly sheet" devoted
to the circulation of words
like "foreskin". (Letters to
the Editor, November 17).
The Artisan is not a steo-
typed campus rag. It is deliberately provocative. There is
room for dissent. There
should be, in a good paper.
But surely, P.M., it deserves
more from you than just writing it off as "poor taste".
JEAN ALSTON
Arts  III.
Letters to the editor must
be signed and should not exceed 100 words in length.
Pseudonyms will be used
only if the writer includes
his name with the original
copy.
Letters must be put in the
"Letters" box in The Ubyssey offices in the North
Brock basement.
Does speed kill?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
As I drove my 1949 Austin
home on University Boulevard Wednesday, I saw the
RCMP up to their old tricks
again, namely setting out radar traps.
In six years on this campus,
driving to and from it twice
a day, I have never seen a
serious accident as a result
of speed. Nor have I heard
of one on the main traffic arteries.
I have seen cars speeding
on campus, where they
should not have done so, but
I have never seen a radar set
there.
How come?
JOHN   REAREN
Grad Studies Thursday, November 19, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
THE  DREARY  PAST
The truth all ads up
By MIKE HORSEY
Advertising from the past tells more about
the people of the period than those people
care to remember..
In the day of the $40 million super-pana-
vistic full-color movie spectacular, it's refreshing to look back to when things weren't so
complex.
A November ad in The Ubyssey of 1929
trumpeted that the "gigantic 100 per cent
talking and singing production Broadway
was coming, "The first $1 million all-talking
picture".
Of course, stores were then selling men's
coats which dusted the streets and soaked up
mud puddles.
You think Hertz and Avis are trying hard,
to beat each other in the rent-a-car business.
How about the Moonlight Auto Livery, which
rented cars for $1 to $1.50 per hour or 12
hours for $7.
A big thing then was the $30 double-breasted suit which, according to an ad in The
Ubyssey, made "a decided hit with college
men".
And woe befell the Gables Tea Room when
it became possibly the first coffee house (or
tea house) when it changed its name to the
Cat and Parrot.
Horrible colored women's stockings are
nothing new, either.
"Colored a novel brick-red, these quaint
period sox accentuate the wearer's individuality", claimed an obscure clothing store.
A -year later, in November, the Imperial
Tobacco Company was pushing a "mild and
fragrant" cigarette called "Turret" which sold
20 for 25 cents.
Fur for women didn't seem to be much of
a luxury item, or perhaps today's inflation
has changed our values.
Famous Furs on Hastings were featuring
wraps at $17.50 while a nearby friend, good
old Marion Brown's Corset Shop, was containing women so they could fit into the furs.
Who said the 30's were lean years? The ads
in The Ubyssey make them look fat.
The British Columbia Electric Railway
Company was pounding away at the "increasing proportion of cars downtown" and suggesting that it was in the best interests of
merchant, student and average Joe shopper
to use the street cars.
Totem, your friendly yearbook, was advertising itself as bigger and better. At the rate
Moonlight Auto Livery
ONE-HALF BLOCK WEST OF ORPHEUM THEATRE
726 Smythe Street
Sey. 1313
LATEST MODEL CARS ONLY
Hourly Rates
$1.00 to $1.50 per hr.
<Gaa extra in all cases)
Party Rates
6 A.M. to 6 P M. $5.00 to $7.00
6 p.m. to 6 a.m. $5.00 to $7.00
of bigger and betterness Totem this year
should have about 3,000 pages if we can believe the ad.
Radsoc, UBC's radio station, was advertising a speaker who would "speak on the loudspeaker as a development of modern radio"
which no doubt attracted mad millions of
listeners.
The Ubyssey, in its usual modest method,
placed a small 40-inch ad in the corner of
one page of the paper reminding the readers
that the paper "is a thrilling experience in
reading," and that, "For all the news that fits
there is no better paper".
And students were invited to view the
unique "electrograft". Unfortunately there is
no further mention of this "unique" instrument in the Ubysseys.
One can only assume it wasn't much of a
deal, since 20th century science has not exactly been revolutionized by its presence.
That's a quick look at advertising in the
past . . . when the advertiser wasn't playing
around with sublimation and fancy psychological forces.
ELECTRKtoEwayO).
VICTORIA
^K~^
TMild and Fragrant
iirret
CIGAKETTES
proverbi^gd/
esa NEWS
Professor Polykarp Kusch, winner of the Nobel Prize in
Physics, 1955, will be at the University this week to give
several seminars and to address the Vancouver Institute.
