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The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1975

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Array BCIT food services boycott succeeds
ByMARCUSGEE
The B.C. Institute of Technology
administration has lowered food
prices after students and staff
boycotted food services Thursday.
BCIT principal Gordon Thom
said Monday he agreed to reduce
prices after a meeting with student
council president Steve Brown
Friday.
The agreement was transmitted
in a memo to the campus from
Thom, who made the original
decision to raise food prices 80 to 90
percent this year, which led to
Thursday's boycott.
Brown said Monday he decided
to organize the boycott because he
did not think the administration
would respond to any other means
of pressure.
"We decided'it was time the
bullshit stops and we nail these
guys with a boycott," he said.
Brown said staff and student
support for the boycott was almost
universal after student council
members circulated through
classrooms Thursday morning
announcing it.
"I think students on this campus
have been dormant for so long that
when someone finally stood up and
said 'wait a minute' they really
responded," Brown said. "There
usually aren't any boat rockers out
here."
The interim food price reductions are still not great enough to
be fair to student budgets, said
Brown.
He said members of the BCIT
board of governors, which meets
this week to discuss food services,
have told him final food prices will
be about 20 percent higher than
last year. But this is lower than the
prices agreed on after last week's
boycott.
Thom said the large food service
subsidy required to support lower
food prices will make less money
available for education and cause
cuts in budgets of other departments.
"If we subsidize food, we are
effecting the educational side,"
Thom said "Of course we could
feed everybody free and cut out
education altogether. We have to
draw a line somewhere."
A 100 percent increase in fees
and 60 to 70 percent increase in the
cost of books and tuition for BCIT
students this year made the food
price hikes more aggravating to
students, Brown said.
"The whole thing (the boycott)
came together in three hours. I was
surprised, at the support we got
from both students and faculty."
Brown said the BCIT food services cafeteria usually serves 3,000
people each day but served only 20
on Monday.
Student council brought outside
caterers to the campus to feed
boycotters, who would usually eat
the student-prepared food at the
food training centre cafeteria.
The boycott was a success partly
because of the element of surprise student council used to
organize it, Brown said.
Boycotters surrounded the
cafeteria with picket signs and
banners for most of the afternoon,
he said.
Thom said the administration
started the academic year running
THE UBYSSEY
CREEPING WITH GERMS, sunny shores of Wreck Beach swirl
around cliffs of Point Grey. Health officials say abnormally high
coliform  count  poses .threat  to  swimmers,  clad or otherwise. Two
sources of high human effluent level are north arm of Fraser River and
leaky storm sewer which drains UBC campus from above beach. Photo
by Matt King from airplane piloted by Boyd "Wings" McConnell.
Wreck, Tower beaches face closure
By GREGG THOMPSON
Two popular beaches on the
Point Grey peninsula should be
closed because of high pollution
levels a Lower Mainland health
official said Monday.
Bill Meekison, director of  the
Boundary Health Unit, said in a
press release that water samples
from Wreck Beach and Towers
Beach show an abnormally high
coliform count that poses a threat
to people using the area.
He said water samples from the
area contained an unacceptably
high level of human effluent and
that a potential health hazard
exists.
Meekison said tests performed
by his office, which is responsible
for the Point Grey area, point to
UBC dental survey delayed
By RALPH MAURER
A survey to determine UBC
student dental needs has been
delayed indefinitely, Alma Mater
Society president Jake van der
Kamp said Monday.
The survey, part of a study to
determine the feasibility of a
student dental plan, was originally
to have been held early September.
But it was delayed indefinitely
after Student Unity party members sought the advice of a person
who had conducted a similar
survey on child dental needs two
years ago. "He told us we couldn't
measure the extent of the need
with the survey we had," van der
Kamp said.
In its February election platform
the Student Unity party, which
elected six of seven AMS
executives, promised students a
low-cost dental plan.
A feasibility study conducted this
summer with Careers 75 money
indicated the program would cost
$424,000 in its first year, including
all capital outlays.
The AMS executive originally
had planned to distribute a survey
on campus the week after
registration but changed its mind
after van der Kamp spoke to Don
Earner, research associate in
health care and epidemiology at
UBC.
Earner, who conducted a dental
plan feasibility study for a health
security project under the B.C.
government in 1973, advised van
der Kamp.that the planned survey
would not give the information
they wanted.
He also advised that if a dental
plan were to be brought in, it would
have to be implemented in stages.
That is, only first year students
would qualify in the plan's initial
year, with each subsequent year of
students also being covered.
Earner said Monday this would
defray the large initial cost of the
plan. He said the bulk of the money
spent in the first year would be on
primary dental work. Once that is
done maintenance of teeth would
cost considerably less.
Van der Kamp. said Earner told
See page 3: DENTAL
two possible contributing factors.
One is the north arm of the
Fraser River, which carries silt
and other effluent around the south
side of the Point Grey peninsula
and deposits it on Wreck and
Towers Beaches. A negligible
amount is deposited on Spanish
Banks.
Meekison said the storm sewer
outlet above Towers Beach is the
second possible source of pollution.
The sewer drains UBC campus.
A UBC public relations
spokesman said Monday the
university was concerned with the
problem but admitted he is
"puzzled" by the situation.
He said preliminary  examinations  of  the  drainage  networks
have so far turned up no damage
and have provided no clues to the
source of the leakage.
The spokesman said extensive
tests which involved taking water
samples from each of the separate
"legs"  of the campus   drainage
system will be undertaken. The
results of the samples' laboratory
analysis are expected to produce
some indication as to the source
and    magnitude    of    campus
pollution.
food services on a "cost recovery"
basis, planning for a lower subsidy
than in previous years.
Brown said Thom decided on this
course because he misinterpreted
a May 8 board of governors'
decision to raise food prices 10
percent.
"The administration took this to
mean they were to recover all food
service's costs and make an extra
10 percent," Brown said.
Thom said "the government
policy is cost recovery for food
services at institutions of higher
education. We were going to use
the extra 10 percent for overhead.
And this is direct overhead like
janitorial services, etc."
Brown said he went to the board
of governors a few days before the
boycott to ask it to correct the
administration's misinterpretation
of the May decision.
"I told them they could avoid a
confrontation by moving swiftly to
lower prices. I tried to force the
board to come to a decision."
Brown said he submitted a brief
to the board two weeks ago asking
the price hikes be knocked back
but when no action was taken, he
organized the boycott.
BCSF to
incorporate
under law
The B.C. Students' Federation   -
approved in principle a new constitution Monday that allows the
society to be incorporated under
B.C. law.
UBC Alma Mater Society
treasurer Dave Theessen, who
attended the weekend BCSF fall
conference, said Monday lawyers
must assess the constitution before
it is sent to the B.C. attorney-
general's office for approval.
The constitution was not formally ratified by the BCSF conference due to lack of time, but is
expected to be at the BCSF annual
conference in November.
Theessen said the BCSF is now
only legally an ad-hoc society and
it will probably be another year
before the federation becomes
incorporated.
He said by becoming incorporated as a society the
federation will be recognized by
the government as the official
voice of B.C. student societies. The
incorporation would also make the
federation an "above-the-board"
operation subject to annual audits
by the provincial government,
Theessen said.
"We expect that by the time the
BCSF becomes incorporated in
about a year we will have a budget
in excess of $100,000. With that kind
of money coming in you simply
have to become incorporated. It
means all your financial affairs
must be strictly legal."
Theessen said the BCSF conference also decided students in
member institutions would be
asked to pay 50 cents each per
semester to belong to the BCSF
under the new constitution. He said
this fee would take effect in about
two years and would have to be
approved by referendum at each
institution because it would be in
addition to the regular student
society fee.
