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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 26, 1976

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Array B.C. Fed asks Socreds to let NDU live
1
By SUE VOHANKA
The B.C. Federation of Labor
has called on the Social Credit
government to reconsider its
apparent decision to discontinue
funding of Notre Dame University
in Nelson.
Ron Johnson, the federation's
director of educational research,
Wednesday termed the government's position on NDU "a really
backward kind of step."
Universities Council chairman
William Armstrong indicated
recently there is very little chance
the university would get enough
provincial government funding to
continue operating next year.
Last year, the NDP government
gave NDU a $1.8 million grant,
which covered 73 per cent of the
university's budget.,
"And the former education
minister (Eileen Dailly) had made
a commitment to continue funding," Johnson pointed out.
He also said that during the
election campaign premier Bill
Bennett "made commitments that
there would be no jeopardy of NDU
if the Social Credit were elected."
However, in late January,
education minister Pat McGeer
said the new government would
discontinue the grant and asked
the Universities Council to be
responsible for preparing NDU's
budget.
"Without cutting back funds
from the other three provincial
universities, there's not going to be
any funding for NDU," Johnson
said.
Armstrong has said that
university funding generally is not
very encouraging.
Johnson said McGeer should
reconsider NDU's fate because the
university serves the Interior and
the Kootenay area.
He also noted it provides jobs for
48 faculty members and about 100
other staff members, and is one of
the largest employers in the Nelson
area.
Johnson said the government
stand on NDU indicates the
government is dominated by
people who believe that B.C. stops
at Hope.
"I think it's a really backward
kind of step," he said. "The world
doesn't revolve around Vancouver."
Johnson said he hopes that if
THS UBYSSEY
Vol. LVII, No. 55     VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1976   <*$H*>48     228-2301
enough groups and organizations
in the Nelson area protest the
government decision, the government will be forced to change its
position.
"Where governments tend to be
concerned in this province is when
the people in the province begin to
think they're Vancouver
dominated."
Johnson said the labor federation
will urge the government to
reconsider funding NDU when the
federation presents its annual
report to the cabinet.
"I don't know what more it (the
federation) can do," he said. "We
can't really do anything in terms of
advising them (groups within
NDU) as to what they should or
shouldn't be doing."
—doug field photo
SOME PEOPLE don't know how to separate work from leisure as witnessed by library book stacker who
reads during break. Like most students who deal with libraries these days she is probably wondering why
5th level entrance in Main has been closed down. Anybody know?
Lucky few
get bucks
By MARK BUCKSHON
There's about $1 million of provincial government money available to
senior UBC students for summer jobs this year — but the persons
responsible for doling out the cash say only one of 50 eligible students will
get any.
And those who are lucky enough to benefit from the Professions for
Tomorrow program, known as Careers 75 last year, will get the same
wages as in 1975 — between $600 and $750 a month, depending on how
senior the student is — with no provision for inflation.
Program co-ordinator Richard Spratley said the Socreds have chopped
$181,000 from last year's allocation and included education students in the
scheme, who had previously received separate funds from the provincial
education department.
The result of the cutbacks will be a reduction in the number of UBC
students employed to 250 from 500 last summer, Spratley said. Cutback
figures were not available for the rest of B.C.'s students.
The decision by labor minister Allan Williams to suspend the NDP-
initiated program, while he decided whether or not to continue it, means
there will be only three weeks between applications becoming available
March 5 and the labor department's deadline.
Before March 22, the job ideas initiated by students and profs must be
examined and approved by departments and faculties.
The program provides jobs in fields related to academic disciplines and
the money is divided on a per capita basis among UBC's 13 faculties.
A provincial allocation of $1.5 million to UBC, Simon Fraser University
and the University of Victoria was divided Monday by an ad hoc B.C.
Universities Council committee.
In a rare example of student participation in decision-making, three
student representatives were on the 12-member committee and, according to Spratley, the labor department requires student involvement
in decision-making at the department and faculty levels.
But Basil Peters, the UBC student representative on the committee and
a board of governors member, said he doesn't know how much student
input will be allowed at UBC.
Peters said he, Spratley and assistant graduate studies dean Llewelyn
Williams, also a member of the ad hoc committee, will watch the campus-
wide program, but ideas must first be initiated and approved at the
departmental and faculty levels.
Spratley said ideas such as a music department singing group would
have "100 per cent student involvement," but a physics department
research project probably would require co-ordination by professors.
But there isn't that much money to give to the students who apply, who
must have completed three years of university.
See page 2: LIMITED
Why did the Conservatives go for Joe?
Everyone now knows that the Progressive
Conservatives elected a virtual unknown for
their leader at last weekend's convention in
Ottawa. But no matter haw closely you
watch what happens an television, there's
nothing like being there in person lo watch
all the bachraaming (he camera missed.
Ubyssey correspondents Denise Chong
and Maureen Boyd attended the convention
and watched from the floor as. the spectacle
unfolded. In today's paper [ see page 5 also I
a series nf background pieces on the
leadership convention analyzes what led up
to Joe Clark's victory, why the pundits were
wrong and what ihe futun1 r>ui>hr hold for
the haplftsTtitiev who hawi't lasted pov.t>t
since the r);efent>aker yeai*
By DENISE CHONG
OTTAWA — Tangled clothes lines of
campaign banners, abandoned placards,
discarded lapel stick-ons, coffee cup debris
and wilted daffodils — that's Ottawa's civic
centre hangover from the four-day
Progressive Conservative leadership
convention.
Yet the first shift of sweepers had scarcely taken to tht' convention hall's floors
when the political pundits, who had preyed
vulture-like over the candidates on the
campaign trail and during the four days ot
the convention, began their post mortem
dissections
Caught with their pants down by the Joe
Clark 'upwrt' and embarrassed by their pre-
ccimeiition predictions, the pundits,
proclaimed the victory as the "scourge nf
lriefenbaker loyalists." hased on the lout*
fact th.it Claude Wagnei. war defeated
hy   Dielenhaker'h   hle.».sm^  early   in  the
Ivillollllf!
(lark, like mam of the candidates placed
!«ir h.ick in the e.irly running n." the
leadership rare >el w.i.s considered a! lu-si
a dark horse candidate going into the convention.
But through a shrewd, low-key campaign"
gcaredto peak at the convention, he took the
leadership against all pre-convention odds
and defeated the big guns of the Tory party.
At 36. he is the youngest man ever to lead
a major national political party in Canada,
is a moderate left-wing Tory, a thinker and u
professional politician...
To the average Canadian, he is a virtual
unknown
In part, he was shortchanged by the press
- accorded the draught rattier than deluge
treatment given certain other leadership,
candidates.
The media concentrated almost exclusively nn only lho.se envisioned a.s
'contendere.' amonc them Wagner. Brian
Mulroiw}, the slick Montreal Iaw\er. former Liberal cabinet minister Paul Deliver
anil Flora Macdonald the unman candidate
with Ihe fumou> naiiieh.ikr
F'.'wn in pro convent inn week, ihe com
mt iil.ilors i|joke only M Ihi-M  liair trout
runnei" and areiwii !heiu"rl\i»- h\  jnim:
through the mental exercise of thinking up
aU the possible combinations on the final
ballot.
No mention of Clark.
So where had the pundits erred in-their
Sunday miscalculations'?
