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The Ubyssey Oct 15, 1971

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Array C.f FRIDAY, OCTOBER  15,  1971        -^H^"48    228-2301
money
By NATE SMITH
Who is Cecil Green and why is he
doing those wonderful things for us?
This week's issue of UBC PReports
proudly trumpets the fact that "former
UBC student" (dropout would be a more
precise term) Cecil H. Green, of Cecil
Green Park fame, has given the university
$600,000 to establish a series of visiting
professorships.
The story quotes physics department
head George Volkoff, chairman of the
committee to administer the fund, as
saying he is considering such people as
"physicists Linus Pauling and Robert
Oppenheimer" as possible visiting
professors under the fund.
A course taught by Oppenheimer
would certainly be interesting, since "the
father of the atomic bomb" has been
dead almost five years. (Volkoff is
certainly up on the physics world.)
For Pauling (who is now a chemist, by
the way) to come to UBC on funds
provided by Cecil Green would be purest
irony.
Pauling is a leader of the American
pacifist movement and a former winner
of the Nobel Peace Prize; Green's fortune
is based largely on the supply of strategic
equipment to the U.S. military.
He is, in fact, a full fledged member in
good standing of the legendary
military-industrial complex.
Favors from LBJ
Green was a founder of Texas
Instruments Ltd. and, at the age of 71,
still sits on the company's board of
directors.
TI is an international corporation
dealing in transistors, semi-conductors,
computers, the U.S. space program and
sundry other electronic gadgetry, based in
Dallas with subsidiaries in Canada,
Britain, Germany, France, Italy, Japan,
Taiwan, Singapore, Argentina, Brazil,
Mexico, Australia and the Netherlands.
Its products, listed in the current
Standard and Poor's industrial directory,
include such items as air-to-ground
missiles and armaments, radar systems,
military data systems, "target detection
and acquisition programs" and undersea
warfare signal studies.
In the past, TI has also developed
guidance systems for the RF4 Phantom,
A7 Corvair II and F111A fighter planes.
As an example of its profitable
relationship with the Pentagon, TI's new
contracts and new extensions of existing
contracts from the U.S. Air Force alone
have totalled $24 million so far this year.
Like so many corporations, TI has
grown spectacularly in recent years — a
growth that is directly attributable to the
war in Vietnam and the increasing
purchases by the military.
In 1963, the year before the U.S.
began its major escalation in Vietnam,
TI's total sales were $276,476,571 and its
net income was $13,420,980.
By the end of last year, sales had more
than tripled, increasing to $827,641,000,
and net income had risen to $29,861,000.
Most of that growth occurred between
1964 and 1968, while Lyndon Johnson
was president.
Like all Texas defence industries, TI
How UBC got its latest
philanthropical blessing
from a war profiteer
prospered from the presence of a Texan
in the White House.
During the LBJ years, defence plants
suddenly began sprouting like weeds
everywhere in Texas and the state's
defence industry suddenly became the
second largest in the U.S.
(As far as TI, at least, is concerned,
the changing of the guard in Washington
did little to reverse the trend.)
The company did not hesitate in
showing its gratitude to LBJ for past
favors.
When Johnson's closest political
associate, John B. Connally, stepped
down as governor of Texas in 1969, he
was appointed to the TI board of
directors.
The move didn't exactly hurt TI's
military contacts, since Connally had also
served as Secretary of the Navy in the
early days of the Kennedy
administration.
Connally, of course, has since left the
TI board to design and guide Richard
Nixon's new economic policy as secretary
of the treasury and is widely mentioned
as a possible vice-presidential candidate if
Nixon chooses to dump Spiro Agnew for
the 1972 election.
Obviously, the pipeline to the White
House is still functioning.
So much for the corporation, but what
about the man?
Cecil Howard Green was born in
Manchester, England and raised in
Vancouver.
He entered UBC in 1918 to study
engineering, but left in 1921 without
completing his degree because, at that
time, UBC had no course in his chosen
specialty of electrical engineering.
He went to the Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, where he got his
bachelor's degree in electrical engineering
in 1923 and his master's the following
year.
After graduation, he worked as an
engineer for such companies as General
Electric (Schenectady, N.Y.), Raytheon
Manufacturing (Cambridge, Mass.) and
Federated Telegraph (Palo Alto, Cal. and
Newark, N.J.).
In 1930, he went to Dallas and helped
found Geophysics Service Inc.
He held various positions in the
company's hierarchy, but in the early
years concentrated on work in the field
rather than the executive suite.
However, he donned the grey flannel
suit to become the company's
vice-president in 1941 and president in
1950.
In     1951,    GSI     organized    Texas
Instruments and, through the baffling
shift of corporate structure, TI became
the parent company and GSI the
subsidiary.
Green became a vice-president and
director of TI, but remained as president
of GSI until 1956, becoming chairman of
the board in that year and honorary
chairman in 1959.
Green is one of UBC's prized
ex-students, a rather unusual state of
affairs since universities are not known
for their affection toward people who
drop out and move to other institutions.
Green's special status undoubtedly
stems from the UBC Alumni
Association's renowned ability to spot a
dime taped to the tip of a passing
air-to-ground missile.
Scraps for UBC
The Alumni Association probably
became aware of Green's wallet first in
1959, when he gave MIT $2,527,500
worth of Tr stock to finance a 20-storey
earth sciences building.
On the very sound principle that if
MIT was worth that much to Green, UBC
should rate a few scraps, UBC gave Green
an honorary doctor of science degree in
1964.
The citation described him as "a leader
in geophysical exploration whose love for
science and higher learning was first
aroused in Vancouver."
It praised him for his efforts to
"promote, widen and enrich ... a very
close and understanding bond between
industry and the universities."
Suitably flattered, Green came
through with a grant of more than
$200,000 for UBC to develop Yorkeen,
the former estate of Sen. S.S. McKeen, as
a centre for "contacts between the
university and the community." (The
property had been purchased by the
university in 1964 at a price of
$103,000.)
The property, of course, is now known
as Cecil Green Park, housing the offices
of the Alumni Association and being
rented out for wedding receptions and
private banquets.
Obviously, Green is pleased with the
results, having now come through with
his new $600,000 gift. (Imagine the
nervous finance department clerk who
had to carry that cheque to the bank.)
At the going interest rates, that kind
of money will buy some high-priced
temporary help.
However, judging from the names
George Volkoff and UBC PReports are
currently throwing around as possible
Cecil Green visiting profs, the
administration is more interested in
prestige names for the calendar than in
any improvement in the quality of
education at UBC.
Undoubtedly, a course taught by Linus
Pauling, Margaret Mead, Laurence Olivier
or Kenneth Clark (some of the names
being mentioned) would attract wide
attention and might even be interesting
for a number of students.
But considering that such a course will
exist only through the generosity of Cecil
Green and considering the source of Cecil
Green's wealth, there will be blood stains
on the text books. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,   1971
'Tenure system ensures
jobs for incompetents'
CALGARY (CUP) - Steps should be taken to
abolish the tenure system at Alberta campuses, the
Alberta Association of Students plenary session
concluded at their Thanksgiving weekend
conference.
An alternate system proposed by U of A
delegates is the Minnesota system of a three-year
probationary period followed by five-year
renewable contracts.
The issue was brought into focus in response to
a report on tenure presented to the AAS by Ron
Murphy of the University of Calgary.
He pointed out the tenure system freedom is a
hangover from the McCarthy era.
"We don't have a similar situation in Canada,"
said U of A delegate Don McKenzie.
"Students should fight the concept as a basic
principle issue."
Murphy also advocated the abolition of tenure.
"It was once used for the protection of the
academic freedom of faculty members. It is now
used for job security and to hide incompetence," he
said.
The acceptable causes for revoking tenure now
are: moral terpitude, discredit to the academic
community, a lack of service, and the unavailability
of funds. In other words, tenured professors can still
be dismissed at the whim of administrators.
Notice to Graduating Students in
ARTS
A meeting will be held in Room 106, Buchanan Building
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
Cable visions seal their lips
By BERTON WOODWARD
The     Alpha     and    Omega
Foundation   has  uncovered   the
THIS CHILD, refugee of civil war
in East Pakistan, is now dead.
Pakistan films
The Pakistan Relief Club is
sponsoring films and discussions
of the Pakistan problem next
week.
Monday, two Indian films of
recent events in Bangla Desh will
be shown in SUB 205 at noon.
More information will be
provided at speeches in the SUB
auditorium Tuesday and
Wednesday.
essential truth of the impending
Amchitka explosion.
It has a triggering device.
The triggering device uses a
cable.
The foundation now has in its
possession a hand-drawn picture
of that cable.
Foundation spokesman
Graydon Moore said Thursday
that A & O members feel the
picture is important information
for their continuing fight against
the planned blast.
Moore would not reveal his
sources for the picture, saying:
"Our consciousness is open but
our lips are sealed."
The picture shows what
appears to be the inside of a cable.
Four sets of different colored rods
are arranged in concentric circles
around a core rod or wire.
'Ignore
the lights'
The UBC bicycle club has
come up with a threat to campus
motorists which may replace the
traffic patrol and the Wesbrook
Crescent-University Boulevard
traffic light as a source of
frustration.
Club spokesman Wren Green
Thursday urged all campus
cyclists to disobey the UBC traffic
patrol ruling preventing cyclists
from driving on roads where cycle
paths are provided.
Green said by doing this,
cyclists can force a test case in
provincial court to prove the
inadequacy of the paths.
Green urged all cyclists to meet
at the SUB traffic circle Sunday at
2 p.m. for a tour of cyclist's
campus trouble spots, and to
decide future action in improving
biker's facilities.
'Moral bankruptcy'
The bankruptcy of the American corporate state is the principal
motivation for Nixon's "wind down" of the Vietnam war, said a labor
speaker at Wednesday's anti-war teach-in.
"As far as we are concerned it was morally bankrupt several years
ago," said Phyllis Young of the B.C. Federation of Labor at the UBC
anti-war committee sponsored teach-in.
Bill Willmott of the anthropology department said,
"Vietnamization is the use of Asians to solve American problems."
Links between Vietnam and Amchitka were drawn by George
Hermanson of the Anglican campus ministry and Shawn Glynn from
the Student Action Committee on Amchitka.
"Amchitka is the logical outcome of cold war diplomacy," said
Hermanson. He said Canada should get out of the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization and the North American Air Defense Command
agreements.
Glynn, a high school student said, "The proposed test is a show
of strength to bully both U.S. allies and non-allies alike."
They believe that through an
intricate process of
consciousness-raising human
beings can withstand the effects
of any bomb explosion, said
Moore. One member confided'
that he could feel the
"frequencies" given off by recent
Russian atomic tests.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Profs show class consciousness
-kelly booth photo
ANYONE FOR CHESS — or maybe you'd prefer a profound discussion about diving equipment. UBC's clubs day
provided all this and more in SUB Thursday. -david phillips photo
Clubs stage annual invasion
By VAUGHN PALMER
UBC's annual clubs day came off in typical fashion in
SUB Thursday.
The parachute jump was cancelled because of rain,
the motorcycle ride was cancelled because of rain and the
canoe and ski clubs had to move inside because of rain.
