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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 25, 1979

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Array r
New rules to subdue rowdy roost
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
The party is over for students
living in UBC's Walter Gage
residence.
Gage residents are being asked
by their community council
executive to tune out, tone down,
and turn off all party plans for up
to a month.
Floor representatives will vote
Wednesday night on a plan to
stop all liquor licensed events and
private parties at Gage during that
period, Gage council president
Allan Soltis announced Monday.
The move comes only three
days after Friday's tough
emergency clampdown on Gage
merrymaking that Soltis said was
necessary to stop non-residents
from continually crashing
residence parties.
"We must teach everybody off-
campus that Gage is not the place
for a (public) party," said Soltis.
UBC's housing department and
the Gage council executive jointly
demanded Friday that students:
• hold no more parties in the
"common" area between rooms
on the residence floors;
• allow outside doors to be
locked at 8 p.m. on weekends;
• register "floor parties" at the
Gage front desk;
• limit  the   total   number   of
guests and residents on a floor to
50;
• keep parties contained within
their own "quads";
• close the party down if
requested to do so by a student
house advisor;
• expect eviction if they do not
respond to a house advisor's
requests.
The move was in response to an
incident two weeks ago in which
Gage partygoers refused to leave a
crowded party when a fire alarm
sounded.
Firemen refused to attend the
scene as they feared beer bottles
and debris would be dumped on
their heads when climbing the
stairs, said Soltis. He said the
party was finally cleared by
residence advisors but took longer
than was thought to be safe.
The measures announced
Monday came after weekend
vandalism at a registered Gage
quad party, when a dining room
table and chair were thrown from
an eleventh floor balcony.
The 24 students who hosted the
party were immediately
threatened with eviction, but
claimed the vandalism was caused
by gate crashers who had
trespassed into their quad, said
Soltis.
They were vindicated after a
meeting Monday night with
housing director Michael Davis,
but are still liable for damage to
the furniture.
Soltis said he hopes the stiff
regulations will rid Gage of its
current reputation as a place to
party for non-residents.
"We're being invaded, we've
got to get rid of those trespassers.
We've got too many people who
aren't accountable to anybody,"
he said.
Davis said he supports the
regulations outlined in the Friday
newsletter but said they do not
seem to be harsh enough.
r
THE UBYSSEY
* Vol. LXII, No. 7
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 25,1979
228-2301.
AMS stutters
on speakers
"STRAIGHTEN YOUR TIE and comb your hair, Smokey the Bear's taking your picture," CB nut advises good buddies over miniature set
mounted on bicycle. Undercover agent, posing as fund collector for United
Way during Forestry Week, flagged down three campus cowboy wagonss,
— glen sanford photo
a fire truck and an administration vice-president for speeding in pedestrian
area on Main Mall. Forestry Week culminates in dance Saturday and that's
a big 10-4.
'Do / have to teach in Pango-Pango?'
Although there are education graduates unemployed, UBC's education dean is encouraging students to enter his faculty.
A 12 per cent drop in this year's education
faculty enrolment will lead to an over-all
shortage of teachers by the early 1980s, dean
Roy Bentley said Monday.
But he cautioned that a flood of new students
into the education program might not be wise.
"There is a danger of over-reaction," he said.
And he said that education graduates must be
willing to look harder and farther afield for job
opportunities.
"It's not like a few years ago when people
were knocking on your door."
He said future education graduates will better
deal with the situation that awaits them on
graduation, "if they know the score."
He said graduate teachers will have to
specialize in more than one area to increase their
marketability when searching for jobs.
And he stressed that B.C.'s three major
universities have produced less than 50 per cent
of the province's teachers.
"We are a net importer of teachers," he said.
"Our three institutions have not expanded
enough to meet the need."
Education students association executive
Rosemary Harris said the general outlook for
education students is favorable. She said
students are channelling their studies toward the
future educational needs of the province.
She also said there are opportunities for
graduates in outlying areas if they are willing to
relocate.
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC's Alma Mater Society has a
$70,000 surplus in one hand and a
tin cup in the other. And neither
hand knows what the other is
doing.
AMS speakers organizer Susan
Hughes is attempting to solicit
$1,520 from the UBC alumni
association to cover a budget deficit
without the consent or knowledge
of the student representative assembly or the student administrative commission, some
student politicians charged
Monday.
SRA secretary-treasurer Glenn
Wong said that nothing about the
handout request has appeared in
the official minutes of the speakers
sub-committee, the programs committees, or SAC minutes.
"There should have been some
mention of it in the minutes," said
Wong.
Wong and AMS external affairs
officer Valgeet Johl said the incident is the second "mistake" the
speakers committee has made in the
past two weeks.
"This is the second incident
where the speakers committee has
failed to comply with AMS regulations," said Johl.
And if the request had been
published in the committee's
minutes, SRA would have dealt
with it, and probably objected to it,
Johl said.
"When the AMS doesn't know
what its committees are doing,
these are the kinds of problems you
end up with."
Hughes said she applied to
alumni fund director Dale
Alexander Monday for the money
needed to make up the predicted
deficit. She said the shortfall occurred because the price of speakers
rose and the Canadian dollar fell.
She also said she only had rough
estimates of her costs when she
originally budgeted.
Hughes said she applied to the
alumni and many other groups,
including the university administration and individual university departments. "I just want to see a
damn good speakers program. I'll
go where the money is."
She denied that she invited Alexander to an exclusive lunch with last
week's UBC speaker William F.
Buckley to "butter him up."
Hughes said she invited him
because he had helped her in
organizing the speakers program
and was a worthy representative of
the alumni association.
She said if she does not get the
money, a $4,200 speaking engagement by American architect and
author Buckminster Fuller in
March will have to be cancelled.
But Alexander said he was optimistic the association could give
her some money. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 25,1979
Humping hurts hedgehogs
SAN FRANCISCO (ZNS) —
Laid-back sex may not be as exciting as it's cracked up to be,
according to a U.S. university researcher.
