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The Ubyssey Nov 15, 1972

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 Quebec CEGEP students vote to strike
QUEBEC CITY (CUPI) — Community college
students in Quebec will go out on strike later this
month against tough new government school
regulations.
The decision to strike came at a general meeting
, of more than 200 delegates to the Front des Etudiants
du Quebec held here last weekend.
The FEQ is the provincial student union affiliated
with the Confederation of National Trade Unions.
Most universities and colleges in Quebec belong.
The strike will protest the new regulations, termed
the "nouveau regime pedagogique", as the latest
move by the Quebec government toward complete
control over the CEGEPS or community colleges.
Delegates determined the strike would start before
Dec. 1.
The regulations require arts students to take
several science and physical education courses along
with their arts options. Many CEGEPS professors
interpret this rule as a government attempt to phase
out humanities departments within a few years.
The regulations also compel students to attend 45
hours of classes weekly, automatically eliminating
students who must work part-time to finance their
education. The move contradicts the original aim of
the CEGEP program which was to provide some
post-secondary education to people who formerly
could not afford it.
Students from both French and English CEGEPS
united in opposition to the regulations and called for
mass support to demonstrate their displeasure.
Members of the Anglophone delegation from
Vanier, Dawson, John Abbott and McGill CEGEPS
stood in the forefront of the demand for a general
strike as soon as possible. The FEQ convention
established continued liaison between the French
and English junior colleges to maintain communication during the coming struggle.
The Comite Executif National or executive
committee was empowered to co-ordinate action
among the various FEQ regions to ensure a solid
front.
A delegate from Sir George Williams University
pointed out private educational institutions were
subject to the same repression as the CEGEPS, and
called for solidarity among students in colleges and
universities. McGill University delegates called for
close collaboration among all student and between
students and faculty in the upcoming strike.
The FEQ plans a mass demonstration in front of
the offices of the Direction de L'Instruction Generale
et Collegiale, the authority which issued the new
regulations.
1,500 occupy MU building
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CODE OF ETHICS
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RADIO STATION
University Radio & Television Sonetv
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Hi i member broabtastimj station of tbe Canadian lisacatwi
of UroaocasterJ, tor plebge our*elbe* to tbe best of our m$?
1. Programme each broadcast day to meet th* varied
interests of all groups ol listeners.
2. Serve Hie best interests ol our community
3. Provide suitable religious broadcasts without per
mitting this station to be used to convey attacks upon
any race or religion.
4. Provide suitable broadcasts for the entertainment and
information ol children,
5. Provide programmes which educate entertainingly
6. Broadcast tbe news of the day in a factual and
unbiased manner.
7. Provide opportunity for the broadcast of all sides of
controversial public issues to the degree of public
interest in such issue*
$. Encourage advertisers and their advertising agencies
to present information of goods and services available
for the comfort tad convenience of listeners to this
station and to present such information in a simple,
truthful and believable manner.
^Wf e*^"V^e*# 9vw«*a tr w#sm ^ime* ▼ wa MmmpsfeUP WMpeflsa ^^ae* vniHSiRwa^iP ^•^c^w*#- *^*ak w^»
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—kini mcdonald photo
CYVR HAS ETHICS, Irving Fetish said Tuesday, as he noticed this sign in the station's newsroom. The
student radio's management fired DJs Bob Bakshi and Stuart Foster allegedly because they don't.
^ *,
£■-'
ST. JOHN'S, Nfld. (CUP) — Nearly 1,500 students occupied
the arts and administration building of Memorial University at
1 p.m. Tuesday, and the students say they will stay there until
their demands are met.
The students are protesting
the unilateral decision by the
university administration, to
discontinue collecting compulsory student union fees for
the union.
The decision announced
Thursday in a press release
from president Lord Stephen
Taylor, would effectively put
an end to compulsory collection of fees, as the student
union would have no means of
enforcing their payment.
The students say Taylor and
the administration had no right
to make this decision
unilaterally and without any
negotiation. They say students,
not the administration, must
make any decision as to
whether student union
membership would be
voluntary or involuntary.
Since the administration
timed its announcement so that
it was made on the first day of
the five-day mid-term break,
students had to wait until
Tuesday before they could take
fully constructive action.
The first thing they did was
to organize a general union
meeting Tuesday noon. About
3,000 students showed up at
that meeting — a remarkably
large number for this usually
apathetic campus of 7,500. At
that meeting, a strong
majority of the 3,000-plus were
opposed to the administration,
and though a very small
minority of students expressed
their opposition to the union
and the decision to occupy the
administration building, more
than 1,000 students marched to
the building to begin the occupation.
The students occupied
Taylor's office as well as the
comptroller's and vice-
presidents's offices, among
others, and they waited for
Taylor to return from a lecture
he was giving engineering
students. When he returned, he
was flanked protectively by 15
to 20 engineers, who said that
they were opposed to the
council of students' union in its
present form, and hence
supported Lord Taylor.
Taylor said he would allow
the engineers in his office, and
would talk with demonstrating
students two at a time. They
refused such an arrangement,
and Taylor left the building.
From there on, there was a
series of proposals and
counter-proposals, as administrators and student
representatives tried to reach
an agreement of a means of
negotiating the whole affair.
Taylor, who first would allow
only two students in his office,
See page 8: GEARS
On air
for laughs
-VR jocks
By LINDA HOSSIE
Recently fired CYVR disc
jockies Bob Bakshi and Stuart
Foster say the point of the
program which cost them their
jobs was just to rant and rave
and try to " get a good laugh."
Both Bakshi and Foster were
fired from the university radio
for allegedly slandering the
Alma Mater Society executive
in one of their Saturday
broadcasts.
"I don't think we really gave
too much thought to the fact
that it was slander," Foster
said in an interview Monday.
"We were just sort of playing
around."
Foster said the part of the
show that Clemens termed
slanderous was a game invented called "Abuse the
Executive."
"I doubt if there were even
ten people listening to us,"
Bakshi said.
"Even Blankstein hadn't
heard about it. We had to tell
him," Foster said.
Blankstein was one of the
AMS executives under fire in
the Saturday broadcast.
Clemens said the station
discovered the slander when
they taped Bakshi and Foster
two weeks in a row.
He said the tapings are done
so the DJ's can get an idea of
how their show sounds and
make improvements in their
style.
"If the first tapewasOK why
did they tape us the second
week? They were just waiting
for us to make some kind of
mistake," Bakshi said. "When
they made the first tape they
should have told us if anything
was wrong with it."
The two DJ's said they were
never given any rules or
boundaries about what they
could say on the air. Neither of
them knew about slander laws.
"When Clemens threw us
ouu it wasn't for slander. It was
for bad taste," Bakshi said.
"He said 'This is shit and we're
losing listeners because of it."
"Losing all two listeners,"
Foster added.
"Clemens told us if he
wanted to hear that kind of shit
See page 3: CYVR Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 15, 1972
Foreign control
threatens future
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canada's future is threatened unless
the federal government ensures major industrial sectors of the
economy are removed from the grasp of foreign-controlled
corporations", a Science Council of Canada report says.
The report, written by Pierre Bourgault, applied science
dean at the University of Sherbrooke, says the government's
failure to create a pro-Canadian industrial climate has accelerated the take-over of the economy.
Foreign-owned industry has established itself in Canada's
major industrial sectors — such as automobiles, pharmaceutical products and plastics and man-made fibres — using
technology and products developed by their parent corporations.
This foreign domination in the economy's key growth areas
has blocked the development of the industrial base and
technological knowledge Canada needs for the future, the report
says.
Such industrial skills are keys to the growth of innovative,
high-technology industries which Canada needs to provide jobs
and achieve greater economic independence.
Bourgault attacked government policies offering investment "incentives" to corporations without preferential
treatment for Canadian firms. The policies have led to an acceleration of foreign control in the economy.
Release of the report last week came only two days after the
U.S. commerce department announced the value of U.S.-owned
business in Canada jumped by $1.24 billion to $24.03 billion in
1971.
Such government programs as regional incentive grants
have "encouraged a considerable amount of counter-productive
investment in Canada in recent vears."
"In our policies and in our programs aimed at industrial
development, we seem to give more importance to capital, the
plant, and the equipment than we do to development of the
people who provide the knowledge inputs that make them run,"
the report says.
"We have given large grants to multi-national corporations
so that they may build factories that are little more than four
walls and a roof, in which to house easily transportable
production machines run by unskilled or semi-skilled
production workers."
Bourgault says this means the structure of Canadian industry must be radically altered over the next decade if Canada
is to hold her own in world trade.
Bourgault also says we must stop being "hewers of wood
and drawers of water". Although exports of natural resources
continues to soar, Canada's trade deficit in sophisticated
products keeps growing.
Canada has failed to develop the advanced materials and
new technologies associated with our natural resources, again
because of foreign control and imported technologies.
"We are the world's largest producer of nickel, but we are
net importers of stainless steel and manufactured nickle
products, including 'cold climate' nickel-cadmium batteries
Bourgault says.
Similarly "we are the world's largest exporter of pulp and
paper, but we import much of our fine paper and virtually all of
the highly-sophisticated paper, such as backing for
photographic film and dielectric papers for use in electronic
components."
The report says development of high-technology industry is
vital because Canada can no longer count on the same growth
previously enjoyed from mineral extraction.
ATTENTIONALL SWINGERS. . .
ROCK — RAP — REFRESHMENTS
TURN ON TO THE VIBES OF
THE FISHERMEN'S UNION
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16
7:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre
Information: 733-7067
Donation Sponsored by Charismatic Campus Ministry
The Killing of Sister George
by FRANK MARCUS
An M.A. Thesis Production
Directed By Don Briard
November 22-25-8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $2.00
Students: $1.00
Tickets: Room 207 - Frederic Wood Theatre
POQggfr
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Tel. 261-6011 Wednesday, November 15, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
National French study 'simplistic'
By LAURENCE LEADER
The recent report titled
French-Canadian Studies and
Their Place in University
French Departments is simplistic and inadequate, UBC
French    department    head
Larry Bongie said Tuesday.