Meanwhile, most clubs put on a competent display of
what they are about. Mussoc plugged their musicals,
Radsoc plugged Radio CYVR and the religious clubs
plugged religion.
"Pardon me sir, can I convert you?"
The UBC Progressive Conservatives demonstrated the
hardsell tactics which have made them the biggest political
club on campus. Besides featuring visits by members of
.<* .v r    .   * * s   **  *.,        .     *','%     *
What-a letter?
An extremely important letter containing statistical
information about food services was sent to the
" Exposure column early last week.
The letter was lost, in typical Art Smolensky
fashion. Unfortunately we do not have the name of this
person nor his phone number.
Would he please contact this column c/o The
Ubyssey office (288-2301) as soon as possible. An
explanation and apology is awaiting you.
parliament, they played the collected speeches of Bob
Stanfield, and that took guts.
Their competition didn't do so well.
The New Democratic Party had an entire booth
where they didn't once mention their new leader, David
"What's-his-name".
The Liberals came out in favour of all those wonderful
issues which Trudeau manages to ignore.
Karl Burau, not outdone by the fact that he lost the
room where his experimental college meets to the Latter
Day Saints, set up a booth and recruited new members.
Interesting contrasts were -available, showing once
again that UBC's clubs have something for everyone.
For example, downstairs, theAnti-War Club had
posters to turn both mind and stomach against war, while
upstairs, the Thunderbird War Games Club manoeuvred
toy tanks and men, in a display of dehumanization, that
would please the best 'minds' of the Pentagon.
"How many megadeaths is that, Charlie?"
In the middle of it all, the alternate food service
ruthlessly sold their huge eight cent cookies, while in the
SUB cafeteria the university food service, (SLOPSOC),
performed.
Clubs committee vice-president Clayton Volger chose
the joint winners of the best booths competition as the
Chinese Varsity Club for their display of music, films, art
and food, and Aquasoc, who had everything but the
Pacific Ocean in their exhibit.
From The McGill Daily Quebec Service
MONTREAL — Six hundred faculty members at the
Universite du Quebec at Montreal (UQAM) went on strike
Wednesday, calling for a new collective agreement and the
recognition of their union as the sole representative for all
faculty, including vice-deans and department heads.
UQAM now joins the Universite de Montreal and Sir
George Williams University as an "exploiter of the
workers".
One thousand office workers and laboratory
technicians have been on strike at the U de M since Oct. 4.
Library workers at Sir George have been engaged in a
nine-month running battle with the administration to
obtain recognition for their union.
The UQAM strikers set up picket lines at 5 p.m.
Wednesday and most of the members of the Syndicat des
Professeurs de l'Universite du Quebec (SPUQ) turned out.
All students had been locked out of the university an hour
earlier.
It is illegal for other UQAM employees to strike in
sympathy. They are forced to report for work every
morning, even though they are barred from entering
buildings by the picketers.
Points at issue in the UQAM dispute include wages,
working conditions and job security. SPUQ is also
objecting to the U de M administration's attempt to break
union solidarity be classifying vice-deans and department
heads as administrators.
One union member predicted the UQAM strike could
last as long as three weeks.
In the past two weeks sympathetic students and
faculty from UQAM have joined the striking U de M
workers on the picket lines. A spokesman for the U de M's
Local 1244 of the Canadian Union of Public Employees
promised this gesture of solidarity would be reciprocated.
No delegation from McGill has yet helped out the U
de M picketers, even though students from Quebec City's
Laval University have made a pilgrimage to the U de M as
an indication of their support for the strike.
Local 1244 is affiliated with the Quebec Federation
of Labor. SPUQ is an affiliate of the Confederation of
National Trade Unions.
The U de M strikers are now examining a new
administration proposal submitted by provincial mediator
Yvan Dansereau.
The workers overwhelmingly rejected an earlier offer
last week as 'ridiculous' and 'insulting'.
The U de M administration refuses to acknowledge
their demand for parity in wages and working conditions
with other Quebec universities.
The strikers are also fighting for job security and the
clear definition of their jobs.
Morale is still high on the U de M picket lines and
many students and faculty members have demonstrated
their support.
The Association des Professeurs de l'Universite de
Montreal is also backing the strike. Its members voted
158 to 124 Tuesday to respect the picket lines, blocking
an attempt by anti-union elements to return to work.
Head against
tenure for 2
Anthropology and sociology department head Cyril
Belshaw has recommended against tenure for assistant
sociology professors Ron Silvers and Matt Speier.
By opposing their tenure (guaranteed permanent
employment at UBC) Belshaw overruled the decision
made by the anthrosoc promotions and tenure
committee last week to grant the two professors tenure.
In response to this the graduate students of the
department have created a committee to consider both
the general process of promotion and tenure in the
department and the decisions made
thiss year.
The committee urgently want
to hear from students who have
taken courses from any of the six
professors, involved in the tenure
proceedings.
The other four professors are
George Gray, Bob Ratner, Robin
Ridington and Robert MacDougall.
Gray, Ratner and Ridington's
cases appear to be more secure but BELSHAW
MacDougall, who has taken a leave of abscence, has not
been recommended for tenure by the tenure committee
or Belshaw.
Students should send their opinions about the
teaching they received to James Heap in Henry Angus
351.
The committee will submit briefs reporting its
conclusions to the anthrosoc department and to the
promotions and tenure committee of the faculty of arts. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,   1971
Democracy
The current controversy in the
anthropology-sociology department opens up the
question of tenure in general.
In tenure disputes in recent years this
question has often been overlooked, and instead
we have seen certain professors denied tenure and
then turned — rightly or wrongly — into martyrs.
Ironically, they have been turned into
martyrs by supporters who often have
fundamental disagreements with the object of the
struggle: tenure.
Thus we find ourselves faced with a division
between means and ends. Schizophrenically, we
protest when good, competent profs are screwed
by the inequities of the tenure-judging structure,
yet at the same time — dispute whether tenure
should exist.
Since we object to tenure on principle, and
since it has proved to be mainly a vehicle by
which     narrow,     conservative     mediocrity     is
THE USYSSIY
FRIDAY,   OCTOBER    15
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday,
Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"When yer a jet," crooned Mike Sasges, as John Kula,
Berton Woodward and Vaughn Palmer continued their
excellence to the point where Nate Smith decided he'd be the
most excellent of all. Bernard Bischoffed for the second day in
a row, as Gord Gibson looked on, not quite believing his eyes
as the redundant Julian Wake revealed himself as Randy Frith.
Sandy Kass gasped in horror at the actics of Sandy Shreve, and
although Daphne was just visiting it didn't take her lonQ to
figure out that Mike Buck and Dave Schmidt were weirdos of
the first order, along with Tricia Moore, Jan O'Brien and Kathy
Carney. Kelly Booth and David Phillips just didn't believe their
eyes, though Paul Knox did, and don't forget Saturday, 2 p.m.
at Eighth and Waterloo.
perpetuated at universities, we must fight for an
alternative.
Specifically that alemative should be a form
of institutionalized job security for professors in
which undergraduate and graduate students,
community representatives and faculty members
make hiring and firing decisions.
Although such committees — the most basic
of which should exist at the department level —
would give a professor job security after an initial
probation period, such security would not
constitute guaranteed life employment as the
tenure system virtually does.
The standard union principle — that a person
must not be fired unless it is proven she or he is
unable to properly do her or his job — would
prevail. However, if sufficient complaint was
made by any group about a professor's
competence, the departmental committee would
be free to review a professor's case with a view to
continuing or terminating employment.
So.
Tenure must give way to job security. And
job security must be based on a democratic
system of judgment.
Until such time as this is carried out, we will
continue to see the expulsion of profs whose
social commitments do not include doing research
for Gulf Oil. Whose sense of priority and
responsibility prohibits rotten teaching. Whose
orientation is not towards raking in bigger and
better corporation grants for UBC.
Although we must still contend with tenure
committees stacked with the Old Guard and slick,
proper department heads like former colonial
administrator Cyril Belshaw of anthrosoc, there
are signs that the natives are restless.
Anthrosoc grad students are at last realizing
that they can only accomplish their ends by
working collectively, and a groundswell of protest
appears to be developing among the department's
junior faculty members.
Sociology professors are indulging .in more
than idle talk about splitting away from the
anthropologists.
The white man's burden must be weighing
heavily on Bwana Belshaw and his cronies.
4fe 4fe 4fe 4fe 4fe 4fe 4fe rffc rffc rffc
Well, UBC PReports has done it again.
In the finest tradition of flackery, the
administration's propaganda sheet has turned
black into white, dipped it in a candy coating of
omission and published the resulting goody.
We refer to PReports' Oct. 13 announcement
that war profiteer Cecil Green and "his wife"
(mustn't forget the little woman) have given UBC
$600,000 with which a fund for visiting
professorships is to be established.
As a side issue, it's hilarious to note that one
of the proposed visiting professors had been dead
for a few years, and at least one other is a pacifist.
But more fundamental is the spectacle of the
university scrambling for a cut of the spoils of
war gleaned by this ex-student through the
manufacture of military goods for the U.S.
Of course, UBC has never been backward
about accepting money from corporate villains
(who usually use such grants as tax write-offs
anyway).
But for obvious reasons, the acceptance of
Cecil Green's money is especially disgusting
because the university is revealing its ugliest facet.
It is literally blood money.
Let's not forget, though, that it's no accident
that UBC is acquiring these funds.
The university is merely a part of the system
which it serves, and serving the capitalist system
means espousing its values — the values that
produce the thousands of Cecil Greens, large and
small, who hold power.
And naturally, the university also does its
part to produce what administration president
Walter Gage calls "a good product."
Yeah, Cecil Green is a good product all right.
Swell.     Pour     some     more     of     that"
blood-and-guts bread on us Cece, and we'll make
sure we manufacture lots more people to work
for men like you.
And we'll promise not to even think about
your armaments, U.S. imperialism, the Vietnam
War and all that blood. Page Friday review of books FREE
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
LECTURE
"What Makes A Happy Family"
Lecturer:
Mr. Harry Smith, C.S.B.
Thursday, Oct. 21st,
at 12:30
Clubs Lounge, S.U.B.
EVERYONE WELCOME
The class struggle in Quebec
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By DICK BETTS
UNEQUAL UNION, Confederation and the Roots of Conflict
in the Canada's, 1815-1873, by
Stanley B. Ryerson, Progress
Books, Toronto and New
York, 1968.
The Constitutional Crisis in
Canada does not have contemporary roots. Nor is it merely
constitutional; it is not a problem
of legalities or ramifications of
state framework. The
contradictions of Quebec
remaining within a confederal
framework are not even solely
national.
"... important as is the fact
of   national   identity   and
difference,   it   is  not   the
prime   mover.   It   cannot
provide the explanation for
the    dynamic    of    social
change   either' within   the
community, or on the scale
of relations among peoples.
Attempts    at   explanation
solely in terms of nation or
race end up in a reactionary
mysticism  whose unfailing
(if  tacit)   premise   is   the
alleged innate superiority of
the exponent of one's own
race or nation."