See page 2:  BCSF
The bash
That long-awaited, oft-promised
but as yet unfulfilled freebie put on
by The Ubyssey is finally going to
happen. That's right, folks,
beginning at noon today, The
Ubyssey opens its heart and more
than a few brown-colored bottles
for any and everyone on campus.
All you have to do is find us.
We're in the northeast corner of
SUB in room 241K. Free copies of
The Ubyssey's highly acclaimed
introduction to the campus will be
available on request. See you
there. NUS searches for self
UBC students currently contribute $6,400 annually toward the
National Union of Students.
However, the union is now asking
that students, through the Alma
Mater Society, up their funding of
NUS to about $22,000 or $1 from
each student on campus. It's a lot
of money. Here, via Canadian
University Press, is a background
article on what NUS is about. It is
written from NUS's point of view,
which should be remembered when
reading it. 	
™^^u!HvasH!)onHn,,lMay^ff72T
arising   from   the   ashes   of   the
Canadian Union of Students.
CUS had made a number of
mistakes in its past, involving
itself in things it could have better
left alone.
CUS had begun to expend too
much of its energies and finances
on non-student oriented political
interests.
Not that this in itself is such a
bad thing — students should interest themselves in the politics of
their world — but CUS began to
deal with these issues to the exclusion of academic issues. As a
result, membership began to
dwindle until CUS could no longer
function as a political entity.
A couple of years passed with no
student representation on a
national level. Provincial unions
began to resurrect to partially fill
the gap, but it was obvious to most
that this was not adequate.
Windsor Students' Union began
to lay the groundwork to start a
new national union.
In May, 1972, a national conference was held in Windsor. Out of
this meeting were formed a
steering committee, which was
given tentative approval, and an
outline of* proposals to plan a
founding conference for the
national union.
Ottawa was chosen as the conference site and in November, 1972,
BCSF free
From page 1
Students now pay nothing to the
BCSF but member institutions
have pledged 10 cents per student
for next year's budget. UBC has
pledged $1,000 to $2,000 to be paid
between Jan. 1, 1976 and Dec. 31,
1976, for the $26,000 BCSF budget.
The money will be used to hire
two permanent- staffers, a field
worker, an office worker, and for
conference fees, Theessen said.
Any democratically elected
student society can join the BCSF,
he said.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
50 student governments met and
NUS was officially born.
The conference divided,
however, with the Atlantic and
Quebec delegates walking out over
an implementation question. They
saw NUS as a federation of
regional unions; the majority,
made up of Ontario and the West,
refused to allow this to happen and
through their efforts NUS took on
its present form.
The first Central Committee was
formed as an extension of the
original steering committee. The
committee spent the next five
months on publicity and a membership drive. Income was derived
solely from donations and subsidies from interested student
organizations.
The first annual general meeting
was held in Halifax in the spring of
1973. A 30 cent per student fee was
established at this meeting. There
were at that time 24 member
student organizations.
At the next conference in Edmonton, November, 1973, priorities
were decided upon. It was decided
that the first priorities of the union
would be financing of post-
secondary education, followed by
housing, employment and the
status of women in post-secondary
„ institutions.
Income was sufficient at this
"time to establish a national office
with two full-time staff members to
co-ordinate the efforts of volunteers across Canada. They also
began to make initial contacts with
federal and provincial officials,
paving the way for subsequent
NUS lobby programs.
1973-74 saw the initiation of NUS
lobby programs on many areas of
concern to students, the major
emphasis being on student aid.
The federal government was at
that time asked to begin a long-
term policy.
The government was also
requested to make students' union
fees and educational expenses tax-
deductible.
The government has begun its
survey of the socio-economic
characteristics of students with
help from NUS also. Other lobbies
are beginning to have effect.
However, progress has been slow
and painful in most areas. All is not
dark, though; real progress has
been made, and will continue to be
made, especially in the area of
student aid.
For the first time since the
■demise of CUS, the future of the
national union looks bright. A
number of new memberships are
expected this year, including those
of the other Alberta universities in
Edmonton and Calgary.
The   student   aid   lobby   is
=FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE=
HELD OVER
MISALLIANCE
By George Bernard Shaw
TUESDAY, September 23
WEDNESDAY, September 24
8:00 p.m.
MUST END WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24
Student Ticket Prices: $2.00
BOX OFFICE   *   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   •   ROOM 207
  gptpn/ntinnf 99fi-2678 	
HAVE I GOT
A DEAL
FOR YOU ?
See Back Page
CO-OPERATIVE CHRISTIAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
r—RETREAT—
At Point Roberts - Sept. 26-28
film "SLAUGHTER HOUSE FIVE"
Phone 224-3722 or come by the Centre
I I
FRAMES
as low as
$g.95
Glass lenses
start at
$7.00
per lens
proceeding, along with lobby actions on student housing, financing
of post-secondary institutions and
foreign students. A guide for
survival of women in post-
secondary institutions will be
published later this year.
Dealing with governments is
always a long and frustrating task.
NUS has now established its
credibility with the various officials and departments involved in
the area of post-secondary
education and real progress should
be made soon — progress that will
be of benefit to all students across
Canada.
SUBFILSOC presents
rSHANGHAI
EXPRESS
Thurs/Sun 7:00
Fri/Sat 7:00/9:00
SUB AUDITORIUM
75c & AMS card
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
FREE SATURDAY NIGHT LECTURES—UBC
FALL LECTURE
PROGRAM
September 27
Mr. Pierre Berton
Canadian author, journalist and broadcaster
THE AMERICANIZATION OF THE
CANADIAN IMAGE
October 4
Prof. Robert K. Macleod
Director, School of Architecture, UBC
THE INADEQUACY OF BUILDING
October 11
Dr. Gary E. Schwartz
Visjting Associate Professor
Department of Psychology, UBC
" BIOFEEDBACK, MEDITATION AND THE
VOLUNTARY CONTROL OF MIND OVER BODY
October 18
Prof. John Helliwell
Department of Economics, UBC
ARCTIC PIPELINES IN A BROADER
CONTEXT
October 25
Dr. Ruth G. Hodgkinson
History of Medicine and Allied Sciences
Queen's University
Kingston, Ont.
PROGRESS IN MEDICINE - A SOCIAL
HISTORY
November 1
Prof. Albert Bandura
Department of Psychology
Stanford University
NEW PERSPECTIVES ON VIOLENCE
November 8
Prof. Max Beloff
Principal, University College, Buckingham,
England, and Fellow, St. Anthony's College,
Oxford University
IS THE U.K. BREAKING UP?
November 15
Prof. Norman MacKenzie
Director, Centre for Educational
Development, University of Sussex, England
THE NEW WOMAN - DILEMMAS OF
BEATRICE WEBB
November 22
Prof. Gordon Walker
Director, Institute of Astronomy
and Space Science, UBC
THIS GOLDEN AGE OF ASTRONOMY
November 29
Dr. Howard Petch
President
The University of Victoria
DIVERSITY WITHIN A FAMILY OF
UNIVERSITIES - ONTARIO'S 16 AND
B.C.'s 3
December 6
Ms. Marjorie Nichols
Parliamentary Correspondent in Ottawa for
The Vancouver Sun
GOVERNMENTS AND INFORMATION
Vancouver Institute lectures are held on Saturdays at 8:15
p.m. in Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre at the University of British Columbia.
Admission to lectures is free and the public is invited to
attend.
■clip for future reference^ Tuesday, September 23, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tenured women profs scarce
By LEN MacKAVE
Women are under-represented
among tenured faculty at UBC,
UBC sociology prof Dorothy Smith
charged Wednesday.
Smith told about 200 people that
only 30 per cent of faculty members at UBC are women, but of
tenured faculty, only 6.35 per cent
are women.