Sex therapist John Wincze
decided to test the widely-held
belief that sexual relations without
anxieties and worries are the most
enjoyable. In his tests Wincze
compared the reactions of two
different groups of volunteers to a
sexually-arousing film.
One group was first shown an
anxiety-producing movie, such as
an Alfred Hitchcock thriller or a
videotape of a violent automobile
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Rat
McSneer, foremost researcher into
sex in this tiny island kingdom, today astounded thousands of hairy
puce blorgs with an announcement
that his latest research shows sex to
be "enjoyable, if not downright
fucking fun."
A survey taken among fornicating blorgs indicated that at least 70
per cent enjoyed what they were doing. Fifteen per cent said they'd
rather be watching Saturday Night
Live while 10 per cent expressed a
wish to punch the surveyor in the
mouth.
"I think, that is pending further
surveys on my own, that this could
be the reason for the recent population explosion," said McSneer. "In
previous centuries sex has had a bad
name, but that attitude seems to be
changing, causing a lot of messing
around and not a few pregnancies."
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
accident, before watching the erotic
movie. The second group was only
shown the erotic film.
Wincze was surprised to find that
the volunteers who watched the
anxiety-producing movie first, later
recorded the highest sexual arousal
rates.
The therapist suggests that,
contrary to popular belief, a little
anxiety might be beneficial and
laid-back sex a little dull.
Meanwhile, in other sexual
research developments, a London
zoologist claims that sex is no fun at
all for hedgehogs, laid-back or
otherwise.
After Andrew Mechelen, of
Peacehaven, Eng., recently
complained to zoologists that the
squeals of love-happy hedgehogs
were keeping him awake, a study
was conducted.
The problem, one zoologist
concluded, was that, "the
hedgehogs are noisy because what
they are doing is probably a very
painful experience."
A.M.S.
1979-80
Student   Administrative   Commission
(S.A.C);    Student   Representative
Assembly (S.R.A.) Commissioners, and
A.M.S. Ombudsperson.
Applications will be received for the positions of:
Commissioners of S.A.C.
(2 Positions)
Commissioner for Programs
Committee (SRA)
A.M.S. Ombudsperson
at the AMS business office Rm. 266, SUB.
Applications close 4:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1979
Applications may be picked up at Room 238 and
266 SUB.
GLENN WONG
Secretary-Treasurer
UBC BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational Meeting
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26
12:30 Buch 106
Bowling commences Monday October 1st
at SUB Lanes
NEW BOWLERS WELCOME!!
For further information call
Walter at 228-8225 after 5:00 p.m.
1 Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
SIR WILLIAM HAWTHORNE
Master of Churchill College, Cambridge University, Sir William's concerns
in energy policy range from petroleum to nuclear energy to windmills. He
has taught applied thermodynamics both at Cambridge and at the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and now serves as chairman of the
Advisory Council on Energy Conservation in the United Kingdom. He has
had wide international dealings with both government and industry on
energy policy and will provide ar\ interesting comparison with Visiting Professor Amory Lovins.
Tuesday, September 25, 12:30 p.m. —
Buchanan 106
'Energy Conservation in the U.K. —
Achievements to Date'
Thursday, September 27, 8:00 p.m. —
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, 2
'Can Conservation Solve the Energy Problem?'
RUSTY WRIGHT
DYNAMIC CAMPUS LECTURER:
'GOD OR MYTH?' MON. 24 12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
'THE RESURRECTION' TUE. 25 12:30
SUB AUDITORIUM
'DYNAMIC SEX' WED. 26 12:30
HEBB THEATRE.
SPONSORED BY CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST OF U.B.C.
C. .J.
M
UMMIMi
NOTEScWdes
300 TITLES AVAILABLE
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
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ARTS
STUDENTS
Nominations are now open for
1. S.R.A. Representative
2. Secretary
3. Social Coordinator
4. Editor, Arts Newsletter
NOMINATIONS CLOSE OCT.5
ELECTIONS ARE OCT. 10
Advice, information and nomination forms available at the\
Arts Office (Buch. 107)
LSAT
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330- 1152 Mainland St.,
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(604) 689-9000 or
call us toll free at
1-800-663-3381 Tuesday, September 25,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bulldozers taught lesson on UEL
•#» *
* \ /
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Protestors blocked the path of
trucks and bulldozers attempting to
fill in a ravine near the University
Hill elementary school in a confrontation Saturday.
Teachers and parents are angered
by the university endowment lands
office's attempt to fill in the area
and use it as a public works yard.
"We were outraged that nobody
asked our opinion. If we hadn't
been there on Saturday, the creek
would have been filled in," said
teacher Mary Ungerleider.
The parents and teachers were at
the school on Saturday finishing
work on an adventure playground
when they heard the noise of
machinery coming from the woods,
she said.
When she realized what was
happening, Ungerleider told the
crowd and they rushed over and sat
in front of the bulldozers.
"I feel people's frustration level
has gotten so high over things like
this happening, something's going
to happen. These things go on
without their consent and people
get upset," said Ungerleider.
"We became annoyed and sat
down in front of the bulldozer and
what's going on,' " said principal
Noel Herron.
The philosophy of the school is
that the total community is the
students' most valuable resource,
Herron said. He added that the
ravine is regarded as an extension
of the classroom.
The ravine has been used as a
study area for over a decade and the
filling in of the area came as a total
shock to the teachers and parents,
said Herron.
UEL manager Robert Murdoch
said he was not aware the ravine
was being used by the school.
"What created the problem was a
lack of communication on both
sides. I'm keeping an open mind
about this thing, though," he said
Monday.
It would be better to extend the
present public works yard into the
ravine than to find a new location,
said Murdoch.
"Now that they've bulldozed so
much of 16th Avenue, "why don't
they put it up there? I think they
could put it somewhere else," said
Ungerleider.
The ravine acts as a buffer zone
between the existing yard and the
. ^s^r^a**-***
*•   xj**      " *^J? Urn.
DOWN IN THE DUMPS are students, teachers and parents of University Hill elementary school over attempt by
endowment lands bureaucracy to convert ravine near school into works yard. Ravine has fostered outdoor education classes in the past, but powers that be would prefer it as parking lot for heavy equipment.