For Stanley Ryerson, author of
the above quote, the problem is of
dual nature. Quebec is oppressed
in    a    national    sense    by    its
relationship   to   English   Canada
within   confederation.   But   the
essential    thing    is    the    class
question,    the   ruling   class   of
Anglophone     interest    and   the
working     class     predominantly
made up of Quebecois. This is the
relationship   which   propels  the
history   of Canada and Quebec.
The national question represents,
in   conjunction   with   this,   the
over-all relationship between the
two groups.
This is the theme of
UNEQUAL UNION, an important
book for Canadians
The book is important because
it represents the strongest attempt
to provide a historical materialist
framework on the origin of the
national and class question in
Canada today. In other words
Ryerson attempts to make sense
of our history, not mystify it.
"National     consciousness,
national sentiment, are the
product and expression of the
historical emergence and
experience of the nation."
Further, "the nation is (like the
class) a materially-based social
entity". With these two premises
plus the supremacy of the class
question established, Ryerson
proceeds on a radical
reinterpretation of Canadian
history.
And the history becomes the
setting and description of the
activities of people, not the
abstract, outside thing which
pushes people onward. Nor is it,
for Ryerson, "a mere
accumulation of facts." In the
pages   of   UNEQUAL   UNION,
free
quebec
free
Canada
history becomes the struggle of
the people of pre-confederal
Canada (Upper and Lower
Canada) for self-government and
self-determination. For the people
of Quebec (Lower Canada) it is a
struggle which is reappearing
today.
The rebellions of 1837 as a
prelude to the actual scheme of
confederation represent a dialectic
which has been overlooked in
Canadian  history. Confederation
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of il/latchivia iSanai
Simplicity
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REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
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itself turns out to be a
compromise to facilitate capital
expansion, the secure Canada as a
neo-colonial base for Britain
against U.S. expansion and an
attempt to placate what the
English rulers knew would be a
rebellious Quebec. John A.
MacDonald wanted a legislative
union which would have
completely taken autonomy from
Quebec.
All this because of the
development of a class and
national antagonism which
remains to this day. In light of
this, talk of constitutional reform
by Ottawa technocrats becomes
ludicrous.
In fact Ryerson has some
words for Trudeau in the
postcript to the book. Trudeau's
confederation schemes become
"the Trudeau conju ring-trick"
which "would cause the national
fact of French Canada to vanish".
The interests of the Canadian
status quo necessitate the denial
of national (read class) struggle
for that is just what the Quebec
revolution is all about. True to
these interests Trudeau has
branded national sovereignty as
"absurd and retrograde", leaving
the way open to an affirmation of
outside imperialist control of any
given nation and people at any
given time.
Trudeau's fallacy "is rooted in
an   abstract  metaphysic,"  states
Ryerson.     Trudeau     calls
nationalism per se the cause of
war.  Ryerson's reply: "Not 'the
principle    of   nationalities'    but
capitalist   development   and   the
rise   of  the   bourgeoisie  are  the
reason     for    the    wars    and
revolutions   of   the   post-feudal
era." An additional lengthy quote
from Ryerson is necessary here.
"... the twentieth century
emergence    of   monopoly
capitalist   imperialism   has
brought   with   it   a   dual
process:  nationalism  being
exploited by the ultra-right
and    fascism,    and    tidal
counter-movements    of
national colonial revolt and
socialist revolution. So long
as    imperialism    engenders
national    oppression,    the
'principle    of   nationality'
will have the validity of an
assertion    of   democratic,
community rights."
This is something the Liberal
Party and bourgeois theoreticians
like     Trudeau     will     never
understand simply  because  they
are   engaged   in   the  process  of
selling   out   both   Quebec   and
Canada    to    outside    interests,
notably    the    U.S.    Of   course
nationalism is dangerous to their
interests  and, as Ryerson points
out,   the   national   struggle   in
Quebec and Canada today is in
reality     the     struggle     against
corporate capitalism.
The "unequal union" is a fact
of our existence and for Ryerson
it has a dual yet closely related
nature. It is the unequal union of
Canada and Quebec and the
inequality of the class structure
which perpetuates the national
inequality in Canada.
The historical continuum
prevails to this day and "no
amount of sentimental invocation
of the rule or reason, no dosage of
'rational functionalism' can
exorcise the hard facts of
dual-national existence, and of
resentments engendered by
national inequality".
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,  1971 Inside the Liberation Cell
By T. R. STAFFORD
Brian  Moore,  The Revolution Script,
McClelland and Stewart, Toronto, 1971.
I read The Revolution Script straight
through in one sitting (finished it at 2 in
the morning) and felt like it was
happening all over again. Once you
begin Brian Moore's fictional account of
last October's kidnappings of British
diplomat James Cross and Quebec
Labor Minister Pierre Laporte by the
FLQ, it's hard to put down.
Written from the point of view of the
kidnappers, Moore, one of Canada's
best-known novelists (he's written The
Luck of Ginger Coffey and I Am Mary
Dunne among his half dozen books)
succeeds in doing two things that other
accounts of those events haven't done.
Moore's major achievement is that
we come to see the Liberation Cell that
captured Cross as a group of real human
beings with understandable human fears
and aspirations. In this emotionally
successful recreation of October, 1970
in Montreal, Brian Moore restores the
absolutely vital dimension of the
ordinary world — streets, stores, tv,
food, intimate conversations — that the
kidnappers move in, as we do.
Also, he demonstrates how much of
our sense of reality has been swallowed
up by media: as you read the novel you
realize that all communication between
the FLQ and the government takes
place on tv, radio, and in the daily
papers. Both sides are struggling to
control the media. Moore suggests that
one of the major reasons for Trudeau
invoking the War Measures Act is to gain
legal control, for a period, of all media,
in order to prevent people from
understanding the FLQ position. The
frightening aspect of all this is the
suggestion that manipulation of the
media (largely by business-political
powers now in control of our society)
gradually comes to replace free
discussion of political questions.
As Moore gives us close-ups of the
FLQ members, we begin to understand
the reasons for their actions.
We enter the thoughts of Marc
Carbonneau, a cab driver, the oldest
member of the group:
All cab drivers are slaves, Marc
said. All of them suffer the same
things. The big shot fare who throws
your money into the front seat so
that you'll have to bend down to
pick it up: the English Canadians
sitting in the back seat, talking to
each other about their crooked deals
and asking where they can find a girl
to fuck. And five times out of six,
the whore getting into your cab with
some 60 year old Anglo is an 18 year
old French Canadian girl just out of
convent school. . . Yes, you sat there
driving the cab while some
Westmount Anglo bastard was
groping a kid in the back seat, and if
he saw you look at him through the
rear view mirror, he'd just wink,
because what does he care, to that
Anglo you're just some smelly
peasouper, a servant. . . wasn't it just
as Pierre said, we're their white
niggers. French Canadians are just
shit to them. Yes, real education
began, not in school, but in those
months I drove a taxi.
Moore takes us back, minute by
minute, through the suspenseful grab of
Cross. And then we're moving through
the streets of Montreal.
A taxi was normal, even invisible,
coming out of this rich man's street.
In silence they drove in an easterly
direction, doubling back on a
two-way street, passing student
residences and university buildings,
seeing files of McGill students, many
of them long-haired Easy Riders
ambling to morning classes, books
under their arms, English Canadians
who, despite their Berkeleyian cool,
were bent, as always, on acquiring
those skills — engineering,
management and scientific - which
in a hundred years of so-called
parity, few French Canadians have
mastered. The taxi moved past. . .
It's in these passing details that we
get a feeling for how the facts of daily
life continually remind the Quebecois of
their oppression.
And in case we think the oppression
is merely symbolic, Moore reminds us of
the hard facts, as the car passes into
French Montreal:
In this dormitory of cheap labor
were congregated the human
statistics of these young men's rage.
Forty per cent of Canada's
unemployed live in Quebec, despite
the fact that the province, twice as
big as Texas, is as rich as it is vast. It
is also, lamentably, a haven for
foreign capital and a source of
non-union labor. American
corporations own sixty per cent of
the province's industry. English
Canadian companies own or control
most of the remainder. English
Canadians, who make up only 17 per
cent of the population, provide the
vast majority of managers and
executives. The language of
command in this French-speaking
province is, astonishingly, English.
Unemployment hovers chronically
around ten per cent...
Moore takes us as far inside that
apartment where the FLQ and Cross
were as it's possible to do. The style of
journalistic fiction justifies itself by a
life-like mix of public political events
and the details of private life. A great
deal of the abstraction we associate with
politics disappears.
When we arrive at that moment when
the Liberation Cell and Cross are
watching the reading of the FLQ
Manifesto on tv, Moore gives us an
appreciation of what it meant to the
young revolutionaries. "For the first
time in the history of Canada, it was the
angry, confused voice of the
lumpenproletariat in the nation's most
exploited region, the voice of the
French defeat in a country which has
traditionally papered over its racial
differences with a thick paste of
hypocrisy about a 'biculturalism' which,
in fact, does not exist."
As one reads the Manifesto (which
Moore reprints in his novel, word for
word), one is struck by the particularity
of it. It isn't at all a rhetorical cry from
a bunch of anarchist terrorists, but
rather a statement by and for an
oppressed working class which deals
with specific political occasions in the
history of Quebec. It is an attack on
imperialism and capitalism, and reading
it a year later, in the context of Moore's
narrative, it comes through with
eloquence.
The Revolution Script, with all the
limitations it has — simply, it's not a
'great' novel — is nonetheless a book
that ought to be read. Not only does it
work on the level of suspense, it
increases our understanding of certain
events as no 'factual' account has done.
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Friday, October 15, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 "Just watch me
//
By STAN PERSKY
Denis    Smith,    Bleeding    Hearts...    Bleeding
Country, M.G. Hurtig, Edmonton, 1971
Denis Smith says:
1/ Pierre Eliot Trudeau badly mishandled the
October 1970 crisis when he invoked the War
Measures Act,
and attributed the prime minister's action to
two sources:
2/ Trudeau's opposition to separatism which
amounts to undemocratic and dogmatic
federalism, and
3/ Trudeau's theory of democracy, which is
narrow and authoritarian.
Smith's Bleeding Hearts ... is thus a harsh and
well-argued condemnation of the actions and
theory of the Trudeau government during the War
Measures Act period as well as a critique of its
political philosophy.
Smith's book, where it goes deeper than the
events of last October, is a defence of democratic
idealism. The theory of democratic idealism is
admirable in theory (it's reasonable, tolerant and
full of good will) but slightly misleading in
practice. It leads one to assume that in addition to
Smith, a professor of politics at Trent, there is a
large body of democratic idealists.
More seriously, such a view tends to
de-emphasize issues of political economy. That is,
this theory would prefer to pass over the struggle
in Canada between capitalism and socialism. Smith
has only a passing reference to Trudeau's support
of a "market economy that reflects an indifference
to the problems of monopoly control, income
distribution, technological unemployment, the
multi-national corporation," etc. The socialist
claim that a capitalist system of this sort inevitably
makes real democracy impossible is never taken
up.
With these warnings in hand, it is possible to go
on to an appreciation of Smith's attack on
Trudeau's authoritarianism and why it poses a
danger to the country.