"This means minimum voting
power, minimum say as women
and therefore, minimum effect,"
she said.
In the arts faculty alone, she
said, 44.8 per cent of lecturers are
women, 21.2 per cent of all
professors are women but only 2.7
per cent of full professors are
women.
"Meanwhile, where it really
matters, as in the faculties of
commerce and law, there is not a
single woman holding any one of
these positions," she said.
"If this is any indication at all,
women are not closer to control of
society, rather they suffer forms of
control."
But she pointed out the sexism in
academic institutions is not limited
to the university level.
"In the academic structure polled
(by Smith), we found that women
were only involved in certain
proportions, with the percentage of
women in major academic posts
decreasing as the level of
education increased," Smith said.
"It was found that in primary
schools, 75 per cent of the staff
were females. Secondary schools,
only 34 per cent. The number of
high school principals was only 23.6
per cent. Community colleges
showed an 18.6 percentage, and the
trend continued, with universities
haying a mere 12.54 per cent
women on faculty," she said.
She also said that women are'
excluded from other major
positions in society, including
government and legal institutions.
"The exclusion of women from
major positions in society is not a
function of their biology," she said.
"Prior to the last three or four
years of history, women have been
excluded to speak out against the
ideological processes of society."
"Women' throughout the centuries have been locked in insane
asylums, guillotined, exiled,
shunned and ridiculed because
they claimed the right to speak as
women of women," she said.
She explained the so-called
Goldberg experiment, in which
volunteers are read an article and
some are told the author is a
woman, others that the author is a
man.
Dental plan stalled
From page 1
him probably the most accurate
assessment of the dental needs of
campus people would be to choose
500 students at random and ask
them to submit to a brief clinical
dental inspection and answer a
questionnaire.
The purpose of the questionnaire
would be to find out how many
students rely on their parents for
dental money, how many can't
afford dental care, how they felt
about a dental plan and how much
they would be willing to pay for it.
The Student Unity party first
considered bringing a dental plan
to UBC through CU&C, a private
corporation. But CU&C, which
administers dental  and  medical
plans for businesses, rejected the
UBC plan for several reasons, said
van der Kamp.
The reasons were the large
initial expenditure; the transience
of most students which would keep
individual costs of the plan at about
$40 a month (considered too high
by Student Unity); the fact that in
most CU&C schemes the employer
usually pays 50 per cent and in
UBC's case there would be no
employer; and because CU&C
thought bookkeeping would be too
difficult.
Van der Kamp said he has
learned Alabama has a student
dental plan and he has written
officials there for details.
—peter cummings photo
DISPLAYING LEUKEMIA FIGHTING molecule UBC cancer researcher James Kutney poses with eight
giggling assistants after faculty club press conference Monday. The "analogues" Kutney has synthesized may
be used to treat cancerous tumors in the future and will be ready for human use in about a year.
Res vacancies still exist
There are still 23 vacancies for
women in Totem Park and Place
Vanier residences, acting housing
director Mike Davis said Monday.
There were 33 vacancies Wednesday, and Davis said he did not
know why the vacancies were
being filled so slowly.
He said cancellations by both
foreign and Canadian students and
people failing to show up and oc
cupy their rooms are the chief
reasons for the vacancies.
Meanwhile, student housing
service manager Dave Johnson
said inquiries about housing are
down to 60 to 70 a day from 100 a
day last week. He also said that the
student-run, off-campus housing
service received about 65 housing
listings on Monday.
Johnson   said   he   thinks   the
reason for the vacancies in Totem
Park and Place Vanier is that
students on the residence housing
lists became discouraged with the
length of the lists and sought
housing on their own.
Johnson said those who are still
looking for housing should come to
the student-run housing service in
SUB early in the morning when the
new housing lists are posted.
Canadian writers avoid political discussion
By ROBERT DIOTTE
The weekend with Canadian
novelists, sponsored jointly by the
faculty of Continuing Education
and the Canada Council, was
reasonably well attended both
Saturday and Sunday by a diverse
audience of academics, students,
teachers from all levels and a
contingent of the general public.
While the evening readings were
the most popular features of the
weekend, the panel seminars
commanded a sufficient following
to indicate a concern for Canadian
literature.
The novelists, who centred the
four discussion panels and read
excerpts from their current works-
in-progress, were Margaret Atwood, Sylvia Fraser, Graeme
Gibson, Robert Kroetsch, Harold
Horwood and our own Audrey
Thomas.
If there was one word to synthesize the spirit of the conference
it would be commitment. What:
might be called almost a clenched
fist determination not to be
defensive any longer about this
Canadian literature. As Graeme
Gibson, president of the Canadian
Writer's Union, put.it later "the
writers are here. All they need is a
fair chance in their own country."
Yet this determination was not
entirely shared to the same degree
by the floor as the discussions
around the issue of literature as a
cultural force indicated.
Audrey Thomas, an emigre
whom British Columbians gladly
claim by virtue of the fact she has
lived here for some 16 years,
asserted that she could see no
difference between Englibh
speaking Canadians and
Americans. The statement was not
challenged from any quarter.
Despite the panelists' reluctance
to deal with the separatist issue,
the queries which repeatedly came
from the floor to question both the
position of Quebec within the
scheme of the Canadian culture
that they were proposing, and the
viability of such a culture in the
face of separatism forced the
reticent novelists to show their
unwillingness to get involved in the
problem.
GIBSON, ATWOOD...to the left, to the right.
It is significant that the-
Canadian Writer's Union is an
association of Anglophone writers
and that the weekend did not include a Francophone representative.
In fact, the panel on regionalism
as a critical concept in Canadian
literature witnessed some heated
commentary from the audience
while the writers themselves
maintained a tight-lipped quiet.
The rationale of the writers was
succinctly presented by Graeme
Gibson. He indicated that there
was by no means a unanimity
among the members of the union
with respect to Quebec but that his
own sympathies lay with the
Francophone populace.
Newfoundland novelist Harold
Horwood premised his assertion
that Newfoundland is, in fact, a
country apart because of its
particular ethos by announcing a la
Macleans' Walter Stewart that he
has always felt that Quebec is a
distinct nation. The floor
responded jocularly with a
declaration of B.C. independence.
The apolitical character of the
weekend, occurring as it did in the
foreground of the debate over
Quebec's bill 22, a piece of
legislation which'rigorously limits
the use of English in Quebec, was
the weakest aspect of the conference.
The whole issue of the
relationship of life to art, particularly in this case the art of the
novel, was blurred in the
discussions.
None of the panelists really
defined their position. But the
question of what good a Canadian
literature, indeed Canadian
novelists, as represented by those
on the panel are if they do not
confront the emotional and
political issues of the day lingered
on the floor.
But if during the weekend the
novelists refused to discuss the
political issues which are so much
a part of the present climate in this
country, issues which were articulated fully from the floor, the
novelists may have fostered a
foothold in B.C. for the writers
living both here and in the east.
During the panel on literature in
^;he schools, Sylvia Fraser, author
of Pandora's Box and The Candy
Factory, revealed the telling
statistic that only 6.9 per cent of
B.C. students surveyed recently
had taken at least one full course in
Canadian literature. This compared to 15 per cent on the prairies
and 70.5 per cent in Ontario.
The Saturday afternoon seminar
on the issue of literature in the
schools was the most serious
minded discussion of the weekend
as teachers and school board
personnel arose to comment on the
proposal, of the writer's union,
advanced by Graeme Gibson, to
draw up a curriculum for the study
of Canadian literature in schools on
all levels.
The scheme was predicated on
the co-operation of teachers in
working committees which are to
be assembled across the country,
each to plan a desirable program
of study of their own area with the
assistance of an advisor to be
provided by the writer's union. The
key to the program is its flexible
and mutual co-operation.