'Pawns' get rooked by teachers
said 'go no further until we know    school, she said.
University students
reject radicalism
MONTREAL (CUP) — Quebec
CEGEP (community college)
students could lose a semester of
studies this fall if CEGEP teachers
do not settle a contract dispute with
the government soon.
The Common Front, representing the union for Quebec civil
servants, teachers and hospital
staff, has decided that if a full-scale
strike is to be used it will have to be
before Nov. 7.
The Common Front chose that
date because it is worried the
government will validate the
semester if the strike is called later.
(Validation means students receive
credit for an entire semester
because most of it is completed.)
Nicaragua gets
real thing from
new wave fans
Vancouver's new wave fans made
financial support a real thing for
out-of-luck Nicaraguans at a
concert Saturday.
More than 300 people crammed
into the Canadian legion hall at 6th
and Commercial to rock the night
away with some of Vancouver's
best new wave talent.
And they made almost $800 for
the residents of the war-torn Latin
American country in the process.
"It was quite a success," said
concert organizer Harvey MacKinnon. "I think I'd like to see more
political concerts. Musicians
certainly have a lot to contribute
and it's a good way of fund
raising."
The show was headlined by the
Pointed Sticks, while the Dishrags
and Modernettes opened the show.
All three bands played for free.
The Pointed Sticks will perform
in the SUB ballroom on Friday,
Oct. 5. Tickets are $3 and are
available in the Alma Mater Society
business office.
But if teachers walk out before
Nov. 7 students will be forced to
make up the time next summer or
forfeit a term.
Bill Fillmore, John Abbott
College student union president,
thinks a teachers' early walkout is
unfair to students.
"The students are being used as
pawns in the contract game," he
said.
But college faculty association
executive John Sheshko said he
disagrees.
"Personally I guess that there is a
plea that students will support us,
because I live under the illusion that
whatever will benefit us will benefit
them," he said.
The faculty association has
supported the Common Front
stand and also approved the concept of 24-hour walkouts in October to back their contract
demands. One of the main
stumbling blocks is the introduction
of a cost-of-living allowance clause
into the teachers' contract.
MONTREAL (CUP) —
Complaints of rampant radicalism,
underrepresentation and errant
political beliefs have severed Quebec's student organization from its
university members.
L'Association Nationale des
Etudiants du Quebec, Quebec's
student organization, will soon be
losing its university members,
according to student politicians
here.
Le        Regroupement des
Associations Etudiantes Univer-
sitaires, a sub-unit of ANEQ, has
grown dissatisfied with the former
group over the last few years
because of underrepresentation and
political differences.
ANEQ has been labelled as being
"too radical" by some university
members.
Jean-Yves David, an official of
the Concordia University students'
association, says although the
universities are outnumbered in
votes by the community colleges,
they speak for too many students to
be ignored.
The group will meet in early
October to vote on a split from the
association but indications are that
the vote will only be a formality.
Benoit Laurin, McGill University
student society external vice-
president, says he thinks the
majority of the university members
will favor the split.
The separation was discussed at a
meeting Sept. 16, and a motion to
leave ANEQ was introduced but
not voted on.
The association has about 30
members, seven of which are
universities.
DO YOU NEED A PUSH? asks concerned student after discovering
forestry wagon on safari near library pond. Bushed occupant was waiting
for tow-truck after hydrofoil-operated vehicle stripped gears and refused to
budge.   Revolutionary  automobile  boasts  futistic  body  styling,   flow-
through ventilation, and blockhead in front seat
power plant. Wood alcohol fuel in tank was quickly
too impatient to wait for Pit to open.
— glen sanf ord photo
in addition to unique
consumed by students Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 25,1979
■~D—
-<h~
''^rj££^*\lHr*> #»
«««
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I   YeM— ANfc ,FwG ^GTMaJW uJiTTi THiSj /Ve^rj
Cans can't
Tin cans have a new future at UBC.
Instead of holding smelly fish, stale vegetables, beer or dragging
mindlessly behind cars' Just Married signs, metal containers can
have a dutiful, meaningful purpose on campus.
They can gather coins for the AMS speakers' committee. Alms
for the poor inept.
In a slimy beg, borrow or steal move, AMS speakers organizer
Susan Hughes has tried to solicit $1,520 from UBC's (cringe) alumni association to cover a budget deficit. She said she'll "go where
the money is" even if it means kissing asses of those who will
give her the speakers she wants.
And she didn't even tell the student representative assembly or
the student administrative commission.
Such blatant inefficient bungling is becoming regular tinned
goods from the AMS. And it reeks of rotten contents.
Not only has one AMS hack misled the others, but sought financial aid from a patronizing source, the established alumni association. She invited alumni fund director Dale Alexander to the exclusive banquet for speaker William F. Buckley so he could wallow
in the reception of a weighty speaker. But what's worse, no one
seems to see anything wrong with it.
Finance director Len Clarke says he thinks the AMS should take
what it can get: "If they're giving out money we might as well stick
our hands out," he says. "If anything falls in, that's great."
So the next AMS project could well be a recycling campaign.
They need all the tin cans they can collect to stir up profits.
Because of Hughes' money mismanagement and poor budget
estimates, AMS lids are opening quickly.
But their inner goods are already damaged. Second-hand merchandise just won't do the trick.
We need a new and improved product. Fast.
Letters
'Venomous innuendo' poisons students
Blood Money (Sept. 13 Ubyssey)
is full of dangerous innuendo and
gross assumption. The article
suggests that UBC's board of
governors indirectly supports
murders, beatings and political
imprisonment. Says the author Bill
Tieleman, they do so by "investing
in firms which operate in and
support the economies of countries
whose governments . . . violate
human rights." Outrage, he cries,
and his noble sentiments are lost in
his venomous wrath.
He fails completely to demonstrate how a company's operation
under such a government contributes to the moral injustice
perpetrated by that government.
