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The Ubyssey Mar 1, 1966

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 54
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,  B.C., TUESDAY, MARCH   1,   1966
CA 4-3916
— norm  betts photo
SWEEPING UP after sloppy UBC students, buildings and
grounds workmen ponder pay raises they're seeking in
negotiating  new  contract with   university.
Council condemns
Canada's failure
By   CAROL-ANNE   BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Council Monday night approved an ammended letter
to be sent to Ottawa condemning the Canadian government's
action in the Viet Nam war.
The ammended letter states
WILLIAM WHITE
. . 'bank set split'
Bank space row
flares over SUB
Bursar, McAfee disagree
on split of room, money
By STUART GRAY
Ubyssey  SUB Reporter
UBC bursar William White said Monday a $500,000
student contribution to the new adrninistration building
does not exist.
He said the sum — which Student Union Building
Chairman Roger McAfee told AMS council in January he
regarded as a student contribution — is in fact part of a
general $1,130,000 offer made to the administration by the
Bank of Montreal.
White said the bank had made the single offer for a
total of 9,000 square feet of banking area on campus —
with the split of space and rental to be negotiated between
the AMS and UBC's administration.
McAfee, however, said the
bank itself had specified a
split which was virtually unalterable by any negotiation.
Bank officials Monday refused comment on the discrepancies between White's and
McAfee's version of the bank's
bid.
McAFEE DENIAL
The Ubyssey interviewed McAfee Friday, after learning he
was denying the half-million
figure was a student contribution.
The $500,000 was "not directly a contribution", McAfee
said, because it was actually
part of a $928,000 bid by the
B of M for 3,000 square feet
in the administration building
while a separate bid for SUB's
6,000-square-foot bank space
was only $202,000.
Both sums represent prepaid
rent for 35 years.
'NO HOPE'
McAfee said the bank had
specified the split of floor area
and prepaid rental between the
two as-yet unbuilt buildings.
"When I found out after negotiations, there was no hope
qf altering the split as the bank
spelled it out, I sent a letter
to bursar William White telling
him we would consider the
$500,000 as a student contribution to the new administra
tion building,"   McAfee  said.
White said he could not remember receiving the letter.
McAfee said he "was looking
for his copy" of the letter to
show The Ubyssey.
THREE PLANS
If the bank space were rented on a proportional basis, the
AMS would get the $500,000
as additional rent for the SUB
space, McAfee said.
White said there were three
separate plans laid down in
bids for tenders sent to all
Canadian banks.
These were:
• Banking facilities in one
place;
• The major portion of the
total area in the administration building and the minor in
SUB;
• The major total in SUB
and the minor in the admini
stration building.
"The 'banks were required
to submit suggestions under
all three headings," White said.
'BEST OFFER'
"The Bank of Montreal came
up with the best offer and gave
us the option of either the last
two conditions," he said.
"The whole agreement about
the  money allotment was be-
(Continued  on  Page  3)
See: SUB
the AMS:
• Condemns the failure of
Canada to act on the Joint Control Commission with the im-
partiatility and vigour necessary to prevent the conflict and
subsequent escalation of the
war in Viet Nam;
• Urges the government of
Canada to adopt a stand totally
independent of all external
pressures and to use all channels of negotiation and political pressure on the U.S. government and at all international levels to effect an immediate cease fire and resolve
the conflict in accordance with
the Geneva Convention of the
year 1954;
• Calls for an immediate
and full debate of these mat-
(Continued on Page 3}
See: LETTER
IN  SUBWAY
NEAR U OF T
Engineers pull a slow one
Special to The Ubyssey
TORONTO — A horde of
500 University of Toronto engineers Monday turned this
city's subway system into
chaos.
It took only one switch —
and when it was pulled:
Power was cut off to the
new $200 million east-west
line opened Friday by Ontario
premier John Robarts andi
Prime Minister Lester Pearson;
Trains were left stalled for
an hour over the eight-mile
route;
The entire underground sy
stem was thrown behind schedule for more than five hours
—including rush hour;
Commuters found it took as
long as 15 minutes to move
three blocks;
And Toronto Transit Commission officials, gleefully
awaiting the line's rush-hour
debut, were choleric with
rage.
Led by their blue-jacketed
Lady Godiva memorial band,
the engineers entered a station
near the university at 1:30
p.m.
Witnesses   said   the   horde
lept over turnstiles and jammed 400-strong on the first
train that came along.
The band went, too.
One of the 100 engineers
left behind — his identity is
not known — ran to the end
of the platform and pulled
the emergency power switch.
TTC chairman Ralph Day
said later: "The whole bunch
should be thrown in the jug."
A U of T engineering dean
said an inquiry will be held1
and the university will take
disciplinary action if it can
be proven students had misbehaved.
Union calls
for negotiator
in UBC talks
The UBC employees' union
Monday broke off negotiations
with the university and decided to send for a provincial
labor conciliation officer.
Robert Black, president of
the 700 member UBC Employees Union local 116, said
the university committee had
failed to make any offer regarding the requested 30-cent-
an-hour wage increase.
The union represents the
non-prqfessional staff of the
university including truck
drivers, laborers, cafeteria workers, building service workers,
and traffic and patrol personnel.
' Black said the union was
forced to apply for the conciliation officer "because management made no offer on any
point."
The request made Jan. 31
also urges special adjustments
for university tradesmen including carpenters, electricians
and plumbers.
Present rates range from
$318 a month for a building
serviceman to $590 for senior
tradesmen.
John F. McLean, UBC labor
relations director, said the union had presented no case for
the requested wage boost.
"We were quite willing to go
on negotiating," he said, "but
we have received no submission."
Neither Black nor McLean
thought the breakdown would
result in a strike.
WUZ WE
ROBBED?
See Page 7 Pago 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  1,  1966
— norm  betts photo
WOMAN'S WORK is never done says pretty Joan Ruskin
of Delta Phi Epsion, as she helps to advertise Vancouver
Hotel  fashion  show.  She  will  also  model   the   latest  in
bridal fashions.
B.C. student group
names interim head
Simon Fraser Academy ombudsman John Mynott has
been named provisional chairman of a proposed B.C.
Assembly of Students.
The assembly was created
in January at a B.C. student
leaders conference in Victoria.
Mynott will act as chairman, and organizer until a
new president is elected at the
first congress in October.
The assembly involves all
secondary and post-secondary
students in B.C. — high
school, university, technical
school, nursing and city college students.
"The group's aim is to promote further interest in higher education," Mynott said.
"It will be a group in which
students can exchange ideas,
and discuss action on common
problems. We will also act as
a lobbying group," he said.
"THE"  PLACE
to meet
your   friends
is  at  the
|Do-NutDinerl
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.35
If* Really Good!
Full course meals
within your   income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
Opportunities for
GRADUATES IN
LIBRARY SCIENCE
with the
National Library
and
Main Libraries of
Government Departments
at Ottawa
and other centres
$5,760 - $6,300
Interviews on Campus - March 7, 8 & 9
Appointments for interview may be arranged through
the Office of the  Director of the Library School.
'BOX-TOP" BUILDINGS
Debators knock UBC
By JACK KHOURY
UBC does very little to encourage creativity and the
arts.
This is the opinion of debators Les Harowitz, law II,
and Steve Tick, law I, who
returned Sunday from the
McGill Winter Carnival debating conference in Montreal.
"Universities should be in
the forefront of architectural
design, but at UBC all we have
are box-tops for buildings,"
said Tick.
This contrasted greatly with
the Stephen Leacock and Medical Buildings at McGill, and
artful layout of the University
of Saskatchewan campus, he
said.
Both    debators    said    food
services of the eastern campuses provide better food at
more reasonable prices than
UBC.
"Personally, I think our food
is abominable. Theirs isn't the
Ritz, but it isn't abominable,"
said Harowitz.
In addition to UBC, there
were 45 other North American
universities represented at the
conference.
The UBC team defeated McMaster, Loyola University,
Emerson College, Boston and
Fairleigh Dickinson, New Jersey; but lost its debate with
Harvard, which won the contest.
UBC is sending McGoun Cup
debators Jim Taylor and Wolf
ram Raymer to Regina Wednesday to debate for the Mac-
Donald-Laurier Trophy awarded to the best university team
in Canada.
UBC has held the cup for the
last two years.
Cohn seeks
Nazi banners
for lectures
Nazi flags, banners and badges are in demand at UBC.
D_\ Werner Cohn, associate
professor or sociology, says he
wants second World War flags
of Germany, Italy, and Japan
as well as pre-war political
posters, badges and banners.
Cohn said the items could
be used by history and sociology profs to illustrate how
totalitarian governments appealed to people for support.
The sociologist emphasized
he is not interested in firearms
or other military items.
