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The Ubyssey Nov 30, 1962

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 *■-•
ANGRY UBYSSEY EDITORS QUIT
K. L. BRADBURY
. . . gone at last"
The Ubyssey editorial board
has resigned.
The 11-member board led by
news editor Mike Hunter and
city editor M. G. Valpy, walked
out a few minutes before the
Thursday  press deadline.
A statemer;: handed to student council said the editors
quit because of the incompetence and dictatorial practices
of editor-in-chief Keith Brad
bury.
"Bradbury's attitude has
mac's this paper a travesty of
harmonious relation s," the
statement said.
The majority of senior staff
reporters    resigned    with    the
board. Bradbury and a handful
of' junior reporters put out today's paper.
"In the three months we
have worked under Bradbury,"
said Hunter, "he has forced us
to cut lectures, fail courses and
miss meals.
*      •      •
"Often he keeps us at the
printers until 3 or 4 a.m.
"All iie does is relax in his
private ofiice with the editorial
assistant."
"I only wish we had left
sooner," said Valpy. "This is
intolerable."
Fred Fletcher, associate editor   and   a   former   editor-in-
chi.ef, complained that in his
day "it wasn't like this."
"We had editors who knew
something about journalism,"
Fletcher said. "They didn't sit
and watch the staff work —
the staff watched them work."
Denis Star-3y, managing editor, said Bradbury is a disgrace to the journalism profession.
"I've been at UBC a long
time, yet I've never seen an
editor as incompetent as this
one," he protested.
Bradbury is reported to have
laughed at their angry charges.
"I'm not incompetent—I'm a
Sun reporter," he said.
"I've had.my Ubyssey editorials reprinted in The Sun
and even in The Pacific Tribune.
"I don't really need the editorial board. I'm glad to see
them leave. There's been too
much friction here.
"I'll carry on alone — and
I'll put out as many issues as
I possibly can.
•      *      •
"I must emphasize the fact
that th.e students will not suffer because of the board's leaving."
Bradbury said all copy in fu-
(Continued on Page  2)
See STAFF QUITS
If Phil's
Chevy hits
you,
THE US YSSEY
you need
a Fiat
to sue
Vol. XLV, No. 34
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1962
* 20 PAGES
3 of 4
say UBC
abused
By   RICHARD   SIMEON
UBC gets a raw deal from the
present provincial government,
agreed three of the four speakers at an all party political
meeting Thursday.
But the Social Credit candidate in the Point Grey byelection, Mrs. 'Eve Bottwp-MiKer
thiriks the, government is doing
fine.
The  meeting  in  Brock  Halt,
sponsored by The Ubvssey, was
attended by 1,100 students.
HOLLAND EXPLODES
"The Social Credit government is not really interested ir.
education," se.id Antony Holland,   NDP   candidate.
"It is true that the Socreds
have increased their grants to
UBC, but we are getting leps
than Alberta, Saskatchewan
and Manitoba," he said.
"I hope Dr. Macdonald gives
the government a great bi^
shock in the near future," he
said, referring to the soon-to-
be-released president's report
on University finances.
JUNIOR  COLLEGES
To ease the financial burden
on out of town students Holland
suggested Junior Colleges
should be set up.
Tory Reg Atherton argued
that Junior Colleges miaht
solve future problems, but will
not help UBC today.
"It is now time to start tapping the resources of the vast
acreage of choice residential
property adjoining the University which could be leased and
provide huge revenues," he told
students.
"You students have the facilities, and the br&ins. Study the
matter and present a brief to
the government. It might force
them off their big, fat chesterfields."
Liberal Party Leader Ray Per-
rault, speaking in place of Liberal candidate Pat McGeer, trapped in Victoria 'waiting for the
provincial government ferry.
said UBC must; double its facilities by 1970.
■ ; ■• "The Liberal Party has
.spoken out in favor of Univer-
(Continued on Patje 2)
f-       Sees ALL CANDIDATE
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS officials placed several of these
giant disposal cans on campus when they heard The Ubyssey
was putting out 20 pages today. In the can are Nonna Weaver and Shannon Pigott, two nuts among the newspaper's
cashews.
Motherhood isn't
political armor
Eve Burns-Miller, Socred
fate of Socred candidates, was
didate meeting.
Speaking before a near capacity crowd of 1,100 students, the
diminutive, grey haired mother
was hissed and booed repeatedly.
Near the end of her speech
she pleaded to the assembled
crowd: 'Hush children, be quiet
a moment."
Then as she left for another
meeting at l:lo, she blew a kiss.
The audience laughed and hissed again.