Professor Kusch has been invited to have dinner followed
by coffee in the Lounge with Graduate Students on
Thursday, 19, November. More information may be
obtained at the Office at the Graduate Centre. All interested students are welcome.
•    •••••
Sunday Night At The G.S.C.:
The Sunday night cultural activities are beginning again
on Sunday, 29, November, at 8:00 p.m., when Mr. Brian
Belfont will give a talk on Cuba.
On Sunday, 6, December, the Music Department Choral
and Instrumental Group will give a performance in the
Lower Lounge of the Centre at 8:00 p.m.
On Sunday, 13, December, there will be an evening of
recorded music based on the Spanish theme. Watch for
more details.
Available  at these  Canaday  Dealers:
FINNS
Clothing   Stores
Limited
3031 W. Broadway
2159 W. 41st Ave.
6495   Fraser  Street
4000 East Hastings
il   I   '   i    ii ii   i i ■ "' Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19, 1964
Violence waits in wings
if Quiet Revolution fails
Violence will take over if
Quebec's Quiet Revolution
peters out, a Montreal professor said. Tuesday.
"Unless this Quiet Revolution achieves the desired
French - Canadian consolidation, the very radical younger
generation, where separatism
gets its major support, will
blow up," said Jacques Parizeau of L'Ecole des Hautes
Etudies   de Montreal.
"The present Quiet Revolution is more psychological
than economic — a vast feel-
Epigraphists
WANTED: A Travestite Lava-
tory Epigraphist to gather in-
. scriptions from UBC restroom
walls for publication in
PIQUE. Apply to Wayne Nyberg, 6560 NW Marine Dr.
Phone 224-9014, etc. Three
cents a line.
ing of inferiority in decision
making by French-Canadians
must be overcome.
"This feeling goes deep," he
told a student audience in Bu.
106. "And the entrenched social leaders of Old Quebec are
fighting any change.
• •    •
"The Quiet Revolution is the
attempt of French-Canadian
society to reach the status of
a complete modern social system," Parizeau said.
"Until recently this society
was a tightly-knit but not
diversified union of farmers,
workers, and professionals —
but one unable to function in
the fields of technology or big
business.
• •.   •
"French Canada is now coming to the stage of a complete
community where Le Quebecois can now determine his own
economic future without having to switch his language to
Heres a swill opportunity
to get in on German beer
You can go to the biergartens and back for less than
$125 if you drop down to Brock Extension 359 at noon
today.
The Canadian German Academic Exchange Association
provides round trip air transportation to Germany in the
summer, and a two-month job to boot, all for between $100
and $125.
Students must be Canadian citizens and have taken at
least one course in German at university.
They must also have joined the Association by today to
be eligible.
English and his thinking to
English-cultured."
Three goals have been determined by Quebec's post-
Duplessis government, in-reality the most leftist-leaning in
the country, said Parizeau.
"These are—a modernization
of industry, alleviation of unemployment, and r e s o 1 v ing
vast regional differences in
the standard of living.
"French politicians and economists are beginning to
doubt the validity of relying
on automatic market adjustment of economic problems,
and have set up the General
Investment Corpora tion to
mold a steady development of
manufacturing, education, and
technology in Quebec," he
said.
Some participation of Le
Quebecois in developing their
complete social structure has
led to conflict with the federal
government, said Parizeau.
•    •    •
"Quebec feels to satisfactorily run its economy she must
acquire as much control as
possible over her resources,"
he said.
"The federal government
must relinquish control of
fields in which the provincial
governments can act with as
much or more efficiency."
Prairie Red
speaks here
A Communist alderman
will speak on democracy
Friday at UBC.
Joseph Zuchen, communist alderman from Winnipeg,
'will speak on Canadian Communists and Democracy in
Bu. 104 at noon Friday.
Zuchen has been re-elected seven times by Winnipeg
voters and Is a member of
the National Committee of
the Communist Party.
Homosexuality
film banned
BERKELEY (UNS)—A film
on homosexuality won't be
shown on the University of
California campus because
Berkeley police have banned
it.
The film, titled Un Chant
d'Amour, deals with homosexuality as a means of escape
from the repression and dreary
surroundings of a prison.
• Eye Glasses
* Contact Lenses
• Prescriptions Filled
* Immediate Optical
Services
- Student Rates -
PITMAN OPTICAL
Vancouver Block
734 Granville       MU 5-0928
"THE" PLACE
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is at fhe
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4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
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It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Students Meal Tickets
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Western Canada's Largest
FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
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Morning Coats Blue   Blazers
Directors' Coats 10%  UBC  Discount
OVER 2000 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623  HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU  3-2457
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INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES
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HONORS MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
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IBM Thursday, November 19, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
LIBERIAN Consul H. A. D.