Does a citizen (individual or corporate) who contributes to the
economy of a  country  in whose
laws he does not believe commit a
crime?
Tieleman also fails to suggest
how any company operating under
a repressive government can bring
about change. Should they pressure
the government? That government
would find another investor.
Should they refuse to operate there,
deny the government taxes, and the
people jobs in a country inevitably
short of capital? The logic of that is
the logic of trying to flush out a
criminal by starving his hostages.
The suggested moral irresponsibility of these companies is
even more tenuous when drawn to
UBC's board of governors. Judging
by those few facts in the article the
board has given fair consideration
to its moral responsibilities. They
have passed "a resolution of regret
over human rights violations in
Chile." "(They) have looked at
what defines a socially acceptable
stock." And they are subject to the
realities of the marketplace where
"rapid buying and selling . . .
makes it difficult even for the
university to know what stock it
holds," let alone consider possible
moral implications of the company's business dealings.
Bill Tieleman continues,
questioning the morality of
companies from Rothmans, for
selling cigarettes, to Robin Hood,
for hiring security guards (albeit
independently stupid ones) to
protect their property from damage
by strikers. And he implies that the
UBC board must shoulder some
responsibility for all these "immoral" actions. This is sensationalism that befits the National
Enquirer.
That resource-based companies
like Noranda do not improve the
economic lot of underdeveloped
countries is true. They take advantage of their hosts. A sad fact
that the author in his spite has
misdirected   against   UBC.   If  he
were to address this problem
squarely, deal in facts instead of
venomous innuendo, he might have
something of value.
Repression of human liberty is a
problem that requires a firm grasp
of all the implications before
constructive action can be taken. It
may still be a problem we cannot
solve. It will not be solved by
simplistic boycotts. And it will not
be solved by the hollow-minded,
verbal mud-slinging of Bill Tieleman.
Charles Campbell
Book guru gets boo all
Take a crate, hacks
Post-secondary education in
Canada is not free, but UBC-is a lot
closer to it than most Canadian
universities. In addition to this, and
despite the 14 per cent inflation rate
faced by the UBC administration,
student fees increase by an annual
average of only three per cent. I
offer my congratulations to Doug
Kenny and his staff for this accomplishment.
So who are these hacks who
can't appreciate their good fortune? Are they really so narcissistic
as to believe UBC students would
be the only people in the world
exempt from the pressures of inflation? These same hacks blame us
for being apathetic. Oh, no, we're
not. We would be though, if we
paid any attention to our so-called
leaders' delirious logic.
Leaders? I have seen more
federal politicians on this campus
than students. Once in a while we
are faced with a page of
photographs in The Ubyssey and
are told that if we don't vote for
one we're apathetic.
When did anyone ever stand up
on a crate and make a speech? Are
they all so cowardly that they can
only speak through the typed pages
of this paper? Leaders my ass.
And if they are of that mentality
that can only see the negative side,
why don't they do more than just
talk about it? The provincial
government is spending millions
enlarging the highway access to
UBC, even in the face of an energy
shortage, while the bus service
leaves much to be desired.
C'mon, let's have some action
and don't let them blame the
apathy on you.
Phil Green
zoology 3
What's wrong with these
studious, artsy-fartsy types out here
at UBC? For weeks I've been trying
to sell some textbooks for Spanish
355 and 363, all for substantial
bucks off and barely used to boot.
Godammit, I was even the only
student I knew last year who put
covers on his/her textbooks. Why?
To keep them clean this year for
you lily-pure third-year language
types who AREN'T BUYING.
Get this: I put up signs at
registration in the room set aside
for Spanish courses; I put up signs
and wrote on the blackboards in the
rooms where the courses are taught;
and another sign languishes on the
front-hall board in Buchanan
across from the women's 100.
Result: boo all. Yes, I know there
are lots of dull Xerox signs around
for English 100 books, and we're all
tired of looking at them, but mine
are in felt colors and are the only
Spanish texts for sale I've seen,
besides. So come on, willya
someone?
You need the books and I need
the money more than the bloody
bookstore does. You can call me at
266-4098 (4 to 10 p.m.). And be
ready to crawl for forgiveness.
Larry Green
arts 4
r
THE UBYSSEY
September 25, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member. Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Tom Hawthorn sprang into the office. "Quick," he said, "turn on the TV it's almost time for the Twilight Zone and anything can happen then." Heather
Conn pushed him aside and cried," No, no Idi Amin's going to be on the Muppets and I don't want to miss it. "Joan Marklund, Brad Mennie, Carly Skjeluik and
Dave Francis all wanted to watch Hockey Night in Canada but Kevin Finnegan protested," No, I can't stand any more sports, lets watch something intellectual
like the CBC test pattern." Peter Menyasz wanted to watch All in the Family and wouldn't settle for watching Julie and Geof Wheelwright fight. Paul Von Matt,
Glen Sanford and Ross Burnett wanted Saturday Night Live and were disappointed when they were told it was only Tuesday. Verne McDonald and Ralph
Maurer grabbed the tube, tired of all the bickering," we're watching the news, take a hint and get to work," they barked Tuesday, September 25,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Marx mixes 'deadly quicksand'
Rereading Eric Mills' story on
the Nicaraguan crisis, one obtains
the impression that we students
should be proud of the sometimes
violent organized activities of the
Nicaraguan student body, which is
heavily infiltrated by Marxists, in
their removal of the Somoza
regime.
To praise the removal of the
corrupt Somoza regime, which at
times resorted to dictatorial
methods may be one thing, but to
glorify the efforts of Marxist-
controlled and infiltrated student
organizations is another. These
people envision a nation rigidly
controlled by totalitarian means,
not even comparable to Somoza's
quasi-dictatorial rule.
The Marxists were therefore
solely interested in Somoza's
downfall,    not    to    liberate    the
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ARE YOU
ASTHMATIC?
Inhalers for Asthma have
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interested in assessing the effectiveness of these inhalers;
volunteers will be remunerated.
The study consists of breathing
tests done before and after use
of five different inhalers on five
different days.