The slightly cumbersome title of the book
comes from Trudeau's revealing comments of last
Oct.   13: Trudeau:   Yes, well there are a lot of
bleeding hearts around who just don't like to
see people with helmets and guns. All I can say
is, to on and bleed, but it is more important to
keep law and order in the society than to be
worried about weak-kneed people. . .
Reporter: A t any cost? How far would you go
with that? How far would you extend that?
Trudeau: Well, just watch me.
Watching Trudeau is exactly what Smith
proposes to do, for he is justifiably suspicious of
those who play fast and loose with civil liberties.
The government claimed that in the acts of the
FLQ they saw an insurrection taking shape and
thus were justified in placing human life second to
the maintenance of the state by invoking the War
Measures Act. Smith examines the government
claim. And he persuasively argues, on the evidence,
that the government case was confused, inflated,
and false, a view that many Canadians have also
come to since last year's events.
Smith makes a useful distinction between
actual events and the image-making of the prime
minister. He describes Trudeau's martial law tv
speech as "a brilliant performance, and it succeeded overwhelmingly as advocacy. As rational
argument, however, it was a demagogic display of
charged language, clever device, undefended
assertiop, and questionable psychology."
Smith is unequivocable on what should have
been done last year: the government should have
negotiated with the FLQ, released some political
prisoners, and saved LaPorte's life. Smith is
convinced that the FLQ's offer to negotiate was
honest and that the life of LaPorte was saveable.
"To put life first in this kind of crisis is only to
reaffirm the standards of decency and humanity
we so glibly proclaim in the abstract. It is, in a
sense, an act of weakness for the state; but in
another sense, it is an act of moral strength, for it
demonstrates that life is actually regarded more
highly than political face." The democratic idealist
position is quite clear on this point: when the
authority of the state appears to be in danger, the
situation must be much more carefully examined
than was done by Trudeau before citizen's rights
are to be tampered with. Human life comes first,
except in the rarest cases, and the October crisis
wasn't one of those rare cases, Smith concludes.
In Smith's political philosophy, the idea of the
state has a central place, but he balances the
possible dangers of this view by insisting that the
first responsibility of government is protection of
individual rights. At the heart of his argument is
his disagreement with Trudeau's overly-influential
position in Canadian political theory and with
Trudeau's theory itself. Nor is Smith happy with
Trudeau's propaganda tactics.
Smith deplores Trudeau's style of
"psychological violence" which is manifested in
"his persistant tendency to identify his opponents
as extremists and absolutists: they are never
granted the respect of being reasonable, moderate,
or practical men. They must always be pushed to
the extreme so that their claims are made to
appear absurd, ignorant, irrational, frenzies, or
mad."
Trudeau tends to lump anyone that disagrees
with him with the most extreme elements of the
FLQ, Smith says. He's referring particularly to
people like Parti Quebecois leader Rene Levesque
and Le Devoir editor Claude Ryan, both of whom
oppose Trudeau's federalism, a doctrine which
Smith believes has been turned into an absolutist
dogma by the prime minister.
Furthermore, in analyzing the FLQ as an
anarchist movement with historical roots, Smith
defends the legitimacy of their existence, though
he doesn't agree with their actions. "The FLQ is
not an alien infection, a 'cancer' to be rooted out
of the body politic," he says. "It is, rather, one
manifestation of deep and widespread human
frustrations in Quebec society . . . The declarations
and impudent acts of the terrorists speak to the
complacent part of the community, and to the
polticians, of the depth of these frustrations; and
those silent, passive, beaten citizens who cannot
speak for themselves recognize their own voices in
such acts."
Although I'm unable to take up the issue here,
Smith's claim about the anarchist character of the
FLQ is most debatable. A reading of the FLQ
Manifesto or Pierre Valliere's White Niggers of
North America, with their emphasis on the
concept of working class, and their attack on
capitalism and imperialism, are far from the
priority of the individual that we associate with
anarchism. (Vallieres, in fact, whose range of.
philosophic    reading   has   gone    unappreciated,
attacks Sartre exactly on the question of
individualism.)
The crisis and the acts of the government have
raised some important questions about political
life in Canada, Smith says. "The crucial points of
concern are how the Canadian system permits the
public will to be expressed, how clearly and
immoveably the line is drawn between the
legitimate and the illegitimate expression of
dissent, and how the community allows itself to
reply to acts of dissent which are considered to be
beyond what is legitimate."
Smith is much more worried about what
governments are likely to do in such
circumstances, than he is about the dangers of the
people. He claims that the government response to
the FLQ was a "combination of a shallow liberal
commitment to the democratic process and a
deeper dependence upon justification by force."
He challenges Trudeau's position that political
authority is granted essentially through the
electoral system. Smith argues that there is a
traditional theory of democracy in Canada that is
far more flexible and broader than Trudeau's
distorted view of electoral primacy. No doubt,
lurking behind this disagreement, is his suspicion
of Trudeau's consistant manipulation of the public
media.
Smith emphasises "that the Canadian
constitution is a mixed system, which lacks any
clear location. of sovereighty or source of
legitimacy. It is misleading in both fact and spirit
to claim that polular election is the simple and
straightforward source of legitimate authority in
Canada." The virtue of this system is that it
"allows for a substantial judgment of whether
authority actually performs acts which serve the
interest of the citizens".
At the base of Smith's case is another
fundamental principle: 'There are always limits to
democratic authority. The use of violence or
coercion by the state can be as great a threat to its
legitimacy as may be their use by opponents of the
regime."
One comes away from Bleeding Hearts ... with
the suspicion that Pierre Eliot Trudeau and his
theory of authoritarian 'democracy' is far more
dangerous the Canada than the 'anarchist' wing of
the separatist movement.
Denis Smith asks the question that is on the
horizon: "Is it permissible for Quebec to secede
peacefully from Canada?"
Given his theory, he has a clear answer: "For
liberal democrats, as opposed to liberal defenders
of vested interests or vested power, the answer can
only be yes."
Speakers
LEANDRE BERGERON
Leandre Bergeron, a native of St.
Boniface, Manitoba, teaches French and
Quebec literature at Sir George Williams
University in Montreal. He is best-known as
the author of Le Petit Manuel d'Histoire du
Quebec, a best-selling popular history which
has sold more than 80,000 copies in its
French version. It has recently been
published in English under the title, A
Patriot's Handbook: The History of Quebec.
In his History of Quebec, Bergeron seeks
to counter the traditional view of the
Quebecois as propounded by the ruling
elites of Quebec and the clergy. For
Bergeron, Quebec's history is one of national
and class oppression: first, of the native
Indians by the French; then, of the French
Canadian habitants by the French-Canadian
seigneurs and clergy; since the Conquest of
1759, and even more since Confederation, of
the Quebecois nation by the
English-dominated Dominion of Canada and
its predecessors; and increasingly, in the
twentieth century, of both Quebec and
English Canada by American imperialism.
Bergeron's language is extremetly simple
and   direct   -   a   far   cry   from  the  often
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,  1971 By LANNY BECKMAN
Karl Marx: The Passionate Logician;
by Joel Carmichael, Scribner's, Paper,
any   price.
An attack on Marx for tricky Dick
ECKMAN Bourgeoisie,   the  Idea   of the the worst of all, but I had to do significant events,
..•__.*- . ._■ • Proletariat, and so on - mere it if I was tint tn starve nnt m,.rh HiffWo,
$Not   worth   it   at
Carmichael's biography of Marx is
a work of scholarly horseshit. It is
written for someone who wants to
read one source — a cut above Time —
on the basis of which he can discount
Marxism in its entirety. Someone like
Richard Nixon, a man too busy to
spend much time confirming his
vacuous anti-communism.
It's easy to picture Kissinger placing
his pallid hand on Tricky Dick's
shoulder while slipping him
Carmichael's book - a tranquillizer to
dispell vague anxieties over the
renaissance Marxism is enjoying.
One realizes after a few pages that,
as far as Marxist theory is concerned,
the book is biased and simple-minded.
However, the author states his
principal concern to be Marx's life
rather than his ideas. Carmichael says
he has found it illuminating to regard
the latter as a "mere pendant", of the
- former.
Taking him at his word, I figured
the book would be an innocuous source
of biographical facts, things that are
hard to distort, like where Marx lived
and whom he married and when he
published what - stuff like that. In
fact, the chronological details can be
found but they are padded so
unremittingly with Carmichael's
scornful and unsubstantiated
interpretations that the reader is
repeatedly tempted to forget the
whole thing.
While I felt determined to finish the
book, on page 223 with only 25 pages
to go, I came across this paragraph
which proved to be the last I could
stomach:
// is true after all that there are
workers and capitalists,
proletarians and bourgeois: that
is why statements about them
sound (sic) convincing. But Marx
was not referring to real workers
or bourgeois at all, that is, to
ordinary human beings
performing certain
socio-economic functions. He
actually meant the Idea of the
pedantic character of academic histories. His
book, in its English translation (the
publisher is New Canada Press), sells for
$1.50, a far cry from the usual rip-offs of
Toronto publishers. He is speaking on
Tuesday, Oct. 19th, at 12:30 p.m. in the
SUB ballroom.
PIERRE BOURGAULT
Pierre Bourgault was one of the first
separatist spokesmen in Quebec in the early
1960s. He was a founder and President of an
independentist party, the Rassemblement
pour flndependance Nationale (RIN). As
such, he was actively involved in such events
as the protesting of the Queen's visit to
Quebec City in 1964.
With the founding of the Parti Quebecois
in 1969, the R.I.N, disappeared. Bourgault
entered the new party, and is identified with
the left wing of the PQ leadership. At the
most recnt congress of the PQ, last
February, he was elected to the party's
executive, through strong support for the
rank-and-file.
A journalist by profession, Bourgault, for
over a year, edited a left-wing Montreal
magazine, Pointe de Mire. He is now
associated, part-time with a Montreal radio
station. An excellent speaker, he is still one
of the most articulate spokesmen for Quebec
independence. He will be speaking Thursday,
Oct. 21st, at 12:30 p.m. in the SUB
ballroom.
Bourgeoisie,   the  Idea
Proletariat, and so on
links in a logical chain.
Nowhere does one find support for
these abundantly cynical allegations;
in fact, reading between the lines I
continually sensed that Marx's
concerns were genuine and heartfelt.
Carmichael insists on doing to Marx
what he accuses Marx of doing to the
world: flattening, devitalizing, making
academic.
Carmichael makes good on his
promise to regard Marx's ideas as a
mere pendant of his life, but the
promise is only partial. He also
manages to do the converse. The
reader loses both.
Carmichael is as bad a biographer as
he is a theoretician. Marx, the man, is
turned into an homunculus seen
through the wrong end of a telescope.
His minor failures and
disappointments are relentlessly
highlighted. Carmichael delights in
exaggerating such trivia as the fact that
— much to Marx's chagrin — no one
reviewed Capital for two months after
its publication. (Maybe 'cause it takes
that long to read, which Carmichael,
who describes Capital as "difficult to
wade through," probably never has
done.)