The results would be made
available to schools and school
boards across the country as it is
co-ordinated by the union. It can
then serve as an authoritative
guideline to necessary curriculum
outlines.
Judging from - the interest
generated on the floor, the plan
showed definite possibilities for
overcoming the current scanty
awareness of Canadian literature
in the schools. The thrust of the
program is good and the result, if it
comes off, would be opening the
heritage of Canadian students to
them.
One of the major preoccupations
of the schools, which is also of
interest to the reading public in
general, was the marketing and
distribution of Canadian books.
Plagued by an emasculated
publishing industry and unfair
copyright laws, the literature as a
product is both expensive and hard
to get.
The fact that only one company
markets paperback books which
sell for under $2 is critical to the
issue.
The more costly Canadian
product cannot compete with the
cheaper U.S. and British books.
There are ways open to the schools
to bring the prices down when they
buy in volume but, for the general
public, who, as Gibson pointed out,
have not been convinced they have
to buy the expensive Canadian
book, there is only the hope that
Canadian publishers will receive
fairer legislative preferences
which will enable them to get hold
of their business practices.
The role of the novelists who
attended the weekend was summed up best by Robert Kroetsch,
winner of the Governor General's
Award for The Studhorse Man.
"We have built a culture,"
Kroetsch said, "by speculating
about whether or not we have a
culture.
"We enjoyed choosing between
whether we might still be or not be
Canadian. We are hopelessly stuck
with it (the culture).
Certainly Kroetsch has cut away
the fat in this respect. The books
are there. "Regional mythologies
and the more universal regions of
the mind, we have a right to
because they are a part of our
heritage as Canadians.
If they cannot save us from the
dissolution of the peaceable
kingdom in the separatist energies
loose within the confederation; at
least they can, these books, focus
for us the history, the consciousness and the values of a
Canadian people which may or
may not be a single nation. ruyc   •*
U  D   T  O O C  I
luesaay, oeptemoer 23, 1975
Justify NUS
funding to us
The National Union of Students wants more money.
Some people's first reaction is nuts to NUS.
Others warn that without NUS fledging provincial
student   unions   will   go   under.
Whatever.
The fact remains that NUS wants UBC students to cough
up a buck each for the somewhat questionable antics of this
national organization.
The debate is just starting and The Ubyssey, in its role as
provider of scintillating background features, offers a brief
history of NUS on page 2.
In the next few weeks, the Alma Mater Society executive
has promised a position paper on NUS before the union's
national conference later this fall.
Finally someone will explain what this organization is
doing and why it's worth anything (the proposed AMS
budget designates $6,400 for NUS) let alone the dollar per
student campaign.
The campus is waiting and this time it better be a good
explanation.
Down on food services
If BCIT can do it why can't UBC?
Great victories in food dispensation were made at the
Burnaby institute because faculty and students refused to
pay exorbitant price increases.
They boycotted and won.
At UBC food services is a monopoly. There is no pressure
on them to clean up their act. Students don't usually
complain too loudly and there is virtually no competition.
Hence there are three major problems with the
university's institutional food: high prices, poor quality and
cut back selling hours.
(Some may argue in favor of the last point.)
If the university continues in the food business they have
an obligation to make it a service as the name alleges.
But it isn't now.
The Alma Mater Society council or any group of
disgruntled students should follow the lead of BCIT and
organize a protest against food services.
Let's force a change.
Big bash today
The big bash is today.
In its usual tradition of infinite good taste, The Ubyssey is
hosting a welcome back bear-party in SUB 241-K.
Anyone, even social retards and residence dons, are
invited to quaff a (ginger) ale and meet this year's newspaper
staff.
You'll also be able to meet members of the campus elite
who'll be dropping by this gala opening event of this year's
UBC social calendar.
Don't be left out. It's party time.
TIME: Noon until ?
PLACE: Ubyssey office, SUB 241-K. No Lowlanders,
please.
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 23,1975
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
. Editor: Gary Coull
"Gosh," said Gary Coull to Doug Rushton. "Just think. Our annual
beer orgy is about to begin." Suddenly a wheezing, slurping sound came
from the hallway as 50 gears stumbled, tongues dragging on the floor,
into the Ubyssey office. "Yipe," said Ralph Maurer to thirsty-eyed Sue
Vohanka. "Grab a beer." Vohanka grabbed a gear. "No, a beer!" said
Marcus Gee of The Ubyssey apologizing to the red-faced red-jacket.
Lorna Millard and Fred McMahon splashed in an amber puddle in the
corner sniffing deeply on a Molson's cap. "A cap of that shit'll blow yer
mind," said Greg Thompson, tunneling an ale into George Baugh's
bottomless throat. Doug Field sacked philosophically on an Old Style
contemplating his left, little toenail. Matt King did the tango on his
belly, spraying a foamy fountain on Peter Cummings lying 'au naturel* in
the darkroom sink. Mark Lepitre caught a bottle on the first bounce and
bowled over Cedric Pretzel and Len MacKave on his way to a T-D.
"Touch down!" yelled John Sprague toothily. Robt. (Robert) Diotte
groaned as Patti-Reay Stahl tried to open his skull with a church key.
And all disappeared into a frothy foam. Never to be obscene again.
a^D'SCxU/lW THE. 6U30K6FUL. £*K5T 3FACE
R16HT UJE WNEPfcN^ TDTHE VJCRlD W TU)C
CCUUre\e>.EH (BtfWMUG rVV *£>?K\V6 O09EU/
ONE. CDUVfliRW U3dfe^6 N-OKe.,
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Letters
Book
prices
Could it be possible that the
bookstore is a non-profit enterprise?
This condition probably does not
exist any longer as I will demonstrate with the following example.
Title of publication: Permafrost
Terminology
Publisher: National Research
Council of Canada
Bound:   Soft-cover
Number of pages:   62
Government price: $3.00
(purchasable off-campus for $3.00)
Bookstore price: $6.75
Why must the bookstore charge a
markup of 125 percent over the
government's price? Any increase
charged by the bookstore should
only be intended to include all costs
incurred in the retail distribution
of the book.
The bookstore stocks books
required for university courses,
ordered in advance and purchased
by the academic community over a
very short period of time. How
many other bookstores would
enjoy operating under these
seemingly ideal conditions?
If the above book is an example
of the bookstore's operation, I feel
that this situation should change.
Robert Salkeld
science 2
treasurer,
science undergrad society
Carrels 2
I regret that Garth Edgar,
commerce 3, was incorrectly informed about the carrel situation
in the Main Library. (See his letter
in the issue for September 16th).
Here are the facts of the situation.
There are 431 carrels in the Main
Library stacks, which is all we can
jam into the available space.
It isn't enough.
Last year we assigned 950 persons to these carrels, which means
that most had at least two occupants and some three.
Since there are more students
wanting carrels than  there are
carrels available, we can't please
everyone. Last year, when we
stopped taking applications, in
October we had a waiting list of
208.
In this situation, we have to
establish some priorities. Instead
of focussing on the number of years
a student has been at U.B.C, we
consider how far away student is
from program completion.
Generally it is in the final year
that students write theses and have
a greater need for carrels. So they
receive first consideration. After
satisfying this group, we then
move to those who are two years
from completion, then three.
There's certainly no
discrimination against commerce
students. According to the
registrar, last year there were 209
commerce students enrolled in
program leading to the Ph.D. and
M.B.A. Of that group, 100, or
nearly half, had carrel assignments.
There were 531 arts students in
programs leading to the Ph.D. and
M.A., and 131, or roughly a quarter
of them had carrels. Fortunately
the difference is made up by the
availability of more seats for the
arts students in departmental
reading rooms in the faculty of
arts.