In vicariously thinking that old demons
See page 8: TORY
P+l
\«B ^
i<& Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February ,26,  1976
Fire hits CUP HQ
OTTAWA (CUP) —Theeditorial
and executive offices of Canadian
University Press were hit by fire
when an exploding light bulb in the
offset press ignited chemical
solvent used in the printing process
and spread from there to an adjacent wall.
The Feb. 18 fire was put out
quickly after firemen arrived, but
not before the $6,000 press was
completely destroyed. Smoke and
water damage was serious,
although news files and the
organization's records were not
damaged.
Initial attempts by CUP printer
Derek Amyot to put out the blaze
with the fire extinguisher located
down  the  hall  from   the  offices
proved futile when it was
discovered that it was empty.
CUP president Francis Fuca
said the three-person national
executive has decided the first
priority is to set up temporary
working facilities to resume
publication of the twice-weekly
national news service. He
estimated it would take "at least a
week, maybe more" before even a
modified service could be put out.
For the present, the national
office staff of. CUP have moved into
the offices of the National Union of
.Students, which are located in the
same building. Telephones for
CUP have been rerouted to the
NUS office until the CUP office is
again operative.
Limited jobs open
From page 1
"There's only about 300 jobs,"
Peters said. "Divide that up into
20,000 (students) and see how few
that is."
Spratley said to be eligible
students must have completed
their third year of study at the end
of the current academic year.
(Also included are students
registered in the second year of
four-year programs in faculties
such as applied science and
commerce.)
Third-year students are paid $600
a month, fourth- and fifth-year
students get $650, and graduate
students and students enrolled in
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
medicine and dentistry get $750.
The amounts are the same as
last year.
"The labor department felt the
wages were too high last year,"
said Spratley. In any case, increases in wages would further
decrease the number of students
who could be employed, he said.
Under last year's program,
students worked in a variety of
projects such as aid for native
Indians and provision of free legal
aid services. Application forms
will be available at departmental
and faculty offices.
mm+—mm—••••••••••
iff
NOTICE
Tuition Fee
Income Tax
Receipts
Available
Dept. of Finance
General Service
Admin. Building
8:30 to 4:30 p.m.
TW PloyhwM Thtotra
Ctntrt tl I.C a.
Ar^*ttk
eonce
and
ena
E
"a satiric fairytale"
by Georg Buchner
directed by Liviu Ciulei
"an extraordinary Theatrical    •
Experience." v
MARCH 1-20
previews Feb. 27 & 28
Tickets: The Boy Box Office: 681-3351
COMING SOON! W. 0. Mitchell's
BACK TO BEULAH
at tba Vancouver to«t Cultural C««t/»
»r«i«fit*d by Th« Playhou** W«w Compan.
AFGHAN"
HOUSE
669-8329
m<h
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NOW OPEN
IMPORTED FASHIONS
FROM AFGHANISTAN
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953 DENMAN STV
ECKANKAR
The Path of Total Awareness
ECKANKAR is a spiritual education. It's moving in today's and
tomorrow's worlds — answering the age old questions . . . "What is life
all about?" "Have I lived before?" "What is my purpose for being here?"
Through ECKANKAR the individual learns to discover the secrets of
existence for himself. The student who has mastered Soul Travel
operates in an atmosphere of inner confidence, inner peace, serenity and
harmony with all things.
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
7:30 Thurs. Feb. 26 S.U.B. 119
SUBFILMSOC
PROUDLY PRESENTS
UTAMLET KUBRICK t|
3
DAYS LEFT!
To Renew Your
SUB AUD. Thur. 7:00
Fri., Sat., Sun. 7:00/9:30
75C,   AMS Card,
no hallucinogens required
"PHOTOGRAPHIC
SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING
Wednesday, March 3rd
8:00 P.M. SUB 215
— elections
— finances
— constitution
FREE REFRESHMENTS
CALCULATOR REPAIRS
FREE ESTIMATES     ■
REASONABLE RATES
4861 KINGSWAY
CAL-Q-TRONICS
434-9322
Government authorized agent l_ _
HI, I'M JIM BUNTAIN a fellow student reminding
you there are just three days left to renew. So
avoid the lineups. See us today.
2 LOCATIONS
18th and Dunbar 3713 West 10th Ave.
3458 Dunbar St. 224-3713
736-8104
MONDAY TO SATURDAY
9:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.
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MEET HASSELBALD REP. DAVID DE LISLE, AND
VANCOUVER PROFESSIONAL KEN MAYER
SHOOT A ROLL OF FILM WITH A HASSELBLAD
WE'LL EVEN GIVE YOU THE
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SEE AND FEEL FOR YOURSELF WHY
^PROFESSIONALS CHOOSE HASSELBLAD Thursday, February 26, 1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Under B.C. Rent Aid program
Money back for rent
By GREGG THOMPSON
If you pay rent for your living
accommodations, whether it be on
campus or off, you can get an extra
$100 back this year on your 1975
income tax return.
It's all made possible under the
RentAid program, financed by the
provincial government and
designed to help offset high rents.
If you are under 65 and your
taxable income is less than $10,000,
you are eligible.
Here's how it works.
Basically, anyone over 16 years
of age who paid rent for their
principle residence in B.C. on Dec.
31, 1975 is eligible.
If you were in and out of the
province in 1975, or moved into the
province during the year, you may
not be eligible and must seek
clarification with RentAid.
The maximum benefit paid by
RentAid is $100. If you are under
65, the maximum benefit is $100
minus one per cent of your taxable
income for 1975. No benefit can
exceed 10 per cent of the total rent
you paid in 1975.
For example, if your taxable
income for 1975 was $3,000, your
RentAid rebate is $100 minus $30
(one per cent of $3,000). Your
rebate is $70. But because the Rent
Aid grant may be no more than 10
per cent of the total rent you paid in
1975, so if your total rent was less
than $700, your RentAid grant
would be 10 per cent of that figure.
Although RentAid is a B.C.
government program, it is administered through the federal
government's income tax system.
To claim RentAid, you must fill out
the federal income tax form (T-l),
even if you have no taxable income.
You must also fill out the Ren-.
tAid claim form (B.C. Renter's
Tax Credit form T-lC-B.C.) which
is included with your federal Income Tax Return form.
If you have never filed an income
tax return before, chances are you
won't receive anything in the mail,
so you'll have to pick up the forms
at any post office.
And you'll need a social insurance number for all this too, so
if you don't have one pick up an
application form at the post office
and complete it.
If you live with a person who
claims you as a dependent for
income tax purposes, you cannot
claim RentAid, even if you contribute toward the rent.
If two or more people, other than
a taxpayer and spouse, pay rent for
the same accommodation, you
have two alternatives to choose
from: you can designate one
person to claim RentAid on behalf
of the group; or you can make an
individual claim in proportion to
the amount of rent you each contribute.
Naturally, the total of individual
claims must not be more than the
total rent paid for the accommodation.
If you choose this method, you
must attach a list of all the other
claimants and identify which one
of them holds the rent receipts.
You don't have to attach rent
receipts but you should be
prepared to provide proof of rent
paid.
Rent paid for semi-permanent
residences such as hotels, motels
and rooming houses can be part of
your claim providing you occupied
them continuously for all or part of
the year and they constituted your
principle residence. But you must
not include any costs other than
rent — no meals or board or special
services.