The report, which was
prepared by Carleton
university professors Donald
Smith, Sinclair Robinson,
Robin Matthews and former
student Joyce Wayne, claims
that Canadian university
French departments show
inadequate interest in French
Canada.
"We need to see how accurate the report really is,"
Bongie said, "for example the
report says UBC has only two
courses in French-Canadian
literature when we really have
four."
"The positions of the report
are very simplistic," said
Bongie. "A more serious study
Indian unemployment off reserve
seven times more than B.C. norm
By LINDA HOSSIE
Unemployment among B.C. status
Indians living off the reserve is at least
seven times higher than unemployment
for B.C. as a whole.
These findings, published recently by
Manpower, are part of a larger study by
UBC professors W. T. Stanbury and D. B.
Fields and University of Victoria prof D.
Stevenson.
The study deals with Indian urbanization and unemployment and studies
the effects of age, education, family size
and other factors on Indian unemployment and income.
The study was financed by a Donner
Canadian Foundation grant.
The study sample was "very large"
Stanbury said. It included 1,095 B.C.
status Indians living off the reserve.
About half the sample had spent at least
half their lives off the reserve and 78 per
cent had lived off the reserve for at least
12 months Stanbury said.
The unemployment figure was reached
by including all persons unemployed and
looking for work and all persons unemployed who indicated they were not
looking for work.
The official Monthly Labour Force
Survey by Statistics Canada includes only
those unemployed persons who are
seeking work in its calculations of
unemployment but this does not take into
consideration the "discouraged worker"
factor which is important in the Indian
study Stanbury said.
Discouraged workers are persons who
have given up looking for work because of
previous futile searches for employment.
An unemployment rate not taking this
factor into consideration is understated
Stanbury said.
The official B.C. unemployment rate
during June, July and August of 1971 was
27 per cent. Stanbury's study, including
discouraged workers, found the rate to be
46.5 per cent.
"What it means is if you made unemployment bad enough (so everyone got
"discouraged") you could reduce the
unemployment rate to zero," Stanbury
said.
Stanbury stressed the fact that "for
Indians who completed grade twelve the
unemployment rate fell to 16 per cent."
This drop wasn't significant until high
school graduation he said.
Stanbury also stressed the Indian
problem in the university.
"Almost no Indian students finish
second year," he said. This is something
UBC should be concerned about. It's the
same case at UVic and the community
colleges."
The study of Indian income was
organized around the question "regardless of level of income how many people
were able to support themselves," during
the period January 1969 to mid 1971. The
term "support themselves" was defined
as avoiding welfare.
"We found that 28 per cent of the
families in our sample were not self-
supporting in even one month in the two
and one-half year period upon which we
obtained data and 24 per cent of the
sample were self-supporting for the entire
period," the report reads.
In order to measure and describe the
incidence of poverty among B.C. Indians
the study defined a poverty line. They
adopted the Senate poverty line even
though it is somewhat above that of the
Economic Council of the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics — "particularly when
families of more than five persons are
considered."
"It is interesting," the report reads
"that a public opinion poll conducted
during the course of the line adopted in the
Senate investigations places the poverty
line about 50 per cent above the Senate
Report line."
"Perhaps we could define the
"hypocrisy gap," as the difference between Canadian social assistance
payments and the amount sufficient to
ensure that all Canadians achieve an
income above the poverty line as indicated by the public opinion poll."
Measuring income from employment
only, 54 per cent of B.C. status Indians
living off the reserve make under $2000,65
per cent make under $4000, only 13 per
cent make over $18,000 and 35 per cent
make nothing.
Measuring income plus government
transfer payments (welfare, family
allowance, old age pensions and so on) 28
per cent make under $2000, 53 per cent
make under $4000, and 14 per cent make
over $8000.
The figures for all of B.C. under the
second category are 13 per cent of B.C.'s
"economically active group," (population
aged 16 to 65) make under $2000, 28 per
cent make under $4000 and 44 per cent
make over $8000.
"These figures don't adjust for family
size and Indians have, on the average,
larger families," Stanbury said.
"Some 36.2 per cent of persons who are
or have been married report having five
or more children, while 40.5 per cent
report two or fewer children. The average
number of children reported is slightly
more than four. In addition 70 of the 402
single persons indicated they were
parents of one or more children."
"The conclusion we must reach is that
the typical Indian adult has a significantly
larger number of dependents to support
with a very much smaller income from
employment than is the case of non-
Indians," the report reads.
In Canada 25 per cent of the people were
below the poverty line in 1969. For Indians
the comparable figure was 63 per cent.
This is two and one half times as high
Stanbury said.
The gap in education is being closed and
Stanbury said he sees this as a sign that
the Indians are making a move to improve their economical standing.
"A lot of people are taking vocational
training," he said.
"Of our total sample of 1,095 we found
that 385 persons of 35 per cent had taken a
total of 599 special or vocational courses
of various duration . . . Perhaps the most
striking finding elicited from our
questions about special coursess and
vocational training is that 92 per cent of
persons reported one or more courses
stated that they had completed the course
or are in the process of so doing," Stanbury wrote in the report.
Stanbury became interested in the
Indian economic situation through
working with Fields on another study,
"The Economic Impact of the Public
Sector Upon the Indians of B.C.," which
was contracted from the Department of
Indian Affairs.
This study "was being held up by
Premier Bennett personally as I understand," Stanbury said. The study has
now been published.
of its recommendations is
needed."
The report claimed that
Quebecois literature and
civilization was generally
ignored in Canadian university
French departments or limited
to honors students.
Students taking French on a
general program are taught a
language which is exclusively
international and are i'l
prepared for any real contact
with French-speaking
Canadians.
The report proposes 46 per
cent of a university's French
department be involved in
French-Canadian studies.
At present only the
University of Saskatchewan,
University of Regina and the
bilingual University of Ottawa
offer Quebecois studies to that
extent.
According to the report the
present national average is 14
per cent, UBC's is eight per
cent, and SFU's is 12 per cent.
Gerard Tougas a UBC
professor who supports the
report, said its proposals
should not be taken verbatim.
"The report recommends in
principle what should be done
but its recommendations are
too ambitious for some
places," he said.
Tougas said the French
department has a generally
favorable attitude towards the
principle of the report.
"We're trying," said Tougas,
"but it is very hard to get
competent instructors in this
area."
This season the French
department offers three
courses involving Quebecois
literature and language, as
well as a course given through
the centre for continuing
education.
There is also an interdepartmental seminar about
Quebec involving the French,
history, geography and
political science departments.
CYVR anti-liberal
From page 1
he   could   listen   to   George
Carlin," he said.
"The university community
is supposed to be liberal,"
bakshi said. "And then you run
across a radio station that is
more rigid than any down-
'town."
"The thing we'd like to push
is that there's nothing on the
radio worth listening to,"
Foster said. "All we were
trying to do was add something
creative."
Foster        and        Bakshi
challenged Blankstein to sue
them in a letter to The
Ubyssey:
"If Gordon sues us, and we
hope he will, we would love to
see his learned council
wrangling before a perplexed
judge as to the exact meaning
of "farnitious tit". Afterwards
they could battle over what
constitutes a "colonly of lost
arteries". If we go to court,
Gordon, we shall surely prove
that you are variously,
altogether and without
abruption — a fool."
Exposure
By RYON GUEDES
For a mere $125,000 you could be swimming in a
covered swimming pool on the UBC campus by the
end of next term.
But instead UBC students a re paying $5 a year for
the next 20 years to pay for a $2.8 million white
elephant which won't be ready for at least a year and
a half.
F. D. Bolton, owner of Bolton and Company, a
firm that for two years has been building collapsible
plastic coverings for outdoor athletic sites, says his
firm could cover the Empire pool as it stands now for
$125,000 and could do it in four months.
Of course renovations to the pool such as added
bleachers, filtration systems and even new showers
would add to the cost, but it is doubtful whether the
increase would amount to anything like $2.65 million.
The point, it seems was to have a covered pool.
Bolton could provide that.
St. George's Private School had such a top built
for its 100' by 45' pool for $27,000.
This is their second season with the dome and
they have had no problems — they are completely
satisfied.
The Jericho Tennis Club had a similar dome built
for their courts two seasons ago.
They also are quite satisfied with the performance of the cover. So much so that they intend to
have Bolton build an additional structure on to their
present one.
The domes are puncture resistant, air conditioned, and can be easily collapsed for storage by a
few men.
There is no problem with condensation — less, in
fact than with a conventional structure.
Bolton's price includes the installation of the air
conditioning and provides a dome high enough to
accommodate the diving tower.
Bolton was approached a year and a half ago by
the AMS regarding construction of a cover for the
Empire pool.
Bolton says he is not sure why he was turned
down.
Alma Mater Society vice-president Gordon
Blankstein says he doesn't know why either.
Blankstein says a covered Empire pool would be
inadequate.
The filtration, wiring, and shower facilities of the
Empire pool are antiquated.
However, Blankstein did say once the new $2.8
million baby is built its filtration system will be
hooked up to the antiquated, outdated, Empire pool
so UBC will have two pools.
Maybe then we'll put a cover on Empire pool. Page  4
THE       UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 15, 1972
Student power
Fifteen hundred students are on strike at Memorial
University in Newfoundland.
In Quebec, thousands of university students are
preparing for a strike.
At UBC, 20,000 students are . . . uhh . . . hmmm . . .
well, maybe . . . they could be. . . sort of. . . but then
again, maybe not. . .