If interested please call
Dr. K. Elwood or
Dr. R. Abboud,
at 873-5441, Local 3336.
Tiaicotf
Pam's Unicut for men and
women is now open . . .
and to my many friends
from U.B.C. I am offering
a 10% Discount.
FOR APPOINTMENT
738-7310
4009 MacDONALD
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT
Wednesday
MOM AND POPS
Thursday
MAINLAND JAZZ BAND
Friday
DIXIELAND EXPRESS
Saturday
PHOENIX JAZZERS
Members $3-00       Guests $4.00
TUES/WED/THURS — FREE (or Members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broaaway — 873-4131
_    YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — S3 00   __
Nicaraguan populace and give them
a western-like democracy, but
rather saw the pandemonium as an
ideal breeding ground for their
political expansion and eventual
grasp for total power.
I hope that the moderate and
conservative elements within the
now ruling FSLN (Sandinista National Liberation Front) recognize
this threat and prevent Nicaragua
from sliding from its already
muddy past history, into a deadly
Marxist quicksand. It is thus a
shame that Mills so blinded by his
quasi-socialist philosophies, totally
disregards the ominous situation
which the Marxist elements pose
and glorifies them as heroes.
HubertusT.
forestry 2
£| GAY $
Pi      DISCO DANCE M
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24 Garden Room >£
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g 9.00 p.m.-1.00 a.m. $2.50 Visitors (gj
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Careers
Interested in CA Employment?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1980
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of the
Firm. Submit an original or photocopy of your
personal resume (UCPA form is suitable) by
October 5, 1979 to the Canada Employment Centre
on Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be
contacted on or about October 26th regarding
campus interviews which will take place during the
period November 6-15th. Additional information is
available at the U.B.C. Canada Employment Office.
louche Ross &Co.
Chartered Accountants
We are an international firm of chartered accountants seeking
persons to article as chartered accountants in our British Columbia offices.
If you are currently on a Faculty of Commerce
undergraduate, licentiate, or graduate program, have a
sincere desire to become a chartered accountant, and will
graduate in 1980, we would like to meet you.
We will be recruiting on campus from October 29 to
November 1. Persons desiring to meet our representatives
must apply for an interview in writing and forward their
resumes to the Campus Placement Center by October 5, 1979.
These applications will be pre-screened. Students selected for
interviews will be contacted as quickly as possible to make appointments through the Campus Placement Center.
PRICE WATERHOUSE
& CO.
Chartered Accountants
Representatives of the Vancouver office will be
available on campus on November 7, 8 and 9 at the
Canada   Employment  Centre  to  interview  1980
. graduates who will be eligible for student registra-
;. tion with the Institute of Chartered Accountants of
^ British Columbia.
*„ Arrangements for an interview should be made
^ through the Canada Employment Centre, Room
*> 214, Brock Hall by October 5, 1979.
; Additional information is availble at the Canada
Employment Centre.
C.A. STUDENTS - VICTORIA
THORNE RIDDELL & CO.
Considering a career in Chartered Accountancy? Many
U.B.C. graduates have made successful careers as Chartered
Accountants with the Victoria office of our firm.- The office
has a complement of more than 45 professional staff and a
diversified practice.
A representative of our Victoria office will be on campus
November 5 and 6 to interview students.
If you are interested in arranging for an interview please
complete an application form available from the Canada
Employment Centre on Campus, attach a transcript of your
marks, and leave it with the Employment Centre by October 5
marked to our attention.
THORNE RIDDELL & CO.
305-645 Fort Street
Victoria, British Columbia
With offices across Canada including
the following in British Columbia
Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster, Cranbrook, Vernon,
Kamloops and Kelowna
G1REERS
Public Service Canada
The class of '80
This year the Public Service of Canada will have a definite need for
a limited number of Canada's finest graduating students from the
following areas only:
Accounting/Finance
Business and Public Administration
Commerce
Computer Science
Economics and Statistics
Engineering
Library Science
For information and application forms, see your campus placement
office or your nearest Public Service Commission of Canada staffing
office. Your application must be postmarked no later than October
15, 1979.
FOREIGN SERVICE:
If you are interested in a career in the Foreign Service, you must
also write the Foreign Service Exam, on Saturday, October 13, at
9 a.m. Check your campus placement office for the location of the
exam centre nearest you
Competition 80-4000
Open to both men and women.
1 +
Public Service Commission
of Canada
Commission de la Fonction publique
du Canada Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 25,1979
Tween classes
TODAY
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General meeting and films, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper,  study and vespers, 6 p.m.,  Lutheran
Campus Centre.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE,
LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
NDP MLA Stu Leggatt speaks, noon, Law 101.
RUSSIAN CLUB
Coffee and cake reception with speeches, noon,
faculty club salon C.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Bible study and discussions over lunch, noon
Fr. Paul Rennick's rom at St. Mark's College.
RED CROSS CAMPUS BLOOD DRIVE
Donors' names to be entered in a draw for four
complimentary dinners with other prizes, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. all week, SUB 207.
MUSSOC
First general meeting, noon, SUB 205.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Organizational and information meeting, noon,
SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
VOC
General meeting and slide show, noon, Chem.
250.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
First general meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 212.
AQUA SOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CCM
Salmon barbeque, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
UBC SAILING TEAM
Organizational   meeting,   noon.   War  Memorial
gym foyer.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
German language evening with free admission, 7
p.m., International House coffee place.
HILLEL HOUSE
Shefa vegetarian lunch, noon, Hillel House.
UBC BOWLING LEAGUE
Organizational meeting, noon, Buch. 106.
TM PROGRAM
Introductory lecture, noon, Angus 306. Weekly
meeting with video tape, noon, Buch. 217.
AIKIDO CLUB
First practice, 7:10 p.m.. Armories 203.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 207.
POTTERY CLUB
General meeting and membership sales, noon,
SUB 251.
THURSDAY
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 224.
LSA SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Harry Hammer speaks on the interference of
government in legitimate private rights,   noon.
Law 101.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Title: Welcome you, noon, SUB 207.