We are still assigning carrels,
but we have to be sure that first we
meet the needs of graduate
students who are working on
theses. There are over 650 applications on hand today.
However, Mr. Edgar may yet get
a carrel.
What is regrettable is that there
isn't one for every student.
BasiLStuart-Stubbs
university librarian
CITR
Why does Alma Mater Society
treasurer Dave Theessen say there
is a 50 percent chance of council
granting UBC radio station CITR
its $7, 215 budget when the station
is already $1,090 in debt and has
little possibility of becoming a
community service in the future?
Right now CITR functions as one
of the costliest "clubs" on campus
and   provides   little   input   into
everyday student life. Why then
the 50 percent chance?
This student funded radio station
has run into a wall of disinterest
from the students and has failed to
generate a market sufficient to
become self-supporting.
However, this lack of support is
not due to lack of effort from the
people at CITR. More than once,
station members have dug into
their own pockets to put out quality
material. Coverage of varsity
hockey is only one example.
An FM licence is being considered for the station to get it on
the airwaves, instead of through
the limited "over the wire" facility
that is in operation now.
This would certainly provide
possibilities for a wider audience,
and might even make a student-
run radio station a worthwhile
venture.
But CFUN and CKSF (SFU
campus radio) are also in the
running for the one new FM licence
that the CRTC will be granting for
the Lower Mainland.
They both would appear to be
ahead of CITR at this point as
CFUN has an established AM
station to build from and CKSF
enjoys a location on Burnaby
Mountain that would make it
possible to transmit to all of
Vancouver, plus the Fraser Valley
using a relatively low wattage.
It seems that CITR has no other
future than one of being one of
UBC's more expensive clubs.
Is it really worth students'
money to keep a venture such as
this operating?
Stuart Lyster
arts 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. ivcjuuji, ocpiemoer /.■a,   iy/o
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Profound
comment
Is it possible that a new age of
enlightenment has descended upon
our fair campus? With Jake van
der Fenderbender heading the
Alma Mater Society and Gary
Drool running the Ubyssey, can it
be true that we will be led to new
heights of intellectual commentary, social reform, rational
humanism and clean shorts?
I have asked this question
mainly so that my letter might
have a chance of getting printed.
However, my curiosity has been
aroused by this alleged love affair
between Ron Binns and the Queen
of England.
Having made courageous stands
in the past on such spell-binding
moral issues as baggy eyelids and
McDonald's hamburgers, why
don't you folks say a few words on
something humorous,  like the
growth of political violence,
terrorism and assassination in our
modern world?
In short, can you maintain as
high a level of morality on the is§ue
of non-violence as you claim to
have on economic issues?
Pat McKitrick
arts 2
Morals
The letter in your Thursday,
Sept. 18 issue was capped by a
comment which leaves an oft-
quoted bit of ' — barrel-of-a-gun —'
illogic which in that form belongs
in the Dick Tracy un-comic strip.
The    sequence    Hennessey/-
Binns/The   Queen/Egerton/Binns
-leaves out certain considerations.
Perhaps 'amorality' is the key to
your belief in cynicism. Life is the
common factor which separates
moon-scapes from earth, and it is
the life support natural processes
which make all else possible in our
society.
The learning process, badly used
by alienated amoral people with
power, brings us to accept phony
logic about cynicism.
In this sequence military juntas,
after gunning the political opposition, attack the university and
the history and journalists
faculties suffer prison, torture and
death.
May I commend the work that
Amnesty International is doing as
a very moral learning process
which contributes to the treatment
of "The Pathology of Power."
Our century with nuclear terror
cannot afford the luxury of 'half
quotes' about guns, nor can we
afford universities which fail to
deal with the need for understanding of living together in
world sized communities.
The Vancouver branch of AI can
use lots of humans who want to
work on the problems of human
rights.
Ken McAllister
224-5340
Lies?
The cement city cow persons played extremely well
as usual, lately? But the dance at the grad center last
Friday was a bust. Sorry folks but if an innocent
bystander gets his treasured porcelain pipe broken in
eight pieces; then gets his windpipe broke half off by
a crazed groupie, whatever went down that could
have been cool is null and void. Period.
Then, to top it off somebody wanted his money back
so Flake O' had to crank up idling gears thus: You
don't like the music? No, the music was fine. Not
enough chicks he told us. Look! You paid for music
here, if you want chicks go down to the whorehouse.
(We told him during a raving session at full moon.)
* * *
Rumblings: There is a move afoot to elect a.woman
mayor of Vancouver. She is laying in the weeds at this
writing so we can't say her name. Word is that she
will seal-up the wimmin vote by declaring a
minimum annual income. For Wimmin Only.
To be paid them as salary for the nurture of
children, or the potential to nurture, whichever fits.
Rumor has it that there are more wimmin than men.
After the votes are counted there is going to be a
significant number of men who will be receiving an
ultimatum "git your act together baby, or here are
your walking papers."
0 yea? Well what about those buys who are sent out
of the house each morning to sit at factories making
electric fondue pots and bacon toasters simply so
wimmin can give them back and forth to each other
as gifts at baby showers and weddings?
What do you do with them?
"They are not strong enough to be an enemy, too
dumb to be a friend, and too up-tight to be any good on
the rack."
She said from the weeds after being irritated by the
factoid: bras cause breast cancer because atrophied
muscle milk factory holder uppers become acclimatized to a deoxygonafed environment and start
multiplying those bad cancer gigs like wildfire.
* * *
Heard from the voice of a small child, "the
machines inside people are made out of meat." As he
passed by he had a look on his face that some people
get when they are angry just because there isn't a
storm.
He looked as if he could take off his pants and give
them a spanking then put them back on and walk like
he was balancing a butterfly on his shoulder past a
whore before she puts on her make-up.
HOLOCAUST^LUES #1
one a these days.
I'll take a whole month
and never do a chore.
you can bet I'd never
even think about all
that empty junk blowin'
out the door
is there any bread?
or an empty bottle on the floor
what didn't I remember?
oh yea, give a gift to hayzoos
in December.
better save your dimes for
the weekend.
and what would you think about
with all that time?
whatever I wanted to -
maybe just dream all day
iron-shirt for Monday.
a beef every nite
no hitches in between
and it'll be alright.
I got a cut under my lip
Hay! a lemon.
HOLOCAUST BLUES#2
any bar will do for gin and tonics
any bar will do for ribs and you
any place we can get ultrasonic
on some kind a pill or some kina a
smoke, that's true
but WATCH OUT for that haunted tow-truck
when he hooks on to take my car
and there's nobody but him
to pull us back if we get out too far
you can come cryin' to me
when it's time to use your shoes
I '11 be on some departin' spree
come along if you choose or loose.
* .* *
We were captured for a debut session where we
heard Walter Zuber Armstrong's latest opus: a
couple of jazz sides with St. Albert on conga drums.
Auber hisself on flutes and bass clarinet and more.
Zuber was in charge of the session. He pretended
that he still had flutes in his hands, he pointed at the
stereo now and then, to direct our attention to particular notes, sections, or runs.
We recorded his theatre for you and, in his own
words, it runs thus: Listen at that album. Shit, that's
a good investment you made today, (somebody
bought one) Dig the whole rhythm. That's like up in'
the penthouse (points at left side of his brain then at
left speaker) How 'bout this? Hay! when you're
playin' with THESE musicians you can do what you
want to.
I can do all kinds a things. They can ballerina off a
this stuff. I'm workin' all the time out there,
(someone interrupted Zuber to say a part was too low
just then) Too low for what? That's a whale-shit man
and you don't get no lower than that. Listen to that
fuckin horn! Dig the alto flute, (somebody handed
him another beer. Zuber was pointing behind himself
at the stereo again while making Whip! Whip! noises
with his wind.