If you are married, and occupy
rented premises with your husband
or wife, only one of you can claim
— the one with the higher taxable
income for 1975.
The same applies if you married
in 1975. If eligible, the one with the
higher taxable income can claim
for:
• that portion of his or her rent
paid prior to marriage;
• that portion of his or her
spouse's rent paid prjor to
marriage, and
• the rent paid during the period
of marriage.
If marital bliss should dissipate
with a resulting separation, the
rules are simple enough but
require a little co-operation.
The rent paid prior to separation
may be calculated for the purposes
of a RentAid claim in any
proportion the couple chooses,
providing it amounts only to the
actual rent paid. After separation,
each may claim for rent paid while
maintaining a separate residence.
You can include rent deposits in
your claim if you moved during
1975 and that deposit became your
last month's rent. If you didn't
move, and therefore didn't use the
deposit as actual rent, you can't
claim it.
If you want more information on
the RentAid program, and only the
basic rules are outlined here, you
can get it by asking the telephone
operator for "Ask B.C." for a toll-
free call to the provincial government's new central information
switchboard. Contact your local
Revenue Canada district taxation
office about other tax questions.
Lewis blames big government for
disrupted social welfare plans
David Lewis, former national
leader of the NDP, warned
Tuesday against the forces crippling Canada's social welfare
programs — primarily, big,
centralized government.
"If you share my concern for our
social welfare programs, and if
you care that they remain — be on
guard," Lewis told about 250
people at UBC's school of social
work: The speech was co-
sponsored by the UBC school of
social work and the B.C.
Association of Social Workers.
Lewis blamed government for
the large number of people
receiving unemployment insurance benefits.
"Public policy, for which
governments are responsible, has
created the vast amount of
unemployment," he said.
Lewis told the crowd the
unemployment rate was four per
cent when the Unemployment
Insurance Commission was
created in 1971, and has since risen
to seven per cent. The four per cent
consisted of mainly unskilled and
semiskilled workers, he said, but
the seven per cent includes a
significant number of skilled
workers.
"Giving people payments of
money will not end their suffering.
We must help people to feel useful.
"The major purpose of society is
not only to live together, but to help
people attain what they need,"
Lewis said.
"That's what democracy means
to me. It protects human dignity,
enriches people's lives, and
respects individuality."
Lewis also blamed a wrong
approach by government for the
high cost of medicare.
"The way to deal with lowering
the cost of medicare is not by
closing down hospitals," he said.
"What is needed is a system of
convalescent homes with $25 beds
as opposed to $200 beds in
hospitals."
"It's the same with your
provincial government — they
want more power. That's why they
closed down the resources boards.
There was too much local input in
decision-making, which meant less
power to their ministers," he said.
Bill Vander Zalm, Social Credit
minister of human resources,
announced Monday the proposed 23
community resources boards
would be changed from decisionmaking bodies to advisory bodies,
and would not be funded by the
provincial government. Vander
Zalm said one reason the resources
boards were canned is to eliminate
"another level of bureaucracy."
LEWIS
. watch government.
Lewis told the audience about
debates he had about social
welfare in his pre-Co-operative
Commonwealth Federation days
(the CCF was a forerunner to the
NDP).
"When I mentioned pensions, my
opponents said the people would
lose their sense of thrift. If the poor
people have holes in their shoes, at
least they are their own holes, they
said."
He also lashed out at "corporate
welfare bums" —a theme familiar
with those who followed the NDP's
last two federal election campaigns.
"Taking money from the large
corporations means taking a part
of their economic power," he said.
Large corporations are supposedly
taxed 40 per cent, he said, but they
"drive trains through tax
loopholes."
Hold it!
Dear friends, we know how
snowed under you are with midterms. We know how tough it is to
get essays done, and we sympathize.
But sometimes you lose sight of
the really important things in life.
Like, The Ubyssey is publishing
its annual creative writing issue
March 5, and deadline for material
is March 1.
Like, the deadline for
nominations for Ubyssey editor is
March 4. Anyone can run, though
only Ubyssey staffers may vote in
the election.
Like, there's still a chance to join
The Ubyssey before the winter
session moves onto its greater
reward.
So if you want to be a
photographer, sports writer, or,
best — and most challenging — of
all, news reporter, meander up to
The Ubyssey office in SUB 241K, in
the northeast corner on the second
floor of SUB.
Rep list
As you should know by now, the Alma Mater Society — big
language for student union — has a new constitution which
comes into effect March 5.
Under that constitution, the duties of the current 36-person
council have been divided between two bodies, the student
representative assembly [SRA] and the student administrative commission [SAC]. The latter is responsible for
the day-to-day running of the affairs of the society, work now
carried out by the seven-person AMS executive which does
not exist under the new constitution.
Unlike the current executive, this SAC is not elected. Instead, it is chosen by the SRA.
The SRA is the policy-setting body under the new constitution. Somewhat analogous to parliament or the
legislative assembly in Ottawa and Victoria, it is responsible
for setting long-range policies, not for running the dayto-day
administrative affairs of the society.
The SRA consists of student members of the board of
governors, student senators and representatives of each of
the undergraduate societies. What follows is a list, as nearly
complete as we can make it, of the new student councillors
and their phone numbers. Ladies and gentlemen, your 1976-77
student representative assembly!
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Rick Murray 263-0694
Basil Peters 733-5360
MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY SENATE
At large:
Dick Byl 224-5333
Brian Higgins 736-93J 7
Keith Gagne    228-1321
David MacKinnon     224-6380
Bill Black 228-3818
Law: Gordon Funt 926-5063
Applied Sciences: John Swainson 224-0286
Agriculture: Susan Hoyles •. . . . 228-9474
Arts: Bill Broddy 228-2732
Dentistry: Gabriel Gedak     325-9195
Education: Joan Blandford    261-1035
Forestry: Hans Buys 738-9698
Grad studies: Don Poy |\|.A.
Medicine: John Lehuquet JM.A.
Pharmacy: Robin Ensom 228-0669
Science: Robert Salkeld.  . . 224-9572
Commerce:.  " vacant
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY REPRESENTATIVES
Agriculture: Marilyn Hynes 733-8243
Architecture: Don Porter N.A.
Arts: Bev Crowe 224-9881
Pam Edwards 435-5887
Dave Jiles 224-9706
Paul Sandhu 263-0222
Dave Van Blarcom 228-1291
Pam Willis.    733-1753
Commerce:
Doug Johnstone 261-4349
Dave Theessen 731-4529
Education:
Ellen Paul , 733-1200
Christine Paul 733-1200
Roz Manson 224-0293
Engineering: Ray The  228-4628
Forestry: Jim Stephen 266-6507
Home Economics: Eva Villeneuve 738-0717
Law: Kim Roberts.    . 291-0874
Librarianship: Linda Medland , 224-9711
Pharmacy: Arlene Wong 733-3202
Physical education: Greg Heenan 266-2755
Rehabilitation medicine: Lynn Braiden 733-0882
Science:
Blake Fleming 277-8692
Aksel Hallin 732-6053
Anne Katrichak 425-6673
Kerry Zoehner N.A.
Social work: Moe Sihota.     263-0222
The phone numbers are there because these people don't
have offices and as student representatives should be
available. So clip this out and save it. The next time you have
a beef, look up your rep and give him/her a telephone call.