Marx's principal failure was that he
could never predict anything
accurately. His forecasts of imminent
proletarian victory were proven false
time and time again. As for Russia,
China, Cuba . . . well, Carmichael is
too busy describing Marx's boils to
give any attention to the real historical
consequences of Marxist thought. It
seems that each time we get a glimpse
of Marx's genius, Carmichael pokes a
beam of light down the back of Marx's
pants to reassure himself that those
buttocks couldn't belong to the most
influential figure of modern history.
Behind every great man there stands a
third-rate critic with a flashlight.
In fact, Marx did suffer from boils
along with several other physical
ailments. His persistent ill-health
resulted largely from the fact that he
was impoverished for almost all of his
adult life. Here is an excerpt from a
letter of 1852:
My wife is sick, little Jenny is
sick. . . I cannot call the doctor
because I have no money for
medicine. For eight or ten days
now I have fed my family on
bread and potatoes, and it is
doubtful whether I can get any
today. I cannot write the article
for New York because I have no
money to buy the newspapers
which I need. Last week I
borrowed a few shillings from
some workers. For me that was
the worst of all, but I had to do
it if I was not to starve.
It's not surprising that Carmichael,
on his fat five-figure academic salary,
can afford little sympathy for Marx's
hardships. The point of life in
academia is to dissociate yourself from
the struggles or ordinary human
beings, to see them as "performing
certain socio-economic functions."
You're also programmed to disdain the
motives of anyone Who does identify
with the poor and the oppressed.
So when Marx expresses his
compassion for the lot of the workers
he had encountered, when he describes
"the nobility of mankind shining forth
in their toil-worn faces," Carmichael
reacts predictably with derision.
The most prominent impression the
book left with me was the contrast
between Carmichael's narrow,
comfortable, irrelevant activities and
the amazing scope of Marx's.
Intellectually Marx's genius is
indisputable. His contributions to the
fields of philosophy, sociology,
history, economics and political
science are truly epoch-making. From
these disciplines he weaves a system of
ideas that are cosmological in scope.
Additionally, he wrote several volumes
of poetry, translated a book of Ovid's
verse, wrote a comic novel and a
classical tragedy.
In the face of such staggering
intellectual accomplishments, one can
see why an insecure liberal historian
like Carmichael might be tempted to
be scornful. What is most threatening
however to ordinary academicians
performing certain socio-economic
dysfunctions is that Marx could make
the jump from thought to action -
whereas they get all wore out just
making the jump from classroom to
faculty club.
Western dualism has so accustomed
us to viewing thought and action as
separate and exclusive realms that one
responds almost with disbelief at
Marx's daily, active immersion in
political struggle. It should be kept in
mind that he had attained all the '
credentials necessary for joining the
comfortable class of petite-bourgeois
intellectuals. His commitment to
political action represents a wilful and
exemplary choice for a life of poverty,
hardship and persecution.
In 1843, The Rhine Gazette, a
political paper edited by Marx, was
shut down by the King of Prussia. Two
years later, Marx was deported from
France as a result of his connections
again with a radical newspaper.
Shortly thereafter, he and Engels
founded the Communist Party in
Brussels. (Carmichael, with his
unerring     nose     for    historically
significant events, declares "there was
not much difference between joining
the Communist Party and going to a
tea party." The Prussian King would
have taken issue, I think, with this
comparison, for in 1849 he expelled
Marx from Prussia on political
grounds). In 1864 in England, Marx
helped to found the International
Workingmen's Association (the
International).
In an inexplicable lapse. Carmichael
includes the following description,
written by Marx's daughter, Eleanor.
The passage is memorable for its
contrast with the depiction we find in
the rest of the book.
In his home life, as in his
intercourse with his friends, and
even with mere acquaintances, I
think one might say that Karl
Marx's main characteristics were
his unbounded good-humour
and his unlimited sympathy. His
kindness and patience were
really sublime. A less
sweet-tempered man would have
often been driven frantic by the
constant interruptions, the
continual demands made upon
him by all sorts of people. . .
But it was in his intercourse
with   children   that Marx  was
perhaps most charming. Surely
never did children have a- more
delightful    play-fellow.     My
earliest  recollection  of him is
when I was about three years
old,     and    "Moor"    (Marx's
nickname  because of his dark
complexion) was carrying me on
his   shoulder round our small
garden in Grafton Terrace, and
putting convolvulus flowers in
my   brown   curls.   Mohr   was
admittedly a spendid horse.. .
But if Moor was an excellent
horse,   he   had  a   still   higher
qualification. He was a unique,
an unrivaled story-teller. . . To
my sisters - / was then too small
- he told tales as they went for
walks,    and    the    tales    were
measured by miles, not chapters.
"Tell us another mile, " was the
cry of the two girls.
And Moor would also read to
his children. Thus to me, as to
my sisters before me, he read the
whole of Homer, the whole
Niebelungen Lied, Gudrun, Don
Quixote, the Arabian Nights,
etc. As to Shakespeare he was
the Bible of our house, seldom
out of our hands or mouths. By
the time I was six I knew scene
upon scene of Shakespeare by
heart. . .
Quebec week
Mon. Oct. 18-Fri. Oct. 22
"La premiere liberte est de vouloir,
pouvoir, savoir parler a qui Con veut,
quand on veut, comme on veut, de
koskonveu dans la langue du Kebek. A
un moment donne TOULMONDE est
demande au parloir."
—raoul luoar yaugud duguay
speaking:
Tues. 12:30 LEANDRE BERGERON sub
ballroom
Thurs. 12:30 PIERRE BOURGAULT sub
ballroom
reading:
Wed. 12:30 RAOUL DUGUAY sub art
gallery
Fri. 12:30 PAUL CHAMBERLAIN sub art
gallery
films:
Mon. and Fri. 12:30 UN PAYS SANS BON
SENS sub ballroom
Students and professors are encouraged to
devote at least one hour this week to discuss
the Quebec State.
A Special Events Presentation, created by the
education committee of the human
government.
W:S?
Ss
■ym
Friday, October  15, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
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THE
ULTIMATE
EXPERIENCE
ncHNiooLori
Language lifted
out of the ordinary
By TED LYND
George Bowering, Touch, selected poems
1960-70, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto,
1971.	
This is national George Bowering Month
in Canada. McClelland & Stewart have
published the selected poems of the
country's best known 'younger' poet (age
36), and the elegant Coach House Press has
brought out Geneve, his most recent suite, as
well as The Story So Far, an anthology of
short prose edited by Bowering which bids
to define what's happening in Canadian
experimental writing.
Touch, Bowering's selected poems of the
last decade, is, as reviewers often
mysteriously say, an uneven book. (Which
simply means that the reviewer dislikes more
of the poems than he likes.)
Bowering, for all the uncertainty of this
book, is a strong, serious poet. He knows
what the job is all about, as he precisely says
in a poem for William Carlos Williams, one
of his early masters:
Language lifted
out of the ordinary
into the illumination
of poetry.
Where Bowering sticks to the
particularity of known objects, persons and
places — which is the lesson of Williams — is
where he best displays his strength. You find
it in a landscape sharply caught in a
relationship:
The yellow trees
along the river
are dying I said
they are in
their moment of life
you said.
You find it in the poems that move
specifically along one of those Alberta
highways Bowering writes about, or in the
poems about his ancestors. The best poem in
the book, hands down, is 'The Descent',
where he moves in, through a tangle of
photographs, to the presence of a part of
himself that exists in the invoked images of
his grandfather. Here Bowering cuts deeply
and cleanly into feeling.
the eyes in the pictures
straight without desire
-like mine
it is me in
outlandish clothes, long wool
bathing suits, plus-fours, white
shoes, holding tennis racquet
me staring fixedly at the invisible
rigid camera
beside a jazzy black car
with white canvas top
spoke wheels resting on dusty road
somewhere 1927 Okanagan
highway beside rocky blasted cliff
over dangerous drop into water below
Where he goes wrong are in the numerous
poems whose shape seems preconceived and
the poet is constrained to fill in the space, a
procedure which is just the opposite of
discovering the poem as you go into it.
Large chunks of the book are taken up
with ambitious projects: the hopeless task of
writing a serio-comic epic about baseball; the
effort to resurrect an Indian legend into a
language that doesn't sound like American
Anthropologist; an utterly mysterious affair
called 'Mars' which has the program of each
poem being about a number; and the title
poem, 'Touch', which is certainly a
completely serious work, but whose
intention never becomes clear to this reader.
When I say 'ambitious', I don't mean that
word in a bad sense. As a poet, Bowering
isn't an opportunist. He doesn't simply take
the easy roads. He tackles experience, as it
comes, in every form, and doggedly follows
out the possibility of the poem that is
suggested to him. Sometimes he nearly
brings off the unlikeliest prospects. In the
giant baseball poem he decides to cram
everything in: the heavenly muses, his
childhood relationship to the game, the life
of Ted Willians, the death of a poet named
Jack Spicer, and the universe shaped like a
baseball. Well, of course, it doesn't work,
but it's a good failure, if such a thing is
possible. Not even Bowering's considerable
wit and generosity can save it, but
nonetheless, you know it's a poem that's fun
to hear.
Touch arrives at a convenient moment. In
a recent reading Bowering gave at the
Vancouver Art Gallery, he read from his
work-in-progress, Autobiology, a book in
which he returns, in prose poems, to his
literal origins, in the small-towns of British
Columbia's orchard country. These poems
were as good as anything I've heard of
Bowering's. It seems to me that the new
work he's doing picks up from the things I
think are best in this first selection, Touch,
which despite its problems, is an important
and readable book.
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSJEY
Friday, October  15,   1971 Deeper and deeper into the mysteries
By JANET KASLO
b.p. Nichol, Monotones, Talonbooks,
Vancouver, 1971.
Can't figure this one out.
Startsvoff perfectly sensibly. Picture of
a farm house in the background, lots of
turned up ground and growing things up
front. Printed in that old-fashioned photo
color, kind of brownish.
Then the first poem. Roman numeral
"I".
ou t of the dark    wood
workings
of the mind's
memories    we are
alone
move
deeper & deeper
the mysteries
into
the paths
windings     bring you
home &    forever
homely the
homily
simply
to praise you
praise you forever
simply
to praise you
Up to that point, fine. Farm, rural
scene, process of poetry ("out of the
dark . .."), the return home — quite clear
and very elegant.
After that I'm lost.
Turns out there are 100 poems, of
which about 20 appear in this book.
Don't mean to be compulsive, but what
happened to the others?
Also, can't figure out what it's about.
Landscapes at the beginning, then a blank
page, and suddenly we skip to number
"XI", and a run of three poems
driving back    up past
the headwaters of
the humber
broken mills & dams
the country actual
the time confused
and that leads to "terra/earth/mother of
gods".
Then another blank, suddenly we're at
"XXVII" and poems about horses. Then
it's "L" and woods, a woman, and riding
train.
train moving
into the moon
all memory of motion
piled against
the farmhouse door
Looking at it this way, it seems to
make more sense. Do you suppose that is
what b.p. Nichol means by
"monotones"? What's the opposite?
Polychromes? The poetry here is very
spare, the images are sharp, and
something is hidden, or very fragmented.
Then it's "LX", something about the
farm and the ocean. Now it's "LXXVIII",
and there are saints, fools, and kings.