BAY
MAN IN THE MIDDLE
Robert Mitchum
France Nuyen, Trev Howard
Plus
CAROUSEL
Gordon MacRae, S. Jones
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
March 4 and 5
THE CURSE OF
FRANKENSTEIN
Hazel Court (Adult)
Plus
DR. CRIPPEN
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"The home of friendly people and happy teachers.''
SCHOOL DISTRICT
No.  35  (LANGLEY)
Within easy commuting  distance of  U.B.C, 5.F.U.  and
U. of W.W.
Elementary and Secondary Vacancies Effective
September, 1966
For salary schedule and detailed information phone
594-4515 (Toll free Vancouver Area)
Harold D. Stafford: District Superintendent of Schools
Great
Expectations
Thursday, March 3
12:30, 3:30, 6:00 and 8:30
AUDITORIUM
50c
NEWMAN
Campus Mission
BY FR. ALBERT ZSIGMAND
Monday, Feb. 28 to Friday, Mar. 4
at ST. MARKS COLLEGE
From 12:40 to 1:20 and informal discussions during the afternoon.
ALL. WELCOME Tuesday, March  1,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
RECESS OVER
— dennis  gans  photo
IT MAY NOT BE SPRING, but Monday's sunshine turned a young man's fancy, lightly.
Our voyeur photog caught this couple basking on Main Mall. Exams are only seven
weeks away, buddy.
IS  BENNETT  WACKY?
Play parliament sets probe
By  ANN   BISHOP
A play parliament royal
commission is going to investigate B.C. Premier W. A. C.
Bennett's mental health.
Prime Minister Elizabeth
Mackenzie introduced the bill
to form the commission Saturday.
The move is a result of the
questioning of Bennett's sanity by NDP-MLA Tony Gar-
grave in the B.C. legislature
last week.
Miss Mackenzie, vice-president of the UBC Liberal club
replaced Alan Gould as prime
minister in the newly formed
coalition government.
Parliament passed a bill introduced toy the coalition for
increased aid to post-secondary education including travel grants,  living allowances
W. A. C. BENNETT
. . . sanity queried
PART OF COMPLEX
Bids called for
new mental wing
Tenders will soon be called for a $3 million psychiatric
wing for the planned $18 million teaching hospital at the
UBC health sciences centre.
and more bursaries and scholarships.
Commenting on a mace-
stealing incident started toy
Norm Angus. Arts I, labor
minister Derry Nelson said,
"It was a fresh frosh stunt
with their typical excellence
as shown by our regaining it
within five minutes."
Some of the speeches were
partly in French but were
hooted down by the coalition
members with shouts of
"Speak Canada's language-
speak English."
A bill opposing U.S. policy
in Viet Nam was watered
down by the coalition to a
statement disapproving of war
in Viet Nam.
Members were informed
Canada's pickle industry is
growing steadily.
The Postmaster general,
asked if he intended to flavor
stamps this year replied: "It
is a mint question."
Secretary of State, Keith
Mitchell told parliament there
were "too many frivolities.
We should be debating serious
subjects.
"A lot of the speeches were
■were extraneous excretions
and I hope to see better next
year," concluded Mitchell.
The wing will house the most
modern teaching and treatment
techniques including video-taping facilities for psychiatric interviews used in teaching.
There will also be a night
care unit permitting working
patients to receive in-patient
treatmen at night.
The building will be wired
for computerized operation —
a leading feature of the planned hospital.
Construction must begin by
July 1, as stipulated by P. A.
Woodward when he donated
$3.5 million for the centre.
The wing will be built first
because of the pressing need
for this type of service in the
province, says Dr. J. S. Ty-
hurst, head of the department
of psychiatry.
The wing will have 60 beds,
about 70 offices, 10 interview
rooms with one-way. glass in
terview screens, and a 150-seat
lecture theatre.
The basement section will
include pharmacy and occupational therapy units, laboratories, student study and lock
er areas and lounges for students   and   faculty  members.
UBC  sciencemen
sweep vs.  SFA
UBC's science undergrad
society will clash with the
SFA football team in a
broom-ball game tonight at
the PNE Forum.
The teams will mix brooms
between periods of the hockey game between SFA. and
the Vancouver  Canucks.
Reduced price tickets are
available from Bob Johnson
in the SUS office.
LETTER
(Continued from Page 1)
ters of urgent national importance in Parliament, in order
that Canada may move beyond
the limit of our current actions
and contribute to peace in Viet
Nam.
Council defeated the approval of the original letter nine
votes to seven.
The original letter contained
the third point, plus the following points among others:
• Publicly call for an immediate end to U.S. bombing in
north Viet Nam;
• Disallow Canadian firms
to export any arms or material
to the U.S. or any other country to be used in the Viet Nam
war;
• Declare support for the
principles of the 1964 Geneva
Agreement as the basis for
peace.
3-U fund hits
road after jack
The Three Universities Capital Fund resumed canvassing Monday, $8.5 million short of its $28 million objective.
The campaign received $1.1
million while in recess for the
benefit of the United Appeal
campaign, co-chairman Allan
M. McGavin said Monday.
"To take in more than a
million dollars without even
going outside the door is most
encouraging," McGavin told a
campaign fund press conference.
He said since the fund last
canvassed publicly, the needs
of higher education have been
heavily underlined by both the
Bladen Report and the Economic Council of Canada.
"The Bladen Report" McGavin said, "states in effect
that more investment in our
universities today means we
will have more for other things
10 years hence."
The fund was launched in the
fall of 1964 to help finance
expansion projects at UBC,
Victoria College and Simon
Fraser.
The $28 million is part of
a $68.7 million expansion program to meet their minimum
requirements to   1970.
The provincial government
granted the institutions $40.7
million toward the five-year
program.
Active canvassing will end
June 15.
A MODEL girl, frosh queen
Birgit Freybe shows off
creation at Monday noon
fashion show.
Manitobans seek
united college front
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Manitoba's provincial leadership
conference has set up a permanent inter-executive body as
the beginning of a provincial student union.
Delegates from the five pro
vincial institutions of higher
education met at Brandon College to discuss basic issues of
student  government.
The individual student councils must ratify the new body.
It is intended to help present
a united front of Manitoba students  on their  problems.
The conference also decided
to try to rebuild the image of
student government to place it
in the centre of university life
and make it part of the student's practical education.
It was decided to make representations to the provincial
government to lower the voting
age and to allow students re-
presenation on the Manitoba
Council of Higher Learning.
Commerce elects
Walton for head
Alfred E. Newman failed
to gain a victory in the commerce presidential elections
Friday.
Phillip Walton, comm. Ill,
overcame    Alfred's    single
write-in vote to win 123-vote
victory over his other rival,
John Norton.
A total of 402 votes were
cast, representing a 45 per
cent turnout of commerce
students.
Peter Uitenbosch was elected executive member, defeating Allan Gj ernes and
Doug Hart.
MORE SUB
(Continued from Page 1)
tween the  university  and  the
AMS."
McAfee said he and Kyle
Mitchell, former AMS treasurer tried to get more money,
for the SUB space but without
success.
35-YEAR LEASE
White said the $928,000 sum
was allotted as rental for the
administration's bank space because it was hoped this would
cover most of the cost of the
administration  building itself.
'Also, the university will operate both banks for the 35-
year lease period, at approximately 4 per cent of the capital cost per year," he said.
This alone warrants the larger rental sum for the administration bank, White added.
'BANK CONTINUES'
McAfee said the major reason for the university getting
the higher rent was because
the B of M wanted the university's business, which he said
would result in $45 million per
year university patronage for
the   administration   bank.
But White said the B of M
already is the sole banking
agent cfor the university.
"They will just be continuing in their present role," he
said. *- mnvsstv
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the untyeraity
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, MARCH  1, 1966
"The responsibility of the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
*T*w4v. v ?§, ■kJ&SstT
#'■**'•*
Drink
Vancouver police department's decision to invent its
own special liquor law for students is interestingly timed.
It comes at the same time a charming classicist with
the attitudes of a Victorian headmaster has taken command of UBC's residences and declared an almost religious dedication to the status quo.
And both moves come when students across North
America are waking up to the fact it's now their turn for
a civil rights movement.
As American sociologist Paul Goodman has pointed
out, nobody bothers to stick their curious little noses
into the sex life, the legal drinking habits, or the bedtime
of a college-aged mechanic or office worker.
But except at perhaps two dozen progressive American campuses the idea that a student should be able to
relax with a drink — or with a member of the opposite
sex — in his private campus residence — is unthinkable.
And in Vancouver apparently even the idea that a
student undergraduate society should have the same
rights as the Oddfellows or the Cricket association is not
acceptable.
The student rights revolution started at Harvard,
and other Ivy League schools several years ago and is
spreading. It will happen at UBC too.
Perhaps that's why the bureaucrats — slowly, surely,
almost unconsciously — are grouping their reactionary
forces.
— D. S.