NDP  entry   Tony   Holland,
candidate, suffering the usual
jeered* at Thursday's all-can-
pointed to the campaign tactics
of  his   Socred   adversaries.'.,
He held up samples of Socred
advertising purporting to be unpaid   testimonials.
One, telling of a business man
who votes Socred, featured the
president of the Point Grey Social Credit League, said Holland.
Another, showing a hard-hatted construction worker proved
to  be   a   vice-president  of   the
same organization, he charged.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: MOM
JBM
goes direct
to Senate
A faculty request to see Ae-Macd»«ia;;j*^b#t'J
submitted to the Senate has h^N^ turned i
An association meeting passed j
motion asking that Dr. ]
faculty members for discussion
before it goes to the Senate and
Governors.
"But I understand Dr. Macdonald feels committed to submit it to the Senate and Board
of Governors first," said association president C. E. Bourne.     |
Bourne said  tn.ere was  some I
anxiety among faculty members I'
that the report will be taken as |
University document.
PRESIDENT'S   OWN
"In fact ::.e report is strictly
the president's and not a University document," he said. "The
president himself has made that
clear."
But once the report is officially approved by the Senate,
Bourne continued, the public
might believe it has been sanctioned by the whole University.
He said the faculty did not.
want this.
He said the Faculty Association was working on a report of
its own believed to be "quite
similar."
The president's report will
deal with the financial needs of
the University and higher education in B.C. It is expected to
be publicized late next month.
Bourne has denied that faculty
members are trying to. unionize
themselves in the association.
He said the body was an "informal,   unincorporated   association of faculty members.
CHANNEL  FOR  VIEWS
"It provides a channel for the
faculty to put its views before
the administration."
Bourne said the association's
main role was as an informal
advisory board to the administration.
IS SANTA REAL?
See  Second  Section
THE UBYSSEY'S holiday gift to
zootogy    students    rs    AAwry
Chrjtfmo*, Arts Too. Lcut-0m
we gave the Engineers Christmas Carol. They liked Christmas GteM-ol.' We hope zoology
students like Mary. Mary
Christmas to all and to all a
good night.
Sager quits
as IH head
International House's head
has resigned.
Arthur Sager leaves the
University's employ today to
further his United Nations
career.
Sager, a UBC grad with wide
experience in international relations, has administered the
House for  the  past  year.
He was a driving force behind the formation of a United
Natipns training centre at UBC.
He said Thursday a UBC ad-
•ministration's decision last summer to kill the centre is coincidental with his  leaving.
(Continued on Page 2)
See: SAGER QUITS Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
ALL-CANDIDATE MEETING
MOM'   JEERED
(Continued from Page 1)
And a third showed a man
with his family. The man jusi
happened to be another Socred
vice-president, Holland told the
crowd.
. Conservative candidate, Reg
Atherton, looking every inch a
conservative in his dark suit
and light frame glasses, sugs.
gested that students not march
on Victoria. ■■'■
"You should use your heads
instead of your feet" he said.
A voice far back in the gal-'
leries shouted, "And follow
John?"
• Ray Pefrault speaking on be-
. -bajfii ai ^tranded   Pat   McGee^
received trie most applause.
• ■":*<WGe€Jeer-.-was;un&We to retam '"-
storm. ■■    -*     , . j  j
Perrault told of how he had!
been told to  have faith  in the!
"Pat McGeer had faith today
and look what happened, he
couldn't use the government
ferries because they weren't running," he said.
"Pat McGeer has learned
early in his political career not
to trust in the Socreds"
(Continued from Page I)
-ity    development    more    than
any other party,"  he claimed.
"B.C. is at the bottom when
it comes to per capita grants
io universities."
Liberals  advocate  board  and
ravel    grants    for    out-of-town
students,   he   said.   "Too   many
students are  living  off  campus,
we need added residences at a
' price  students can afford."
I     Mrs. Eve Burns-Miller, Socred
I candidate   told   laughing   students   to   look   at   the   government's   record.
"Ten years ago the grant was
only $2 million, today it is $11,
1250,000," she said. "B.C. is the
only province with a money
j for marks program, which so
many of you have benefited
from."
"The   university  has  never!
asked   for   funds  and   been  refused," she said. "But my heart!
is with you. I know you have j
problems.
Holland said the most important thing facing the government is unemployment. "Everyone must have the right to
work, however much education
he has,"  he said.
"There    are    87,000    people
dependent on social assistance
in B.C. This is a result of the
free enterprize system supported by the Liberals and Conservatives."
"Don't tell me there's no
work to de done.