How'd they get there?
We're at the end:
out of your head the sky is taken
pieces of the moon
Then there's another sepia photo of
b.p. Nichol, wearing a cowboy hat, fuzzy
chin whiskers, smiling, or about to sing.
7r&nccte
Truffaut
V<W-   V*» N*
Feeling nothing
Gerry    Goldberg   and   George
Wright,   I   Am   A   Sensation,
McClelland     and    Stewart,
Toronto,   1971.
Wright's sense of poetry.
Ferlinghetti, Sandburg and
Purdy rub shoulders with
Wallace Stevens, William Blake
and Albert Camus.
If you have a simpering
relative whom you detest for
always wanting to "bridge the
generation gap," this is an ideal
Christmas present.
In the 19th century there
were horrible coffee-table poe try
books. I think they were called
samplers. In the 20th century
there are things like I Am A
Sensation. They are still
horrible.
The components of this type
of non-book include: hip tidbits
of wisdom, poems stuck into
categories, the current fad in
illustrations (tarot cards, comic
strips and movie stills), and
flashy typography meant to
encourage people not to read.
All of this is an ad-man's effort
to make poetry appealing.
The people who put this
thing together approve of poetry
and grooving in the same
syrupy-sickening way that others
approve of going to church on
Sunday. One must assume that
they hate poetry.
It is impossible to know what
to    make    of   Goldberg    and
Fri. & Sat.-
Oct. 15th & 16th
at Hebb Theatre
7:30 & 9:30-75c
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AWARENESS GROUPS
FOR INFORMATION PHONE
ALLAN COHEN 228-9631
JOHN MATE 731-7971
ANNOUNCING THE OPENING OF
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Transfers to and from Lodge
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ski area as specified
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5700 University Blvd.
224-4391
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LEADING
TRAVEL
ORGANIZATION
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or 228-2980       (1-4 p.m.)
Priday, October 15, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
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Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,  1971 Friday, October  15,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
Alberta Student Association gets reprieve
LAKE ISLE, Alberta (CUP) -
The Alberta Association of
Students, jeopardized by a
University of Alberta student
union recommendation to do
away with the association's
permanent secretariat, v/as
reprieved last weekend at its
annual conference here.
The UASU which had been
having budget problems, proposed
a restructuring of the AMS which
would have reduced the
association to an informal liaison
between student presidents.
UASU respresentatives said
they could lobby more effectively
with the provincial government
than they could as a member of
the association.
Later when the smaller Alberta
schools protested, they modified
their position.
Letters
Women
I regret that my fatigue left the
question period at the Tuesday
night women's studies program
less than adequately answered.
I would like to correct that
now.
The names of women who have
devoted their lives to women's
rights are legion. Mary
Wollstonecraft raised her voice in
support of emancipation for
women in 1792. Beatrice Webb
became one of the outstanding
social investigators of her time
when the appalling conditions of
the industrial workers penetrated
public consciousness and created
among the daughters and wives of
the ruling class a "collective sense
of sin".
Florence Nightingale created a
new career for women as hospital
nurses; Elizabeth Fry, the Quaker,
worked for prison reform;
Joesphine Butler promoted better
education for women in England.
And I like to think that the
nameless wife (history does not
recall her name) whom Henry
Cook of Effingham, Surrey, SOLD
in Croydon Market for the sum of
one shilling ("In England, the
right of the husband to sell his
wife has been retained down to
our time," reported Ralph Waldo
Emerson in 1856) all helped to
raise the consciousness of the day.
In regard to the question on
the future of the family, in my
opinion if marriage — for those
who choose it - ever had a time
for success, that time is now,
when marriage and the care of
children can be a joint
responsibility of two consenting
adults; when tenderness,
compassion and nurturing are
human qualities both sexes share;
when the terms male and female
have no qualifications or
expectations that destroy the
spontaneity and unique potential
of the individual.
Therese Spitzer
Graduate student
Liz Ltd.
There seem to be a few
students around who have fairly
recent experience of the Soviet
Union, Cuba and other socialist
countries. Sad to say, this is not
true for China. You can imagine
how happy we were that, finally,
Legal aid class
Free legal aid classes will be
held Sundays from 2 p.m. to 5:30
p.m. at the Partisan Party Survival
Center, 666 Keefer.
The classes, offered by the
People's Defence Fund in
cooperation with the Coalition for
Community Control of Police,
will inform people of their rights
in defending themselves against
such police acts as harassment.
there was a student who is
personally familiar to many of us
going to visit China.
Steve Garrod, we felt, was a
person who could have told it like
it is. He has already won our
respect by his bold accuracy, in
informing the royal family how
useless and unwanted they really
are. We can't ask for a better
ambassador to a socialist nation
which has always shown
friendliness towards the Canadian
working class.
The University of Calgary
delegates said the larger
institutions have a duty to the
"emerging campuses".
The final vote, the UASU
resolution was defeated 28
delegates to nine, with each
university having a proportional
number of delegates to their
student populations.
In a further conference report,
UASU   spokesman   Bill   Avison
So please go and do it, Steve. If
the Human Government is going
to collapse, it will do so anyway,
regardless of whether or not you
stick around. However, any
government which is really
"human" shouldn't become
crippled by a month's absence of
any particular individual. Think
again, and let's get on with the
Cultural Revolution.
Elizabeth Windsor Co. Ltd.,
Buckingham Palace
London, WC 1, England
presented facts on student
financing at the U of A for
discussion.
"Undergraduates get only an
average of $250 a year in
provincial grants and loans, as
opposed to $1,800 for masters
students and $2,700 for doctoral
students," Avison said.
He said that the average
post-secondary student comes
from a family with an income
twice the provincial average, and
added that female students
average only half the amount in
provincial grants and loans that
males receive.
"The savings of students living
at home are about $450 a year
more than those of students who
live away from home, whereas
provincial authorities, in
calculating loans and grants, figure
students living at home should
save $800, or nearly double," said
Avison.
Jobs still scarce
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canadian employment took another
nosedive during September, facing the Trudeau government with the
worst unemployment record since 1961.
The seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate for the total work
force during September was 7.1 per cent, the highest for any month in
ten years, and the seasonally-adjusted rate for workers under 25 years
of age was an astronomical 12.2 per cent.
The job market, in view of U.S. president Richard Nixon's new
economic policies, is expected to worsen in the months ahead.
Conservative opposition leader Robert Stanfield, attacked the
government Thursday, saying "1 would feel very unhappy with my
position, if there was not an upturn in the economy in 1971 and if
unemployment did not trend downward on a seasonally-adjusted
basis."
LnJ
L_l!@gQ(2_
Moving with the Times
This year Canadian Hoechst
marks its eighteenth year of
growth in Canada by moving into
new custom-built Montreal
headquarters. The Canadian expansion has been closely linked
to the worldwide development of
Hoechst, which is now among
the world's top five chemical
companies, with worldwide sales
that last year totalled approximately 3.5 billion dollars.
In Canada, sales have almost
doubled in the past three years.
The new St. Laurent head office
and warehouse buildings will
provide space for a 100% increase in the company's head
office staff, and have been designed for expansion to accomodate increased Canadian production.
Research: Window to
the Future
Today's research creates the
products of tomorrow. One-third
of Hoechst's current sales come
from products which did not exist
10 years ago. And with worldwide sales approximating close to
3.5 billion dollars last year,
Hoechst spent close to 100 million in pure research, and on
laboratory buildings and equipment. The results of this investment decide Hoechst's position
in future markets, including
Canada.
Helping Build Canada
Products and ideas from Hoechst
have touched and improved the
quality of people's lives in every
area around the world, in a
hundred countries on six continents. As an affiliate of the
worldwide Hoechst organization,
Canadian Hoechst has a full century of research and achievement
to draw upon In Canada,
Hoechst is an autonomous company employing Canadians to
serve Canadian needs
This new building is just one of
the more visible indications of
Canadian Hoechst Limited's
continuing investment in
Canada.
Hoechst in Canada concerns itself with supplying both the
present and future needs of Canadians. The range of products
and services covers the spectrum
through industrial chemicals,
dyestuffs, plastics, human and
veterinary medicines, pharmaceuticals, and textile fibres.
Hoechst products and services,
Hoechst techniques and know-
how in these fields, combined
with a large international fund of
experience, have given the Company a reputation for expertise
which takes constant striving to
live up to. Hoechst likes it that
way. So do their customers, here
and around the world. Hoechst
thinks ahead
REG T M HOECHST
HOECHST
Canadian Hoechst Limited
4045 Cote Vertu
Montreal 383, Quebec
40 Lesmill Road
Don Mills, Ontario Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,   1971
'Tween classes
FRIDAY
POETRY READING
Canadian poet Michael Ondaatje,
SUB art gallery, 12:30.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Will Wilding warbles "Worship",
SUB party room, 12:30.
ABORTION ACTION COMMITTEE
Meeting SUB 210, 12:30.
GAY LIBERATION FRONT
Organizational meeting to see if
gays on this campus want to
overcome their alienation and
repression, SUB 213, 12:30.
ALLIANCE-FRANCAISE—
FRENCH CLUB
Slides of France. Come have lunch
and speak French, I.H. Upper
Lounge, noon.
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Worship and communion service,
Lutheran Campus Centre, 7:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE —
BEER GARDEN
All instruments welcome, come and
jam every Friday, I.H. Upper
Lounge, 4-8 p.m.
SATURDAY
NVC
Wine    and    cheese.    Admission    at
door,    SUB    207,    8    p.m.-l    a.m.
MUSLIM   STUDENTS'ASSOCIATION
Everyone welcome, I.H. Upper
Lounge, 3-5 p.m.
SUNDAY
BICYCLE CLUB
Campus cycle tour. Bring a lunch,
SUB plaza, south side, 11 a.m.
MONDAY
EL CIRCULO
The   Chilean   Consul   will  speak  in
Spanish   on   recent  events in Chile,
I.H., 12:30.
UBC WOMEN'S LIBERATION
All    women    welcome,    Biological
Sciences 2449, 8 p.m.
ED STUDENT ASSOCIATION
J.  Hasell  from   "Outward  Bound",
Ed 204, 12:30.
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General     meeting.    New    members
welcome, SUB 211, 12:30.
CANADIAN CROSSROADS
INTERNATIONAL
Overseas volunteer programs.-Short
term   —   summer   '72.   Information
and slides, I.H. 402, 12:30.
PAKISTANI  REFUGEES
Films   and   discussion,   12:30,  SUB
207.
TUESDAY
ED STUDENT ASSN,
Dr.      L.      Brown,      "Outdoor
Education", Ed 100, 12:30.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting, SUB 215, 12:30.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Planning meeting, activists welcome,
SUB 213, 12:30.
SAILING CLUB
General    meeting    plus   lecture   on
skippering, Bu. 104, 12:30.
PAKISTANI REFUGEES
Teach-in   from    12:30   to   2:30   in
SUB theatre.
WEDNESDAY
ED STUDENT ASSN.
L.  Mandrake "Special  lecture", Ed
100, 12:30.
THURSDAY
ALPHA OMEGA
General meeting with guest speaker
John     Kolasky,     "Contemporary
CAMPUS
CYCLE
TOUR
Sunday 11 a.m.