Yes, the place has been pretty dead the past four
years.
UBC student activism "peaked" on that glorious
afternoon in 1968 when Jerry Rubin, a piglet and 2,000
students held a party in the faculty club.
Since then the motley group of insurgents have
graduated to face the real world, the piglet presumably has
been made into chops and Jerry Rubin is telling people to
get out and vote.
So does the situation in the east mean student
activism is making a comeback? Not in our opinion.
The strike at Memorial University was caused by a
direct attack on the student union by the administration.
Students are not striking to gain new power; they are only
attempting to hang on to what little power they already
have.
A similar situation exists in Quebec.
In the rest of the country, the student movement is
practically non-existent, so UBC students shouldn't feel
guilty for not storming the administration building to back
whatever demands they're not coming up with.
Besides, they can hardly be blamed for being born
into a dying class in a colonized country.
What they can be blamed for is not attempting to
transcend the limitations placed on them by their
backgrounds.
Students can begin this transcendence by contacting
their undergraduate society reps to find out what they're
doing to increase student power. If they're not doing
anything, students should ask why.
Do it!
\v\     -tV\c Ubyssey
^
Instant brew?
Letters
CYVR
Last Saturday two announcers
were kicked out of CYVR by the
programme director, Dave Clemens, on the basis that their
material violated "station policy"
and "good taste". Naturally, neither of the two had ever been
informed what the station policy
actually was.
"Well, then," you might ask,
"if they weren't told about
station policies, they must have
been warned, in previous weeks,
that they were stepping over the
line."
"But of course not. How
foolish of you to ask!"
"Then what do they assume to
be the resulting effects of all this
offensive material?"
"Well, they said they were
losing listeners."
"Oh, then they must have
ample evidence that the material
caused a drop in the listening
audience?"
"Oh, fuck no! It was all
conjecture!"
"Well, I guess you got ripped
off."
"Oh, hell yeah!"
I would like Mr. Clemens, if he
has   the    guts,    to    state   what
constitutes good taste.
Doug Cox
science 3
more VR
Re your editorial of Friday,
Nov. 10, concerning the dismissal
of two CYVR staffers.
We hasten to express our
pleasure at discovering someone
who shares our concern for the
infringement of our fundamental
freedoms by our country's legislators.
We fully agree that there is
"nothing wrong with a bit of
slander now and then." Certainly,
it is also obvious to all right
thinking people that there is also
nothing wrong with bit of false
imprisonment or medical malpractice either. A little assault and
battery never hurt anyone.
Three cheers for Art Smolensky who, in his Tuesday, Nov. 7
Exposure column, blasted (in
words only) the new Buchanan
Tower as a monument of alienation on top of being a fire
hazard! As Art says: "The erection and execution of this building
MUBYSSH
NOVEMBER 15, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
Rather than try to assemble the usual collection of bad puns, sick
jokes, weak witticisms and general stupidness for the masthed the editors
decided just to list the people who worked who are Linda Hossie, Laurence
Leader, Ryon Guedes, John Andersen, Jan O'Brien, Mike Sasges, Vaughn
Palmer, Berton Woodward, Steve Morris and Steve Brown which, come to
think of it, is a pretty good collection of bad puns, sick jokes, weak
witticisms and general stupidness.
Where  will all this repression   f*£%%%g*1**£*\fgP    2
Al Caplan
Eliot Roadburg
Jim McLellan
law 2
All right, if we have to spell it
out for you we will. The statement   was   meant   to   be   taken
tongue-in-cheek. Okay?
Also, we find it interesting that
you apparently find nothing
repressive in the arbitrary dismissal of the two CYVR staffers
by a small managerial elite.
Concrete
Something has to be done
about all those concrete buildings.
People don't even know nature
exists.
Something beautiful is out
there — outside that window.
Something beautiful that can give
you some of the most exhilarating
moments of your entire life.
Surely to god some bright
architectural student can come up
with something better for the
future than concrete slabs with
windows.
Nature is important. Greenery
and foliage, skies, trees, seas, etc.
etc.
Surely to god it can be
accomodated into our future
cities and (campus) buildings.
Perhaps concrete will need to be
used. But let's not abandon nature
entirely. If we abandon her now
do you think she's going to wait
around to help in the future?
Even if concrete must be used
let's accomodate a little more life
into our future world. It is up to
us you know!
From a presently wishing
to remain anonymous
resident of the new
Wally Gage Towers
Buchanan Tower
has been from start to finish a
visual statement that there is no
long-range planning on this cam-
pus.
We have the most beautiful site
of any university in the world and
yet what has been done to it is a
crying scandal. This is the trouble
with UBC: new needs for space,
buildings, facilities, etc. are met
on a piece-meal, ad hoc year-by-
year, erratic basis, instead of a
long-range, well thought out and
planned basis. The architecture of
Simon Fraser University may be
controversial, but at least it is
architecture! On our campus we
have nothing but a hodge-podge
of 1936 Gothic constructions like
the library, World War II army
huts, and drab faceless matchboxes like Buchanan, Angus and
the Walter Gage Towers. With the
possible exceptions of the Lasserre Building, International
House, the Music building, the
graduate student centre, the faculty club and the Metallurgy
building, there is not one construction which evidences the
imprint of an architect.
This campus is perpetually
being dug up in one area or
another — and sometimes in the
same area time and again —
causing scarce financial resources
to be wasted away, along with our
nerves. Green spaces have
thoughtlessly been cemented over,
instead of building underground
parking facilities. A couple of
years ago a small and unique stand
of primeval forest was chopped
down to widen the Fraser River
parking lot. Seen from the air, the
whole area south of University
Boulevard is a scene of devastation: there, everything has been
destroyed and cemented over into
a jungle of roads that lead
nowhere and parking lots.
Decisions relating to what is to
be build at UBC and to the future
of this campus in general, should
no more be left to the discretion
of a few people who never consult
their constituency (faculty and
students), than the future of
Vancouver should be entrusted to
a few real estate speculators.
Although the UBC authorities I
allude to are honest, selfless and
dedicated to the public good —
unlike their downtown counterparts— still the visual and environmental result is no better.
One wonders for instance, why
does UBC have a school of
architecture when even its voice is
never heard in these matters and
new construction plans, instead of
being entrusted to capable architects on campus are farmed out to
mindless technicians outside. Four
years   ago,   when   the   students Wednesday, November 15, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
voiced objections to our increasingly alienating surroundings, the
senate of UBC set up a committee
on long-range objectives, which
invited all members of the university community to submit their
views and propositions. I wonder
how many people at that time
responded as I did to this
invitation and submitted lengthy
memoranda, which then were
shelved by the mandarins? Obviously, there is no more long-
range planning today than four
years ago and this campus is
getting uglier day by day.
The situation I have described
illustrates the fact that UBC is not
an academic community but a
:old market place, where in the
iast resort pennies and dollars
done decide. Our campus has
become a moribund campus, cul-
:urally and politically lifeless.
Rene Goldman
Asian studies
*J.B. This is a personal letter and
n no way reflects the views of the
lepartment.
Idiocy 6
Twice I have asked those coun-
;il members who support the
;overed pool scheme or food
;ervice takeover plan to publicly
ndicate their, positions. This is
ittle to ask; all holders of political
>ffice are public personalities and
nust be prepared to so conduct
hemselves. The two most effect-
ve restraints on any politician's
:onduct are an aroused public
ipinion and a vigorous opposit-
on. These are both lacking at
JBC; but not, I hope, for much
onger.
The covered pool plan will cost
he student body about two
nillion dollars. Why? We have
leen told that the cost of covering
impire Pool is about two million
lollars. Wrong. We have been told
hat this is so high that we might
is well have .a second pool for "an
xtra $800,000". We have been
old that it would take a year and
i half to cover Empire Pool.
Vrong.
Empire Pool can be adequately
overed for about $125,000, by a
andproof, waterproof air bubble
over. These covers are made in
weden, and have been used in
'ancouver to cover the tennis
ourts at the Jericho tennis club
nd the swimming pool at St.
George's school. 'The covers can
e easily dismantled in the
immer time, by a small crew of
len. Both the tennis club and the
;hool are satisfied with their
lvestments.
I think an air bubble cover is
le ideal solution to the problem
f getting year-round use from
mpire Pool.
But our council proposes to
)end fifteen to twenty times as
luch to achieve exactly the same
id result: "a covered pool for
BC".
I am not going to just stand by
id let this happen. I think
)uncil should immediately con-
der the bubble cover as an
ternative to the second pool
heme. I ask again that council
embers publicly indicate their
isition in his matter. I repeat my
idier criticism: the second pool
heme lacks imagination. I add:
> ignore the alternative I have
st proposed is evidence of
competence. And incompetent
preservatives can be recalled by
petition signed by 10 per cent of
Letters
the active members of the AMS.
I am going to continue to do
everything in my power to introduce real issues into student
politics at UBC. If we are ever to
be taken seriously at other levels,
we must first of all have a student
government that is taken seriously
right here.
Leo Fox
  science 5
Rip off
Last year, while I was living in
Place Vanier, I went to a publicity
meeting for the Walter Gage
Towers. Housing director Les
Rohringer and housing accountant
Keith Davis were at that meeting
Wally Towers
to answer questions and provide
information about the new residence complex.
One common complaint voiced
at that meeting was the high cost
of living in the towers — $75 per
month is quite a bit for most
students. Davis dealt with the
complaint by saying that $67.50
per month was really a truer
figure, when you included the time
that students were permitted to
remain in the residences over the
holidays. Now, however, we have
found that we are all expected to
leave on Dec. 21 and not return
until Jan. 2, or else pay $2.47 per
day for the room. This is not
mentioned anywhere in the information booklet for the residences,
and the majority of residents will
only find out this week when
notices are posted throughout the
towers.