Oliver moderates panel on
African politics Friday at
8 p.m.. International House.
UBC quartet
pushes for
rights group
Four UBC students who attended a Student Non-violent
Co-ordinating Committee conference last weekend want to
start a Canadian branch of
SNCC.
"We wish to explore the
possibilities of organizing a
Canadian branch of SNCC,"
said Dick Woodsworth, one of
the delegates.
The four UBC students,
Randy Enomoto, Christine
Epp, Sylvia Melamed and
Woodsworth, were the only
Canadians among 760 American delegates to the San Francisco conference.
They were sponsored by the
Academic Activities Committee, and received $60 from the
AMS.
The Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee is devoted to furthering racial
equality by non-violent means.
University students spend
their summers conducting
freedom schools to help Negro
children adjust to integration.
They also teach Negro parents voter registration procedures and persuade them to try
to register to vote.
Several southern U.S. states
use complex voter registration
quizzes to disenfranchise Negroes.
For Chris  sake
Meeting jells
for pubsters
Real, honest-to-goodness
jellybeans (this time for
sure) are only part of the
fun, adventure and comradeship available at your
handy-dandy staff meeting
today noon.
All sober Ubyssey staffers
are asked to appear in the
usual puffs of smoke.
"FLECTO"
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CARPAY BLDG.
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4415 West 10th Ave.
224-4545
Wootten brags
of 2nd coming
Special Events is sponsoring a secret Second Coming in
the armory next Thursday—but it's open to everyone.
Special     Events     chairman
Chris Wootten said the secrecy
was due to the nature of the
person or persons appearing.
"It's the biggest thing that
Special Events has ever
brought to the campus," Wootten said.
But even members of Wootten's committee don't know
who's coming, several of them
told The Ubyssey.
Wootten would only say the
identity of the person or persons appearing would not be
released until the day of the
Second Coming.
Banners and posters, advertising the Second Coming
have appeared around the
campus.
Special events' booking listing for the Armory does not
specify who—or what—is to
appear.
East-West
clash probed
The clash between Eastern
and Western cultures will be
discussed on Sunday at International House.
Asian studies professor W.
L. Holland, Sociology professor W. E. Willmott and Asian
studies' Dr. D. G. E. Hall will
speak.
The discussion on cultural,
political and religious problems of the Far East, sponsored by the UN Club, will be
held from 2 to 9 p.m.
Applications may be obtained from AMS office or
International House.
Registration fee is $1.75 including a meal, or $1 without.
ENDS SATURDAY
peter elbling
and
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NEXT WEEK
the
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Reservations: RE 6-6011
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When winter blasts oft this
coat with lining of man-
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wise will invest now, so
that like the admirable
youths, known as Boy
Scouts, they will be
prepared.
$35.00
Jack Elson Ltd.
Clothes for
Men and Young Men
545 Granville MU 1-9831
QJISLSlJLSLSLSUULSLaJISLSLSUUULSUl
Startling Bargains Feature
Last Eight Days of
WITT'S
CLOSE-OUT
SALE
Time is running short — the stock must go — there
are only EIGHT moire Selling Days. Therefore, to do
the job, further price cuts have been made. Only in
a Complete Close-Out Sale are such Bargains possible
in Fine Quality NAME BRAND merchandise for
Women and Children.
Here's Just a Tiny Idea
of How Much You Can Save
All KAYSER Hosiery — Seamless and Seamed and
Patterned Seamless — formerly to $1.50 now priced
99c pair . . . KAYSER Gloves regular $1.95 and $2.95
go at only $1.49 and $2.29 . . .KAYSER Lingerie is
all reduced, too, at 25% off regular Prices . . . Reg.
$4.98 Slips are now $3.49 and $1.15 Panties are 89c
. . . FORMIT Bras formerly $2.50 - $4.00 - $6.00 are
now priced $1.99 - $2.99 and $4.49 . . . and the $5.95
Girdles are going at $4.49 ... Yes, and SCARVES and
HEADSQUARES — the Imported kinds — are now
selling at 1/3 off the Regular prices ... SABRE SLIM
SKIRTS were $14.95 and they are now only $10.88.