They '11 be surprised, because AMS reps aren't used to having
a constituency that pays attention to them, but don't hestitate
to call them.
Some SRA members aren't included. That's because
nobody ran for commerce senator and the commerce undergraduate society must appoint one as soon as senate
passes a motion allowing them to.
Some undergraduate societies have either not picked their
SRA reps yet, or they haven't bothered telling current AMS
secretary Ellen Paul who their reps are. When we have the
rest of the names, we'll give them to you, along with the
phone numbers not included here.
Let these turkeys know somebody's watching them.
J Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 26,  1976
Mouth off
On page 3 of today's Ubyssey there is an important list.
It's a list of your representatives on next year's student
representative assembly — the successors to the Alma Mater
Society student council. ,
Bug them.
That's right — talk their ears off. Bitch, complain, prod
them for action. That's why they ran for office — to make
things better.
This list provides a unique opportunity to have not only
the guardians of the AMS at your fingertips but also the
reps on senate, the academic decision-making body, and the
board of governors, the money controllers.
All these people have contacts around the university.
They sit on committees and they are listened to by
administration types as the collective voice of the student
body.
The problem is that often they only talk for themselves.
They don't get the input they want or need to properly
represent student interests.
Student society affairs have been significantly revamped
this year so that the representative assembly can be a
forum for debate on meaty issues such as teacher
evaluations, new program, budget cutbacks and the Indy
800 road race game.
The opportunity is there to provide a united student
voice, but, as in any organization, simply changing the
system doesn't guarantee improvement.
It's up to the people involved.
And politicians, even student politicos, operate better if
they know their electorate is watching . . . waiting . . .
ready to pounce on every mistake.
So keep the list on page 3. Put it beside your phone or
hang it on your bedpost. Next time you're outraged about
anything, give a student rep a call.
If it's a complaint about food services, traffic control,
the bookstore, residences, lousy teachers or whatever, there
are people to talk to.
Don't be complacent. Call a spade a spade to someone's
face (or into someone's ear) instead of muttering under
your breath.
If you keep it to yourself you might get ulcers.
'Good God, Smedley . . . we're RICH!!!
Letters
UBC is
lacking
Graduation is almost upon us
again, in a few more weeks this
factory will shut down its assembly
lines and release us to the "real
world." With a mixture of semi-
skills, we graduates must enter the
hard world of reality.
This letter is not written in fear,
nor in self pity. It has been written
before in different tones by different people, and it will be written
in successive years until our damn
administrators realize the complete failure our post-secondary
education has become.
This university is not an institution of higher learning any
longer. It's not even a satisfactory
relay station. UBC, along with our
other universities, is no more, the
stage of intellectual debate.
In the past the university's role
was-to challenge the mind. It was a
place for students to question why.
"The idea of a university," as
Henry Newman expressed from
his university chair, "is the high
protecting power of all knowledge
and science, of experiment and
speculation; it maps out the
territory of the intellect.
A university training aims at
raising the intellectual tone of
society, at cultivating the public
mind ... at facilitating the
exercise of political powers." It
prepares a man "to fill any post
with credit, and to master any
subject with faculty."
Is this UBC? My God, not even
the department of classics comes
close to this.
Our universities wallow in a
greying middle ground. We are no
longer the ivory tower, and yet we
are not the community's
playground. We are too worried
about the cost of our degrees, that
we miss the whole objective of
education.
Though I detest admitting this,
the United States is leaps and
bounds ahead of us, dealing with
post-secondary education. An
example is their development of
the community college. For instance, community colleges take
the severe strain off first and
second year students. They offer
sophomores and freshmen the
opportunity of experiencing post-
secondary academe while
simultaneously feeding them
samples of the technical field.
After two years a diploma is
granted along with the choice of
continuing on either track.
University entrance is stiff,
requiring from the people who
chose the academic field, the
conviction to continue.
We at UBC are forcing students
to either get their four-year degree
or drop out without any tangible
certificate. But not everyone wants
to pursue an academic career. This
may shock our administrators, but
one does not need a degree in
history to sell shoes for the Hudson's Bay Company.
We, , too, have community
colleges and technical Institutes,
but they are not fulfilling their
proper course, but that is another
happy trail. My complaint is of the
wasted years we are forced to
endure before we are allowed "to
master any subject with faculty."
As our programs currently stand,
we are indirectly coerced into
taking the so-called "mickey-
mouse" courses to receive the "all
sacred" marks which will open the
"golden gates" of our professional
and graduate schools.
We are not judged by our intellect, but only by our abilities to
juggle classes. Our administration
encourages this. Until we are
shocked into comprehending what
a total mess our educational
system is, we cannot even hope to
comprehend the path of self-
destruction our own country is
following.
Our present education does not
test our powers. We read,
regurgitate, then forget, all in the
hope of receiving the diploma so
we may get onto what we really
want to study. This is not the
theory of a university, but it is the
'present' reality.
Education has lost its lustre.
Whose fault is this? Well certainly
our administrators cannot take full
credit. Fault is shared by many.
Though UBC is incapable of
restoring education to its rightful
place, I do believe it is their
responsibility, indeed it is their
duty to bring this university from
its knees.
To make Us stand up.
In B.C. there is really
no choice but to accommodate the educational demands of the people. Individual
colleges or universities may or
may not be able to resist those
pressures, but if our population
continues to grow larger, we have
no choice but to grow larger and
more numerous, or both. Where
there is a choice, and this is basic
to my charge, it is the quality of
university education. Quality has
been allowed to be replaced by
quantity.
Half-assed education will only
give us half-assed lives, a half-
assed society. Semi-skills are not
good enough. If society reflects its
education, then education must be
earned, not won in a crackerjack
box.
Grant McRadu
political science 4
Ditty
Whilst in a fit of pique on the
morn after the eve of that supposedly auspicious announcement
concerning the raising of
automobile insurance premiums I,
by the greatest fortuity, happened
upon a parody of the Social Credit
campaign lay "Happy Days Are
Here Again."
The content of this ditty served to
exacerbate my already petulant
mood and at once I felt impelled to
express my dissatisfaction with the
present provincial government for
forcing such action.
Thus, I am submitting this
epistle in the confidence that it
shall arouse the too latent sentiment of the university body in a
similar, if not more strident
manner. It is a certainty that
without such agitation on this issue
THE WSS VI
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,1976
Published   Tuesdays,   Thursdays   and   Fridays   throughout   the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K  of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
Good evening and welcome to World Forum. Tonight we have with us
in our studio some very special guests — oh, sod it. I don't want to do
this. I never wanted to be a quiz show host. No! I wanted to be a
lumb/click/ was the way it was, Wednesday, Feb. 25, 1976. This is your
host Gary Coull, saying goodnight . . . news was brought to you by
Denise Chong and Maureen Boyd in Ottawa, Ralph Maurer in Frankfurt
Sue Vohanka in Prague, Anne Wallace in Victoria, Nancy Southam in
West Ham —the Hammers. The Hammers is the nickname of what . . )
Mark Buckshon in Tel Aviv and Marcus Gee in Athens. Executive
producer was Gregg Thompson, news direction was by Doug Field, Matt
King did the sound and technical assistance was by Dave Wilkinson
Thanks to Jim King, Joe Clark's top banana out here on the coast /click/
struggle.of  class  against   claws   is  a  WHAT  struggle.  A  WHAT  struggle
the government presently in power
willsee its path cleared to further
engage in sophistry and the
manipulation of the public to better
its own (or out of country?)
pecuniary interests.