Perrault attacked the Socreds
at   every  opportunity.
"The Socreds have a record
of abject failure in providing
vocational training for the 90
per cent of the population which
doesn't get to university.
"iney push through a debate
at two in the morning when
there c.re no men in the Press
Gallery to hear the government's  figures."
Mrs.   Burns-Miller   said   the
;■*. eseiit  s overnment  is the only
one  which  is  developing B.C.'^
natural   resources.
"Every    other    candidate    in
this   riding   is   useless, and   we
need   a   woman   sitting   on  the''
government  side  of the legislature."
$3-50
Per Tire
LET US CHANGE
YOUR SLACK OR SNOW
TIRES TO WHITEWALLS
1 HOUR SERVICE
$3.50
Per Tire
PRECISION WHITEWALL
OF VANCOUVER
Capacity only 12 cars per day, so
please phone for appointment-
REgent 8-4114
Social Credit government by the
Attorney  General.
SAGER
(Continued frorrt Page 1)
Sager is expecting confirm;
tion today or Saturday of a to
executive post with the Unite
Ne.tions.   i
Sager served his internatio:
al administration apprentice
ship on the Colombo Pla
drafting  committee.
He has long been a hars
eraie of Canada's foreign ai
program. • - '-.       .
A month ago on a nation-wid
broadcast, he ridiculed Car
ada's international role. Eac
Canadian, he said, spends th
equivf.1ent of a case of beer
year  on  his  fellow  man.
* *      it
ii
STAFF
(Continued front Page 1)
ture will be written by himsel
and the few reporters whi
stuck with him.
This is the first time in thi
history of The Ubyssey that ai
entire staff has resigned.
Editors have sometimes beer
fired, and sometimes the?
balked—but th.ey have neve:
before quit.
Don Hume, photography ed
itor, said the board may con
sider returning in January.
naturally
vested...
Be a step ahead on campus
in a vested suit of orlon and
wool worsted,
traditional styling
 69.95
TUXEDO, new, best imported
material, tailor made, midnite
blue, size 38, $50.
Please phone WA 2-4666.
Select your new suit from
the collection of "up to the
minute" styles available in
'the style shop" at
Woodward's Oakridge Friday, November 30, 49*62
THE-     U B Y S S E Y
Page 3
Ubyssey does it again
They mailed early
(The fearless Ubyssey staff,
the most complete news
gathering organization west
of Blanca Street, has done ii
again. We've pilfered the
mails io bring you, the readers, these exclusive gift lists
of the people that are making
the news. —The Editors)
Dear Santa:
A   big nasty  man told me
'Space plan'
on tonight
Sir Ouvry - Robert's new
parking plans go into effect tonight
The new parking plans feature:
• Certain areas of parking
lots now reserved for faculy
and staff will be opened to the
public at night. Those sections
still reserved for faculty and
staff will be clearly marked.
• New areas will be added
behind the Field House, Brock
Hall and 'G' Huts as night pay
lots.
• All other areas designated
for parking will be for use of
the public and students without
charge.
The new night parking regulations will be in effect Monday
through Friday from 5:30 p.m.
to  7:30 a.m.
On weekends, the regulations will be in effect from
12:30 p.m. Saturday until 7:30
a.m. Monday.
there   was   no   Santa   and   he i
took my missiles away.
I still believe in you, Santa.
I    believe    in    anything    red.
Please send me some missiles.
Adeste Fidel.
)£      >&      Cf,
Dear Santa:
Please send us some presents
at Christmas. At least we still
believe in that.
A.  Stroll and
P. Remnant.
#    #    #
Dear St. Nick:
I was going to ask for Drs.
Remnant and Stroll, but 1
won't need to now. They're
coming anyway.
Your friend,
Old Nick.
Dear Santov:
Please send me another
U-2. I haven't had any fun
lately.
Nick K.
V        T        T
Dear Santa:
Send money stop New York
has none stop people out here
getting suspicious stop
Cecil B.
#     *
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs — Inspections
BA Service Station
CA 4-7644
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
HOUSING
Antony Holland is
opposed to the eviction of students from
suites in the Point
Grey area until other
suitable accommodation is provided near
the University.
ON DEC. 17 - VOTE
HOLLAND, Antony I  x
Point   Grey    New    Democratic    Party
TV—Waich Channel 8 Thurs.. Dec. 6 and Friday, Dec. 7, 6:20 p.m.
Committee Rooms :3308 Dunbar St., Phone 736-5112
and Hillcrest Hall, 4360 Main St., Phone 876-6322.
Dear Cecil:
How   about    some    money.
We're getting suspicious.