Also the entire stock of GIFT WARE (wonderful for
Christmas gift-ing) has been marked down 1/3 . . .
and, by the way, ALL THE REGULAR PRICES
HAVE BEEN LEFT ON SO YOU CAN SEE WHAT
YOU ARE SAVING!
And for CHILDREN'S WEAR there are sensational
Bargains ... all have been reduced at least 25% and
in many cases more! . . .these are for Babies and Preschool children . . . the famous LADYBIRD items
are included in these ... so, Hurry and Save!
It's Bargain Time!
Be Sure You Make the Most of It!
I
I
I
I
HOSIERY and
LINGERIE SHOP
WITTS
5732 University Boulevard
_l
Careers In
Technical Management
Proctor & Gamble has openings in
Production Management    -     Product Research
Quality Control    -    Process Development
Package Development
for Bachelor and Master graduates in Chemical Engineering and
Honours Chemistry.
A full outline of the opportunities in these fields is given in our Technical
brochures available at the Placement Office.
INTERVIEWS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23 and TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24
The Procter & Gamble Company
of Canada, Limited
Hamilton, Ontario
Pointe Claire, P.Q. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19, 1964
FORMER UBC rugger coach
Max Howell is chief target
of SFA athletic recruiters.
Ex-UBC rugger coach
Howell may tackle SFA
This little
pig went
to park it
A few sheep taking part in
a secret experiment fled to the
parking lots with a couple of
pigs early Wednesday morning.
The drab woolleys, apparently led by the porkers, escaped
to C-lot area when an unwary
shepherd left a paddock gate
open.
The escapees were seen
munching tall grass near the
poultry products building by
several students arriving for
8:30 lectures.
The animal depot was apparently embarrassed by the
animals' behaviour and refused to comment on the nature of the sheep experiment.
A secretary said if such information was learned, the
animals would be pestered by
inquisitive persons and would
not co-operate.
All were quickly recaptured.
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Simon Fraser Academy—the
school which has threatened
to replace UBC as the power in
Western Canadian college athletics — has picked a former
UBC professor as the man
they want to head their athletic program.
•    •    *
He is Max Howell, professor and head of graduate
studies in the School of Physical Education at U. of A.
Dr. Patrick McTaggart-Cowan, president of SFA, met with
Howell when he was in Vancouver two weeks ago and
asked him if he wanted to take
on the task of introducing
athletics at SFA.
Howell says he is interested
and will meet again with McTaggart-Cowan in two weeks.
But he cannot commit himself now because of his current position at Edmonton.
A former international rugby star with the Australian
national team, Howell attended the University of California on an athletic scholarship
then joined the UBC faculty
of P.E.
•    •   *
Howell says he left UBC because the University of Alberta offered him greater opportunities in the field of physical educational research.
He agrees with Dr. Gordon
Shrum the Chancellor of SFA,
who argues that athletics and
higher education should go
hand in hand. And both want
the best for SFA.
•    •    •
In order to ensure the best,
Shrum has advocated a three-
point program for SFA:
Athletic scholarships provided by outside or private
sources.
Superior coaching staffs, including the importation of
American talent, • if necessary,
until Simon Fraser develops
its own coaching talent.
A sincere interest in athletics by the university in providing tutorial encouragement
but not at the expense of the
academic program.
AUTO INSURANCE AT
SUBSTANTIAL  SAVINGS
For Drivers 24 yrs. & up
Call Bob Bator of A. R. Bakor ltd.
1327 Marine, W. Van.       922-61M
It's
OPEN HOUSE
at
PANHELLENIC
on
FRIDAY
November 20
7:00 -10:00 pjn.
Everyone is Welcome
Green croakers
OTTAWA (UNS) — Police
here are searching the Commons for vandals after green
footsteps were found painted
on the sidewalk pointing from
Quebec.
FLIGHT LIEUTENANT
R.  B. ROBINSON
Available for
Quiet Consultation
in the Armoury
CA 4-1910
BELL
MEEDS
MALE GRADUATES
TO HELP MANAGE TOMORROW'S WORLD OF COMMUNICATIONS
Take the long view when you graduate.
Plan a career offering scope and responsibility in the management of a
leading Canadian industry.
Consider the potential of a position at
the BELL if you are graduating in
Ask at your Placement Office for
informative booklets, and arrange to talk
with one of our representatives when
they visit your campus.
BELL
Built, managed and owned by Canadians
Make a date to discuss a career
in telecommunications on
Monday through  Friday
November 30 to December 3 Thursday, November 19, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Busy Xerox
Students
dog chief
copycat
By LYNN CURTIS
If you're tired of copying
things by hand you can take
your troubles to Vera Traff on
the Library's lower concourse.