Having discovered all this, and
being rather upset about it aU, I
went to see student housing
advisor Dennis Boyd, to find out
what was happening. I was informed that we could not expect
to remain in the residences over
the holidays when we had not
paid for it — we couldn't stay
there free, in other words. I
referred to Davis' statement at the
meeting at Place Vanier last year,
and was told that I should not
rely on verbal information — in
other words, read the booklet. I
was also told that if I worked out
the rates over the total period of
time we are living in the residences, I would find that it did
come to $67.50 per month. I
spent some time trying to do this,
and it just doesn't work out that
way. Gage residents pay $252 for
the first term, which consists of
102 days, and $291 for the
second term, whicy consists of
119 days. This works out to
approximately $2.47 per day. The
residence clerk corroborated this
daily rate, and said he knew
nothing about the monthly rate —
yet residents are expected to give
a full month's notice if they want
to receive a refund if they move
out before the term ends.
It seems to me that this is just
another example of how the
university administration is taking
full advantage of its monopoly
situation with regard to housing,
and while I really don't believe
that they are going to change their
policies because of student protests, I think the students of this
university should be aware of the
activities of the housing authorities.
Rosemary Cairns
arts 4
God!
I had to know the truth now. I
questioned everything. A grain of
doubt had entered by heart. I was
sincere, but trouble had pierced
my soul. I had been robbed —
brainwashed by university
professors into thinking that I
could not believe the Bible
because it deals with the
supernatural and the miraculous;
that it is foolish to believe
See page 12
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DISCOUNT PRICES
BUYING OR SELLING
REAL ESTATE? *
Ph. Mrs. Joan Bentley-224-0255
RUTHERFORD-McRAE
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NOV. 16-19
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ARLO GUTHRIE
TIME MAGAZINE
»iu..m PAT QUINN ■ JAMES BR0DERICK  Sl
GEOFF OUTLAW ■ TINA CHEN ■ KATHLEEN DA8NEY a
s,an« PETE SEEGER-LEE HAYS
. Police Chief WILLIAM 08ANHEIN
..tr> MICHAEL MC CLANATHAN
Oniiwl MutK tlr »»10 GUTHRIE Page  6
THE       UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 15, 1972
Western shift to
By PAUL KNOX
In Italy, just to prove they can do it, 5,000 workers
take over the operation of a tire factory and run it for
several days at varying speeds without the help of
engineers or technicians.
In Toronto, several years of organization and
agitation stop the construction of an expressway
condemned as a soul-destroyer for the city's core.
In Vancouver, residents of the Strathcona neighborhood organize and thwart an urban renewal
project which would have levelled their homes.
For University of Toronto political scientist C.
B. Macpherson, these phenomena — all occurring
within the last five years — represent the beginnings
of an important shift in consciousness among
Western industrial societies.
We are, he says, going to be thinking of ourselves
more, and more as producers rather than consumer,
as creative transformers of the world rather than
users of goods and services provided to us by a
structure over which we have no control.
And for Macpherson, who last week finished a
series of UBC lectures on democracy in the industrial age, the move toward participation in the
community and the workplace may represent the
only hope for liberal democracy.
Macpherson is an imposing, hook-nosed political
theorist who filled a Buchanan lecture hall for four
noon-hour talks. His slow, precise manner enabled us
to follow the logic — and see some of the shortcomings — of his analysis.
His work on the history of political theory reached
book form in 1962 when he published The Political
Theory of Possessive Individualism. In this look at
the work of Hobbes, Locke, the Levellers and James
Harrington, he showed how their theories —
elements of which are present in modern liberalism
were designed to fit the emerging market economy
of the 17th century and its notion of man as an infinite
consumer, driven by his nature to acquire as many
goods and services as possible.
Since the theory of Hobbes and Locke was based
on the internal cohesion of the decision-making
community, he argued, it ceased to become a
workable political' principle when the democratic
franchise was extended in the mid-19th century from
the political and economic elite to the masses.
In 1965, Macpherson's The Real World of
Democracy suggested a way out of this "lack of
cohesion", which has become increasingly apparent
since the franchise was universalized in Western
democracies. The non-capitalist (communist and
third-world) countries might be short on "individual
freedom," he reasoned. But the lessons they were
supposed to contain for Western democracy was that
the abolition of what Macpherson called "the
compuslive transfer of powers" of a group of people
(workers) to another group (i.e., non-individualist)
democracies, is just as important as the retention of
"individual freedom".
Therefore, he said, "the societies which can best
meet the demand of their own people for equal
human rights, equal freedom for their members to
realize their essential humanity, will be the ones that
survive ... in the world from now on, power and
influence will depend on moral advantage ... we in
C.B. MACPHERSON
—kini mcdonald photo
. . visits UBC
BALLOT BOX
'blunting class conflict'
the West will decline in power unless we can discard
our possessive market morality."
Now, Macpherson is often labelled an academic
Marxist, which means he sees political theory and
structures as not only related to but flowing out
of economic organization, and that he sees the
history of politics as the history of attempts by social
classes to gain or retain control over the resources of
a community.
For one with such an outlook, it might seem a little
idealistic to speak of "moral advantage", rather
than differences in economic systems themselves, as
the coming thing in international relations — the
motivating factor behind people's choice of one
political alternative over another.
And it may be a realization of this which prompts
Macpherson to come somewhat back to reality, in
the form of the participatory structures he held out
last week as "an emergent model" of liberal
democracy.
In his first three lectures, Macpherson gave a
generally excellent and cohesive description of the
history of democracy from the time James Mill, in
the early 19th century, advocated universal manhood
suffrage as the political logical conclusion of the free
enterprise system.
In his view, the early liberal democrats, contemporaries of Mill, maintained that each human
being if left to his own devices would according to
his own interests, which naturally conflicted with
those of each other human being. Since governments
were composed of humans, they would naturally act
the same way, and only the vote could protect the
individual from government.
These theorists managed to convince themselves
that the working class would follow the lead of the
economically dominant commercial interests in
exercising their franchise, and this pose no threat to
the social order.
Mill's son, John Stuart Mill, and his followers,
who included Woodrow Wilson and the educator John
Dewey, witnessed the extra-parliamentary working-
class activity which took centre stage in the middle
and the latter half of the 19th century. They were
afraid the working class would attain political power
electorally and introduce "class legislation"
detrimental to the interests of some. Thus they advocated a weighted vote system whereby the
educated person's vote would be worth more than
that of the uneducated.
They also saw democracy as not only a political
system to protect the individual from government,
but a moral system for the individual's improvement. The uneducated would hopefully be
motivated to improve themselves, led by the carrot-
on-a-stick of the vote. The logical flaw here was that
the lower classes knew their views would never
prevail, and thus would lose interest in the political
process.
As well,
Western den
conflict thri
interfered w
the people,
democracy
munity".
The faili
developmen
the "equilib
consumers \
(parties anc
place" (ball
Macpher:
theory, whit
found in P
element wl
economic sti
"produce th
required, in
So if you
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energy — j
sealing enve
energy,the■
"moral mod
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as the hour
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choose betw
The liber
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pherson rea
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the seeds of
The prer
people's cor
that   of   ex
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equality".
This seb
ticipatory d
these chara<
under the p
structure it
However
back up his i
participatioi
diminishing
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one does not
begin.
"For exe
more people
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are seeing
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"It it tot
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"Second,
apathy are
allows the
dominate m Wednesday, November 15, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
i new consciousness
y systems which developed in
s had the effect of blunting class
Tipromise and coalition. They
esponsiveness of government to
as with the ability of liberal
lop J.  S. Mill's "moral com-
lis "moral model" led to -the
)th century of yet a third model:
mocracy" by which people as
jn a choice of "political goods"
ates) in the "political market-
its out that this marketplace
>e logically traced from those
e Individualism, contains an
resents as well as fits the
»f modern Western societies. To
' some "purcashing power" is
i of money or time and energy,
ir views to be represented in the
»u either have to give money,
lon't have much of to spare, or
i party, handing out leaflets,
id so on. But even with political
•>blem arises as we saw with the
disadvantaged know their hour
isn't going to be worth as much
lthy put in planning campaign
an't participate. And even the
is limited, for the voter must
jry limited set of alternatives,
cratic theorists of the mid-20th
these shortcomings by saying
itter than tyranny. But Mac-
3 is not enough. The thrust for
xacy, he says, must represent
ither improvement.
5, he says, are "a change in
jss from that of consumers to
and enjoyers of their own
sssening of social and economic
vicious circle, for while parry requires society to take on
;, they are not likely to take root
conomic system and the social
5.
erson quotes Marx and Mill to
>n that changes in the amount of
dsing of consciousness and the
il and economic inequality can
ge and reciprocally", and that
je complete before the other can
he said last week, "more and
onsidering the cost-benefit ratio
gross national product. People
ey didn't see before, such as
to suggest that awareness of
tep away from quantity?
ct and indirect costs of political
g more and more apparent. It
ration of corporate power to
oods, jobs, security, and even
DEMONSTRATORS
the chances of continued life. This realization is
coming slowly, but it can't be postponed indefinitely.
"Third, there is growing doubt about the ability of
the liberal state to meet consumer demands. The
system will either have to spread goods more widely
or it will break down. This may be enough to give us a
breakout from the vicious circle."
It is rudimentary consciousness that has
produced the neighborhood and community
association, and the moves for control of decisionmaking in the workplace. Macpherson sees the latter
as more effective because it is not merely a single-
issue organization. (He referred only in passing to
the fact that workers' control has not been the issue
in Canada that it has been in Europe, and more
elaboration on this point would have been welcome.)