Students and faculty, I trust that
you will be inclined to move as I
have.
To be sung to the tune of "Happy
Days Are Here Again":
Happy days are here again,
Let us drink to Pat McGeer
again,
We'll be on the bus or in arrears
again,
Happy days are here again.
Happy days are here again,
We've been shafted by a Bennett
again,
We     can     thank     the     god
"Credit/Debit again,
Happy days are here again.
John Russell
education 2
Great!!
Just a note to say you're doing a
great job and keep it up. Might I
take a moment to say this is the
first time I've written a letter to
the editor? Oh, no time? Sorry.
Reve Bardell
commerce 3
P.S. Go Habs, go.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and
typed.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter or
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241-K. inursaay, reoruary zo,  iy/o
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
76
Clark: great compromise
By MAUREEN BOYD
OTTAWA — "The message of my candidacy was unity in our party and our
nation. It is now the message of my
leadership," said young Joe Clark.
Well, good luck, Joe, you're going to need
it.
It was on the strength of the unity theme
that Clark was elected leader of the opposition. Convention delegates have taken a
big chance on Clark — based on his potential
for growth and potential for unity.
If this potential isn't realized, if he doesn't
mature with the job and doesn't unite the
party behind him, then both Clark and the
Conservative party are going to end up big
losers.
Clark's election is the election of the
compromise candidate. Less than 12 per
cent of the convention delegates picked him
as their first choice — that he was an acceptable alternative for the majority got
him the job.
"I ran my campaign without criticizing
any others. That was not tactics — it was
how I feel about my friends," Clark said.
Tactics or no tactics, it worked.
Clark's single most important asset was
that he had no significant enemies within the
party and managed not to alienate anybody
over the course of his campaign.
That might have been enough to win the
convention. But being second choice to
delegates at a Conservative convention on a
promise of unity isn't going to be good
enough alone for Clark to win the next
election.
And that's what the convention was all
about — picking someone who could lead the
Tories to victory against Pierre Trudeau
and the Liberals.
To say Clark has a tough job ahead is an
understatement. He has to reconcile all the
different elements that make up the Conservative party before he can devote his
fulltime energies to tackling the Liberals.
There are several plausible recipes for
Disaster ahead. They all have to do with
uniting the party.
The most crucial is how the, defeat of
Claude Wagner is going to be interpreted in
Quebec.
Hellyer's suicide
While it was clearly the rejection of an
"old politician" style of leadership rather
than the rejection of a French-Canadian
leader, Clark (and the party) has to get that
message out immediately if he has any hope
of consolidating support in'Quebec.
The second scenario for disaster is an
ideological split between the right and left
wing elements of the party.
Joe Clark is of the Stanfield mould
ideologically, but will have to attempt to
steer a middle-of-the-road course to appease
the right-wing element in the party and the
conservative shift in the country.
The third question is Clark's ability to
handle the caucus. His age and his less than
four years' experience in parliament aren't
assets as far as riding a tight line on the
ragged bunch of Tory MPs.
Can Clark overcome those potential
problems? Two positive notes on a French-
English and right-left theme enter the
picture.
First, Claude Wagner's gracious and
sincere motion to the convention floor to
make Clark's election unanimous will
hopefully ease the way in Quebec for the
new leader's organizing abilities.
Second, even though Clark was grouped
ideologically as a progressive, he was not so
By MAUREEN BOYD
OTTAWA — The real loser of the Tory
leadership convention last weekend was
Paul Hellyer — a former politician and
journalist.
And he just may have blown his credibility
as both with his convention performance.
The day after his abortive bid for the Tory
top spot, Hellyer announced his intention to
return to the parliamentary press gallery.
He may have problems, however, picking up
where he left off.
HELLYER ... ain't smilin' no more
Several members of the press gallery
thought that he used his tenure as a journalist from 1974 to 1976 simply to keep his
name before the public and to gain press
sympathy when the time came for his
leadership bid.
Backed by more Conservative MPs than
any other leadership candidate, Hellyer
appeared to be a frontrunner going into the
convention. In an attempt to consolidate
right-wing support behind him fdr the first
ballot, Hellyer took several swipes at the left
wing of the party in his Saturday afternoon
speech.
There was mixed, if not confused, reaction
from both Hellyer delegates and the block of
MPs supporting him.
B.C. MP Ron Huntington (Capilano) said:
"Hellyer isolated a fact that had to be
recognized — if the party keeps going the
way it is, we will never form an alternative
party that can form an alternative government."
When asked whether it was wise for
Hellyer to make an issue of ideological
differences, Huntingdon said, "Some feel it
had to be said. I personally feel it was just as
well left unsaid or said another way."
MP Gordon Fairweather (Fundy-Royal),.
who backed Flora Macdonald, said that he
felt the MPs backing Hellyer were pretty
shaken by his remarks.
The disenchantment with Hellyer translated itself into weak first choice votes and
a fifth place spot on the first ballot. It
became clear that the convention delegates
were not going to commit themselves to a
new leader who would have trouble bringing
the party together again the day after the
convention.
So where does Hellyer go from here?
Hellyer claimed that he did not join the
Conservative party immediately after he
resigned from the Liberal caucus because
he had watched the "so-called Red Tories in
the house," whose policies were "very
similar to where the Liberal party was or
where the NDP had already been."
Boos from the Macdonald, Clark and
Mulroney supporters greeted his remarks.
MP Walter Baker (Grenville-Carleton),
Hellyer's convention arrangements
chairman, said that he had no prior
knowledge of Hellyer's intention to include
the divisive remarks. He said that had he
known, he would have tried to convince
Hellyer to change the speech.
Hellyer later released a letter to the
delegates explaining that his remarks on
Saturday afternoon "were not a slip of the
tongue nor were they an ill-considered
accident."
At a Hellyer dance, he apologized to those
supporters who thought he should not have
directed his remarks to the Red Tories, but
said that it was his intention to polarize the
convention and force the party to make a
choice on its future direction.
A look at Hellyer's political career shows
him to be a three-time loser.
His first major political setback came in
1968 when he was a candidate for the
leadership of the Liberal party. Even though
it was clear that Hellyer could not win that
convention, he refused to throw his support
behind Robert Winters until it was too late to
stop Trudeau.
left wing that Sinclair Stevens (considered
by some to be the most right wing of the
candidates) could not come to Clark as his
second choice.
There is some basis for an alliance forming between the left-right and English-
French elements and so there is potential
for Clark's leadership prospects.
But it's going to take time and time is
something that Clark may not have. The
Liberals aren't going to wait around for
Clark to gain any ground.
First indications are that Trudeau will
make mincemeat out of Clark in
parliament.
One danger for the Tory party is that
Trudeau will make Clark, a political
unknown before the convention, a household
word throughout the country, but on
Trudeau's terms.
Is two years, or less if the Liberals figure
the time is right for an early election,
enough for Joe Clark to make his own mark
on the country?
Opinions are varied. But the country will
be watching Clark's performance, and it
would do well to remember his words: "I
intend to conduct myself in such a way that
will make my (leadership) victory a victory
for all."
r
MOTV
^-"Oter ueyssey _J
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OLD BOB ... loping out to pasture Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 26,  1976
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reviewed
Almost three months after tne
hammer came down on the NDP
Dec. 11, party types are still
wondering what hit them.