"IN LETTING YOU GO, we hope you understand that
we didn't appreciate your lectures on the development of
sex in the American novel, . . . uh . . . it's just that we had
hoped you might have made it a little less interesting."
Oh, really?
department
"We need good reporters
and we think you would find
reporting on the Berkeley
campus exciting and rewarding."
— part of an editorial
in The Daily  Californian,
student paper   of  UCB.
Feb., 1966
What is yellow, has six
sides, is a quarter-inch thick
and can be used either to test
the fit of a brassiere, as a
door hinge, a hair curler or a
component in an electrical
system?
Answer: the ordinary lead
pencil.
— press release from
Toronto's   Baker  Public
Relations Services Ltd., for
Venus Pencil Co. Ltd.,
Feb., 1966
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
'Calm tone, but those
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I should like to congratulate Mr. Mate on an extremely
well written article 'Viet Nam
Again'. I was particularly impressed by the Calm, reasonable tone which his article set.
Yet there 'is, in my opinion
one side that is less wrong or
more right, and that is the
South Vietnamese and the
Americans.
Mr. Mate disagrees, and he
has every right to do this. I
doubt he would enjoy this
freedom in Hanoi.
In one case the article
quotes a Canadian military
observor to the I.C.C. stating
that, and I quote, "there has
been no significant flow of
weapons or material from
the North."
I don't know when the remark was made, by whom,
when, or even if it was made.
What does come down the
Ho Chi Minh Trail anyway?
Messages of sympathy and
good tidings. I think not.
In another instance, Mr.
Mate quotes General Eisenhower as having stated in
1956 that, again quoting, "Ho
Chi Minh enjoyed the backing
of 80 per cent of the Vietnamese, North and South. "He
continues "there is no reason
to believe that this support
has since decreased." Come
now, this statement is just
plain foolishness.
Here is a man whom allegedly enjoyed considerable
support in 1956. He was at
that point a liberator — freeing his people from French
colonialism".
Since that time and with
the aid of the communist nations of Russia and; China he
has   actively   supported   the
RON QUIXOTE
BY RON RITER
USSR: No ads, no Pepsi generation
Citizens of North America,
the Union of Soviet Socialist
Republics must be invaded
and liberated at once.
This conclusion has been
forced upon
me by a startling, shocking
piece of intelligence I came
across when I
inadvertently stumbled into a
political science class the
other  day.
The lecture subject was
Russia, and while discussing
control of production and consumption, the professor let
slip this incredible fact:
There is no advertising in
Russia.
None. Nil. Zilch.
The professor, apparently
oblivious to the terrible implications of such a deprivation, explained with astound-
RITER
ing calm that, because production of Russian consumer
goods is state-controlled, there
is no competition and therefore no need of advertising.
No NEED of advertising.
Why, I said to myself, those
poor, backward, benighted,
underprivileged, heathen Communists.
The miserable, ignorant,
downtrodden, deprived, bloody
blighters, I said.
•      •      •
And I say to you, citizens,
they must be liberated.
A crash program must be
established to bring to those
poor, backward benighted, etc.
Russians the spiritual joys
and intellectual enlightenment
of advertising.
Can you imagine the plight
of Russian women who don't
KNOW that two shields are
better than one; that they
have a choice of junior, regular and super; that there's
also a Modern Way that's In
visible and Unfelt in Place?
And what about the men,
hot and sweaty after a hard
day down on the collective
farm?
• •      •
They haven't even HEARD
they should have before-shave,
during-shave, after shave lotion; spray, stick, powder and)
roll-on deodorant; cavity reducing, nice-to-ibe-near toothpaste for those who can't
brush after every meal.
And What about the youth
— misunderstood in any country. What about the pitiable
Russian youth?
• •      •
• Do you realize they are not
AWARE that to be popular
they need the blemish-control
cream that's invisible; skintight orange-label TJ's; beatle
t-shirts; uplift - spread - apart-
push-out brassieres and/or six-
week body-building courses;
a fridge-full of Pepsi?
How in the name of Marx
can they be part of the Pepsi
generation without Pepsi?
How can Russian women
catch a husband without
Maidenform, My Sin, My
Scent and Come On?
•      •      •
How can a Russian swain
go courting without some 007
in the leopard-skin shouder
holster uhdler his narrow-
lapel, button-down, beltless,
loopless, cuffless, collarless
Ricky Nelson wool worsted?
How can there be any transportation in a land that does
not have Tigers in its Tanks?
Citizens, this outrage must
not be condoned. The ad
man's burden must be taken
up.
It is our sworn moral duty
to start running things up the
flagpole and get those Russians saluting.
facts!'
overthrow of a regime (or
several) whose aims are not
friendly to those of Marx and
Lenin.
His forces which he frequently acknowledges are in
South Viet Nam, have invaded South Viet Nam to carry
on war with the people of
South Viet Nam.
Yet Mr. Mate still can see
no reason that this support
has decreased. Well, I can.
And I contend, so can hundreds of thousands of South
Vietnamese. And Thais. And
so can millions of citizens
from other nations.
PHIL LIND
Arts IV
'HITLER UNTEACHABLE'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to your article on Squires in your last
Wednesday's edition, I just
wanted to say that I was certainly glad to see that THE
game has arrived on our campus.
I used to play Squires in
Germany as a boy. It will be
interesting to see the Squires
tournament and compare the
ability of the UBC team to
some of the experts I have
seen in my homeland.
A point that may interest
you is that Hitler was rumored to have hired tutors to
teach him the game of Squires
which he was still unable to
master! A SQUIRES FAN
EDITOR: Tern Wayman
News   Ren Riter
Associate George Reamsbottom
Chy Al Donald
Photo Norm Betts
Sports Ed Clark
Ass't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City Danny Stoffman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing Ian Cameron
Features Mike Bolton
COP Don Hull
The Frosh wandered in and out
of the North Brock basement today and disrupted the hard working crew of Uby_(feey staffers.
Those who were disrupted were:
Pat Hrushowy, Bill Graf, Rosemary ' Hyman, Chris Crockburst.
Carol Wilson wrote the masthead,
Marilyn Hill typed 'tween classes.
Stu Gray sat on city desk for
a while, Bruce (Wheels) Benton
ran copy, Val Zuker walked in,
Denn's Gans, Powell Hargraves,
Kurt Hclger and Don Kidd took
pix, and Carol-Anne Baker, Kris
Emmont, and Doug Halverson
went to the council meeting. 'Al
Donald wrote his essay. THE ODDYSSEY
fade,
away
March  1, 1966
THE      ODDYSSEY
Phone CA 4-0419
Frosh capture campus
Takeover today
kicks off week
The banana republic conies to UBC
37  DEAD
DETRIMENTAL  DRESS'
Frosh firing squad strikes
Thirty-seven engineers were
shot in Brock Hall Sunday
evening.
The engineers, all dressed
in miscellaneous red costumes,
were assassinated for what a
spokesman for the Frosh
squad described as:
"Dress highly detrimental
to the morale and image of
an institution of higher learning."
The   Frosh   firing   squad,
dressed in academic gowns
and Oxford tweeds, absconded with the engineers as they
walked out of a class suspected to 'be Graduate Studies in
Poor Dress.
The engineers were herded
into interrogation centers
after their abduction.
Given the chance to throw
off the bonds of their iniquity
(i.e. poor taste dress) no less
■M^t'^^W^^^'^ff "V:f •:'      :
y
w^j
—   bruce   benton   photo
"I like the girl at check-out number three . . ."
than seven times, the engineers refused to reform and
Frosh were left no alternative other than execution.
Several victims pleaded for
mercy and finally removed
their horrible red jackets.
These were given handkerchiefs and were sent home to
their mothers.
Art Stevenson, EUS president, would accept no (blindfold and called for "union
through death."
As the shots rang out, a lone
voice whimpered, "Engineers
rue the world."
Interment will be in the
Engineering Oriface.
A fashion show in Brock,
when frosh take over campus.
With Betty Runcie as commentator, the fashion show featured both contemporary fashions from the centres of the
world and styles currently display on campus. A door prize
was offered.
March 1 sees a debate in
Theatre, "Resolved that students should be allowed to
park anywhere on campus."
OUVRY MODERATES
Sir Ouvry Roberts, traffic
czar, will moderate at noon in
Hebb Theatre.
Taking the negative will be
Art Stevenson and John Wheaton, with Ed Laval and Julian
Blake opposing.
The   Shantelles   play  for   a
soc-hop   and   pizza   party   in
Brock on Thursday, March 8.
PEPPERONI FLOW
Music swings and the pep-
peroni flows from 12:30 to 2:30.
Admission will be seventy-
five cents.
On Friday, March 4, Campus
Proper becomes the scene for
Frosh stunts and general hell
as first year students will attempt to move several of the
more prominent buildings on
campus.
Soon to be displaced are the
library, the engineering building, and Brock.