The advantages of all this are twofold. "People
are getting experience in decision-making in areas
where their concern is more immediately felt and
seen than in any other area of their life. Also they are
participating as producers, not as consumers.
They're not doing this to get a higher wage, but to
make production more meaningful.
This, Macpherson continued, "may sound as
Utopian as Mill. But it isn't, because capitalism is
now in a more unstable position. It may have to
change its spots."
Macpherson admitted that at this point he is more
concerned with how we get to participatory
democracy than what it looks like when we get it. But
when he discusses how to get there, his logic seems to
break down.
How can we be sure that the change in consciousness, if such it is, will really produce fun-
STUDENT PROTEST . . . greater consciousness, but no change
a need to be producers, not consumers
damental societal changes? Does the ecology
movement really contain the seeds of the destruction
of capitalism? Did the courageous Strathcona
Property Owners' and Tenants' Association, in
stopping the destruction of their neighborhood,
change the cosy relationship between the land
developers and city council, or leave behind them a
structure that others in a similar predicament could
use?
And how can we be sure that workers in control of
a factory (or students in control of a university, for
that matter) will not merely try to beat management
(and other managements, or administrations) at
their own game? Is the attainment of consciousness
as a producing collectivity really the be-all and end-
all, or just the first step?
Part of the answer lies in the French socialist
Andre Gorz's article, Workers' Control is More than
Just That. Gorz agrees that the struggle for
workers' control is "a self-educational process". But
he adds: "Neither the workers' councils, nor the
factory or shop committees, nor the workers' power
they stand for can prevail unless the political power
of capitalism is broken, unless the capitalist state
itself is overthrown and the capitalist relations of
production and division of labor abolished."
Gorz goes on to say that true workers' control
organizations "cannot coexist for long with the
power of capitalist management and of the capitalist
state." If the fight "is not carried toward by political
vision and organization, if it does not transcend itself
into a generalized all-out offensive for a completely
new society, then the organs of workers' power or
workers' control must inevitably degenerate."
On the question of community control, Mar-
jaleena Repo in The Fallacy of Community Control
points out that organization around community
issues, while not unprogressive per se, acts just as
Macpherson sees the party system does by blurring
class distinctions which in fact should be emphasized
so the class struggle can come to the fore.
And we students know that our own involvement
around issues such as representation on university
senates, while it has perhaps made us more conscious of our own individual and collective political
potential, really could never have hoped in itself to
bring about any basic societal change.
Macpherson, at the end of his last lecture,
acknowledged that the "emergent model of participatory democracy" will not be reached "until we
have reduced social inequality and fundamentally
changed the relations between labor and capital.
"Because," he said, "capitalism creates class
division, and workers' control or the welfare state
won't do the job."
We are entitled to ask what will do the job. The
classic Marxist response would be a revolutionary
working-class political organization. Macpherson's
commitment to the Marxist view of history seems to
fall short of this. Of course he is under no obligation
to answer in this way the dilemma he laid out before
us last week. But there are obviously a lot of people
who are anxious to get on with the job, and they will
find themselves forced to answer it in one way or
another. For many of them, organizing on a class
basis aimed at the conquest of political power will
seem the only logical and practical way of getting at
a structure by means of which that power is used to
pit class against class.
I Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 15, 1972
Gov't urged to stop cliff erosion
By STEVE BROWN
The UBC Alumni Association
intends to request provincial
government action to stop the
erosion of the Point Grey
Cliffs, says communications
director Clive Cocking.
Unless action is soon taken,
Cecil Green Park and other
buildings in the area of the
cliffs will be sliding into
the sea, Cocking said in a press
release.
Cocking says the
association's cliff erosion
committee have requested a
meeting with' provincial
resources minister Bob
Williams to discuss a proposed
plan to stop the erosion.
The association believes
because public buildings and
public lands are at stake, it is
the responsibility of the
provincial government to
cover the estimated $250,000
cost of the proposed operation,
Cocking says.
The solution to the erosion
problem, devised by the
engineering firm of Swan
Wooster Ltd., would effectively
stop the erosion along 3,700 feet
of the most seriously
threatened section of the cliffs,
says Cocking.
The Swan Wooster plan
would create a new beach
above high water elevation
which would protect the base of
the cliffs from further erosion.
Sand fill would be dredged
from the nearby offshore area
and covered with a three foot
layer of course pit-run gravel.
The minimum width of the
fill would be 30 feet, extending
to a maximum of 85 feet at the
most critical point.
The fill would protect the
cliffs from further wave action
and allow slide material to
accumulate on the beach and
the cliffs to stabilize.
Once the project is completed, the action of the waves
would gradually "landscape"
the area into a natural beach.
The sea would carry sand and
driftwood up onto the beach
making it again a pleasant
natural area, says Cocking.
Unlike earlier proposals, no
provision is made for a road
along the beach. This had been
a source of contoversy.
Cocking says the Alumni
Association feels that this
proposal is the best and most
economical plan available to
protect the cliffs from further
erosion and to perserve tower
beach for recreation.
The main cause of the
erosion is the wave action of
the ocean at high tide. This
action undermines the sand
cliffs which then slough into
the beach to be also swept
away by wave action.
The undermining effect of
surface and subsurface
drainage water also contributes to the erosion process.
The association feels that it
the sand and gravel fill project
is not undertaken soon, another
slide may occur of the
proportions of the one of
January 1935.
That slide carried 100,000
cubic yards of land into
English Bay. It took a large
bite out of the old campus,
narrowly   missing   the   old
Graham residence and
slashing across Marine Drive
into the area of the present law
building.
While the servity of the 1935
slide resulted from the lack of
a campus drainage system
which has since been rectified,
there is nothing to prevent
another major slide from
occuring, says Cocking.
In recent years the cliffs
have been eroding away at the
rate of 0.3 to 1.6 feet per year.
Cecil Green Park, a former
residence which now serves as
offices for the UBC Alumni
Association and as a centre for
conferences and social
gatherings is now only sixty
feet from the cliff edge.
The continued erosion also
poses a threat to the School of
Social Work in the old Graham
residence, the UBC president's
residence, and the law faculty
offices in the old women's
residences.
The total value of the endangered buildings is about
$3 million dollars.
Gears support president
From page 1
agreed to meet with a four-
man negotiating committee of
students, provided the students
would vacate the buildings,
The students vociferously
refused, and the stalemate
continued past 6 p.m., with
students prepared to stay all
night if necessary.
Donuts, soft drinks, coffee,
fried chicken and sandwiches
were brought in at various
times to feed the hungry
demonstrators, and local folk
singer entertained the
audience with a bit of music —
including such songs as Get
Together and Power To The
People. Previously, students
had joined together in several
rousing rounds of Solidarity
Forever.
The bursar's office,
registrar's offices, and
numerous other branches of
the administration had to close
their doors in the afternoon,
though only the vice-preisent's
office continued to be occupied
for more than an hour or so.
Outside, the university's flags
were lowered to half-mast.
There was no immediate
action from the local police on
the occupation, though a
couple of plain clothes men
were keeping an eye on things.
Campus security locked as
many rooms as possible, but
otherwise did little to oppose
except   observe   proceedings.
Students were given a strong
moral boost by a series of
telegrams and phone calls of
support. Student unions at
Dalhousie, Manitoba, UPEI
and the College of Trades and
Technology here declared
theier support, as did the local
bus drivers' union — presently
striking against city hall.
066. sound
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Puccini:   La   Boheme   (Victoria   De
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MFG. SUGG.  LIST 5.98
A&B  PRICE       2.98 (2 LP'S)
IB 6024
A Wagner Concert (Vienna Philharmonic Orch. cond. by Wilhelm
Furtwangler)
MFG.  SUGG.   LIST 5.98
A&B   PRICE       2.98 (2 LP'S)
IB 6032
Donizetti: Lucia  Di  Lammermoor
MFG.  SUGG.   LIST 5.98
A&B   PRICE    2.98 (2 LP'S)
ID 6048
Walter Gieseking  — Mozart:  Complete Music  for Piano Solo,  Vol.  2
MFG.  SUGG.   LIST   11.98
A&B  PRICE       5.96 (4  LP'S)
S 60123 —Mozart:    Tha     Two     Flute
Concertos,   Concerto   No.   1   in  G.   K.-
313;    Concerto    No.    2    in   D.    K.314;
(Elaine    Shaffer,    flute;    Philharmonia
Orchestra,  Efrem  Kurtz Con.)
60125  —  Nadia   Boulanger  —  Vocal
and  Instrumental  Ensemble
S 60126 — The   Art    of   Giuseppe   Di
Stepfano.   Recorded  in   Italy.
60127    —   Chopin:     Waltzes     (Alfred
Cortot,  piano).
Orchestra cond. by Louis Auriacombe.
S 60129 — Toulouse Chamber Orchestra — V by Vivaldi.
S 601 32 — Haydn: Concerto in D-cj-
f (Rovert Veyron-Lacroix, Harpsichord)
S 60133 —Alfred Wallenstein—Rachmaninoff: Symphony No. 2 in E minor,
Op. 27 — Los Angeles Philharmonic
Orchestra.
S 60134 — The    Art    of    Sir   Thomas
Beecham   (Roya!   Philharmonic   &   RTF
Orchestra/Beecham Conductor).
60135 — Yehudi   Menuhin   (Violin) —
Wilhelm   Furtwangler   —   Philharmonia
Orch.  Beethoven Concerto in D. Op. 61
S 60136 — Mstislav    Rostropovich     —
Dvorak:   Concerto  in   B   minor.
S 60137 — The   Drolc  Quartet  —  Mozart:  Haydn. Quartets.
S 60138 — Carlo Maria Giulin Conducting   the   Philharmonia   Orch.   — Verdi:
Rossini:
S 60139—Dietrich Fischer - Dieskau
with Josef Traxel, Lisa Otto — St.