Vera's Xerox machine can
reproduce pages from books
and notes in one minute.
A trip to her office—located
under the stairs leading from
the main entrance to the card
catalogue—can lighten your
work load and even raise your
spirits.
One of the many humorous
signs posted around them depicts an orgy and invites students waiting for service to
feel free to entertain themselves while they wait.
Reproduction costs 10 cents
for each sheet copied.
The Xerox office is open
from 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. Monday to Friday. Miss Traff said'
she closes during lunch and
tea-time only.
"We don't want any publicity, we're already overworked," she said.
Library circulation department head Robert Harris said
the Xerox is a rather complicated machine and research is
now in progress to buy less
complicated machines.
"The Xerox requires special
electrical outlets, paper and
ventilation. It would be better
if we had self-operated copiers
located around the campus,"
he said.
At present Xerox machines
are also located at the extension divisions photographic
department and the Wesbrook
library.
"We are trying to improve
service. Starting Saturday, we
will have a student in the office all day," Harris said.
Court changes
follow acquittal
"Student council Tuesday approved several changes in
student court procedures to increase court's efficiency and
protect student rights.
The new regulations forbid
—don kydd photo
FORBIDDING SIGNS greet students entering Vera Traffs
Xeroxing retreat. One minute reproduction of pages from
books and notes costs students 10 cents a sheet.
calling accused students to
testify as prosecution witness.
But, if an accused student
fails to appear in court without submitting a written reason for his absence one day in
advance the case will be turned over to Faculty Council.
The council is chaired by
UBC president John Macdonald, and acts as an appeal
court to student court.
The changes were made after a student court case last
week acquitted a student of a
charge laid fallowing a
Screech Day egg-throwing incident.
The accused student did not
appear at trial and the court
entered an automatic not
guilty plea on his behalf.
In a letter to The Ubyssey
the student, Donald H. Mackay, charged the court followed improper procedures in
bringing him to trial.
Earlier student court officials had been unable to locate
Mackay to serve him with official notice of the change.
Law president Dick Hayes,
discipline committee chairman,
said the administration has
promised student court full
co-operation in student discipline cases.
Male cause
suffers again
SEATTLE (PSP)—Women
have set up housekeeping in
a men's dorm at the University of Washington.
As a result of shortage of
dorm space for women, a
group of 29 girls, all senior
students, have toeen given
rooms in the dorm furthest
from the campus—previously all-male.
Fine material and
painstaking craftsmanship combine
to give you a suit
of impeccable cut
and lasting quality.
Price? A pleasant
surprise!
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
7tt Granville Street U1-S425
Arena curling
times available
The Winter Sports centre
now has open time available
for student curling.
From 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. and
5 to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday and 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. Fridays are now free.
Charge is a special student
rate and club rates can be arranged. Contact manager Malcolm Lee at 224-3205.
We bend an ear to undergraduate money
problems of all kinds, from setting up a savings
account, to budgeting, to discussing your financial
future. Any time we can be of help .. .
ROYAL BAN K
Original
engineering work
Our Company, founded in 1927, with a highly successful record
of achievement, in 1957 formed its own Design Development
Group to produce a wide range of small gas turbine engines
of original Canadian design for both national and international
markets.
With the highly successful introduction of the PT 6 gas turbine
engine, now in volume production, the Company is intensifying
its efforts in all areas of design, development and production
of both aircraft and industrial engines.
We are looking for engineering graduates who would like to
join this outstanding team of engineering and manufacturing
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are interested in such fields as:
PRELIMINARY AND DETAIL
MECHANICAL DESIGN
COMPRESSOR AERODYNAMIC
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
STRESS ANALYSIS
PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS
CONTROL ANALYSIS AND
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EXPERIMENTAL RIG TEST DESIGN
TURBINE DESIGN AND
DEVELOPMENT
EXPERIMENTAL TEST AND
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INSTRUMENTATION DESIGN
MANUFACTURING PLANNING
AND DEVELOPMENT
we invite you to get in touch with your Placement Office. Brochures are available that will give you additional information
about our Company.
A representative will be on the campus November 24, 25, 26
and 27 to meet interested candidates.
Us
A
iB#ys^   w     *■■» s~
OF CANADA LIMITED
Longueuil, Quebec Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19, 1964
Students are
no suckers
SEATTLE (PSP) — A professor at the University of
Washington gave his class
lollipops to keep them from
talking among themselves
as he lectured.