TAKEOVER FRIDAY
What they will leave in their
wake remains to be seen.
Friday we take over the
campus.
A campus-wide dance will be
held in the armories Saturday,
March 5.
The Shantelles alternate
with Don and the Goodtimes.
$1.75 gives you five hours of
fun, frolic, and you get stoned
at your own expense.
noon, today, started the week
Liaison group
takes pity on
1966 Frosh
Will wonders never cease?
Finally some bodies on this
campus are taking some interest in those poor souls who will
become  Frosh next year.
The "High School Liaison
Committee" is the title of this
group of benevolent beings.
The committee was formed
when the Education Action
Program dissolved. It operates
on an AMS budget.
The main aim is to give
those bubble-gummers some insight into the life on campus,
from a student's point of view.
"Information on university
life as given by high-school
counsellors is sketchy, especially in respect to housing,
course content, and social functions," said Derek Rendle, committee chairman.
Kim Campbell, publications
editor, said "High school students are completely mystified
by the university. Information
on fees and courses offered is
easily obtained, but more information on dress, social life
(which includes drinking), and
life in Residence is desired by
the high school students."
The program includes a one
hour informal talk given to the
students by a graduate of their
school.
The program should be successful because it has an opportunity to touch all of the 193
high schools in B.C.
FROSH  CONSENSUS
Executive a 'failure'
Consensus around the Frosh
office is that the executive and
the council are both failures.
Of the remaining members
from an original executive of
eight the disilusionment is
great, the sense of failure
greater.
John Kidder, treasurer who
recently resigned, said "I spent
so much time in the office pretending to do things."
Doug Day, recently resigned
as vice-president, was not available for comment.
John Wheaton has recently
called for the abolishion of his
seat on the AMS which means
that Frosh will be represented
nowhere next year.
Ann Bishop, publications of
ficer has stated that "My job
has called upon me to do nothing other than dole out editorships."
Men's sports, in the words of
Rick Gospel, the Athletic's rep.
has been "nothing short of a
farce."
Said a council representative, "the tea party that some
had the gall to call a council
meeting was very enlightening
... I guess."
Wheaton said, "With the exception of perhaps twenty people the Frosh office has been
known about, visited, used, and
inhabited by only the executive
and friends."
The total registration in first
year is approximately 3500.
Bob Cruise, this year's AMS
vice-president has stated that
the only way Frosh can deter
impending abolishion "is by
turning out in full force at the
spring general meeting of the
AMS
"This is a decision that has
faced; them every year since the
granting of undergraduate society status in 1961," added
Wheaton.
Abolishion of Frosh, coupled
with the fact that Arts Frosh
cannot vote in AUS elections
would mean that sixty per cent
of the students on this campus
will have no say in their governing for two years.
Sixty per cent of Frosh are
in Arts. Page 2
THE      ODDYSSEY
Tuesday, March  1,  1966
THE ODDYSSEY
"It is a pity indeed, that in this world there are so many
more horses asses than there are horses." — G.J.B.
Horses: Doug Bruce, Chris Brockhurst.
Horses Asses: Jim Moodie, Ann Bishop, Bruce Benton, Vic
Young, Arnold Saba, Norman Angus, Sybil Jenkins, Derick
Blackie, Patsy Anderson, Rosemary Barrett, Nancy Buchart,
Barb DuGas, Gerry Botto, Danny Francis, Julian Blake, and the
list of critics is endless . . .
Donkey: Ron Riter.
An Editorial
President John B. Macdonald has stated in a recent
talk with students that he has not the time to spend with
individual students studying individual problems.
And so who has the time ?
Nobody in the university faculty is in a position to
officially oT unofficially study and mediate disputes
between student and administration.
This would seem to reflect a great lack of foresight
Both alternatives are deplorable.
But both are definite indications of the great rift
which exists between governors and those governed
throughout  all  the  governmental   institutions   in  our
society.
We need a common meeting place; a common
ground; an unbiased representative to pull the hands
of both groups — student and governor — together.
We need what may be called an Ombudsman Board.
Perhaps seven people. Three faculty, three elected
student representatives, and one member of the Board
of Governors.
These chosen seven would meet frequently and regularly to hear the complaints of student and faculty
alike, would have definite advisory powers, and definite
access to actions toward implementing their decisions.
By these means impartiality would be brought to
students for the first time, and faculty would recognize
the existence of such problems as are. And a very necessary function of governing bodies would be served.
That of recourse by those governed to explanation,
definition, and reconsideration.
Take, for example, the present university parking
laws. An Ombudsman Board would have power to hear
complaints from students concerning the archaic laws
concerned and would act according to their judgments.
Into this organization would fall, eventually, such
obscure and sometimes farcical activities as the student
court, elections procedure, and, after a long, long time a
revamped individual faculty council structure.
Hand off the AMS ? . . . maybe.
In case ot fire
Bruce Benton
A voters plea
On Wednesday I approached a polling booth in
North Brock with every intention of voting for the
arts candidate of my choice.
I handed the girl manning the polling booth my
AMS card and waited patiently for my ballot. But it
was not forthcoming. Instead, I got my AMS card back.
I was then told that my patriotism was to be commended
but Frosh can't vote.
This situation bums me up, as this year 1,900
students will have no say as to who is to represent them
on council.
It seems to me that the Frosh are getting kicked
around pretty badly at this university.
Next year when the frosh come on campus it is
likely they will have no say as to who will represent
them.
What's more, if they are in arts, they will have no
voice in selecting their faculty representative for two
years.
First year science students can not only vote but,
if they wish, they can run for president of their faculty.
Even the first year aggies can vote.
It is too late to do anything this year. Don Wise
has been elected for us. Let's hope that the oldet, more
knowledgeable arts students have chosen a good leader
for us.
Give next year's frosh their vote, Don, please . . .
—Bruce Benton
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PRESENT SYSTEM   CONTROVERSIAL
A Frosh alternative
Earlier this year John Wea-
ton- president of the Frosh
Undergraduate Society, supported a motion in council
that could eventually lead to
the abolition of the F.U.S.
It  is   the   purpose   of  this
article  to view  the  strucure
and   activities   of   he   F.U.S.
and to state some alternatives
to the present system.
The F.U.S. council is composed of 98 members, each re-
presening one of the English
IOC sections. The executive is
elected by the frosh class
early in the year and consists
of a president, vice-president,
secretary, treasurer, men's
and women's sports representatives, executive member,
and special events chaireman.
There are, therefore, seven
voting members. The president does not possess a vote.
The whole council meets
whenever Wheaton feels it
necessary.
The F.U.S. receives $415
annua^y from the A.M.S. to
finance its Homecoming Float,
Frosh Queen advertisements,
dances, Frosh Week, publications, and numerous lesser
activities.
Several possibilities have
been advanced concerning the
structure of the F.U.S.
One is to elect a general
council o f representatives
from the English classes, as
at present, and to have them
elect an executive from
among themselves. Another
would have the council nominate a certain number of persons for each executive position to contest an election involving the whole Frosh class.
A third is to have an appointed committee, like the
Frosh Orientation Committee,
to handle the activities
throughout the year.
Finally, Wheaton advocates
the abolishing of F.U.S. in
any form. First year students
would then join the undergraduate society to which they
register. Students, according
to Wheaton, would benefit by
direct participation in the faculty to which they belong.
One's preference would depend on his interpretation of
the function of the F.U.S.
But no matter what system is adopted there will always be the difficulty that
first year students have not
been at the university sufficiently long to make many acquaintances.
When a student first arrives
at the university he is faced
with new surroundings and a
great change in his education
pattern and it may be that he
wishes to meet this experience
with the frosh.
Wheaton has described
frosh as having interests that
are far too varied to be amalgamated as a separate group
on council.
It is possible that being a
member of a distinct faculty
offers more chances to meet
those who have common interests.
The first three suggestions
for reorganization listed
above would meet with the
same difficulties encountered
by the present system.
It is, then, a choice between
the continuation of the latter
or he total abolishment of the
F.UvS. The decision will be
made at the general meeting
of the A.M.S. in March.
Flanders bar
In Flander's Bar the liquors flow
From out the bar-taps row on row;
The booze is cheap but the proof is high
Served in a twinkling of Fat Joe's eye.
Some alky hollers out "Old Crow!"
In Flander's Bar.
• • •
We are marked out. Short days ago
I jingled change; saw silver flow.
But now that Jew has all my dough
In Flander's Bar.
• • •
Take up our quarrel with Fat Joe.
To you, from drink numbed hands we throw
The bottle — be your's to hold it high
And chug-a-lug 'til day it nigh
In Flander's Bar. Tuesday, March  1,   1966
THE      ODDYSSEY
Page 3
$h  Q
TAKE UP JUDO'
A hikers rules
to avoid hitches
CAMPAIGN REVISITED: Frosh need a dependable leader . . .