AMNESTY UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 125.
IVCF
Urbana '79:  a multi-media presentation,  noon,
Chem. 250.
PRE DENTAL SOCIETY
New members welcome, noon, IRC 1.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 117. Social list)
gathering and coffee party, 4 p.m., SUB 205.
HAMSOC
Organizational meeting and beginning of classes
towards ham radio license, noon. Brock Hall annex room 358.
AQUA-SOC
Swap meet, noon, SUB 205.
HILLEL HOUSE
Beginner's and intermediate Hebrew seminar on
the Holocaust, noon, Hille| House.
INTRAMURALS
Organizational meeting for Co-Rec hike to Mt.
Seymour on Saturday, noon, War Memorial gym
room 210.
INTRAMURALS - MEN
Contract mile, noon, Harry Logan track.
Deliverance
THIS THURS.
12:30
NORRES
*w MOVING AND ~
51 TRANSFER LTD
I    51
MOVING AND j^
STORAGE        ^
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements. Yards
CLEAN-UPS
Application
for Students' Court
The Student Administrative Commission is now accepting applications for the following positions on Students' Court.
5 JUDGES
2 ALTERNATE JUDGES
1 CLERK OF THE COURT
At least one of the 5 judges will be chosen from among
themselves to be the Chief Justice.
The Chief Justice shall be entering 3rd Year Law.
At least one alternate must be in the Law Faculty.
Application forms can be picked up in
Room 238, S.U.B.
NOMINATIONS FOR
SCIENCE SRA REP.
Close Wednesday,
September 26, 1979
Nomination Forms can be picked up in the
S.U.S. Office (BioSci 1500).
DESSERT PARTY
TO WELCOME STUDENTS & STAFF
7:30 p.m., THURS., SEPT. 29
Lutheran Campus Centre
BERNICE GERARD, Speaker
RADIO OPEN-LINER, ALDERMAN
Sponsor:Charismatic Christian Fellowship
325-2515, 879-4085
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
FACULTY OF ARTS
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES TO THE FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) one representative from the combined major, honours and
graduate students in each of the departments and schools
of the Faculty of Arts.
b) two representatives from each of First and Second Year
Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the meetings
of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the
Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Advisor's Office,
and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the Registrar
of    the    University    not    later   than   4:00    p.m.,    FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 28, 1979.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional lines 50c. Additional days $2.75 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a.m, the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.UB., UBC, Van., B.C V6T 1W5.
5 — Coming Events
25 — Instruction
RELATIONSHIPS
A    seminar    which    increases
understanding of relationships —
How they work.
How we sabotage them, and
How we can enhance them.
Sept. 28-30     595.00      Phone ARAS 437-3334
30 - Jobs
35 - Lost
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander graduate of
Juilliard School of Music. Member of B.C.
Registered Music Teachers Ass'n. 731-0601
READING SKILLS, reading comprehension, retention and speed. Plus note-taking/study techniques. 1 day course. Ideal for students. 266-6119.
*«• Sh'rto-ryu Karate-do
***      Tues: 6:3fl-8f30 p.m.
*.#*    # SUB, 207*209
* • * TK&rs: 12^80^00 p.m.
SUB Party Room
REWARD thin 3 piece silver bracelet lost Friday.
Sentimental value only, ph. 732-9069.
REWARD for woman's ID lost on campus last
Wed. If found call 734-4956.
REWARD. Lost blue duffle coat in room HA 310 on
20/9/79. Phone Stan, 325-0034.
$50 REWARD. Lost Thurs. 13 gold wristwatch. Back
inscription John 8- Mee 1962. Sentimental value.
Phone 738-5394.
80 — Tutoring
85 — Typing
TYPING
accurate.
873-8032
80c      per      page.      Fast      and
Experienced    typist.    Phone   Gordon,
40 — Messages
TYPING: Essays, Thesis, Manuscripts, Reports, etc.
Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy
324-9414.
50 — Rentals
90 — Wanted
60 - Rides
65 — Scandals
99 — Miscellaneous
70 — Services
CX PHOTO LAB. Special Sale on 16"x20" C.
Colour Enlargements.  Regular price $15.50 until
the end of Sept. Sale 511.50. Special at 4480 W.
10th location only!
MEETING OF the BURT REYNOLDS FAN
CLUB will be held in SUB Theatre this weekend.
Admission $1.00.
10 — For Sale—Com'l    cont'd.
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and racquet
sports equipment. 733 1612. 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West Broad
way, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super Valu.
INSTANT
PASSPOR
PHOTOS
bSa4^£LLTo.
,r^    4538 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
To Sell -
Buy —
Inform
11 — For Sale — Private
DEMONSTRATION
Sept. 27, Thurs.
1:00 p.m.
SUB Ballroom
1976          YAMAHA
etudes many extras.
Glenn, 438-2652.
M
tw
usl
n         DOHC
sell for tuition
i n-
$1275.
15 — Found
20 — Housing
4TH  YR.   FEMALE  student   has
suite     to   share  with   another
876-6479.
large 2-bedroom
female.   Oct.   1,
WOMEN'S ACCOMMODATION ON CAMPUS.
Shared double rooms at Totem Park Residence
are available. Contact the Student Housing Office,
Ponderosa Building, 8:30-4:30 p.m. Monday to
Friday. For information call 228-2811.
SUMMER END CLEARANCE
TENNIS EQUIPMENT & CLOTHING
MENS & LADIES TRAINING SUITS
NEW "BALANCE" JOGGING SHOES
IEHQ9P 228-0414
Ell-jBll-ltai LOWER MALL
pju^-JLsJU STUDENT UNION BUILDING
PllB"lllfl^        "Across from the Pit"
SALE ENDS
FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 28 Tuesday, September 25,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Stoppard play
show stopper
By VERNE McDONALD
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern
Are Dead is an especially tricky
play. Trying to upstage William
Shakespeare is one thing, but actually succeeding is something that
must be seen to be believed.