Four people who think they
might have answers to that
question will be members of a
panel discussion: the NDP in
power — a retrospective view.
The panel discussion will be
7:30   p.m.    Friday   in   the   grad
Hot flashes
student centre garden room.
Panelists are Cliff Scotton, NDP
MLA Bob Skelly, Jim MacFarlan
and Philip Resnick.
Scotton, former national NDP
campaign planner, was
paratrooped into B.C. to become
provincial NDP secretary and to
organize the party. The official
rumor is that if Scotton hadn't
organized the party, the NDP
might well have been shut oik in
December.
MacFarlan is a former
president   of   the   B.C.   Teachers
'Tween classes
from      Public
Prisons,    noon,
p.m.,
card,
TODAY
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Slide      shows
Education     about
SUB  207.
CHINESE  CHRISTIAN   FELLOWSHIP
Pastor Jim  Davies  on  the vine and
the branches, noon, SUB 205.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Dr.  Ken Tobias on esthetics, noon,
IRC.l.
GAY  PEOPLE OF  UBC
Meeting  re dance,  noon, SUB 224.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,    7:30
SUB  119.
REC   UBC
Dance   class    free   with   rec
4:30 p.m.. Armouries 208.
INTER  VARSITY  CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
George    Malone   on    man's   needs,
part  of series on basic Christianity,
noon, Chem 250.
FRIDAY
EL CIRCULO
Genera,  noon,  Brock  annex  351A.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Rendez-vous,     midi     trente,     la
maison internationale, le salon.
SKYDIVING  CLUB
General     meeting,     discussion     of
open house, noon, SUB 215.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Fred    Nelson    on   the   upsurge   in
Spain, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
THE CENTRE COFFEEHOUSE
Jazz     guitarist     Michael     Kleniec,
8:30    p.m.    to    1    a.m.,    Lutheran
campus centre.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS-
ASSOCIATION
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny leads an open
discussion of psychological issues,
noon, Bu. 203.
DECORATE WITH PRINTS
grin bin
3209 VI. Broadway
738-2311
(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs & Prints
Jokes - Gifts, etc.
'DECORATE WITH POSTERS'
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
SATURDAY
ROTATING COFFEEHOUSE
Featuring Tetelestai, 7:30 p.m. to
12 noon, Marpole United church,
67th and Hudson, between Oak
and Granville.
Federation who destroyed his
NDP membership card to protest
that party's drift to the political
right. Resnick, a UBC political
science prof, is a founding
member of the Committee for a
Democratic University and a
critic of many NDP policies.
Refreshments will be sold.
Fans will also have the
opportunity to renew their
membership in or join the B.C.
Committee on Socialist Studies,
which is sponsoring the event.
Health
Student health services will
hold a nutrition clinic Thursday
from noon to 4:30 p.m.
The clinic will offer free
individual counselling on any
aspect of nutrition, dieting or
whatever you want to know, and
appointments can be arranged
through the student health clinic
in Wesbrook.
The Second
GENERAL
GRAD CLASS
MEETING
w/// be held on
Thursday, March 4
of
1:30 p.m.
in Buchanan 106
DR. BUNDOLO
SATURDAY SPECIAL
S.U.B.
THEATRE
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
SATURDAY
FEBRUARY 28, 1976
7:30 P.M.
THE OLD AUDITORIUM
Sat., 11:30 a.m.—CBU 690
HILLEL HOUSE PRESENTS
LUNCH
PROFESSOR
EUGENE ROTHMAN
CARLTON UNIVERSITY
SPEAKING ON
JEWISH NATIONALISM
THURSDAY,
FEBRUARY 26
12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m,
lBLE
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming  Events
'CONSORT WITH the followers of all
religions in a spirit of friendliness
and fellowship."— Baha'u'llah. Informal discussions on the Baha'i Faith
every Tuesday night at 5606 Presidents' Row. Phone 224-7257.
SILVER JUBILEE REUNION, Smith
Memorial School, Port Alberni,
March 27-28. For information contact
Cheryl Toly, 3858 Bruce Street, Port
Alberni, 723-3447 .
DISCO PARTY — Friday, Feb. 27th at
8 p.m., SUB Ballroom. All students
welcome. Tickets available in AMS
office. Door prizes, liquids.
DR. BUNDOLO is proud to announce
"Enough seats for everyone." This
Saturday Night, Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m..
Old Auditorium. It's Free!
SATURDAY NIGHT comedy special!
Dr. Bundolo Sat., Feb. 28, 7:30 p.m.,
Old   Auditorium.   It's   Free!
10 — For Sale — Commercial
CLEARANCE of scientific calculators.
Texas Instruments, H.P., etc. 25 to
50%   off.   Call 738-5851.
11 — For Sale — Private
■61   V.W.  VAN, $200.  FACULTY PARKING  STICKER.  734-1880.
50 — Rentals
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to lent
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5021.
65 —Scandals
CAN YOU HANDLE IT? Find out Feb.
27th at The Party; Disco in SUB
Ballroom at 8 p.m. Sponsored by
UBC Ski and Skydiving Clubs. Tickets in AMS Office. Buy Now!
CONTRARY TO malicious rumors Subfilmsoc is showing Clockwork Orange
this Thurs., 7:00 Fri., Sat., Sun., 7:00
9:30 in the SUB Aud. So be sure to
beat the c a. 20,000 standing in
line!   75e.
70 — Services
EXPERIENCED     MATH     TUTOR     will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basis. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
CUSTOM CABINETRY & woodworking.
Renovations, additions, new eontruc-
tion done anywhere. Guranteed work,
free   estimates.   689-3394.
15 — Found
CALCULATOR     POUND.     Identify     to
claim.   Dave  Jones,  228-0685.
20 — Housing
ROOM & BOARD, Kerrisdale home.
Mature responsible student, male
preferred, references, $150.00. Available   March   1.   Evenings 261-0158.
STUDENT TO SHARE four-bedroom
house with three others. Near 13th
& Cambie. 879-0305. Occupancy
March 1st
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. Essays,
thesis,   manuscripts.   266-5053.
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING,    my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
WILL TYPE your term papers, essays,
thesis, etc. Call Mrs. FTyfield, 327-
5381.
FOR RENT: Sleeping room, snack facilities, private entrance and bathroom.
Non-smoker, male preferred. Near
UBC gates. Tel. 224-9319 after 6 »m.
SUITE on 2nd Ave. near Jericho Beach.
Rent $160/month, female preferred.
Call Mark, 278-7624 between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m.
FRATERITY HOUSE on campus, $60.00
per month. Kitchen privileges, room
only. Phone 224-9679 evenings, manager.
30 — Jobs
SUMMER JOBS in Eastern Canada.
Long hours; good pay. Interviews In
person Tues. & Thurs. 1:30, 3:30, 7
p.m.  in Rm.  224 SUB.
EARN $15.00 MONITORING psychology
subjects for 24 hours. Monitors may
eat, sleep, study, etc. Required to
play tape during experiment. Sign
up Friday, Feb. 27, 12:30, room 13,
Henry Angus.