QUEER
CLOTHES
Mad Mel offers rare raiment
By DERICK BLACKIE
Floral shirts, bell-bottoms,
double breasted leather shirts,
and "matching unmentionables."
These are just a few of the
neat clothes featured at the
Bad Boy's Ragge Shoppe.
The BBRS, which opened
less than four months ago is
now doing a booming business
with the "in-crowds."
Some of the wild clothes include polka-dot shirts, worn
with corduroy bell-bottoms;
velour shirts (with bell-bottom
sleeves), worn with colored
casuals; and floral shirts, worn
with the Bad Boy "Blunderbuss" pants.
The Bad Boy "Blunderbuss"
pants  are  an  iridescent  dress
pant with a slight taper or bell
bottoms.
If you want to wear a tie
you can choose from leathers,
florals or suedes.
They also have Batman
sweatshirts — no well-dressed
engineer should be without one.
The BBRS imports numerous
sweaters from Europe. Some
of these, like the large- turtle-
neck and Norwegian pullovers,
are selling great.
Brock types! The BBRS now
has a new shipment of Spanish
Wineskins. Get one and take
it to the Ball!
"Now . . . say this is the Ho Chi Minh trail, then
An interesting thing about
the BBRS as that they have
their own tailors and limit pro
duction of each item to about
a dozen.
Most of the styles come from
continental Europe and a few,
like the 'P' jacket, come from
the U.S.
The BBRS are now selling
exclusively to the over eighteen age group. Anyone under
eighteen can only shop with
privileged  membership.
The other owner Brian
Mann said, "We're restricting
the age limit to over eighteen
because some people, like
screamies and bubble-gummers,
just cannot wear high styles."
Now, if you happen to like
tha "gear look" the BBRS will
make you anything without (?)
reason. "Use your imagination"
is their favorite saying. For
example, they make leather,
seal skin, and calf skin suits
with traditional or double
breasted jackets (with brass
buttons). You can have your
choice of tapered or bell-bottom pants.
If you are a co-ed, and have
managed to stay with me this
far, you might want to soar in
and see the Bird Cage. The
Bird Cage is the latest addition
to the BBRS and it features
the "mod" look from Europe.
One of the items, called Bad
Boy "Skorts" come in cord,
leather, and fur. The amazing
thing about the skorts is that
they are only fourteen inches
long!
The skorts are worn with
panties (matching unmentionables).
Another hot item from the
Bird Cage is a Swedish knit
sweater which resembles the
"poor boy" look. These sweaters are worn with nothing (i.e.
no bra) underneath.
The BBRS also have other
novelties such as leather rings,
leather money-bags, jewelled
cuff-links, and cow-hide shoelaces.
And, if you should purchase
something, the money will be
dropped into — what else? —
a toilet bowl.
By ANITA NAESGAARD
A veteran hitchhiker has, for
your benefit, drawn up the following list of practical questions for fast, efficient transportation to and from the university:
(1) Put out your thumb the
minute you see a car approach.
This gives the driver more time
to feel guilty if he isn't going
to pick you up, and by the
time he reaches you he may
just say something like "Aw,
what the heck." — Psychology,
you know.
(2) Female Students: Dress
to advantage by wearing clinging sweaters, sexy hairdos,
etc., bearing in mind, of course,
discretion. Remember, your intention is to get to class.
(3) Male Students: Cultivate
a scholarly appearance, employing such devices as gold-
rimmed glasses, unruly hair,
and an air of consternation,
deprivation, and undernourishment. Motorists, particularly
businessmen, like to think they
are helping a genius. (Note:
you will know you performed
convincingly if, as you are
about to disembark, the driver
asks your name).
(4) Female Students (again?):
Hitchhiking   after   dark   pre
sents some difficulties. These,
however, are not insurmountable problems. The student
with initiative  will:
(a) Take up judo.
(b) Sit close to the door,
making sure you know which
handle opens  it.
(c) If the gentleman looks
sinister, too nice, or begins to
pant, or asks the same question
three times because he wasn't
l.stening, or rests his palm on
your knee, then you can be
sure his motives are not honorable and you should be ready
to bail out at the next corner.
(5) To avoid boredom while
waiting, play a little game,called "Will It Stop", keeping in
mind the following general
rules:
<a) '56  Plymouths  stop.
(b) '66 Plymouths don't stop.
(d) Mustangs (speaking of
cars) don't stop.
(e) Sports cars splattered
with mud  stop.
(f) Cars driven by women
and girls don't stop.
(g) Cars driven by businessmen and night school students
usually stop.
(h) Rolls Royces, as a general rule, don't stop, especially
if driven by a man in uniform.
«>
IF YOU DON'T get into the frats -
one group that will take anything.
never fear. There's Page 4
THE      ODDYSSEY
Tuesday, March  1,  1966
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ANN  MORTIFEE SAYS:
'My job is done
if people happier'
"If I can leave the audience happier than when I came
then I consider my job done."
And   with  this   simple   sen
tence, one of the most successful folk-singers that Vancouver has produced states her
aims toward life and people.
Ann Mortifee wanted to play
an instrument so, two years
ago, she picked up a $19 guitar
and "I haven't put it down
since."
A first-year arts student, Ann
came originally from Zululand
where her father owned a cane
plantation.
"One of my favorite tricks
for a restless audience is to
play my 'click' song. I learned
it from the cane workers and
it's kind of ballad punctuated
with irregular clicking noises
made with the tongue."
Her favorite type of song is
a "light air".
"I come to entertain the
audience, not make people consider their role in life.
"I won't sing a song that I
don't believe. Take, for example, the House of the Rising
Sun. I think it's a very exciting
piece of music but I will not
sing it because I don't believe
the words."
Her first professional appearance was with the Travellers.
Three at the Bunkhouse last
June. From there she went on
to appearances with Josh
White, offers with Bud and
Travis and single stints at coffee houses all over the mainland.
Ann sees singing as perhaps
not the goal for which she was
intended but as only a pointer
towards the larger field of service toward others.
"I may end my life as a
professional singer, but as long
ANN MORTIFEE
. . . frosh folksinger
as I am helping somebody else
I will not be unhappy and I
will not be wasted."
When asked about her academic life, Ann replied:
"I am really disappointed in
some of the courses. Perhaps
disillusioned is a better word.
My marks are second class —
nearly first, but I can't help
but feel that I'm losing or missing a lot.
"My aims have changed since
September, I now want to major in English.
"And I guess the greatest
impression is one of wasted
time. You know- toddle off to
Brock for coffee instead of to
the library for other reasons."
"My singing has helped me
to find a real meaning and a
personal fulfilment to life.
"Somebody once said that
there is a God-shaped vacuum
in everyone "and I fill mine
with the creation of happiness."
Engineers host world
to recruit the Frosh
Engineers host the world.
The mighty impregnable engineers changed their accepted
roles last Thursday and. played
nanny to anyone interested in
viewing their inner sanctum.
As it turned out, most of
those interested were Frosh.
After being ushered into Engineering 201 students were
given an opening address by
Art Stevenson, EUS president.
This was followed by a short
speech outlining the field of
engineering given by E. Teght-
soonian, associate professor of
metallurgy, the acting engineering dean.
Following this, Stevenson
once again took Over and informed all of the necessary
qualifications,   course  require-
A-mace-ing,
the way Frosh
get around
Anonymous Frosh strike
again.
Last Friday, amid the gasps
of all who watchedi, helpless, a
Frosti ran through play parliament and stole the Mace from
the hands of the inattentive
sergeant-at-arms.
It was quickly given to another Frosh waiting at the door.
He ran out of Brock screaming
"Freedom from Iniquity."
The thief and his accomplice, who held the doors, later
returned the Mace at a formal
presentation.
Said the unidentified thief,
"Maybe it will waken those
memibers who are asleep at the
back benches and get all parties working together."
"This is only a dry run for
Victoria next month."
The next target . . . "Ottawa
maybe."
ments, and generally, what is
needed to obtain the status of
engineer.
Having once entered the engineering faculty one has a
choice of specializing in any of
the branches of agricultural,
chemical, civil, geological, mineral, mineralogical, electrical,
mechanical, or metallurgical.
After the initial enlightenment, the students were divided into smaller groups with
two   engineers   leading
To the accompaniment of ear-
splitting noises of the mechanical division's steam turbine air
compressor, a computer making microscopic adjustments to
a wind-tunnel model jet was
viewed.
These were all scale models
with direct applications to the
real thing.
Students were next whisked
off to the geological section
where prehistoric creatures
were on exhibition in a museum setting.
At the mining department
the visitors dodged rock splinters as various rock crushers
performed.
At this stage all feet were
screaming for a halt to the
pedantics and all blessed the
guides for their presence.
"They were unusually polite
and constantly helpful in answering all of our questions,"
said a Frosh afterwards.