It didn't work, he explained  later.
His students just kept
talking with their mouths
full.
Hail UBC
Kitchen
can turn
to prison
Alcoholism can turn a woman's kitchen into a prison or
a skid road, according to an
Alcoholics Anonymous member who .spoke here.
"Society forces women to
hide their problem," said the
female AA member who was
speaking at a pre-social work
club meeting.
A businessman, also a former alcoholic,  said:
"Sometimes alcoholics are
so concerned with the label
society attaches to alcoholics
that this detracts from their
ability to attack their problem."
The AA members said every
member of our society should
understand that alcoholism is
a sickness not a vice.
They said the cure of alcoholism lies not only with the
alcoholic but with the society
that made   him what  he was.
The AA feels alcoholics are
worth a social worker's time
and trouble despite the image
of the alcoholic that prevails
today,  the  members said.
Last lecturer
gives a cheer
Students who attended the
gifts from the last lecturer.
Alumni director Tim Hollick-Kenyon gave his 100-odd
listeners copies of the old UBC
cheer, Hail UBC, after his last
lecture.
Hollick-K enyon said he
liked the cheer and feels it
should be brought back.
The Alumni director, who
received his Masters of Social
Work degree in 1953, was
speaking on the olden days
at UBC.
He said in the 1930s the
Women's Undergraduate Society forbade all female students
to smoke in public.
"And in early years, $2 covered your AMS fee," he said.
Hollick-Kenyon poked fun
at the modern UBC.
On the student means survey, which showed that more
than 12 per cent of UBC coeds have fathers earning over
$16,000 annually, he said:
"I wish I'd known who they
were when I was here."
Hollick-Kenyon also lauded
The Ubyssey.
"It is an excellent edition
this year," he said.
last lecture on Tuesday got
Nobel winner
speaks today
Professor Polykarp Kusch
will speak on the magnetic
moment of the electron today
at 4 p.m. in the Hebb lecture
theatre.
Professor Kusch is the co-
winner of the 1955 Nobel
prize in physics.
You'll Treasure Totem in the Years
to Come
Don't Delay—Order Today
Two Editions - "Grads" and "Campus Life"
OK   BRAKES
1st Ave. & Main St. Phone: 879-3014
* For all popular makes:—
Brake Shoes (4 wheels) $16.50
Wheel Kits (4 wheels) $10.00
Both Shoes and '
Wheel Kits $25.00
* Special 5% Discount Before Xmas, for UBC Students
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. • 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets at Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205
Bishop's host
LENNOXVILLE (CUP) —
Bishop's University will likely
host the 29th National Congress of the Canadian Union
of Students early next September.
Lynne Hughes
plus
George Hewison
November 17 - 21
at ihe
BUNKHOUSE
Coffee House
612 Davie
Reserve now — 683-9790
.... and remember
Jazz Every Sunday
Afternoon 2-5 p.m.
JULIUS
CAESAR
UBC Auditorium - Today
3:45, 6:00 and 8:30 p-.m.
Directed  by JOSEPH  L.  MANKIEWICZ, with
MARLON  BRANDO,  JAMES  MASON,  SIR JOHN  GIELGUD
... all  for the  ridiculously  low  price  of 50 cents
(A SPECIAL  EVENTS PRODUCTION)
"Surely some revelation is al hand;
Surely the Second Coming is at hand.
The Second Coming! Hardly are those words out
When a vast image out of Spiritus Mundi
Troubles my sight: somewhere in sands of the desert
A shape with lion body and the head ot a man,
A gase blank and pitiless as the sun
Is moving its slow thighs, While all about ii
Red shadows of the indignant desert birds.
The darkness drops again; but now I know
The twenty centuries of stormy sleep
Were vexed to nightmare by a rocking cradle
And what rough, beast, its hour come round at last.
Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?"
—w. b. yeats
NOVEMBER 26, NOON, THE ARMORY
DON'T MISS IT!
Ohlif 25 cents Thursday, November 19, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
UBC FEMMES: FAIR AND FETCHING
■dave freemart t>h6to' Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 19, 1964
'tween classes
Prof combs new red heads
Slavonics and Economics
professor H. E. Ronimois
speaks on Russia Under Its
New Leadership noon today
in Bu. 106.
• •    •
UNIVERSITY  CHOIR
Annual Fall Concert Friday
noon in Brock Hall. Brahms,
Handel, Britten and others
will be represented.  Free.