Frederic Wood Theatre's production of Tom Stoppard's bold work
is something that simply must be
seen. Director Robert Graham,
resisting the temptation to be
obscure in dealing with such rich
material, has crafted a thoroughly
entertaining comedy without losing any of the thought-provoking
insights that are the real reason
behind this philosophical drama.
Rosencrantz  and   Guildenstern
Are Dead
By Tom Stoppard
At Freddy Wood Theatre
Until Sept. 28
The premise is actually rather
simple. A central part of the action
in Shakespeare's Hamlet involves
the duplicity of two courtiers,
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, in
King Claudius' plans to rid himself
of his troublesome nephew.
But in that earlier play,
Shakespeare's masterpiece of
motivation and human psychology.
the reasons behind Rosencrantz
and Guildenstern's actions are
curiously absent. Stoppard's play
attempts to explain their involvement and goes beyond to explore
the entire question of how people
try to cope with the world, or
worlds, into which they are thrust.
Using the well-known plot of
Hamlet as a frame, Stoppard concentrates on Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern alone. The story of the
Prince of Denmark becomes
peripheral and finally irrelevant.
What we care about are the two
main characters, their bewilderment at being drawn into a plot
they don't really perceive or understand, and their desperate wish to
escape from a universe that more
and more is bent on their destruction.
As well, they must wrestle with
less weighty problems such as
which is Rosencrantz and which is
Guildenstern, a distinction
Shakespeare did not clarify in terms
of character, and why a coin, after
ninety throws, still has an equal
chance of coming up heads as tails.
There's a connection there.
This blend of a classic play, a
new twist, the question of existence, the relationship between
fate and chance, the absurdity of
—IFREE_
SKATE
SHARPENING
With AMS Card REGULARLY $1.50
Offer expires September 29      1 Pair Per Customer
Est. 1930
WEST PT. CYCLES
3771 W. 10th
224-3536
INTRAMURALS
Dial Inter-Action   228-2401
WOMEN
Register In
Event
Event Date
WMG 210 By
Novelty Swim Meet
Thur. Sept. 27
Fri. Sept. 21
Aquatic Centre
12:30
(Teams)
Joggers 3 Km run
Fri. Sept. 28
n/a
Mclnnes Field
12:30
Basketball League
Oct. 1-Nov. 20
Mon. Sept. 24
War Memorial Gym
Mon, Tues, noon
(Teams)
Hockey (with equipment)
Oct 4-Nov 29
Fri. Sept. 28
Thunderbird Winter
Thur. 7:30-9:30
(Teams)
Sports Centre
Contract Mile
Thur. Sept 27
n/a
Harry Logan Track
12:30
Joggers 5 Km Run
Fri. Sept 28
n/a
Mclnnes Field
12:30
Basketball League
Oct 9-Nov 30
Fri. Sept 28
War Memorial Gym
Tues thru Fri
noon and evenings
(Teams)
Hockey League
Oct 9-Nov 29
Fri. Sept 28
Thunderbird Winter S C
Tue, Thur 7:30-11:30 (Teams)
Inner Tube Water Polo League Oct 8-Nov 30
Fri. Sept 28
Aquatic Centre
Mon 7:30-9:30
Fri 3:30-5:30
(Teams)
CO-REC
Volleyball
Sept 20-Nov 29
Drop-in
War Memorial Gym
Thur. 7:30-9:30
Badminton
Sept 26-Nov 28
Drop-in
Gym B
Wed. 8:30-10:30
Mixed Tennis Tournament
Sun. Sept 30
Mon. Sept 24
Memorial Gym & TWSC
10:00-6:00
(Pairs)
Exploration Hike
Sat. Sept 29
Mon. Sept 24
Seymour Mountain
8:00-6:00
(Individual) ^
life and the reasons behind men's
actions could easily become too
confused to follow.
Stoppard isn't about to help us,
either. The dialogue is fast, witty
and furious, propelling laughter
from the audience a split second
before we realize something important has been said. Keeping all this
up without losing the audience requires devilishly fine timing as well
as compellingly human portrayals
from the actors involved.
This production does not fail in
that respect. Ron Haider and Tom
McBeath, playing Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern (or is it Guildenstern
and Rosencrantz?), perform an intricate verbal dance, never faltering
and never allowing us to catch up
with their dilemma long enough to
resolve it. Like Rosencrantz and
Guildenstern we can only wait and
hope that some sense will emerge
from the chaos of life.
Helping to confuse them (and us)
is Leon Pownall as the chief "tragedian" who manages to slip himself
into their seemingly seamless unity,
and occasionally even take charge
of the action, without disrupting
the harmony of the two main
characters.
The   central   characters   of   the
original play by Shakespeare
become shadowy phantoms in
Stoppard's version. With few entrances and even fewer lines they
are on the fringe of the action in a
reversal of the part Rosencrantz
and Guildenstern play in Hamlet.
Yet they cannot be ignored.
Gerry Claman as Gertrude makes
much of little, projecting the
character of a frail, manipulated
queen in as little time as it takes to
tell of it. Ann St. James does a
similar job with the part of Ophelia.
Also not to be ignored is Jergan
Beerwald, who plays Claudius as if
he had a string in his back and a
tape recorder in his bowels. He'd be
good in front of a candy store with
a bunch of cigars in his hand.
Plaudits, however, should go to
the group of students who played
the minor tragedians and to Robert
Dahlstrom for set design. If this
play is an indication of what we can
expect from Frederic Wood this
season, we have much to look forward to.
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS:
September 25th-28th
Tues: Jews in the Diaspora. Why?
FIRST IN A SERIES
Guest Speaker: Richard Messing,
Rabbi of Temple Shalom — 12:30 p.m.
Wed: Shefa Vegetarian Lunch Ban
Menu: Gourmet Macaroni and Cheese
Fresh Garden Salad
Thurs: (1) Beginners and Intermediate
Hebrew
(2) Seminar on the Holocaust
* Last chance to enrol.
The Advance Consumer Seminar
"How to buy a
• ,j
The most popular and educational
program on loudspeakers in Canada
OCTOBER 1, 1979, 7:30 P.M.