"It was an interesting tour
and to round it off we were entertained iby a 15-minute movie
on several amusing engineering
stunts."
This week, engineers are
again host to 650 high school
students.
Bubble-gum in the Froth
Flotation?
ROTTING   TIMBER   MINES
has openings for
GRADUATE CIVIL ENGINEERS
to replace present shoring in Berlin Tunnel.
Steady work and good pay. Permanent position. No experience necessary.
Interviews—Feb. 31 in Eng. 3206-9-1.
Associated Radio  SERV|CE Engineering
requires
Highly Organised   Laser   Experts
to lighten load
— Apply R. M. Bumstead, Manager Tuesday, March  1,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
RED BARON LETTER
\
Harmut offends
against security'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Due to the current controversy raging over the identity
of several aircraft shown in
recent issues of your newspaper, I feel that it is only fitting that at this time. I should
settle the question once and
for all.
•     •     •
The data quoted here is taken from issues of Flying Review International, a monthly
journal   of   aviation   reputed
for its accuracy.
Squadron Leader Feather-
stone-Smith obviously has
little knowledge of aviation
since he believes one could"
mistake an aircraft of the
Messerschmidt Bf 109 series
(which he incorrectly calls
a ME 106E —sorry, no such
aircraft Smithy, old chap —)
for a North American P-51
Mustang.
ZOOMING into sight are two of the many planes our confused letters have pegged as
the Red Baron's own. On the left is a Stearman N2S-5, a primary trainer of the Second
World War. On the right, a Fokker DF-1, in which our Baron Manfred von Richthofen
met his death.
NO DOGHOUSE DU-2, despite Pilot Officer Snoopy's
objections, this is a Gloster "Gladiator", only biplane used
in the last war.
Observation of the accompanying photographs will
prove my accusations.
• •      •
But even worse, he says
that the bi-plane pictured on
Feb. 24 was a Gloster Gladi
ator — Horrors — it is a
Stearman N2S-5 primary
trainer, built in large quantities during World War II by
Boeing as the United States
Army Air Force PT-17.
This is the same plane that
Skyway Air Services in
Langely tow their advertising
signs with. Observe how the
crudely drawn insignia obliterate the rear cockpit. Included photographs verify this
claim.
• •     •
Scienceman Mcintosh was
partially right in stating that
the Baron flew a triplane,
but it was a DR-1, not a DK-1.
He   also   flew the Albatross
(Dl and Dili) and the Fokker
DVH.
•      •      •
Finally,  does  Harmut Von
Richthofen   realize  that  it is
an offence against security for
a  serviceman in a  war zone
to disclose the name of his
unit. Think what Hanoi will
say!
MIGUEL de  CORRUPTA.
Air Marshall,
Air Force of Tristan de Cunna
COMING
SPECIAL EVENTS
Friday:
Tomasi: Fijian folk singer
Brock   —   Noon   —   25c
Saturday Night   —   Aud.
Paul Winter
Jazz Ensemble
Advance Tickets — AMS
Swiss Specialty Restaurant
Ufa William ^pU
722 Richards at Georgia
Excellent Service in 14th Century
Decor
5:30 p.m. to Midnight. Reservations:
MU 3-8810
2 min. from Queen Elizabeth Theatre
FULLY
SWISS CHEESE FONDUE -
AIR CONDITIONED   BEEF FONDUE BOURGUIGNONNE
We Honor American Express and Diner's Club Cards
SATURDAY, MARCH 5th
9 -1 in the Armouries
DANCE
Don & the Goodtimes
Kentish Steele & the Shcmtelle's
with A-Go-Go Girls
$1.50 Person Pago 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March  1, 1966
HOCKEY BIRDS DOWNED TWICE
Season ends, losingly
By JOHN RODENHIZER
UBC's hockey Thunderbirds
closed out the season on a losing note.
Birds dropped both ends of a
weekend doubleheader to
Notre Dame University Knights
from Nelson, 4-2 Friday and
8-3 Saturday at the Winter
Sports Centre.
Notre Dame, made up mostly
of  players  from  the  Western
International Hockey League,
Nelson Maple Leafs, completely outclassed the hosting squad
in both games.
Saturday, Knights scored six
of their eight goals while UBC
had at least one player in the
penalty box.
Shell-shocked goalie, Brian
Wallace, time and time again
was left at the mercy of the
deadly Notre Dame snipers be-
Rugby teams take
some, lose some
rugby
By DOUG MOSER
teams  enjoyed  mixed
UBC
weekend.
The Birds downed Oregon
State 14-6 at Wolfson field Saturday. In an earlier game at
Oregon State the teams had
drawn 3-3.
Birds dominated the first
half on a superlative effort by
the forwards.
They gave substitute scrum-
half Rod Halloway good protection and a good supply of
the ball from the lineouts and
set scrums.
When Oregon had possession
of the ball the covering of
Doug Patterson prevented the
Oregon team from developing
a scoring threat.
Birds backs were clearly superior on the offensive and
only a stern Oregon defense
kept them from scoring more.
All of the scoring took place
in the first half.
Next weeks the Birds face
the Vancouver All-Stars in McKechnie Cup competition. Although the Birds are considered underdogs, they could surprise.
The Braves were defeated at
Brockton Oval by the Rowing
Club 11-3.
Totems ran over Richmond
success   over the
G/Ma*M0'7£Mni
&<Ak>M>
DIAMOND       RINGS
LYRIC FR0M»10O
FIRBANKS
599  Seymour  -  Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
II 21-3 at Wolfson field.
Tomahawks were handled
their first defeat by ExBrits
12-3. Tomahawks and ExBrits
are now tied for first place in
the Dunbar Cup competition.
cause of a weak UBC defence.
When Birds played a man
short for five minutes in the
first period, because of a fighting penalty to Glen Richards,
the Nelson squad broke open a
2-1 lead with three goals.
Richards was also given a
match penalty for kicking
Knights' Glen Richards and has
been suspended.
Knights led 4-1 after one
period and 7-1 after the second.
• Murray Owens and Carl
Chwacka scored twice for
Notre Dame.
Mickey McDowell with two
f?oals and Dan Cumming scored!
for the Birds.
Friday, Notre Dame opened
scoring after 53 seconds of play
and never looked back.
Len Bousquet and Cumming
scored goals for UBC.
UBC loses Ken Ronalds,
Garry Morris and Al Merlo
through graduation tout still
have a nucleus for a strong
team next season.
Arts  election
ruled valid
The arts undergraduate
society has ruled its presidential election valid.
Arts president Ian McDougall said Monday no
candidate had disputed the
Wednesday election in which
Don Wise defeated opponents
Jim Cooke and Vic Hamm.
During the election, some
booths closed early and one
moved from the Angus building to Brock Hall.
POLKA DOT
'HOT DOTS'
. . Straight from1
Calif.  .   .   .   and'
9 A few extremely high
* collars  in polka-dot
#dress shirts from London.
If you can't fall  in, at least
m  spread the "Bad Word".
Bad Boys Ragge Shop
• 315 SEYMOUR*    •
(jetting tllarried?
Yours for the Asking . . . Our FREE
"Take Home" Invitation Album — mailed
to you or call at our store
Bride's books, albums, cake tops, place
cards and Thank You cards, are all
included in our Wedding Invitation Service.
™b card SHOP
Conn Robson and Burrard
MU 44011
RECRUITMENT SERVICES.
DOMTAR  LIMITED,
2100 Sun Life Building.
Montreal, Quebec.
Please send me your booklet containing complete information on current
career opportunities in Domtar Limited's wide range of operations.
NAME.
ADDRESS.
CITY/TOWN.
.PROVINCE.
MY FIELD IS.
The world's strongest coupon.
Fill it out and it opens doors:
Doors to a bright future with Domtar Limited, one
of Canada's most diversified and vital companies.
Domtar produces a world of products for a world of
people: pulp and paper, products for the home and
kitchen, building and construction materials, chemical products, and packaging.
University graduates in the engineering fields, in the
sciences, business administration, and in commerce
and finance will find ample opportunities within the
continually expanding Domtar organization. Dom-
tar's wide range of modern operations includes 121
plants, mills and laboratories from Victoria to Halifax,
with additional facilities in the United States, the
United Kingdom, Europe and the West Indies.
Talk to the Domtar representative when he visits
your campus. Send now for the booklet describing
Domtar career opportunities. Domtar today is on
the move. The doors are open to university graduates.
DOMTAR
DOMTAR LIMITED Tuesday, March 1,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— powell hargrave photo
TAKING IT on the ear, Rambler and  Engineer go down
in   intra-mural  soccer   noon   Monday.   Ramblers   finally
triumphed 1-0 in game held behind Memorial Gym.
Soccer Birds blow
first-place hopes
UBC Thunderbirds Saturday lost what chance they had
for a first-place finish in the Pacific Coast Soccer League.