• •    •
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
Dr. L. Pulos of the Burnaby
Mental Health Clinic speaks
on group therapy noon today
in Rm. 19 of the Psych Huts.
• •    •
FACULTY BAND
Band rehearsal noon today
in Hut 0-16, Rm. 20.
• •    •
ACADEMIC GOALS
Meeting of committee noon
today in the Committee Room
of the  Grad Students Centre.
• •    •
BODY BUILDING CLUB
Strongest Man of Campus
Power contest. Weigh in noon
today  in the Stadium.
• •    •
SOCREDS
Peace River films at noon
today in Bu. 104.
LORD CECIL
. . . nature of life
•
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Lord Martin Cecil, President of the Universal Institute
of Applied Ontology speaks
on The Real Nature of Life
at noon today in Bu. 202.
•    •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Don't miss the Second Coming, November 26 at noon in
the Auditorium. Admission 25
cents.
Ontario drinking laws
blasted at CUS meeting
TORONTO (CUP)—Ontario liquor laws came under
fire at a Canadian Union of Students meeting here last
weekend.
The University of Western Ontario delegation called
present laws absurd.
They said an individual can legally get married and
have children at 16 and fight for his country at 18, yet is
not allowed to buy or drink liquor until he is 21.
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Jacques Rozier's beguiling
new comedy Adieu Philippine
noon today in Bu. 102. Members 25 cents; non members
35 cents.
• *   •
PHOTO SOC
Gordon Hughes, Kodak
Technical Representative,
speaks on Color Processing,
with film and demonstrator
model of the new Rapid Color
Processor noon today in Bu.
204.
• •    •
RICKSHAWERS
Royal Hong Kong Rickshaw
Racing Association is holding
a drivers' clinic and a discussion on the merits of stainless
steel racing spokes. It will be
held in the club junk, Marpole.
• •    •
FILM SOC
Mankiewicz's Julius Caesar,
with Mason, Gielgud, Brando
et al in the Auditorium today
at 12:30, 3:45, 6 and 8:30 p.m.
Admission: 50 cents.
• •    •
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Reserve tickets for the Copenhagen String Quartet, Nov.
24 in the Auditorium, and Ravi
Shankar, Nov. 28 at 8:30 p.m.
in the Auditorium.
• •   •
GREEK FILM
Immortal Land, Nov. 25 at
noon in the Auditorium.
• •    •
UNITARIANS
Unitarian Club business
meeting Friday noon in Bu.
225. If unable to attend telephone Kim at WA 2-5142.
• •    •
PHYSICS SOC
Theoretical physics group
meets to discuss graduate
study opportunities and their
work 1:30 p.m. today in Henn.
204.
fc ftijing some ^ m a pan,
But (m egg, was boded, fjg
It soti^Ia) ©cpbded, n=qvJ^ '
§o,qfGOwse,noMf =^-—
tk ijotk is onOm^M
If bills yourfinances are wreckin',
Give a thought to Personal Chequin',
The account that says "whoa",
To your vanishing dough—
To the B of M now you'll be tMin?
10 3 Million CAHADIAHS
nffli
Bank of Montreal"
&HKUU& "P&iAt &cuc6fryi Student*
U3-61
The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building: MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242. 	
LOST—College Physics Text last
Friday in Hebb, Arts or Chemistry
Bldgs.   Reward.   Call   HE   3-8969.
LOST — Pair of lady's white flat
shoes, about 2 wks. ago. Please
phone AM 6-8046.
LOST — One football, vicinity Fort
Camp. Reward offered, contact
Vlad,  224-9029.	
LOST — 1 black purse with identification, Tuesday in BU or Woodwards Library. Phone Betsy Prid-
dle, 224-9090. Leave message .	
LOST — One strand of cultured
pearls, Tuesday. Reward, phone
224-9805, Carolyn Allan. Lost Hebb
Theatre, BI, Sciences, Forestry &
Geology.	
WILL PERSON who took my briefcase from Hebb 32 please phone
Frank at 327-7824.
FOUND — Volkswagen gas cap 10th
& Sasamat. Castle 4-3080.
FOUND — Light blue ski jacket in
Hab 20. Will exchange for mine,
same color. Phone AM 1-1979
after 6.
Special Notices.
13
MOON RIVER PROM featuring "The
Sinners", Dunbar Heights, Kairos
24th & Collingwood, Nov. 28, 8.30
p.m. $1.50 per couple. Tickets at
the door.
HEAR the young lovers in action.
731-9108. Soon you can SEE the
young lovers in action.