90 - Wanted
ANYBODY OUT THERE teach clarinet? Struggling beginner needs
assistance. Phone 228-8519 after 5
p.m.
99 — Miscellaneous
35 - Lost
GOLD WATCH LOST in vicinity of
Panhellenic House — small diamond
on either side of face. Sentimental
value.  Reward. Phone 224-7237.
WILL TRADE — old homestead and
2 B.R. restored house (electric,
plumbing) near coast in Lund, B.C.,
for 2 B.R. house or apt. in city.
Aug. 1976 to Aug. 1977. Write S.
Marx,  R.R. 2, Powell River.
ir=ir=Jr=ir=Jr=jr=if=Ji=ir=)r=ii=i
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
ir=Jf=i|=Ji=Jr=Ji=Jr=ir=Jr=T=ir= Thursday, February 26,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Tot' pourri in Calgary
CALGARY (CUP) — Smoking
marijuana and hashish has
become very commercialized with
new products being introduced to
the market weekly, says the owner
of this city's largest "head" shop.
Smokers can bubble the dope
through wine, water, or beer, heat
it electrically, super toke it, bong
it, or roll it in banana flavored
paper, says Rod Chapman.
"We sold over 40,000 pipes last
year," he said. "Everything from
$37hookahs to the $21 weed pipes."
Although marijuana and hashish
are illegal, the equipment for
smoking them is not.
The store's most popular expensive   pipes   are   the   large
Pakistani hookahs which stand
about three feet tall and are
equipped with party bowls for
group gatherings.
And for the cleanest weed
possible there is a weed cleaning
kit. A small plastic wheel
separates the stems and the seeds
from the green leaves.
"There are even dope testers
now so you can test the quality of
the marijuana or hash," says
Chapman.
Because there are new pipes and
more accessories arriving on the
market constantly, Chapman
keeps in touch by making frequent
trips to the United States for new
supplies.
Education hurts natives
according to AIM group
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Education
has been "one of the main enemies
of the native people," according to
a spokesman for the American
Indian Movement (AIM).
Speaking at the University of
Winnipeg, Vera Bellacourt said it
must not be long before whites
recognize native people's right to
the land and their culture.
Bellacourt said native people
must walk with the peace pipe in
one hand and "the freedom
fighter's gun" in the other because
they have been contaminated by
the violence brought upon them by
the white man and white
education.
He called prisons "institutes of
higher learning for Indian people"
because natives were "pushed
out" of the white education system
by racist curriculums. For
example, he said native people
make up only five per cent of the
South Dakota population, yet
account for 32 per cent of the prison
population in that state.
AIM helped establish a "survival
school system" in the U.S. where
native languages, hunting, crafts
and songs are taught to native
children in the Minnesota-South
Dakota area. He predicted that
Canada would soon have its own
native community college.
Bellacourt said native people
could not put down their pipe of
peace, without  being destroyed,
Your University
Formal Wear
Centre
Special Occasion
Formats
Graduations
Dinner Jackets
Tuxedos
Bride INT Groom
Formals
224-5221
4397 W. 10th Me.
(at Trimble)
Right on
Campus
Directly Behind Bank
of
Commerce
224-7514
2154 Western Parkway
(in Village)
since the "white man makes all the
guns." But Indians, he said, have
the most powerful weapon in the
world — truth — on their side.
"I go to dealers' shows and
displays and they send me new
brochures and samples," said
Chapman.
One of the pipes sent him for
distribution is the electric pipe. It
includes a burner that is electrically heated, causing the
marijuana or hashish to smolder.
The smoke is caught in a glass
bubble and drawn Out through a
hollow tube.
Although there seems to be an
endless variety in pipes and
smoking accessories, "actually
there are only about five different
ways of smoking marijuana or
hashish. All the various pipes work
but many are basically only a
different shape or made from a
different substance."
Of course there are still many
people who prefer to roll their own
rather than use a pipe.
All they have to do is decide on
plum, cinnamon, banana,
strawberry, mint, licorice, cherry,
chocolate or lemon flavored rolling
papers.
INCOME TAX REFUNDS!
Don't get ripped off again! If you need money against your
refund come to THE BANK first. We offer fast service and much
lower costs. In most cases you will qualify for an advance and
need only be:
1) A student at U.B.C.
2) A customer of the B of M on Campus
tt
Drop in and see us for more details.
Bank of Montreal
(Campus Branches Only)
UBC SINGLE STUDENT RESIDENCES
REQUIRE HOUSE ADVISORS FOR
1976-77
As a mature senior student living and working within the
residence, the House Advisor provides basic paraprofessional
advisory services to residence students.
As a student leader and a part of a residence area team, a House
Advisor is important in developing a sense of community within
the residence area and in contributing to the overall quality of
residence life.
This position involves diversified tasks and calls for a
commitment of purpose and flexibility in responding to varied
situations. Candidates will possess a basic knowledge of human
relations skills and a willingness to further develop in areas such
as communication, leadership and counselling.
Application forms are available at the front desk of each
residence area. Totem Park, Place Vanier and Walter H. Gage, and
at the Housing Office.in the New Administration Building.
Applications will close on Friday, March 5, 1976.
WOMEN'S ATHELETICS
Nominations for executive positions will
be received between March 3 and March
17 — Forms may be picked up and submitted to Room 208 War Memorial Gym.
EXECUTIVE POSITIONS:
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
MEMBER-AT-LARGE
Letters of application for appointment to managerial
positions will be received between March 3 and March
26. Submit applications to Room 208, War Memorial
Gym.
POSITIONS AVAILABLE:
Public Relations Officer Gymnastics
Equipment Manager Golf
Badminton Skiing
Basketball Swimming
Curling Tennis
Fencing Track & Field
Field Hockey Volleyball
Figure Skating
UBC SINGLE STUDENT RESIDENCES
TOTEM PARK AND PLACE VANIER
REQUIRE RESIDENCE FELLOWS FOR
1976-1977
A Residence Fellow, as the name implies, is a fellow residence
student who interacts with House members on a daily basis. In
this role, the Residence Fellow acts as a friend and peer
counsellor in helping students develop as individuals and
community members.
The position provides an opportunity to develop basic human
relations skills that will enable the Residence Fellow to make a
positive contribution to residence life. As a part of the total
residence team, the Residence Fellow contributes to the overall
quality of residence life and provides support and assistance to
the House Advisor.
Application forms are available at the Housing Office in the New
Administration Building and at the front desk of each residence
area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and Walter H. Gage.
Applications-will close on Friday, March 5, 1976.
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MOTORS REBUILT
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$235 For 36 H.P.
$265 For 40 H.P.
$295 For A V.W. 1500
$305  . .For A V.W. 1600
CHARGEX
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1897 BURRARD    731 -8171 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 26,  1976
Tory feuds still there
From page 1
still possessed the party — demons
of   party   factions   —   of   bitter
passions and of endless defeats.
"Bloody Sunday" said one
national magazine of the events to
unfold. On national television, a
reporter portrayed the yet-to-beheld convention as "an arena for
the party to tear itself apart."
Perhaps they thought they were
setting the stage for high drama
and political theatre by casting the
event — ironically the most open
political convention ever held — in
terms of back room politics, by
trying to perpetuate old suspicions
and worn out myths.
Undoubtedly, divisive undercurrents remain in the Tory ranks,
including the away-from-centre
ideological leanings and francophone participation in the party.