I bet if he had an alto flute near his mouth music
would have come out of it.) There! I done forgot that. ■'
I'm searchinfor somethin' else. Look at that! I'm out
there every day on those horns. Hay! my daddy
taught me that. I got good mixers.
I got the best of everything out there. Shit this stuff
is over in Switzerland and Germany, (pointing
beyond the stereo now beyond the walls, beyond the
oceans, all the way over to each of those countries
> where his music is being played.) There's 39 years in
that music. Here comes Walter on top of even the
drum. Dig that rhythm that's goin' out there.
It's two years different than my last album, (his
beer foamed over when he pointed this time) Hay!
this buy's got a saxaphone! Dig this here. Dig the
flutes. There, the cops came in (we think he was
referring to the drums as "cops")
The album ended.
Walter thanked us. He thanked us after the treat we
just had, we wanted to know why. We were smartly
told, it was because Walter Zuber Armstrong is a
humble person.
F.O*.
F.O'. is the pseudonym for a provocative Ubyssey
columnist. The author welcomes feedback, good or
bad, to his writing. Queries, comments or complaints
should be addressed to The Ubyssey Office, SUB 241
K, c/o the editor-
While in Fullerton, California in
February of this year I found it
necessary to look for temporary
work because of a shortage of
money.
I was sent out by the local employment office for a posted job as
a grocery clerk to a Tic-Toe store
in the vicinity.
On entering the store I presented
my referral slip to the clerk on
duty and was informed that I could
not be interviewed that day but
would be called for in one or two
days since the interview included a
lie detector test.
I was quite surprised and a little
annoyed about the inclusion of a lie
detector test in an interview so I
informed the clerk that I was no
longer interested and left the
premises.
The situation was a slightly
aggravating one and I decided to
inform you and your readers,
wondering if there were others who
have encountered similar
situations in the U.S.
Michael Ainge
alumnus 1967
Records
I find it necessary at this time to
bring to the attention of the student
populace the sorry state of the
record stores in this city.
There  is   not   one   store   that
specializes in imports, let alone a
store with a decent selection of
imports.
Do you realize that the German
jazz group Passport who have one
album released here in Canada,
have six albums released in
Germany.
One must drive to Bellingham to
get these albums.
Bellingham has a greater
selection of imports than Vancouver.
It is time that we wake up to this
situation and make our needs
known.
I implore you to write to your
nearest record dealer and express
my opinion.
H. B. Runnway
commerce 3
AMS Special Events Presents
AT THE
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
& THE MOTHERS
OF INVENTION
WEDNESDAY,
OCT. 1st 8 p.m.
Tickets available at A.M.S. office in S.U.B.
$4.00 Student Non Student $5.00 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1975
Two films documenting the
industrial and military
achievements of contemporary
Chinese society will be shown 8
p.m. Monday at the Vancouver
East Cultural Centre, 1895
Venables.
member     of     the
Hot flashes
Vancouver-based Native Study
Group, which recently toured
China, will also give a
presentation.
The program is the last in a
series of eight sponsored by the
Liberation Support Movement on
World Revolution. Admission is
$1.25.
Kenny
University    president    Doug
Kenny will talk on what the
university can do for women 12
noon Wednesday at the
Vancouver Public Library's main
branch, 750 Burrard.
The speech will be part of
Continuing Education's Women's
Resources Centre open house,
which goes from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Wednesday on the third floor of
the library.
'Tween classes
TODAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner at 6:30 p.m., round-the-
table discussion and lecture on the
symbol of the cross, Lutheran campus centre.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, conference room, Lutheran campus centre. '
PRO-LIFE SOC
Organizational  meeting,  new members welcome, noon, SUB 211.
PRE-MED SOC
Film on history of medicine, noon,
IRC 1.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General   meeting   and   film,   noon,
■■    SUB 205.
SHITORYU KARATE
Practice,   5:.30   p.m.  to  7:30  p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
GERMAN CLUB
General     meeting,     noon,     upper
lounge, International House.
NEWMAN CLUB
Lecture and discussion on love and
sexuality, 7:30 p.m., St. Mark's
College.
WEDNESDAY
KARATE CLUB
Demonstration,  everyone welcome,
noon, SUB party room.
STUDENTS  INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOC
Transcendental meditation program,
free introductory lecture, noon,
Bu. 104.
voc
General   meeting   and   slide  show,
noon, Angus 104.
PAKSING FUTGA KUNG FU
Practice,  4:30   p.m.  to  6:30 p.m.,
SUB ballroom.
CCCM
Eucharist,      8      p.m.,     Lutheran
Campus Centre.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Weekly   testimony   meeting,   noon,
SUB 212.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting and slide show, noon, SUB
125. •
ELCIRCULO
Orientation   meeting,   noon,   Brock
200.
THURSDAY
UBC  MY JONG   KUNG   FU CLUB
First practice and registration, all
welcome, 5-7 p.m., Place Vanier
ballroom.
HAPKIDO
General   meeting,   noon,   SUB  117.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Jim Borger on Science and the Loss
of Transcendence, noon, SUB 212.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Multimedia   slide   show,  noon  and
7:30 p.m., Totem Park ballroom.
CONSERVATIVE MIDDLE CLASS
NEW STUDENTS' CLUB
Juggling, frisbeeing, unicycle
workshop, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
LIBERALS
Convention orientation meeting for
UBC-delegates, noon, SUB 215.
REC UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, Armories
208.
. YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Dick Fidler on socialism in
Portugal, 8 p.m., Buch. 104.
ENGLISH LIT.
STUDENTS
$  SAVE DOLLARS   $
On Required
Literature Books
Hundreds of
NEW & USED
LITERATURE PAPERBACKS
PRICES START AT
ONLY 50c
Largest selection of Review
Notes in B.C.
LI
BETTER BUY
BOOKS
LOOKING
FOR A
BARGAIN?
See Back Page
IMb£|NUS
EXHIBITION
AND SHE
OF FINE ART PRINTS
SPONSORED BY]
ALMA MATER -|
SOCIETY        |
^featuring the works of Chagall, Dali, Matisse,
Breughel, Cezanne, Van Gogh,
Homer, Klee, Monet, Magritte, Picasso, Miro,
Bosch, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wyeth ,
"^^^" £  \ Gauguin Rembrandt, Escher and others.
^t,^ ) "Group of Seven"
^yS     prices
\[^% SHOREWOOD PRINTS
7 $2.75^3^ $7 OO
NEW YORK GRAPHIC SOCIETY
PRINTS §2 AND UP
DkTE SEPT. 22-26 (Mon.-Fri.)
TIME 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
PLACE STUDENT UNION BLDG. — 2nd Floor
Over 1200 different Shorewood
and New York Graphic Society prints
TnnrW
rd
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
THS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional tines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
PHOTOSOC SOCTAL NIGHT at 8 p.m.
on Thursday, Sept. 25 in SUB 213.
All members welcome.
FROSH:   TIRED   OF   THE   NICHT   LIFEl
Then UNDERCUT is for you. This
Saturday nite in the SUB cafeteria at
8:30. Full facilities.
ENGINEERS AND ARTSMEN: We have
all the events to satisfy your desires.
See you at noon by the SUB. Signed
Harvey Kirk, (King SH7D, F.U.S.
30 — Jobs
HOSTESS WANTED for Leisure Club.
Part-time, work days and nights.
Phone  681-9816 for  appointment.
35 - Lost
UBC   KARATE   CLUB
Welcomes New Members
MONDAY, SUB 207-209 — 7:30  P.M.