Transportation
14
3 GIRLS want carpool for 8.30's till
10 p.m., vicinity 26th & Dunbar.
Phone Heather, RE 8-2407.
RIDE wanted mornings only from
25th & Kingsway, desperate! Phone
876-6665.
Wanted
15
WA NTED — Experiments in organic
chemistry by Frieser. Phone Diana
CA 4-9302.
Ski Trips
16
MT. BAKER Ski package every Sat.
& Sum for $9.50. You get return
bus trip, 1% hour ski lesson, all
day rope tows, 20% off rentals.
Deadline to sign up Thursday eve.
Tickets at all Eaton Stores, Tepee
Sporting Goods, 1017 Robson and
3279 W. Broadway, and Blueline
Sporting Goods Ltd., 154 W. Hastings, or phone CA 4-3955.
Automobiles For Sale
21
1963 AUSTIN Healy Sprite custom
radio, white walls, seat belts fender
mirrors.   Offers.   738-5954.
Motorcycles
27
1963   SUZUKI   80   Sport,   phone   224-
9087, ask for Steve.
BUSINESS   SERVICES
Typing
42
MATURE EXPERT typist, will do
typing in own home. Please phone
685-8879, preferably mornings, or
after 6 p.m. evenings. 	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
HOME EC field work? Domestic help
wanted, 5138 Maple. Phone 266-4740
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SMART QUALITY -clothing for all
the family, like new, at terrific
savings. Ex Toggery Shop, 6246
E.  Blvd. AM 6-6744.
EXCELLENT English 200 notes
now on sale at the College Shop.
Check the high quality yourself!
TOTEM PRE SALES now at ths
AMS office. Books will be wrapped
in plain brown paper for NDP's.
FOR SALE—Sacrifice men's 21 jewel
wrist watch. Waterproof, antimag.
lum. dial, calender, sweep second,
unbreakable crystal, gold case, 9
mos. old, $30 or offer. 224-5389,
7:00-9:00 p.m.
CANON TELEPHOTO lens 135 mm.
f3.5 with case, going really cheap.
Call Raj, 224-3389, 5.15 to 7.30 p.m.,
or 736-4484 during office hours.
FOR SALE — 12 string tiple guitar
$35. Phone Dave, RE 3-0926.
Rooms
81
SHARE cozy room with quiet senior
stud, (male), priv ent. bath, phone,
near Gates,  CA 4-3648 after 5.
NEAT 2 room suite, fridge, hot plate,
good cupboard space. Share bthrm.
261-0669.
GIRL, with large warm apt. on Dunbar has an attractive bed-sitting
room for rent, full use of kitchen,
phone etc. included in $25 monthly
rent.  Phone 731-8654 after 6.
2 ATTRACTIVE ROOMS with study,
kitchen privileges, vicinity 14th &
Dunbar. One or two girls. Phone
224-9582.
Room  & Board
82
PRIVATE room & board for male
student available now. 4595 W. 6th.
CA 4-4866.
ATTRACTIVE ROOM & board for
one or two, vacant now, own wash
room. AM 1-6863.
RENTALS   &   REAL   ESTATE
Furn. Houses & Apis.
83
FURNISHED home, students, teachers, five adults, spacious rumpus
room, TV, etc.; warm, near UBC.
Home for students for years, Telephone AM 1-4332, 12-1 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
The
Copenhagen String Quartet
Nov. 24 - Auditorium - Noon
Don't Miss This Once-a-Year Attraction
*••••••••
RAVI  SHANKAR
Saturday, November 28
AUDITORIUM — 8:30 FM.
RAVI SHANKAR, the great Indian sitarist and composer,
winner of practically all of the international awards for
his scores for films made in India, will be heard here on
his first tour to the Western Hemisphere since his spectacular successes at the Edinburgh, Festival, the London
season and a Continental tour, which followed.
Often  called  "India's Man-of-Music",  he   is  classed
wiih the greatest virtuosi of the world.  He was chosen	
with Casals, Oistrakh and Ansermet—for the International
Broadcast to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the United
Nations and—with Menuhjn and Oistrakh—for some of
the most important International Music Congresses of
Paris and other European capitals.
Shankar has proven that his improvisional techniques
have a very close kinship to modern jazz.
RESERVE NOW
At AMS, Vancouver Ticket Centre or at the Door
Students: 50c.   —   Adults: $2.00
•   ••••••••
THE  SECOND COMING
IS COMING
Thursday,   November  26 — Armouries—12&0

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