Sources of distrust linger on — the
old quarrels and personal feuds
within the party not sufficiently
healed.
Throughout the campaign and-
right up to balloting day, however,
it was the intrigue of the
backrooms that preoccupied many
of the pundits. The notion typically
entertained was one of Dalton
Camp and John Diefenbaker as
puppeteers behind the scenes,
kingpins on balloting day.
While on the one hand the pundits
had Hellyer, Horner and to a lesser
extent Mulroney vying for the
blessing of the former Tory prime
minister, on the other hand, they
linked in turn each left-wing
candidate to Camp, the man who
had deposed the senior chieftain.
Throughout pre-convention
week, reporters watched eagle-
eyed over Diefenbaker and his
aides, ready to swoop down should
he give the slightest hint of whom
he favored and whom he didn't.
The pundits, shrugged, and
surmised that Hellyer had to be the
blessed one, since he had as active
supporters not only aging MPs
from the Diefenbaker era, but
current Diefenbaker aides. While
the Chief didn't come right out and
declare support for the former-
Liber al-turned-Tory, he did say,
after all, that he thought political
conversions were acceptable —
with parliamentary experience, of
course.
This was immediately taken as a
Diefenbaker swipe — actually the
first of several — at Mulroney, the
only Tory leadership candidate
who had never held public office.
According to the grapevine,
Difenbaker had been irked by a
newsletter which Mulroney had
sent to convention delegates,
containing a photo of the candidate
with Diefenbaker.
Then, on the morning the convention started the pundits
shrugged again, but this time in
confusion. Reports out of Ottawa's
civic centre had it that Diefenbaker stopped deliberately at the
Horner booth, picked up one of the
brochures with Horner's face
staring larger than life from its
cover, and signed his name to it.
Horner supporters were overjoyed.
So as not to be outdone, however,
rumors abounded in the Camp
camp as well.
Flora Macdonald, the real Red
Tory, had the closest links with the
Camp political machinery, having
joined forces with Camp in
initiating the leadership review
which finally ousted Diefenbaker
and brought about the Stanfield
election in 1967. She herself was
fired by Diefenbaker in 1966 from
her position as secretary to the
national director of the party.
Based on even less than circumstantial evidence, both Clark
and Mulroney were similarly allied
with the Camp psychosis; Clark
because he supported Stanfield at
the 1967 leadership convention, and
served a three-year stint as his
executive assistant. Mulroney's
connections with Camp, however,
contrary to what the " Mulroney -
Camp" anti-posters would have led
one to believe, were more construed : as a long-time Quebec Tory
organizer and fund-raiser,
Mulroney was the one who introduced Wagner to Stanfield, in
1972 and in Mulroney's mother's
apartment.
Of surely convoluted logic were
the Camp connections linked to
leadership candidate John Fraser,
the MP from Vancouver-South. He
had to be of the Camp following,
the gossip pundits said, because he
was, after all, a personal friend of
Malcolm Wickson, who was
Stanfield's campaign manager in
the 1974 federal election, and who
had political connections with
Norman Atkins, Camp's brother-
in-law .
While the backroom gossip
circulated among the lofty and the
less than lofty elements of the
party, word still came from the
horse's mouth, but at a premium,
Camp himself having acquired the
status of a paid political pundit.
In reference to Diefenbaker's
apparent rejection of Mulroney's
candidacy because of his lack of
parliamentary experience, Camp
dismissed the "stop Mulroney'"
faction of the party as a group
"having some of the finest
seventeenth-century minds in
Canada."
Yet, despite the fact that the
delegates going into the four-day
leadership convention, were
constantly reminded and warned
by the pundits of not only of the
wounds and battle scars of personal feuds and quarrels, but of
lingering divisions in the Tory
ranks, the party emerged
somehow exorcised of fts demons.
But surely one of the most important legacies of the convention
was the farewell address of the
outgoing party leader, Robert
Stanfield.
An urgent appeal for party unity,
Stanfield's speech was one of the
most remarkable of his career.
Perhaps surprisingly, for Stanfield
in his eight years of leading the
Tory party had neither healed the
personal rift between himself and
Diefenbaker (Diefenbaker hasn't
attended a caucus meeting in eight
years) nor achieved detente within
the party.
But in his address to delegates,
however, his blunt confrontation of
the divisions that had plagued the
party illustrated clearly the need
for a sense of common purpose,
and the responsibility of the party
to unite behind the new leader
chosen by the convention, to work
as a team.
With Stanfield's words still
echoing over the convention hall on
balloting day, Diefenbaker's vote
went virtually unnoticed by
delegates.
The old chieftain of the party
turned out to be — not a kingpin —
but a mere curiosity.
Henneken Auto
Your German Car Specialist
8914 Oak St. (Oak & Marine) 263-8121
FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
UNIVERSITY OF CALGARY
A graduate faculty offering degrees in
ARCHITECTURE
URBANISM
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
The Faculty acknowledges the changing character of the professions and
their responsibility in, and to contemporary Canadian society. The
academic setting provides for learning and research opportunities directed
to a better understanding of environmental issues. The program prepares
graduates with professional skills that enable them to contribute to society
in the traditional as well as new institutional settings. Opportunities exist
for exploring new approaches to environmental design and for
re-examining the values, the scientific premises and institutional
arrangements which have hitherto shaped Canadian environments.
The M.E. Des (Architecture) degree is on the R.A.I.C. list of accredited
programs. The M.E. Des (Urbanism) degree is recognized by the Canadian
Institute of Planners as qualification for membership. There is, as yet, no
recognized professional association for environmental scientists.
There are no prerequisite degrees or courses for admission. Applicants to
the degree program will normally possess a baccalaureate degree from a
recognized university with a grade point average in the final two years of
study of at least 3.0 (in a 4 point grade system). The Faculty considers
qualifications of equivalent standing.
Students who already hold a bachelor's degree in architecture may apply
and pursue a specialized program in interdisciplinary research or certain
aspects of professional practise including urban design and planning.
Fellowships and scholarships up to $4,800 are offered by the Faculty.
Other financial assistance is available in the form of research and service
scholarships.
Deadline for application" is April 1 for registration in the Fall Session;
November 1 for registration in the Winter Session.
For information and application forms, contact:
Faculty of Environmental Design
University of Calgary
Calgary. Alberta T2N 1N4
(40 J) 2 84-6601
SEVERAL ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN FACULT\ MEMBERS Wll I
BE ON THE U.B.C. CAMPUS. FRIDAY, FEB. 27. II : .10 a.m. - 1:30 p in
IN ROOM 204. BUCHANAN BLDG.
THEY WILL DISCUSS THE ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN GR \DU-Vl I-
PROGRAM AND WILL BE AVAILABLE TO  \NSVVER_QUES I IONS.
ATTENTION
RECREATION UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY!
EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS & GENERAL MEETING
MONDAY, MARCH 1 - 12:30
RM. 208 ARMOURIES
Nominations for the positions of President, Vice President,
Secretary, Treasurer and Social Co-ordinator will be accepted
in the Recreation Office until Monday noon.
Four delegates will  be chosen from the  meeting to attend
the B.C.R.A. conference in Victoria.
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Fri. - Sat.
4:00 p.m. - 4:00 a.m.
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738-9520
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"Late delivery call 1/2 hour before closing time."
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