THURSDAY,  GYM'E'   PHYSED.
COMPLEX — 7:30  P.M.
SATURDAY, GYM'E' PHYSED.
COMPLEX — 10:30 A.M.
LOST: PAIR OF EYE CLASSES in black
case.  Probably  lost  in  SUB.  736-4048.
ONE PAIR OF GLASSES LOST, Wed.
afternoon. Browii leather case, brown
frames, photogray lens.  Ph.  224-5846.
40 — Messages
STACEY, I won't be zble to do it because I've got to get ready for
UNDERCUT this Staturday: Earl has
agreed to take my place if you are
willing: signed Senator Ross.
10— For Sale — Commercial
BARGAIN OF THE WEEK) At Bargain
Boutique Cords from $6.00. 4860
McKenzie & 33rd. 263-781*.
50 — Rentals
ENJOY VANCOUVER
NIGHT LIFE
AND SAVE!
Send for entertainment pack of 25
money-savers. Includes 8 restaurants,
9 nite clubs, many other attractions.
Save as much as half of your dining
& entertainment costs — some freebies too! The perfect way to enjoy
Vancouver on a budget. Send $3.50
& tax to Roadrunner Advertising,
Dept. B, 9—1035 Richards St., Van.
V<B 3E4. Your money cheerfully
refunded if not totally satisfied.
60 — Rides
CAR POOL? Will pay up to 40c for ride
from Park Royal, M. W. Th., 9:30.
Arrive UBC traffic light 10:10. See at
SUB 216, noon Tues., Wed., Thurs.
70 — Services
CLEARING! Re-packs & demos. Scientific calculators. $50 & up. Call Marv
738-5851.
11 — For Sale — Private
1970 SPORT SATELLITE. 318 V-8, auto-
^matic,   p.s.,   p.b.,  radio,   tape,  extras.
$2500. Phone 325-9783, Phil.
'66   CAMPERIZED   VOLKSWAGEN   Van
for sale — sacrifice sale 738-5200.
MUST SELL SOON. 73 Honda 500-4,
9,000" miles, electric starter. Excellent
condition, 2 helmets included. $1,000
or best offer. 224-9995, ask for John T
15 — Found
SUM OF MONEY near Chemistry Building. Valerie, 733-47T9.
20 — Housing
FREE ROOM & BOARD, plus renum. in
return for some babysitting and light
housekeeping. Suitable for 1st or 2nd
year student. Ph. 263-9948 after 5:30.
ROOM & BOARD in faculty home for
care of 2 chidren when home from
school and cooking supper. 3:15-7:00.
224-5056.
DELUXE BAR SERVICE throughout the
week outside SUB, at the pool and in
the cafeteria. AU you have to do i»
go to the Forstery Week events and
then   to  UNDERCUT.
65 — Scandals
80 — Tutoring
MAN WITH TEACHERS TRAINING will
tutor students in French, German &
Italian (reasonable rates). 669-6619.
85 — Typing
25 — Instruction
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
90 T Wanted
WANTED: "An Intro. To Genetic
Analysis" by Suzuki and Griffiths.
Phone Bee, 261-6785 after 7.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO  SELL - BUY
INFORM roge  /
SPOR TS
To start on familiar note
Rugger 'Birds drop opener
By TOM BARNES
The Thunderbird rugby team
opened this season the same way
they opened last season, by
dropping a game to the UBC Old
Boys.
In one of the finest exhibitions of
rugby that Brockton Oval has seen
in many  years,   the Old  Boys'
Warwick Harivel scored on a late
penalty kick to down the 'Birds 13-
12. The game was also the last
game to be played at Brockton
Point as the stadium was burned to
the ground Sunday evening. Foul
play is most certainly expected.
The two teams pushed each other
up and  down   the  field  at  the
beginning of the game. Finally, the
'Birds penned their foes deep into
their end of the field. Rob Jenkins
capitalized on the situation with a
15-yard spring for the first try of
the game. Rob Craig converted
and the 'Birds were up 6-0.
Shortly   thereafter    the    incomparable Spence MacTavish led
Football 'Birds choke
Some critical mistakes at the
worst possible times led to a 43-17
defeat for the Thunderbird football
team at the hands of the University
of Saskatchewan Huskies Saturday.
The Huskies turned UBC
miscues into 17 points in the final
minutes of the fourth quarter to
break open what had been a close
game. During the same period, the
'Birds were twice turned back
without a point from within the
Huskie 15-yard line.
Vic Waselenko dashed 85 yards
with a punt return to open the UBC
scoring and put the 'Birds up 7-3.
The other UBC touchdown came
when Bernie Crump capped off an
80-yard scoring drive with a two-
yard plunge.
Statistically the game was pretty
close. Gord Penn once again keyed
a potent Thunderbird running
attack, rolling up 90 yards before
retiring from the game with a
minor injury. Bernie Crump
.continued to show promise as he
rambled for 51 yards in addition to
his touchdown. All told the 'Birds
gained 199 yards on the ground.
The Huskies picked up 144.
In total offense, Saskatchewan
held only an 80-yard edge over
UBC7 gaining 414 yards to UBC's
334. The Huskies picked up 18 first
downs, the 'Birds 17.
In addition to Penn, quarterback
Dan Smith was also injured.
Thunderbird coach Frank Smith
expects both players will be
healthy enough to play in Satur-
V'ballers set for season,
championship touted
By MARK LEPITRE
"As far as I'm concerned, the
Canadian championships are well
within our reach," said UBC coach
Lome Sawula, in an interview
September 18.
Sawula, the new Thunderbird
volleyball coach, said that the
team's chances of representing
B.C. in the Canadian Men's Open
Championships are "very good this
season."
The team is made up almost
entirely of returnees from last
year's team, which placed second
in the Canada West league. These
players include Wolfgang Neufeld,
Tim Frick, Keith Gallicano, Merv
Mosher, Gary Warner, Dwayne
Hrechka, Olli Korhoner, Tom
Jones and Jim Campbell.
Other players this year are
Walter Janzen, Ian Gregory,
Charly Mueler and Gavin
Proudfoot. All four played on the
team two years ago. Newcomers to
the team are John Sherstobitoff
and Roy Mayfield.
Coach Sawula, recently acquired
from Dalhousie University also
said: "University of Alberta, the
defending champions, have hired a
Japanese coach, and will be our
most dangerous opponent in the
Canada West league."
This year, each team will play
one home and away set of games
with the other teams in the league.
The 'Birds are at home on
November 7, 9 and 28 against the
Universities of Calgary, Lethbridge and Victoria, and February
7 with the University of Alberta.
Out of town league games are on
January 23, 24 and 25 at Alberta,
Lethbridge and Calgary. The last
league game is on February 1 at
Victoria.
The 'Birds will be playing in
exhibition tournaments in Seattle,
Calgary and here in Vancouver for
the UBC Invitational on November
28. But the high point of the season
will be the .Canadian Intercollegiate . in Winnipeg in
February and the Canadian Open
in April. All this is to be capped
with a tour of Europe in May if
enough funds can be raised.
New players are welcome, and
anyone wishing to play varsity or
junior varsity ball or to help out in
any way can contact Mr. Sawula in
room 212C of the War Memorial
gym, or. come out to a practise.
Schedules of practise times are
posted throughout the campus.
UBC PAKSING FUTGA
KUNG FU CLUB
instructed by
MASTER RAYMOND LEUNG
Classes on Mon., Wed.
4:30 — 6:30 p.m.
at    Ballroom    or    party    room    of
Student Union Building
Students won 150 trophies in last 2 years
including West Coast Kung Fu Karate Club
Champ. North American full contact Kung
Fu Champ. Seattle open champ etc.