Hedwig's Cathedral Choir. Bach: "Coffee", "Peasant" Cantatas.
60140 — The Art of Aksel Schiotz,
Album 2 — Schubert: Die Schoene
Muellerin.
S 6014i—Richard Strauss: Suite from
"Der Rosenkavalier" and Don Juan,.
Op. 20 (Philharmonia Orchestra, William Steinberg Cond.)
S 60144—'Vivaldi: The Four Seasons
(Toulouse Chamber Orchestra, Louis
Auriacombe Con.; Solo violin: Georges
Armand).
60145 — Wagner: Tristan Und Isolde
— Highlights: (Dietrich Fischer - Dieskau; Philharmonia Orch., Wilhelm Furtwangler Cond.).
60150 — Overtures; BBC Symphony
Orchestra   •—   Arturo   Toscanini   cond.
60162 — Mozart/Mendelssohn Concertos — Jascha Heifetz (violin) —
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir
Thomas  Beecham  cond.
60163 — Alexander Kipnis: The Art
of  Alexander  Kipnis Album 3.
S 60165 — Berlioz: Symphonie Fantas-
tique: (Orchestre National De la Radio
diffusion Francaise). Sir Thomas Beecham.
S 60097 — Strauss: Salome's Dance,
Suite from Die Frau Ohne Schatten
(Phil. Orch. cond. Eric Leinsdorf.)
S 60099 — John Browning (piano) —
Schubert - Liszt - Debussy - Bach -
Chopin
S 60101 — Brahms: Symph No. 3,
Tragic Overture (Carlo Maria Giulini,
cond.  Phil. Orch.)
S 60103 — Franck: Prelude, Chorale
and Fugue; Debussy: Six Preludes
(Malcuzynski)
S 601<05 — Mahler: Sympho. No. 4 in
G (Emmy Loose, Phil. Orch. cond. P.
Kletzki)
Mfg. Sugg.
List Price
.98
A & B PRICE
See us first for Classical Records. We have the largest
Classical   Record   Department   in   Western   Canada.
IC 6066
Beethoven Society Recordings, Vol.
4: (3 Record Set) Sonata No. 29 in .
B flat, Op. 106 (Hammerklavier);
Sonata No. 28 in A, Op. 101; Sonata No. 30 in E, Op. 109; Sonata
No. 31 in A flat, Op. 110; Sonata
No. 32 in C minor, Op. 111 (Artur  Schnabel,  piano)
MFG.  SUGG.  LIST 8.98
A&B   PRICE       4.47 (3  LP'S)
IB 6068
Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Choral); (2 Record Set) — Elisabeth
Schwarzkopf, Elisabeth Hongen,
Hans Hopf & Otto Edelmann Orchestra and Chorus of the Bay-
reuth Festival 1951 — Wilhelm
Furtwangler cond.
MFG.  SUGG.  LIST 5.98
A&B   PRICE       2.98  (2 LP'S)
S 60107 — Liszt: Concerto No. 1 in E
Flat, No. 2 in A (Samson Francois,
piano,  Phil.  Orch.)
S 60110 — Anna Moffo (soprano):
Mozart Arias -— Alceo Galliera cond.
the   Philharmonic  Orchestra.
60112 — Songs of Carl Nielsen (Aksel
Schiotz)
60113 — Great Voices of The Century
(Elisabeth Schumann, John McCor-
mack, Lotte Lehmann, Lauritz Mel-
choir,  Enrico  Caruso, others)
60114 — Vladimir Horowitz - Liszt;
Schumann
60115 — Artur Schnabel — Mozart
Sonatas
60116 — Haydn: Concerto In D, Op.
21   (Wanda Landowska)
60117 — Sontas/Andantino — Emanuel Feuermann, Myra Hess, Gerald
Moore
S 601 18 — Vivaldi: Concertos for Two
Orchestras (I. Solisti Milano, Les Solis-
tes de Bruxelles; Ephrikian)
S 601 19 — Scenes From Bizet's "Carmen" (Christa Ludwig, Rudolf Schock,
Herman  Prey)
60120 — The Art of Joseph Schmidt
(Tenor)
S 60122 — Richard Strauss: Don Quixote Til! Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks
(Rudolf Kempe cond. Berlin Phil. Orch.)
60051 — Vienna, City Of My Dreams/
Richard Tauber with Orchestra
60054 — The Art Of Beniamo Gigli
60063 — Haydn: Sonata No. 52 In E
Flat — Rachmaninoff: Concerto No. 3
In D Minor, Op. 30 — Vladimir Horowitz  (Piano)
S 60069 — Beethoven: Concerto No. 5
In E Flat Major, Op. 73 — Walter
Gieseking  (Piano)
S 60072 — Mozart: Piano, Concertos
(London Philharmonic Orch. cond. by
Yehudi  Menuhin)
60073 — The Art of Dennis Brain,
Vol   2.
60077 — Debussy — La Mer — Nocturnes — The Philharmonic Orch.
cond. by Guido Cantelli.
S 60078 — Fritz Wunderlich/Lyric
Tenor, Album 2 — Opera Arias
S 60079 — Beethoven: Symphony No.
9 In D Minor, Op. 125 — Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by ArV
dre  Cluytens.
60086 — Richard Tauber (Tenor) —
Opera   Arias
60168 — Jussi Bjoerling: The Art of
Jussi  Bjoerling.
60169 — Dennis Brain (Horn): The
Art Of Dennis Brain, Vol. 3.
S 60170 — Liszt: The Mephisto Waltz,
etc. (John Ogdon)
S 60172 — Efrem Kurtz Conducts
Prokofiev (Philharmonia Orchestra/
Kurtz conductor)
556 SEYMOUR ST.
PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Wednesday, November 15, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  9
Guelph council disbands
GUELPH (CUP) — The
student council at the
University of Guelph has voted
itself out of existence and
established a steering committee to form a new body.
The move was just the latest
in the bizarre series of events
which has marked the history
of student unionism on the
central Ontario campus.
The council really wasn't a
council at all, but a collection
of college student council
representatives who came
together  to  form   the   Com
mittee of College Presidents at
the central university level. All
CCP members were appointed
by local college councils. Only
the CCP chairman was directly
elected by the students, but he
had no vote on the CCP.
Dissolution of the CCP
followed elections for the
chairmanship, which were
marred by irregularities.
Odette Thomas, who won the
election, was previously
disqualified for spending more
than the $200 permitted by CCP
regulations. Tom Skilman, who
OFS demo Tuesday
TORONTO (CUP) — The Ontario Federation of Students'
demonstration against the provincial government is apparently
on, and is scheduled for Tuesday, the same day the Ontario
Legislature opens for another session.
The demonstration will publicize the OFS campaign against
the provincial government's tuition fee increases and its cutback in student awards.
The OFS earlier this week received the support iof the
Ontario Federation of Labor's annual convention.
The fate of the demonstration was in some doubt for awhile
because several OFS members balked at the idea and refused to
help organize it. The University of Toronto students council has'
re-affirmed an earlier decision not to participate in the action.
But U of T's Victoria College student council, which belongs
to OFS as a separate member, is trying to organize support on
the U of T campus along with other student groups. The campus
is just a block away from the main scene of the demonstration
— the Queen's Park Legislative buildings.
Supportive demonstration are planned in other Ontario
cities the same day.
Last month Ontario students voted to withdraw their second
term fees instalment if negotiations with the government,
designed to eliminate its cutbacks, prove unsuccessful.
Gov't cuts welfare
REGINA (CUP) — About 30 women students at the
University of Saskatchewan Campus have been cut off welfare
benefits because they are taking the wrong courses.
The women, mostly heads of single parent families, were
receiving payments from the Saskatchewan department of
social services for baby-sitting and transportation costs while
attending university.
But provincial policy offers the subsidy only to students
enrolled in a two-year education course or a nursing program of
similar duration.
A department official said the subsidy covers teacher
training "since it is only a two-year course and provides an
immediate and concrete vocational goal.
"It is felt that it is not the function of the department of
social services to sponsor clients for a university education.
Persons with a university education tend to be in a preferred
position and it is not intended that the department of social
services place clients in a preferred position .
Most teaching positions now open require a four-year B.Ed
degree, thus minimizing the value of the two-year course. But
the government will not subsidize a student in a degree
program.
gathered less than half
Thomas' votes, was declared
elected. He immediately urged
dissolution of the CCP.
Skilman managed to stave
off a threatened withdrawal by
the Ontario Veterinary College
(part of U of G), but the
colleges of physical sciences,
biological sciences, and social
sciences were also rumored to
be ready to withdraw from the
CCP.
Under Skilman's direction
the CCP voted to dissolve and
establish a six-member
steering committee to draft a
new constitution and administer the CCP's prior
committments.
The CCP was formed about
three years ago after the
collapse of the University of
Guelph Student Union Council.
Union Council fell apart when
it tried to become an incorporated body. Amid administration pressure against
some radicalism on the
council, the provincial
government refused to allow
compulsory fees collected.
With fees voluntary. Union
Council lost its financial bases,
and after trying to stay alive,
finally collapsed
:»«£
TORONTO $129
LONDON $245
LONDON
One Way $
January 2
149
Association of Student Councils
CHARTER FLIGHTS
Room 100 B-S.U.B.
224-0111
RESTAURANT"
NOV. 16-19
SUB AUD. 50c
RUSHANT
■* CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
DISCOUNT PRICES
THE FIRST 200 PERSONS *j
TO BRING IN THIS COUPON WILL »
receive a FREE TOOTHBRUSH I
DURING OUR EXPANSION SALE! )
COMPLIMENTS OF j
HfcK     UNIVERSITY PHARMACY ^|
i        ^fr         5754 University Blvd. - Sale Runs Nov. 14-25 y^-        j
"WILDROOT
if
Has a New Hangout
so c'mon down
and boogie
your buns
off at
^RAGE
SEYMOUR 683-2610
Jam   Sessions   Every
Sat.  Afternoon   3  p.m.  -   7  p.m.