Birds   were   beaten   3-1   by
Burnaby Villa at Varsity Stadium.
Dick Mosher, ending a long
personal scoring drought, gave
UBC a 1-0 lead but goals by
Ray Nosella, John Macleod and
Ian McKechnie shot down the
Birds.
It -was one of the poorest
played games at the stadium
this season, as the Birds seemed
to have trouble finding open
space and distributing the ball.
The game was marked by
roughness and often showed
signs of getting out of control.
Burnaby finished with only
ten players as playing coach
Kinnes Christie was given
marching orders late in the
game.
Captain Jim Berry was again
the best man for the Thunderbirds as he repeatedly carried
the play to the Villas, but was
unfortunate not to score one
goal.
The Birds start their drive
for a pdayoff position this Saturday when they host last-
place St. Andrews United at
2 p.m.
RECOUNTS AT WINNIPEG I
UBC track team
robbed   of title
By HAL ARMSTRONG
It took three counts of total points before Winnipeg's,
track and field officials were able to divest UBC  of its
national intercollegiate title during the weekend.
The UBC squad was declared
the overall winner of the second annual college all-star
track meet by one point, 54-
53, over Manitoba.
The day after the presentation when the squad was flying home, an error was detected.
Coach Lionel Pugh has submitted a letter of protest concerning the fiasco and the officiating generally, which augurs disaster for the up-coming
Pan-Am Games to be held in
Winnipeg next year.
The meet was fortunately redeemed by the performances
of the country's top college
athletes from 19 universities.
Ayfter UBC's swift men's relay teams had edged Manitoba
out of second place in both the
mile and four-by-one lap relays it was first conceded that
UBC had clinched the title
again after a second count.
UBC was robbed of valuable
points when two of the women's events were re-run because of 'confused' officiating.
By coincidence, Manitoba
won both events.
It did not deter UBC's Pat
Pinsent and Sam Vandermeu-
len from both taking first place
finishes.
Miss Pinsent, UBC's outstanding performer, took the
long and high jump titles, and
Vandermeulen registered 6'4"
to win the men's high jump.
In the fiercely competitive
600-yard, last year's champion
Brian MacLaren of North Dakota State out-kicked UBC's
Dave Aune to win in 1:13.3.
Sprinter Chip Barrett and
women's    shot    putter    Gaby
added   points    to
John Stark Presents—
Eugene O'Neill's
The Iceman Cometh
Nightly at 8 p.m. for Limited Engagement
KITS-LANO THEATRE   -   2114 W 4th Ave.
Tickets from Vancouver Ticket Centre or at the Box Office
"Exciting, absorbing, a theatrical event for Vancouver.''
—Jack Richards.
"A good production of a good play."—James Barber.
"Finest  direction  in  recent years."—Ben  Metcalf.
McMASTER   UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF  BUSINESS
Students who plan to undertake graduate study in Business Administration following
graduation are invited to consider the M.B.A. programme available at the School of
Business, McMaster University.
Admission is available to graduautes who hold a bachelors degree (any faculty) from
a recognized university.
The School offers liberal financial assistance in the form of scholarships, assistantships
and fellowships to students who show good academic promise.
For information brochure contact:
THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
McMASTER UNIVERSITY
HAMILTON, ONTARIO
Applications for admission in September of this year will 'be accepted for consideration
until August 15th. Those who wish to be considered for a financial award should
apply by July IS.
Moro    also
UBC's total.
At the meet's end UBC took
possession of the Golden Buffalo trophy, and pending an
investigation into the dispute,
will retain it for six months.
It was only as coach Lionel
Pugh was about to board the
plane home that meet director
Jim Daly informed him that
Manitoba had edged UBC 56-
52  on  a  recount.
LAST WEEK OF
SA
*E
AT
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th, Van.
Everything
Sale Priced
PHONE:
224-5858     -     224-9112
FOR SALE SHEET
U.B.C. Choral Society Presents
A
Festival
of Song
•
•
•
Frederic Wood Theatre — Friday, March 4
Tickets at the Door
Classical
Popular
Folk
Spiritual
8 p.m.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Finance Committee:
Applications are now being accepted for positions in
the Finance Committee.
1. Three Assistant Treasurers
2. One Member at large
Those possessing a wide knowledge of student activities and capable of assuming an interesting and
responsible office are especially urged to apply. Please
submit applications in writing to Box 53 by March 7,
1966.
Chairmen Needed:
Applications are  now  being  received for  chairmanship of the following committees:
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE.
FROSH ORIENTATION COMMITTEE.
INTRAMURALS COMMITTEE.
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE COMMITTEE.
COLLEGE SHOP MANAGER.
All applications shall be in writing and shall be addressed to the secretary (Box 54).
Eligibility forms must be submitted with applications.
Eligibility forms are available at the Secretary's office
(upstairs south Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m.-Thurs-
day, March 3rd, 1966.
World University Service Committee
World University Service Exchange Scholarships for
a year of study in Germany, Japan, Spain, Yugoslavia,
and the USSR are now open for applications. All students in second or higher years are eligible except for
the USSR, which requires graduate or graduating
students.
Further information on eligibility and terms of the
scholarships is available at the WUS office, Brock
Extension 257. Deadline for completed applications is
Wednesday, March 2, 1966.
CUS Seminar
Date: Wednesday, March 2
Place: International House
Time: 7:30 p.m. -10:30 p.m.
Topic: International Student Affairs
W.A.A. Elections:
Nominations are now open for the positions of President, Vice-president, Treasurer and Secretary.of ttie
Women's Athletic Association. Nominations will close
at 4:00 p.m. on March 7th, and elections will be held
on March 10th, in Bu. 100, at a general meeting
to which all women on campus are invited. Nominations may be submitted at the Women's Athletic
Directorate office in the Women's Gymnasium. Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March   1,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Czar directs debate
FROSH
Sir Ouvry Roberts, traffic
czar, moderates debate — Resolved: Parking should be allowed anywhere on campus.
Engineers vs. Frosh, noon,
Hebb Theatre.
CUS
Seminar on IUS and International student affairs in IH 7:30
p.m. Wednesday. Speaking will
be Ed LaValle, Peter Braund.
Gordon Galbraith, and Valery
Karavayev.
MATH CLUB
Dr. Kaempflu of the Physics
Dept. speaks on Propability in
Math. 229 noon Wednesday. No
lunches please.
VOC  PARKS  AND
RECREATION COMMITTEE
Mrs. Eadie of Alpine Outdoor Recreationail Resources
Ltd. will speak on Cypress
Bowl Development — a new
area to be developed on the
North Shore with 22 miles of
ski tows Thursday noon in
Ang. 415.
WUS
Dr.  Kassis speaks on Study
Abroad Thursday noon in Bu.
203.
NEWMAN CLUB
Dr. J. S. Conway will speak
on the topic Catholics and Nazis in the St. Mark's music
room at 7:30 today. Newman
campus mission takes place in
the St. Mark's Lounge at noon
all this week.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Dr. Zokol speaks at noon today in Bu. 204 on Small Town
Practices — all welcome.
NOON HOUR CONCERT
Shakespeare's The Phoenix
and The Turtle set to music by
Robert Turner for voice and
chamber orchestras, Bu. 106,
Wednesday noon.
EL CIRCULO
Spanish speaking day in IH.
Tickets   for  the   Spanish  play
available.  Coffee.
EUS
Engineering elections for 2nd
slate Thursday — VOTE!
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General meeting Wednesday
Bu.   1221.  Election  of  1966-67
officers. All attend, please!
PRE-MED SOC
General meeting noon Wednesday in Wes. 201. Elections
will   be    held.    All   members
please attend.
CHEERLEADING
CHEERLEAD!
Tryouts for '66-'67 teams Bu.
218 Monday noon, March 7.
INDOOR
FOREIGN STOCK CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday. March 5
J A cross between a demolition derby and a stock
car race —
I FINAL race of the season.
See a race car built in 15
minutes and then raced.
AGR0D0ME
I Time trials 7:30 Races 8:30
Adult $2.00 Student $1.25
Child under  12  FREE with Adult
ONTOLOGICAL  SOC
Divine   Dictatorship?   —   a
talk by Ron Pollack Wednesday noon in Bu. 221.
GRADUATE STUDENTS
Students'  Wives Association
monthly meeting Wednesday at
8 p.m. Speaker: Dr. Brummitt.
SEAFORTH   HIGHLANDERS
OF CANADA
Parade tonight at UBC Armouries at 7:30. Battledress. Recruits welcome.
FILM SOC
Great   Expectations   in   the
Aud. Thursday at 12:30,  3:30,
6:00 and 8:30. 50 cents.
ATMOSPHERIC  SCIENCES
Robert M. MacKenzie of the
staff B.C. Weather Office, Vancouver Airport, speaks at 3:45
p.m. in FG Rm. 101 on The
Frost and Wind Warning Service in the Okanagan.