BAYSHORE INN
SEATING 500 MAXIMUM RESERVATIONS ONLY
Subjects that will be covered
• Frequency response.
• Time alignment, phased array, octave-to-octave balance.
• Colouration and accuracy.
• The four types of loudspeaker imaging and dispersion.
• Exactly how to conduct an AB comparison between two
brands to prove which one is the'most accurate.
• How to recognize misleading and dishonest
selling practices.
• Power handling and requirements, dynamic range,
room acoustics.
• General questions and answers.
This is an "EVOLUTION AUDIO" show
featuring Lome Irlowell
3&
Tickets now available from,
bird sound
LTD.
1246 Lynn Valley Road
North Vancouver 986-4266
:>o. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 25,1979
Ref, coach
finally agree
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
Versatility is expected from rugby
players, but from their coaches?
UBC rugby coach Donn Spence
found himself pressed into duty as a
referee for the second half of the
'Birds Vancouver Rugby Union
match against Capilano Saturday
when the scheduled official became
ill.
"Thank God we were leading at
the half," sighed Spence after the
Thunderbirds downed the Caps
25-4. UBC led 8-0 at half time.
Spence was saved any possible
embarrassment by his players, who
used their superior conditioning to
overwhelm the Caps in the last 40
minutes. UBC consistently won the
ball both in loose play and on lineouts against what Spence considers
"one of the best rucking and mauling teams in Vancouver."
The 'Birds dominated play in
the first half but errant passes
among the backs stymied most of
their drives. Only Dave Legg and
Don Halliday managed to score
tries, and Halliday's was clearly offside.
The 'Birds offense started to
mesh in the second half, with Legg
and Halliday each scoring their second try and Ray Brendzy adding
another. Doug Climie kicked a convert and a penalty goal to round out
UBC's scoring, while Ian Lassar
scored Capilano's only try.
The Thunderbirds are plagued by
injuries and players on tour, but
their backs finally showed signs Saturday of the teamwork that will
allow them to constantly create
overlaps. Scrum half Doug Tate
will be out for several weeks with
back problems, while backs Graham Taylor and forward Robin
Russell are in Europe with the Canadian team. They are scheduled to
return Sept. 30.
The Canadian team tied South
Counties 9-9 in England Saturday
to bring their tour record to 2-1-1.
In other rugby action last
weekend the UBC Seconds downed
Capilano Seconds 20-10, the UBC
Thirds walloped the Cap Thirds
32-12 and the Frosh knocked off
the Red Lions 25-6.
The 'Birds next game is Wednesday evening against Bristol University of England.
ALL OVER CAPILANO was the story Saturday as the Thunderbird rugby
team annihilated Caps 25-4 in Vancouver Rugby Union match. 'Birds got
aggressive play from forwards, as shown here, to control ball throughout
— kavin finnegan photo
the game. UBC plays Wednesday evening against touring English side
from Bristol University.
A game, a score, a whole lot more
The Thunderbird soccer team
won one and missed another in
Canada West action on the
weekend.
The 'Birds lost 2-0 to the University of Alberta Golden Bears on
Saturday, but it was the non-game
Friday that caused the most problem.
For some unknown reason the
University of Calgary changed the
game time from 3 p.m. to 11 a.m.
and informed the UBC athletic department Friday morning, while the
UBC team was at Vancouver airport. The team landed in Calgary at
1:10 p.m., and the Calgary team
was unable to find facilities for an
afternoon match.
This Thursday the Thunderbirds
will meet the University of Victoria
in Thunderbird Stadium at  12:45
p.m. The game will be shown in the
Pit Thursday night.
Saturday   the   'Birds   meet   the
Alumni at 2 p.m. in the stadium.
The football Thunderbirds broke
20 years of tradition Saturday and
downed the University of Alberta
Golden Bears 17-16 in Western Intercollegiate Football Conference
play.
UBC last won in Edmonton in
1959.
WESTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE
FOOTBALL CONFERENCE
Standings
W
L     Pts.
UBC 'Birds
3
1      6
Alberta'Bears
3
1      6
Sask. Huskies
1
2     2
Calgary D'saurs
1
2      2
Manitoba Bisons
1
3     2
The 'Birds, who were trailing
12-0 at one point, scored the winning points with less than two minutes remaining in the game when
quarterback Greg Clarkson hit
Barry Muis with a touchdown pass.
The win puts the 'Birds in a first
place tie with the 'Bears at the half
way point of the season. The two
teams will meet Oct. 27 at Thunderbird Stadium in the last regular
season game.
The 'Birds travel to Winnipeg
this weekend to play the University
of Manitoba, which has improved
considerably since losing 18-12 to
UBC in August.
Sixty-four potential Bjorn Borgs
showed up at the men's intramural
outdoor tennis tournament on the
weekend, but by Sunday evening
only Dave Jackson of Arts was left.
Jackson defeated Wayne Sorin 7-
5, 6-7, 7-5 in the finals on the winter
sports centre courts to take the title.
Jackson and Sorin defeated Peter
Chan and Derek Lee in the semifinals of the double-knockout
tournament.
Registration for the event was cut
off two days before planned
because of the number of entries,
and the play was so competitive the
tournament went five hours
overtime due to long matches.
—kavin flnnagan photo
NOTICE THE HOOK in those sticks? Perfect for fitting around ankles of opposition forwards streaking in on goal
unmolested, right? Unfortunately, harder than hell to hit little round ball with, as UBC and Meraloma women
discovered in field hockey action Saturday. Meralomas figured out trick first, downed Thunderettes 2-0.
FRIDAY
Men's soccer
UBC at Calgary, ppd.
SATURDAY
Men's football
UBC 17 Alberta 16
Men's soccer
UBC 0 Alberta 2
Women's field hockey
UBC 0 Meralomas 2
Men's field hockey
UBC I   1 India 2
UBC II 1 Occasional 1
Men's rugby
UBC I 25 Caps 4
UBC II 20 Caps II 10
UBC III 32 Caps III 12
Frosh 25 Red Lions 6

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