6 Nights a Week-Ladies Free Mon.-Thurs.
^RPi<^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^g Page   10
THE       UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 15, 1972
'Tween classes
TODAY
ONTOLOGY
Dale Miranda and Gigi Wood on
responsible friendship, noon, Buch.
216.
FREESEE
Civilization, noon and 1:35 p.m.
SUB ballroom.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
THURSDAY
VCF
Will Wilding on Jesus, the man of
action,   noon,  Gage  towers lounge.
POLISH STUDENTS
Meeting, wszyscy sa zaproszenl na
zebranie, noon, International House
406.
CCF
Film: Prior Claim, noon, SUB 205.
CSA
Lecture and slide show: The Yellow
River, 8 p.m., International House
upper lounge.
RUS
Les Spooner of BCRA, 12:45—2:00
p.m., armory 208.
FRIDAY
AUS
Starring Art Phillips, Bill Street and
Brian       Campbell,       noon,      SUB
ballroom.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
B.C.    correctional    services,    noon,
SUB 105B.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
George    Knox    conducts    tour   of
exhibit: towards a study collection,
noon, FAG, library basement.
WOMEN'S ACTION CENTRE
Meeting, noon, International House.
CUE
Lunch meeting, noon, Grad. Centre.
Hot flashes
Cece and Ida
present
Harold Seigel, president of
Scintrex Ltd., speaks on Canadian
geophysics as an exportable
commodity, 1:30 p.m., in Buch.
106.
Seigel's lecture is part of the
Cecil and Ida Green visiting
professor series.
Biscvlff Boy
Canadian blues man King
Biscuit Boy gives a concert, 8:30
p.m., Thursday, in the SUB
ballroom.
Admission to the Alma Mater
Society special events committee
presentation is $2.
King Biscuit Boy, whose real
name is Richard Newell, has been
billed variously as "the legendary
Canadian blues man", "Canada's
only living legend" and "the best
damn harp player in the world."
After playing backup to
musicians like Ronnie Hawkins
for several years, Biscuit Boy did
the    Official    Music    LP    with
Crowbar, already acclaimed as one
of the few classic Canadian
albums.
His most recent album,
Gooduns, has also been well
received in Canada and the U.S.
He plays the blues, he's
Canadian, and he's very good.
Given the number of concerts
being cancelled in Vancouver
these days you really shouldn't
pass him up.
Bursaries
Bursaries worth $1,500 to
$3,000 to students wishing to
pursue careers in mental retardation are being offered by the
National Institute on Mental Retardation at York University,
Downsview, Ont.
Application forms are available
from York before Dec. 31.
Gallery opens
Inner Dialogue, a multi media
presentation featuring the
paintings and sculpture of Father
rushant
** CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224 5858
DISCOUNT PRICES
ABRAXAS
CRAFTS
leather belts & bags • batik
> pottery • jewellery • macrame^
stained glass • candles
DISCOUNT WITH AMS CARD
& THIS AD
Mon- Sat 10:30-5:30
Fri 'til 9:00
1124 Robson St       688-3979
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
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AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at Arbutus
Dunstan Massey of Mission City,
opens 6:30 p.m., Thursday, in the
SUB art gallery.
The show, a mixture of
painting, murals, films, sculpture,
lights and mirrors, was conceived
by gallery curator Rory Ralston, a
fourth-year fine arts major.
To be a nurse
Dr. Loretta C. Ford, Rochester
university nursing dean, speaks on
the challenge to be and the
challenge to become — the
emerging role of nurses, 7 p.m.,
Friday, in the Woodward Centre,
lecture hall 2.
Dr. Ford's lecture, which deals
with increased involvement by
nurses in preventative health care,
is sponsored by the P. A.
Woodward foundation.
Layton reads
Irving Layton, Canadian poet
and author, will give a reading of
his work noon Friday in the
Frederic Wood Theatre.
No admission, everybody
welcome.
Grab Yours Today
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD CALLS
UBC's Student Telephone Directory
With 40 Money Saving
COUPONS
Available at
UBC
BOOKSTORE
and SUB
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00* additions! fines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
r 635c; additional days $1^5 &Mc.
CUmifkd ads we not accepted by tekphdne and me payable in'
advance. Deadaneis If:30 a.m. the day before publication.
ftd>ttemions9ffie,R<)0m241SM.B,,lfBC,Van.8,£.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
DANCE   TO   THE   BLACK   SHEEP,
International   House,   Friday,   Nov.
17, 1972,  9:00 p.m. $1.50/person.
GET     A    HOLD    OF    YOURSELF.
Stronghold   is   coming!   Sat.,   Nov.
18, 8:30-1 a.m.,  SUB Ballroom.
Lost & Found
13
LOST/BUTTERFLY PIN STERLING
mauve wings. Reward, $10. Phone
299-2729.
REWARD ?20. GOLD RING WITH
blue stone and family crest. Lost
in SUB.  Please phone 733-8701.
FOUND: LADY'S WATCH BEHIND
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
Phone 224-6090.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
DOCTOR BUNDOLO DID IT AGAIN!
Come and see it — his all new
Pandemonium Medicine Show,
noon, Friday, Nov. 17 in SUB
Movie Theatre. It's free! !
GET A. HOLD OF YOURSELF
Stronghold is coming! Dance, Sat.
Nov. 18, 8:30-1 a.m., SUB Ballroom.
FREE SKATING PARTY FOR
Grad. students, Wed., Nov. 15, 7:30-
9:30 p.m.,   Thunderbird  Arena.
ESSAY AND BOOK MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, spelling, punctuation, clarity. 263-6565.
NO. 5 ORANGE STREET, MAIN AT
POWELL is having a Junk Contest! JUNK! Like stop signs, airplane wings, toilet seats, and as
original aa you can get, cuz if we
pick your junk as a winner, you
too can win a dinner for two at
the White Lunch, a Free Bus Ride
to Burnaby, a gift certificate at
the Army & Navy, and many other
swell stuff. What will we do with
this Junk you ask? We're going to
plaster our walls, ceiling, and all
available places with it so that you
can point to a wrinkled stained
bedsheet for instance, and proudly
tell your friends "I did that."
So, starting when you want, start
bringing it in. Bring as many
as you can, but securely tie your
name, address and phone number
to each piece, so we'll know who
to contact. And don't forget, we
got second, third and fourth prizes
too, like 2 dinners for 2 at the
White Lunch, and 5 Free Bus Rides
to Burnaby. OKAY?
EDITING SERVICE — ARE YOU
bugged by double negatives? Do
you suffer from verbal flatulence?
My forty years experience may
help you. Let DAN MURRAY
gather your dangling participles.
Phone 733-2337 for term papers,
theses, reports, etc.
HAIR SHAPING PROFESSIONALLY
done at UBC Beauty Salon, 5736
University  Blvd.,  Tel.   228-8942.
UBC BARBER SHOP (NEAR CAMPUS). Open Mon. to Sat. 5736 University   Boulevard.
EX SELKIRK COLLEGE STU-
dents! Time for a reunion. Abe
Dunn & Erling Close invite you to
a gathering of Kootenay Folk, on
Sat., Nov. 18th, at 7:00 p.m., room
207 & 209 in Student Union Bldg.,
UBC. Contact John Asun at 224-
0884 or 224-9535 for further info.
Refreshments provided.
$75 FOR 75<
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY!
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION OF STUDENT
Councils Travel Service, Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information 17
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1971 CORVETTE HARDTOP - CON-
vertible, AM-FM, 18,000, cherry-
silver-grey. Call Dave nights after
8:00 p.m.   685-5493.
Automobiles—Parts
23
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Scandals
37
DOCTOR BUNDOLO'S PANDEMO-
nium Medicine Show can cure youi
pre-post exam blues! ! Come Friday noon, Nov. 17 to SUB Theatre.
It's free.	
GET A HOLD OF YOURSELF!
Stronghold is coming! Dance, Sat.,
Nov. 18, 8:30-1 a.m., SUB Ballroom.
C-90 CASSETTES WITH PLEXI-
glas case. Buy minimum of 6 at
J1.50 each — get 3 FREE! Guaranteed against defects. Pickup point
on campus can be arranged. Call
732-6769.
Typing
40
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT —
Essays, Papers, Theses. 41st and
Marine Drive._266-5053.	
TYPING! ! —"ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
ports, etc. — Reasonable, 3 years
exp. — Good location, 2nd & Burrard.   Phone   Sheri — 732-7823.
ESSAYS, THESES, ETC. EXPEFJ>
.  enced.     Elec.     typewriter,     carbon
ribbon. Reasonable rates. 738-8848.
EFFICIENT     ELECTRIC     TYPING,
my home. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
263-5317.
PROMPT, EFFICIENT TYPING
(electric machine) of theses, essays,
examination papers, etc. Phone:
688-4027.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS
Theses,  etc.   Mrs.  Brown,  732-0047.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPIST AVAIL-
able for term papers, essays,
Theses. IBM Electric—Elite type.
Phone   327-5381.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS, ETC. DONE
quickly and efficiently, 35c a page.
Phone 224-0385 after 5:30 p.m.	
TOP   TYPIST   —   35c   PAGE
Lindsay, phone 434-5843.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INTERESTED  IN   SELLING?	
Then why not be an advertising
salesman for the Ubyssey? This
part-time job offers an opportunity
to gain experience and to earn
worthwhile commissions. Reliable
2nd or 3rd year business-minded
student who will work hard for 10
or 12 hours weekly is needed. Must
have transportation. If interested
apply to Publications Office, Room
241,  SUB,  after 2 p.m..