S.U.B. Plaza
bring lunch
UBC Bicycle Club
LADIES
NIGHT
every
MONDAY night
YOUR FATHER'S
MUSTACHE
Vancouver's
First and Finest
Roaring 20's
Banjo Cabaret
Lunch is served Mon.-Fri.
from 11:30 til 2:30 p.m.
Open nightly Mon. thru Sat.
929 West Pender Street
687-1919
BIRD CALLS
UBC'S STUDENT
TELEPHONE
DIRECTORY
AVAILABLE
NEXT THURSDAY
Only 75e
The Most Useful
Book on Campus
UBC'S "WHO'S WHO"
eeBIRD CALLS=
Dissent
12:30.
in   Ukraine",   SUB   105-A,
FRIDAY
ED STUDENT ASSN.
Indian   Ed  —  videoftlm   plus  panel
discussion, Ed 100, 12:30.
SATURDAY
ED STUDENT ASSN.
B. Kerlich "Open Area School", Ed
204, 12:30.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) -
Chief blorg Car-Knee came chiefly
blorg Purse-Key upon a time
person Dikbets rage didn't quite.
Meantime sourse said, "Think
revolution, review books."
OWNERS!
Come Down And See Our Wide Selection of Goodies
For 1200-510-240Z - Everything From Front Spooks
To Steering Wheel Covers
1845 - W. 4 Ave.
Vancouver
732-3731
CLASSIFIED
Rotos: Campus — 3 Unas, 1 day $1,00; 3 dayS $2.50.
Commercial — 3 fine*, 1 day $1.25; additional Knot 30e; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ada are not accepted by telephone and ere payable m advance. Deadline ia
tt:W ajn., the day before piMicaticm. FiOOicatiotm Office, Rm. Mi SUB, UBC, Van, &
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE TO RAM - - - TOTEM
Park Ballroom - - - Sat., Oct. 16,
»-l:00 a.m. - - - $1.00 residents;
$1.50 non-residents.
Greetings
12
FUR COATS $19 & LESS. PAPPAS
Bros. New Annex, 459-461 Hamilton
at Victory Square. Double fur bedspreads $79. Open Fri. nite 7:00-
9:30 p.m. Sat. 11:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Satisfaction guaranteed!
Lost  & Found
13
ONE GREEN CONTACT LENS
found in girls' washroom in SUB.
Ask in Room 236.	
LOST: STERLING SILVER CHARM
bracelet. Great sentimental value.
Reward offered. Contact Sharon,
263-4134.	
LOST—ABOUT TWO WEEKS AGO,
one round, flat, mauve-purple
crocheted hat on North end of
campus between Buchanan, Brock
and Chancellor. Crushing sentimental (?) value. PLEASE contact
Jane Flick, Brock 168 or 733-5684.
LOST — AQUAMARINE RING —
great sentimental value. Generous
reward offered. Contact Iris Rich,
224-1)873.	
WILL THE PERSON WHO AC-
cidently took the mottled light
brown suede jacket from the rack
at the Back From the Bush Bash
please contact J. Franzen c/o UBC
Geology Dept. office and leave a
•message. Phone 228-2449.
Rides & Car Pools
14
WHEELCHAIR STUDENT IN Vicinity of 41st & Nanaimo requires
ride Monday thru Thursday. Call
Audrey Hill,  434-7052.
Special Notices
15
SUNDAY EVENING WORSHIP —
7:00-7:45 p.m. Chapel of Vancouver
School of Theology. 6050 Chancellor. Sponsored by residence
members and Student Christian
Movement.	
SUNDAY FIRESIDE & COFFEE.
8:00 p.m. Guest: Geoff Huddard —
detached worker. 'Subject: "Drug
Use Among Young People." —
Lounge 6050 Chancellor (U.S.T.)
All welcome!	
DISCOUNT ON STEREOS — SAVE
dollars! Example: tuner-amplifier
automatic turntable, 2 speakers,
regular $199.00 your cost $125.00.
2-year parts guarantee. Carry
Sony, Sansui, Dual. Akai. A.G.S.,
Warfdale. Phone 732-6769 for savings.
WIN SET OF GREAT BOOKS AND
earn $123.00 week minimum doing
it. 687-8872.
THE PURCELL STRING QUARTET
at Grad Student Centre, Tues., 19
Oct., 8 p.m. Tickets 75c each at
the Grad Centre office.
MEETING OF UBC MUSLIM STU-
dents Association, Saturday, 16th
Oct. at 3:00-5:00 p.m. in Upper
Lounge of International House.
Everybody welcome!
THE LUTHERAN CAMPUS CEN-
tre — A human place where there
are many questions and few
answers'and much in between.
Come by and ask your questions
and share your answers.
THE GRIN BIN
has  the  largest selection  in
Canada of posters
and  pop art.
Also Jokes, Gifts and 24" x 36" Photo
Blowups from your own prints and
negatives.
Enquiries welcome at
THE GRIN BIN
3209 W. Broadway
across from the Liquor Store
Call 738-23 il
Special Notices (Cont.)
15
CAMPUS CHURCHES — UNIV.
Blvd., Sunday worship St. Anselm's
Anglican, 8 and 11 a.m. — University Hill United, 11 a.m. Church
School through Grade 9 at 11 a.m.,
both churches.	
DANCE   TO   RAM   -   -    -   TOTEM
Park Ballroom Sat., Oct. 16—
9-1:00 a.m.  -  -  - $1.00 residents:
$1.50 non-residents.
Wanted—Information
17
ANYONE WHO SAW THE PICKUP
truck hit me at the Sumas border
demonstration please call 224-7326
or leave your name with AMS
office. I have been charged!	
FRIEND of CORNELIA MARTENS,
Doris Baum is looking for Diane
Goldie. Phone 321-0922.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
ARTISTS — PAINTINGS NEEDED
to be sold in a new. attractive
gallery. Phone 853-2400, House of
Fine Art, Abbotsford. B.C.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1951 AUSTIN. GOOD THROUGHOUT Snow tires. $75 or trade for
good guitar. 10 speed. 224-5537.
1970 MG MIDGET. ONLY 8,500 MI.
Radials, mags, reel, seats, undrct.
tonn. Must sell. Wife is pregnant
and can't fit inside. $2,150. Phone
263-9044.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
CAR REPAIRS TO
VOLVO,MERCEDES
PORSCHE, VOLKSWAGEN
1  Factory trained mechanics
h  Fully Guaranteed Work
'  Reasonable Rates
. We also now repair
, Toyota, & Mazda Cars
SALES AND SERVICE
8914 Oak St. 263-8121
VW SPECIAL—REBUILT MOTORS
and trans, exchange service, also
repairs. Brakes relining, $25. King
and link pins, $30. 683-8078 — 760
Denman St. (rear).	
35
Photography
utht Hen* anti gutter
\{{,1       Cameras!
3010 W. BDWY. 736-7833
also  at  Denman   Place
Want   to   shoot   from
the waist?
Don't waste  money  with costly
accessories!
RICOH TLS 401
Dual Metering,  Dual Viewing
17  Different  Lenses
Rip-offs   NOT   our  Specialty!
Scandals
37
RUBBER BIBLES AT WHOLE-
sale prices. Place deposit with
C.I.C. Chem. 162. Tues. noon at
latest.	
C.I.C. LAB. COATS ARE STILL IN
stock. Only $4.00 each. Chem. 162,
noon hours.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS. PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends. Phone Shari at
738-8745. Reasonable rates.	
FAST & ACCURATE TYPING IN
mv home on IBM Exec. Reasonable.   685-1982.
Typing (Conl.)
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
Phone 263-5317.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced essay & thesis typist.
Reasonable rates. Mrs. Ellis, —
321-3838.	
RETIRED PUBLISHER WILL EDIT
essays, theses, mss. for grammar,
punctuation, syntax, spelling,
clarity, etc. 263-6565.	
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
neatly, accurately. 25c a page. Call
Carol, 732-9007 (after 6 p.m., Mon.-
Friday).	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SOMEONE TO CARE FOR TWO
children every school Friday, 9:00
a.m. to 1:00 or 2:00 p.m. $1.00 per
hour. 266-8492.	
GIVE HELP, GET DOLLARS!  UBC
Tutoring Centre needs tutors. All
courses. Register SUB 228. 12:30-
2:30. Immediate need for chemistry,
physics, computer science.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
TAI CHI CHUAN: LEARN THIS
graceful art of meditation-inaction: also for centering, increased health, dexterity & self-defense
from Raymond Chung. N.A.'s foremost master ($6 month). Also joint
hands practise for the experienced.
Contact Doug Seeley, 228-4143.
HATHA YOGA CLASSES AT
Shyam Yoga sh ram beginning
week of Oct. 18, 206 E. 6th. 879-3703
 MEDITATION	
BIG CLASSES CONFUSING? GET
individual help with a tutor. Reasonable rates — all courses. UBC
Tutoring Centre, SUB 228, 12:30-
2:30.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ARIA GUITAR, CLASSICAL, NY-
Ion strung. Only 6 mo. old. Excellent   condition.   $30.   Call   732-5905.
KENWOOD KR-4140 95 W. AM/FM
tuner, Lenco L-75 turntable w/$60
cartridge. JMI Monitor V speakers,
Pioneer headphones (SE-45). $950
value. Offers! 987-3897.	
DIAMOND WEDDING & ENGAGE-
ment rings, both for only $79 at
your campus jeweler. The Diamond
Room, 2109 Allison, next door to
World Wide Travel.	
CUTE BLACK LABRADOR PUPPY
3 months old. Female, reg. Phone
Pat, 985-0707 after 5 p.m.	
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms 8*
ACCOM. 1 ROOM, $50. KETTLE,
toaster, fridge. Non-smokers. Men
only Mrs. M. Jambresic. 4570 W.
12th Ave. 228-8408.	
Room & Board
82
MEAL PASSES AVAILABLE AT
the DKE House, 5765 Agronomy,
224-9691. Enjoy excellent home-
cooked meals on campus at prices
you can afford.	
GREAT FOOD! ROOM & BOARD
at Delta Upsilon Frat House. Also
meal tickets. Call 224-9841.	
ROOM AND BOARD $85.00 MONTH.
2120 Wesbrook Cres. Dan Dalton,
224-9073.       _____
83
Furn. Apts.
FEMALE TO SHARE 1 BEDROOM
apt 7th & Vine. $75.00 inclusive.
Phone 731-0969.
"MATURE" MALE STUDENT
wanted to share bsmt. suite with
Van Art School student, if musical, great. $55 month. 1705 W. 10th,
No. 5. After 5 p.m.	
Unf. Apis. 84
STUDENT SPECIAL
3 Rooms of Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278 Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
LARGE, ONE BEDROOM UNFUR-
nished apartment. Available Nov.
1st. 3520 West Broadway. $120. Friday, October  15, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
— * —««-— •■■*•- -*--•
Sailing team victorious
The CIAU Sailing
Championships were hosted again
this year by the Royal Military
College at Kingston, Ont.
The UBC team defended their
title, this year winning by a very
convincing margin to capture the
Grant Trophy.