NEW MEMBERS WELCOME!
day's game against the University
of Calgary Dinosaurs.
In the other Western Intercollegiate Football League
game the Dinosaurs quashed the
Golden Bears of the University of
Alberta 33-21.
As a result of weekend play the
league standings look like this:
GP     W     L     F     A     Pts.
Cal.     2 2       0     54    38       4
Sask.   3        2       1    83   57       4
UBC    2 1        1     55    50       2
Alta.    3        1        2   51     66       2
Man.   2        0       2    17   49      0
witn wins over Saskatchewan
and Alberta it looks as though the
University of Calgary is
establishing itself as a power. It
will be the 'Birds task at Thunderbird Stadium to invalidate this
notion.
the Old Boys upfield. Bursting
through, the UBC defense with a
series of cute passes, three Old
Boys found themselves bearing
down on two UBC defenders. Chris
Cook took a neat pass, then split
the defense to go over for the try.
Barry Legh converted to tie the
score.
Legh scored once more to give
the Old Boys a 10-6 half time edge.
Early in the second half, Grieg
hit with a penalty kick to put the
'Birds within one point. John
Billingsley's pretty drop goal put
the 'Birds up 12-10 until Harivel put
the game away for the Old Boys at
37 minutes.
Over-all, 'Bird coach Donn
Spence was pleased with his
team's efforts.
"We played well and it was a real
good back and forth game. The
guys, on the team are looking
forward to the rematch," said
Spence. He also noted that the
game was the seventh for the Old
Boys while only the first for the
'Birds. The Old Boys certainly
didn't look seven games better
than the 'Birds.
The brightest spot for the 'Birds
was the play of their new fullback
Rob Grieg. A transfer from
Vancouver Community College,
Grieg is the B.C. Rep team
fullback this year. His running and
kicking ability are going to be a
boon to the 'Birds this season.
The biggest difference in the
game was probably the absence of
the 'Birds Ro Hindson. Hindson,
generally considered the finest
second row in the country, sat out
the game with a hip pointer.
Spence hopes he will be back in
action soon. Hindson is worth more
than a point to any team.
ORIENTEERING—the Sport of
Physical and Mental Challenge in a
Wilderness setting.
Hear JOHN DISLEY—Author of
THE SPORT OF ORIENTEERING, Thurs., 25th Sept. 12:30,
SCRF 204
WANNA SEE
SOME MORE
OF ME?
See Back Page
FORESTRY WEEK
September 22-27 — Schedule of Events
TUESDAY-
Axe throwing and chokermans races—SUB Mall
WEDNESDAY-
Single and double bucking—SUB Mall
THURSDAY-
Log burling and boomstick racing—Empire Pool
FRIDAY-
Boat races-SUB Mall
SATURDAY-
Undercut—SUB Cafeteria
UBC KARATE CLUB
SHOTOKAN STYLE
PRACTICES:
MON. SUB 207-209 7:30 P.M.
THURS. GYM 'E' PHYS. CMPX. 7:30 P.M.
SAT. GYM 'E' PHYS. CMPX. 10:30 A.M.
ALL WELCOME
DEMONSTRATION
WED. SEPT. 24 NOON
SUB PARTY ROOM   <
PROPOSED CYCLE ROUTE TO
AND FROM CAMPUS
SOME WORK HAS
BEEN DONE ON THIS
ROUTE, BUT MORE
STUDENT PARTICIPATION IS NEEDED TO
COMPETE THIS AND
OTHER CYCLING
PROJECTS ON CAMPUS
(MORE CURB RAMPS,
BETTER BIKE RACKS,
ETC.)
BRING YOUR SUGGESTIONS AND SUPPORT
TO THE NEXT  CAMPUS  SUGGESTIONS CYCLIST
MEETING       SUB 205 FRIDAY, SEPT. 26     12:30 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 23, 1975
LENS & SHUTTER
GOOD SERVICE
LOW PRICE!
THE UNBEATABLE COMBINATION
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, Sept. 23, 1975
LENS & SHUTTER OPENS NEW STORE
AT 2912 W. BROADWAY
LARGEST IN B.C.
New 6600 square foot store offers an incredible range of photographic
items at every day low prices.  Friendly knowledgable staff and good,
good  service. Make it
a    photographic   stop
not to be missed.
OPEN 9:30 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
ALL THIS WEEK
MAKE VIAY- WE'RE HEADING FOR POINT GREY {SATURDAY OPEN Tl i_ 600 p.m.)
SETTING UP A DARKROOM?
SEE US
WE'RE VANCOUVER'S
DARKROOM SPECIALIST
MEOPTA
AXOMAT II
Top Quality
35mm
Enlarger
Mfg. Sugg.
List $160.00
L&S
8x10
ADJUSTABLE
EASELS
$6.95
ARE YOU A CONCERNED
PHOTOGRAPHER
WE'RE DEMONSTRATING!
MINI-PHOTOKINA'
MARKS OPENING
WEEK
M
ONDAY       -       7       P.M.
''UNDERWATER
PHOTOGRAPHER"     -     A
Session    with    Pacific   Divers
Neil McDaniel.
TUESDAY      -      7      P.M.
CIBA   CHROME
DEMONSTRATION    -    See
this exciting new prints from
slides    process    —    publicly
demonstrated    for    the   first
time in Vancouver.
WEDNESDAY     -     7     P.M.
"MAKING     YOUR     OWN
EMULSION" -  Home Made
TRI-X?  A  session with Alan
»    R. Betz.
THURSDAY - 7 P.M. UNICOLOR
DEMONSTRATION -
Probably the most widely
used 'Do It Yourself color
printing process — its so easy.
This demo features really big
prints.
FRIDAY - 7 P.M. "THE
CONCERNED
PHOTOGRAPHER"-with
Jerry Blitstein.
6 P.M.       NIKON  CLINIC -
Free Camera Tests.
6 P.M.       MINOLTA CLINIC
— Free Camera Tests.
7 P.M.        ASCOR   STUDIO
FLASH DEMO.
This symbol means
complimentary camera
insurance, courtesy
Lens & Shutter now
offered on most
cameras & lenses.
FREE CAMERA CLINICS
Whatever your camera brand — we'll check it
out for you and make certain minor
adjustments at no charge Saturday, Sept. 27,
10:00 - 4:00 p.m. Service by Vancam. Also
Special NIKON & MINOLTA Clinics - See
Program.
SATURDAY 10:00 A.M.
10:00 A.M.
\  10:00 A.M.
11:00 A.M.
3:00 P.M.
"All Makes" Camera Clinic — Free Checkups.
Nikon Clinic — Free Camera Checks
Minolta Clinic — Free Camera Checks
Cibachrome Demonstration
Cibachrome Demonstration
PHOTOKINA - A photographic symposium
OPEN HOUSE SPECIALS
FOR EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK
MONDAY
Pentax  SP1000
*1595°
MSL 296.50
,«d9,
/'/>-'| 4>.
Lens & Shutter proudly presents: Nikon
School Director Jerry Blitstein with an
outstanding A. V. Presentation from "The
Concerned Photographer Series", Friday
Sept. 26 - 7 P.M. - Sat. 27 - Noon
TUESDAY
Olympus<DM-1
c/w f 1.8 lens
$26900
MSL 415 50
WEDNESDAY
Olympus
TRIP35 35 mm
camera
$4950
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
,„. r
Canon   TX  c/w
f 1A lens
$179 so
MSL $325.00
SATURDAY
NIKKOBMAT FT 2
C/W F2 LENS
$29950
MSL $430.00
VALUES LIKE
THIS:
PETRI FTX
A Quality 35mm SLR with TTL
Metering and Screw Thread
Interchangeable Lenses.
2912 W. Broadway   phone 736-3461

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