SUMMER    1973
CAREER-ORIENTED
SUMMER   EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
This competition is open to both
men  and  women.
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Engineering and Applied Sciences, Bio-Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Economics.
ELIGIBILITY: All full-time university students in the above fields
who intend to return to university
in 1973-74. Canadian citizens have
statutory preference for appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UCPA application form (available 'from your
University Placement Office) and
a list of courses taken, to the Public Service Commission of Canada,
203—535 Thurlow St., Vancouver 5,
B.C. Apply before December 31,
1972. Please quote competition 73-
4200.
Work Wanted
52
DON'S MOVING & HAULING, 2636
Wrest 11th Ave. 738-0096. Serving
Kerrisdale, Dunbar & Greater
Van.  area  24 hr.  service.  Insured.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring S'rvice
63
THOUGH THIS BE THE YEAR OF
The Mouse, roar into the UBC
Tutorial Centre anytime at Speak-
Easy or see Doug Brock, 12:30-
2:30 to register.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CAMPUS DOUBLE ROOMS, KIT-
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Ubyssey
Classified Wednesday, November 15, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
B.C. HYDRO
B.C. TEL
COLLECTIONS
1*754
University
Boulevard
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
FREE
DELIVERY
Phone
224-3202
&
DEVILBISS ■■■■■■
.VAPORIZER
No. 145 Glass
No.  144 Plastic
Mfg. sugg.
retail 9.95
Your Choice ...
■PRICE 4.88
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY HAS
COMPLETED IT'S EXPANSION & REMODELLING
Sorry for any inconvenience!  More space, volume
buying and mass merchandising allows us to pass
any savings to you, the
customer—WE OFFER
COMPETITIVE PRICES,
and maintain a high
standard of service
PU?*®
JOHNSON & JOHNSON
Soff Puffs
325's. Mfg. sugg. retail 1.09
UP PRICE .63
Listerine Lozenges
Menthol,   regular,
orange or lemon-
mint.    12's
Mfg.
sugg.   retail   99c
PRICE .63
VICEROY
HOT WATER
BOTTLE
Mfg. sugg.
retail 1.59
M*L'
PRICE ,99
'C
*
Christmas Cards
51 cards per box
.99
Deluxe Cards
50 Cards Per Box
£T| B»B&gtt
tWiUnA CWl
NEW! from Colgate
Lustre Dent
TOOTH POLISH
Mfg. sugg. retail 1.69
UP PRICE .99
CHARGEX I
SALE RUNS FROM
NOV. 14 to  NOV. 25
CLAIROL
Herbal Essence
SHAMPOO
Regular, dry, or oily. 12 oz.
Mfg.  sugg.  retail  2.49
UP PRICE 1.49
PERKIN'S
CHRISTMAS
WRAP
3   roll,   26"   wide,    195"
total length.
Mfg. sugg. retail  1.29
UP PRICE .88
6   roll,   26"    wide,   360"
total length.
Mfg.   sugg.   retail   1.98
UP PRICE 1.33
COME AND SEE THIS!
HERSHEY S
CHOCOLATE
Hershey Chocolate of Canada, a Division of  9C Hershey Foods Corporation,
THIS   GIANT   5-POUND   BAR  WILL   BE
GIVEN   AWAY  AS   A   DOOR   PRIZE
SPECIAL!  3 bars for $100.  Reg. 39c each. Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Wednesday, November 15, 1972
Letters
From page 5
anything which cannot be proven
by scientific inquiry based on the
human physical senses; that my
teen-age experiences with God
were but psychological
phenomena.
And then one day I saw an
angel. Not in vision like those
appearing to some men of God in
the Bible. Then you and I would
have shouted, "Hallucination!
Psychological illusion." God knew
that. The angel which appeared to
me was made of physical matter;
at least what I could see of it. A
flesh and blood angel! I gasped in
amazement.
Where a year before there had
been nothing — no soul, no
form . . . only a empty crib, there
was now a masterfully fashioned,
e xtremely complicated, living,
breathing, throbbing being — far
too intricate and beautiful; far too
delightful and inspiring; with too
great potential, and too
impossible to ever be called a
machine, or he product of pure
chance.
A person! I couldn't believe
my senses. A person from
nowhere — from nothing! Far too
impossible to be called anything
but a miracle.
Beholding the loveliness and
beauty of His handiwork;
knowing that such order, and
perceptive intelligence and
loveliness are the work of an
author (a personal author, because
of the intensely personal nature of
the creation), my doubts melted.
With my physical senses I beheld!
Beauty of life, or form, of
complexity, and beauty of
character. Contentment, where I
had none; innocence, where I was
surrounded and permeated with
guilt.
Yes, the physical senses can be
called upon to testify. Not that
this testimony is the only proof
we may lean upon. After all,
science cannot claim to be the
only authority on every subject,
because it is dependent, and it is
based on he human physical
senses, which operate within a
very limited spectrum.
I considered the Bible. Men
testified of God's power as
witnessed by them, and forfeited
their very lives for it. And would
men give up their lives to back up
an idle tale?
Later, at three years she is still
an angel. She sleeps, but she hears
me near her bed, and, just as I'm
thinking she's fast asleep, she
breaks into a smile, a sleepy smile,
even though she's been sleeping
four hours already. She utters a
couple of words to me, then is
gone.
One night last month I asked
God to reveal Himself to me; to
speak to me concerning a deeply
distressing problem. At three in
the morning, I was awakened by
little arms on my face. Laurie had
left her bedroom and had come to
me. She had never done this
before, nor has she done it since. 1
thanked God for this special
reminder of His personal presence
and His limitless power.
Henry Hiebert
(former UBC student)
Abbotsford
Kenny!
An open letter to arts dean Doug
Kenny:
You have asked via Don Soule,
for a detailed description of what
it is we want. Let me review the
events as I see them. At the last
faculty of arts meeting we handed
out a leaflet in which we stated
that we believed that students
should be involved in decisions
about the nature and quality of
their education. We asked faculty
members to think about the idea
of having student participation at
faculty meetings in order to give
students an effective voice in
decisions about course content,
teaching,    degree    requirements,
FRITZ PERLS
FILM SERIES
Eight Films
NOV. 21, 28, & DEC. 5
at
Eric Hamber
Secondary School
5025 Willow St. - 7:30 p.m.
$2.00
Discussion led by
DAVID BERG of Gestact
Doug's mug
new programmes and so on. We
stated that we would hope to have
this question on the agenda for
the next meeting at which time it
would be proper for a faculty
member to introduce motions on
the subject. We suggested a
possible motion which would give
voting rights to the seven students
presently on student/faculty
committees and would also establish a committee to determine
how many more students should
be granted voting rights at faculty
meetings. I know that you received one of these leaflets.
Next, Vicki Obedkoff spoke to
Soule about placing this item on
the agenda. He told her that there
might be some problem with the
Universities Act but said he would
check into the obstacles in our
way. He said to come back on
Monday, Nov. 6.
On Monday, Vicki and I both
went to see Soule. He said that
according to you, the Universities
Act does prohibit students from
participating in faculty meetings.
He suggested that we go to the
senate committee which has supposedly been investigating student
participation. I pointed out that
the committee has done nothing
for two years and what we would
like is a statement from faculty
which supports the notion of
student participation. This statement of support which could
contain the details of our proposed motion, could be sent to
senate as well as to the new
minister of education. Therefore,
we would still want to have this
item put on the agenda for the
next faculty meeting. Well, obviously Soule had not checked into
the obstacles too closely as he
suggested there might be more
technical difficulties though he
couldn't tell us exactly what they
might be. He would have to speak
to you again, he said, and we
should phone him back.
So, on Tuesday I did phone
Soule who said that he's spoken
to you. We were to send you a
letter describing what it is we
want and then make an appointment to come and talk to you
about the contents of our letter.
By this time, I'm feeling that
things are getting unnecessarily
complicated and that we are being
deliberately put off. A couple of
things puzzle me. First, I've got a
copy of the Universities Act in
front of me and I can't see where
it says students are prohibited
from faculty meetings. It does
say, section 26: "There shall be
such faculties of each university as
may be constituted by the board
and the senate, nd each dean of a
faculty shall be chairman of the
faculty of which he is the dean."
If the senate has prohibited
student   participation,   then   pre-
sumeably the faculty can equest a
change. Section 63 of the act
says: "The powers and duties of a
faculty are (a) to make rules and
regulations governing its proceedings, including the determining of
the quorum necessary for the
transaction of business; (b) subject to the provisions of this act
and to the approval of the senate,
to make regulations and rules for
the government, direction and
management of the faculty and
the affairs and business thereof;"
Secondly, I'm puzzled by the
difficulty we're encountering in
merely getting this item on the
agenda so that faculty members
can see it's going to be discussed.
Obviously, we would and are
talking to sympathetic faculty
who could make motions at that
meeting and discuss the issues. We
would also be prepared to come in
the event that the faculty members   might   feel   we   should  be
allowed to speak to he question. I
think we made it quite clear to
Soule that right now we'd like to
get in on the agenda so I was
confused when he said you didn't
know what we wanted and we
should send you a letter. I hardly
see how you can not know since
you've seen our leaflet and Soule
has talked to us and then to you
at least two times. I interpret our
difficulty as an indication of your
lack of sympathy if not outright
opposition to our even raising this
issue. If someone wants to raise an
issue at or put a request to
student council, it is hardly this
difficult. Either there's a problem
of efficiency, or you're being
deliberately obstructionist. At any
rate, we've got an appointment
with you on Thursday at 11 a.m.
Until then,
Brian Loomes
president
arts undergraduate society
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