These are the only two years
UBC has won this championships
which were first sailed in 1936.
Nine schools from across
Canada competed, with Queens
University a distant second and
Trent University third.
. UBC's two crews consisted of
Bob Crossley and Mike Schnetzler
who sailed in division A, and Alan
Drinkwater and Frank Parsons
who sailed in division B.
The two divisions raced
separately with Crossley and
Schnetzler getting five firsts in
five races. Drinkwater and Parsons
won their division getting two
firsts, two seconds and a third.
Both crews won their divisions
and ontotal points they were way
ahead for the overall
championships.
Crossley and Schnetzler are
veterans, having sailed for UBC
for four years. Drinkwater and
Parsons, however, were competing
in their first intercollegiate
regatta.
The racing was in almost ideal
conditions with winds going from
very strong to very light in
strength.
Grid 'Birds try again
The number one ranked
University of Manitoba Bisons are
looking to make it number two
against the UBC 'Bird football
team.
When the teams last met in
Winnipeg the 'birds lost 36-20 in
one of their better efforts this
year.
Intramurals
CYCLE DRAG entry deadline
is October 18.
SWIMMING preliminary
rounds start Monday at noon.
BADMINTON ladder
tournament winds up on Monday.
All competitors A-Z must
compete at this time.
BASKETBALL preliminary
schedule is now up. Check outside
the Intramural office for dates
and times.
Women's
curling
The UBC women's curling
team needs to field four teams
this year in order to enter the
Women's Zone Provincial
Playdowns.
All interested women curlers
are asked to appear at practice on
Wednesday 6:15-8:15 p.m. and
Saturdays 10:15-12:15 p.m., or
phone the Women's Athletic
Department 228-2295.
Coach Frank Gnup likes the
way his offense has been playing.
"Quarterback Jim Tarves
moves the ball pretty good. He's
the best passer we've had here in
five years."
Last Saturday the 'Birds lost
18-7 to Saskatchewan.
That was UBC's fifth straight
loss.
Saturday's game against the
Bisons is at 2:00 at Thunderbird
Stadium.
Women's hockey
This weekend the Thunderettes
field hockey team meets
university teams from Calgary,
Edmonton, and Victoria in round
robin competition.
At stake is the Western
Division Intercollegiate
Championship.
The games start Friday at 1
p.m. and continue through
Saturday at Chris Spencer Fields.
'Bird hockey
The UBC Thunderbird hockey
team begins their exhibition
schedule Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at
the Winter Sports Centre. The
'Birds are favoured to win over
the Coquitlan High Grade Heaters.
LOSE 20 POUNDS
IN TWO WEEKS!
Famous U-S. Women Ski Team Diet
During the non-snow off season the U.S. Women's
Alpine Ski Team members go on the "Ski Team" diet
to lose 20 pounds in two weeks. That's right-20
fiounds in 14 days! The basis of the diet is chemical
ood action and was devised by a famous Colorado
physician especially for the U.S. Ski Team. Normal
energy is maintained (very important!) while reducing. You keep "full"—no starvation—because the diet
is designed that way! It's a diet that is easy to follow
whether you work, travel or stay at home.
This is, honestly a fantastically successful diet. If it
weren't, the U.S. Women's Ski Team wouldn't be permitted to use it! Right? So, give yourself the same
break the U.S. Ski Team gets. Lose weight the scientific, proven way. Even if you've tried all the other
diets, you owe it to yourself to try the U.S. Women's
Ski Team Diet. That is, if you really do want to lose
20 pounds in two weeks. Order today. Tear this out
as a reminder.
Send only $1.00 ($1.25 for Rush Service)-cash is
O.K.-to: Ski Team Diet, P.O. Box 15493, San
Diego, Calif. 92115. Don't order unless you expect
to lose 20 pounds in two weeks! Because that's
what the Ski Team Diet will do!
On Saturday morning the races
were sailed in 15 m.p.h. winds,
but the winds built up all day
with the final race being sailed in
winds gusting to 25 m.p.h.!
In this race only four of the
nine boats finished the course
with three boats capsizing, ami
many boats sailed in to shore with
broken equipment.
The races on Sunday were
easier on the boats and the crews
with the wind being fairly light.
The UBC sailing team is very
strong in the Pacific Northwest as
well.
They compete in regattas all
year in this district and are hoping
for big things at the North
American championships this year
in San Diego.
UPON PRESENTATION OF THIS AD
(5S  Gastown  g)
i Wax 1
-o
3D
^ Museum s|
21 WATER STREET,    685-2751
O
m
OPEN DAILY 11 A.M. TO 11 P.IVi.
Always on Sunday . , .
WORSHIP
t
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
SUNDAY - 10:30 a.m. Study - 9:30 a.m.
FOOTBALL
UBC Thunderbirds
vs.
Univ. of Manitoba Bisons
Sat. • Oct. 16 • 2 p.m
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
Free admission to UBC students on presentation of A.M.S. card
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
rfl
□
cfl
a
tf]
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY. VANCOUVER 9. BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name    	
Residence
Address 	
City-
Phone: Home..
Prov.
Office..
Occupation - ..— -..   .  	
Age         Married o Divorced D      Male Q
Separated □  Never Married □ Female □
Date first licensed to drive — ... .... .
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in any accident in the past five years?
Yes O No n (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?    .... 	
Are you now insured?     	
Date current policy expires    	
This coupon  is designed solely to enable non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile	
No. of cylinders 	
Horsepower	
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv..
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area.,	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1 -'       Car No. 2
...Days
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Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
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FPR UBC 36 Page 16
THE      -UBYSSEY
Friday, October  15,  1971
let the spirit of revolution come'
let the revolution come
come spirit of the great wind
we anarchists adore thurtder and
storms their benefit and
beauty
the tempest has nitrogen sperm
oxygen
the unleashing of elemental
physiques...
That is the beginning of Julian
Beck's first song to quicken the
revolution. At 1:30 today, he,
Judith Malina, their daughter and
This piece was written by
Julian Wake, a member of the
AMS special event committee.
one other member of the Living
Theatre will be on the main floor
of the Student Union Building,
UBC.
Some history: spring 1970
celebrated pacifist Living Theatre
invited to Brazil by Brazilian
artists to help raise cultural and
Poet to read
Canadian poet Michael
Ondaatje will read his poetry in
the SUB art gallery noon today.
Ondaatje is the youngest poet
to have his work included in The
Penguin Book of Canadian Verse.
His poems have also appeared in
the anthologies New Wave Canada
and The Oxford Book of Modern
Canadian Poetry.
He is the author of three books
The Dainty Monsters (1967), The
Man With Seven Toes (1969) and
The Collected Works of Billy the
Kid (1970).
Ondaatje is the fourth poet to
read in the series sponsored hy the
Alma Mater Society special events
committee.
Admission is free.
Music for fun
Anyone interested in playing
musical instruments for fun, but
in a concert band format, is
asked to come to the
Marpole-Oakridge Community
Centre, 990 W. 59 Ave., on
Sunday between 1:00 and 3:00
p.m.
The group consists of UBC
students who have old
instruments lying around, and
want to play them, said one
member.
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY  GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
artistic consciousness in an
underdeveloped part of the world;
study Brazilian reality with poor
people, workers, artists and
students; prepare for new work, a
vast theatrical spectacle of 150
plays, The Legacy of Cain; three
public performances, two with
students for a village square at
invitation    of   respective    cities;
1
—kelly booth photo
SO WHO SAYS you can't sit in the middle of a corridor without a
shirt but lots of pants to make up for it? Besides, the doors can't talk
and the clocks don't even tick.
Women's liberation here
The UBC women's liberation
group is continuing this year.
Last year the UBC women's
liberation group had a large
membership, since then splinter
action groups have formed, said a
spokeswoman for the group.
The group is now looking for
interested women who would like
to discuss the situation of women
in today's society with other
women at 8 p.m. in the bio-sci
building 2449 on Mondays.
It was decided that only
women would be able to attend
these meetings, as many women
'feel they cannot discuss the
situation of women with men in
the group, said the spokeswoman.
However, if many women feel
they would like men to
participate, this can be changed,
shrsaid.
The group meets
independently of the Canadian
Woman: Our Story program,
which is on Tuesdays.
another created for and
performed with eighty school
children.
Invited to premiere The Legacy
of Cain at the Winter Festival at
Ouro Preto, Minas Cerais. Some
weeks after arrival, Festival Board
retracts the invitation without
explanation. The group decides to
remain there. July 1st, eighteen
members of the group arrested for
alleged marijuana possession. One
Brazilian member beaten and
beaten and tortured with
electroshock to genitals, one
Peruvian electric cattle-prodded.
To prevent further torture of
co-workers, Becks signs a blank
paper "confession".
August: Living Theatre
deported from Brazil following
mass mobilization of artists,
friends, workers, students, and
intellectuals throughout the
world.
Some local history: to raise
bread to bring Julian and Judith
to UBC, John Brockington, head
of Theatre Department, wrote a
letter to the Special Lectures
Committee. Five hundred dollars
forthwith granted by chairman
Malcolm MacGregor. Two weeks
later, following procrastination,
$500 unilaterally withdrawn. The
administration have done their
research: know your enemy. They
know theirs: imagination.
And the Living Theatre?
Founded twenty years ago by
Julian and Judith. Exploring,
learning new ways of interacting
with one another publicly.
Change forms, change content,
change consciousness, unleash
potential, change levels of
engagement, change society:
survival necessities. Theatre as
alchemy.
basta
what no one has ever told us
but which we can discern in
visions and hope
will bring  the apples to the
mouths
I am pleading for imagination
as the solution.
Approval given to
first budget reading
By   IAN   LINDSAY
Alma Mater Society council gave approval Thursday to the first
reading of the 1971-72 budget after making slight amendments.
. A three-part amendment, moved by AMS treasurer David Mole,
called for a $1,300 increase in revenues from business ventures, thus
offsetting expenditures of $1,000 for AMS stationary and a $300
margin for-the section of the budget dealing with student organizing.
The amendment was passed by a 15 to eight vote.
Amendments not approved were law representative Grant
Burnyeat's proposals to cut The Ubyssey's budget by $7,000 to
$30,000 with an increase of $3,500 in the intramural sport's budget,
$2,500 extra for the university clubs committee budget and $1,000
extra for the undergraduate societies.
The proposed Ubyssey budget cut would reduce the newspaper to
once a week publication.
The Burnyeat proposals were defeated by a vote of 15 to eight,
the same margin by which the budget was given first reading approval.
The budget now goes back to the budget committee for
modification and approval before returning to council Wednesday for
a final approval requiring a two-thirds majority.
A referendum proposed by the UCC calling for a
non-discretionary grant of 75 cents per student and ten per cent of
any future AMS fee increases directly for the UCC, was referred to
student court after council ruled the referendum's wording
ambiguous.
The student court, consisting of seven law students appointed at
Thursday's meeting, will rule on the wording and, if necessary, reword
the motion before it goes to referendum.
Council also approved a report by the education committee
containing proposals for academic reform and student parity on
faculty committees in the arts faculty. The education committee
hopes reform in arts will lead to improvements in other faculties.
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