FROSH
Come to tea at IH oh Thursday 3-5 p.m. All welcome.
IL CAFFE
Italian Day, Wednesday IH.
Lecture on the Greek colonies
in   Italy   by   Dr.   Rutter   from
Classics   department.   Noon.
PHOTO SALON
Showing of accepted color
slides for annual salon Bu. 104,
Wednesday noon. Black and
white display continues in main
lounge, Ed.  Bldg.   to  Friday.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days. $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST ONE PAIR OP BLACK
framed glasses. Please return to
Ubyssey publications office in
Brock  as   soon   as   possible.	
FOUND AT INTERNATIONAL
House some lime ago — a lady's
gold walcti. Enquire at International   House.
FOUND IN ANGUS 104 ON FRI-
day, black umbrella call Gary RE
8-7008.
Greetings
12
DEAR LYNN, FROM FORT CAMP
I send all my love. Thank you in
advance for making May i3 one
of the happiest days of my fife.
Remember 1 plus 1 equals 3. All
my   love,   Geoff.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSIJR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.   Phone  Ted   Elliott,   224-6X07.
THE "BANDITS". (LITTLE SAL-
ly Walker) are coming. Don't tell.
It's   a   big   secret!
HEAR THE BUREAUCRATS
speak out. On I.U.S., I.S.C. and
S.I.S.A. Mar. 2. 7:30 p.m. Wed.
at International House. Watch
them talk!
NOON HOUR DANCE. BROCK
Thursday. Dance to Kentish Steele
and  the Shantelles, 25c.	
DON AND THE GOODTIM.ES
will be in the armories with Kentish Steele and the Shantelles
Saturday, March 5. Don't miss the
biggest dance yet. Just $1.50 per
person,  9-1.
I SAW YOU STEAL MY UMBREL-
la from Ponderosa. Return same to
same place by Wednesday or I
will   inform   R.C.M.P.
THE GREAT SOUNDS OF THE
"Nocturnals" Friday night ' at
Totem Park 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a..m.
AMS  cards,  please.
STUDY FOR FINALS ! BUT HAVE
a ball first, the Pre-med Ball.
This Saturday at the Coach
House.   Only  $3.50   cpl.   at   A.Jt.S.
WINTER     KEPT     US     WARM,     A
film by D. Secter (U. of T.)
WINTER    KEPT    US   WARM.
ATTENTION: FOUR GIRLS AD-
mired by three e/ligible males last
Sat. in Snackery'll:30 - 12:15 p,m.
Call 224-5214. Rm. 322 for coffee
sometime.
Wanted
15
WANTED: ONE, THAT'S RIGHT,
one metal ski. 200 cm long. Bad
time on mid-term break. Phone
733-2669   after   6.
Travel Opportunities
16
:i WEEK CHARTER FLIGHT TO
London Aug. 24th to Sept. 14th,
$340. Faculty and students (and/
or parents, spouses, children, eligible). Phone WA 2-7931 or RE 8-
6996. Deadline for applications
Mar.    10th.
Automobiles For Sale
21
1966 TR 4-A. EXCELLENT COND.
Tonneau Gov. W.W.'s. Radio.
Must  sell.   Best  offer.   327-8692.
MUST SELL 1958 MGA CONVERT -
ible in good shape with excellent
transistor radio. What offers?
Phone  224-9957.   Ask  for  Randy.
'65 CORVAIR MONZA, 4 SPEED,
bucket seats, 110 h.p. 2 dr., h.t.
Call  254-3656  evenings.
SACRIFICE ! 1962 VOLKSWAGEN
de luxe. Radio, low mileage, excellent condition. Phone CA 4-5979
after 7.
Motorcycles
27
HONDA 90 IN GOOD CONDITION,
1966 plates, and new front tire.
Phil,   224-6381.
Orchestras
35
FREE WEEK END SKI LIFT
tickets and meals for 2 or 3 piece
Combo for dancing, cafeteria,
Whistler Mt. 2-3 hours each Sat.
and Sun. aft. Mrs. Beattie, phone
MU  4-9913.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,  263-4530.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING
thesis, essays, etc., on new IBM
Executive typewriter, phone 1.63-
4023.
WILL  DO   TYPING  IN   MY   HOME,
25c  page.   738-6829.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST, WEST
End, would like typing to do" at
home. Phone Mutual 3-5071 moaning   or   evening. *
TYPING 25c page or $1.95 hour West
End. 685-5539 eves. Campus pi'ek-
up and delivery, $1.00. '
EXPERT TYPIST, SPECIALIZING
in thesis term papers and. reports.
AM 1-4655.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUB53
with Its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening Work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after S p.m. Locations In Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West  Van.
PS:   New  outlet   now   open   close
to U.B.C.
TWO STUDENTS WANTED FOR
part time work now, and full time
during summer. Dflka include
maintenance work on apartments
& revenue houses and occasional
chauffering. Applicants must " be
reliable and of neat appearance. All
applications in writing. Send name,
adrlress & phone number and recent photo to Mr. Alexander, 1320
Comox,  Vancouver 5.
GREYHOUND LINES OF CANADA
is accepting Driver applications
for summer and holiday periods.
Good pay. Qualifications: Age 24-
35 inclus. Minimum 5'10", Maximum 6'2", 165 - 210 lbs., 20-20
vision without glasses. Must pass
Greyhound Physical examinatfon.
Applv in person VANCOUVER,
PENTICTON. or CACHE CREEK,
P.C.
Work Wanted
52
EXPERIENCED R. & B. BAND
wants dance jobs. Phone Rrjan.
AM    6-4260.
Miscellanous For Sale
71
FOR SALE: ELECTRIC GUITAR.
3 pick-ups, strap. Also amplifier.
Excellent condition. Phone George
224-9039.
Rooms
81
SINGLE ROOM FOR FEMALE
student. Share kitchen, bathroom
facilities with two other girls, $30
per month. Regulations, references. Lutheran Student Centre,
4608 W. 10th. Phone 224-3328.
Room & Board
•2
FRATERNITY HOUSE ROOM AND
board. Good food. Studious atmosphere.   CA   4-5006.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.        84
VACANT MARCH 1st — S.C. 2 B.R.
lower duplex. High fenced yard.
Child, pet accepted. Heat, stove,
frig.   incl.   874-2417.   In   Kitsilario.
ADVERTISEMENT
Questions and
Answers on
SUB
DECENTRALIZATION
Coffee facilities
fine SUB says
The chairman of the
Student Union Building
committee has come out
strongly in favor of decentralized lounges and
coffee facilities.
Roger McAfee, Law II,
said Monday that, there is
no reason to believe the
present plans for installing common room lounges
and coffee bar facilities in
some of the new building
complexes, such as engineering and forestry,
will in any way contradict
present SUB or AMS policies.
"There is no reason why
a student should have to
walk to SUB for a soft
seat or a coffee between
classes," McAfee said.
"The SUB committee
has always been in favor
of making sure new buildings have proper student
facilities, facilities which
will enable students to
operate  more   efficiently.
"The existence of these
small coffee facilities and
lounges in new buildings
will be an asset to the
union building program.
They will keep down the
load on the new cafeteria,
and snack bar, at peak
periods.
"Since the campus population will likely exceed
wCiat is programmed for
these smaller areas will be
of great benefit."
AMS president Byron
Hender agreed with McAfee.
"The plans to put small
lounges and coffee facilities in some of the new
buildings is an excellent
idea, one that the student
union building committee
has always ibeen in favor
of.
"This does not represent a Change in policy.
Indeed this policy has
been in existence since the
presidency of Malcolm
Scott, some three years
ago," Hender said.
"These smaller areas
will not have the major
facilities SUB has so there
is np question that the
groups having them will
not use the building. They
will not use it for casual
coffee between classes, but
that is only one small aspect of the new building,"
Hender said.
"Besides," Hender said,
"only a maximum of 2000
rtudents will be able to
make use of these facilities in the outlying buildings. And that's not a very
big percentage of a campus population of 22,500
which we will have in a
few years.
"■Besides, when the SUB
was planned the functions
of these outlying areas
was well-known and considered by the planning
committee."
QUESTIONS WE WANT!
The SUB committee is
looking for questions from
any student with a question
regarding the proposed facilities for the new building.
"Results from our plea for
questions have been rather
sparse," committee chairman Roger McAfee said
Monday.
"For our next questions
page, Friday, we have only
one question. All questions
must be signed and we
would appreciate a little less
obscenity. Unfortunately we
have received, unsigned,
three quite good questions
which, after being cleaned
up, would make interesting
reading. If those who wrote
them would care to re-submit them, signed and fit for
print, we'll be happy to
answer."
Public Meeting
Thursday Noon
SUB Office
Brock Hall
ADVERTISEMENT

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