UBC.
v       v       v
Dear Santa:
You know what I want.
Irving  Layton.
•fi       rp       *p
Dear Mr.  Claus:
I wonder if you could
smuggle me a nice box of
cigars. Present sources dried
up.
• JFK
*V       *V       •!•
Dear Santa  Claus:
Do you think you could
sneak an Impala past the boss?
Sincerely,
Phil.
What a
REFRESHING
NEW
FEELING
•.. what a special zing you get from Coke.
it's do-se-do and away we go for the cold
crisp taste and lively lift of Coca-Cola!
Mi for "&>W w "eoea-Ceb"-^ trade-narks mm tht pfwM
«iC««-CaUU4.-tt«*WU'*bm-l«»«4tc>«Uint*iaiL
Employment   Opportunities
with
Socony   Mobil  Oil  of  Canddd, Ltd,
COMPANY   REPRESENTATIVES   WILL   HOLD   CAREER   INTERVIEWS   ON   THE   CAMPUS   WITH
GRADUATES, SENIOR AND JUNIOR YEAR STUDENTS INTERESTED  IN
Geology
7Srf?opnysics
Petroleum and Production Engineering
January  10, 11,  12
There   are   openings   for    regular   and    summer   employment.
Company literature is available at the campus placement office
where arrangements for interviews may be made.
Mobil Page 4
T HE      U BYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
Editorials
•MMMMMt-MM«MM»MMBiMMMlMBM»*MMMHaMia<
Have a very, merry Xmas
Merry Xmas.
Metry Godless, unchristian Xmas.
Merry busy, profitable, commercial Xmas.	
Merry   parking,  drunking,   unthinking Xmas.
Merry studying, writing, holidaying Xmas.
Merry gift-getting, selfish, dollars
and cents Xmas.
Merry liquor-store Xmas.
Merry cold-war, murderous, tense
Xmas.
Merry American, Kennedy-Gold-
water, brinkmanship Xmas.
Merry Russian, Khrushchev, East
Berlin Xmas.
Merry Third World War Xmas.
Merry poor, welfare. Empty Stocking Fund Xmas.
Merry striking, fighting, picketing
Xmas.
Merry intellectual, no-God, philosophical Xmas.
Merry political, lying, untruthful
Xmas.
Merry Madison Ave., advertising,
image-building Xmas.
Merry phoney Xmas.
Merry moralized Xmas.
Merry CHRISTmas.
A f
e w specia I wishes
The Ubyssey wishes the best of the season
to:
• the UBC Rowers. May they get a welcome back.
• the Point Grey politicians. May they
continue to split hairs.
• to all student councillors who thrnk for
themselves. AU three or four of them.
• all Social Creditors who feel that UBC
should have more money. May they influence
Bennett.
• to all students who walk from the end
of C-Lot. May the New Year bring less rain
and snow.
• the Greek letter societies. May the
DU's and others not mar your name.
• to MAC. May their budget be controlled.
• to Real Caouette and followers. May
the Liberals eat them up in the next election.
• to  all Faculty members  who  set  easy
Christmas  exams   and  all   the   students  who
flunk them anyway.
• to all the Undergraduate Societies. May
their spirit be shown in their studies.
• to all crub PRO's. May they learn to
print  intelligibly.
• A. Pathy. May he always be barred
from the-campus.
• all those who want- a pub on campus.
May they not get speeding tickets in the rush
to the city pubs.
• "to the SUB committee. May they not be
railroaded into giving the future students a
pipe   dream.
• to James Meredith. May he make Ole
Miss' Christmas black.
• to the advertisers. They are responsible
for this huge edition.
• to The Ubyssey Staff. The editor hopes
they pass their Christmas exams and come
back to add new fire to the paper.
Indagatio
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of the Editor-in-Chief of The Ubyssey and not necessarily thosa
of the Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3242.
Locals:  Editor—25;  News^—23;  Photography—24.
Member Canadian University Press
Editor-in-chief:   Keith   Bradbury
Managing Editor .... Keith Bradbury
Associate Editor K. L. Bradbury
News Editor Lyall Bradbury
City Editor  Bradbury Jones
Picture Editor Flash Bradbury
Layout Editor Inky Fingers Bradbury
Sports Editor  Scoop Bradbury
Features Editor Jones  Bradbury
CUP Editor Chester Bradbury
Editorial,Assistant Bradbury's friend
Critics Editor           Bradbury Brown
Layout: K. Bradbury
REPORTERS: Keith Bradbury and a few close friends.
SPORTS: Keith Bradbury and a few close friends.
TECHNICAL: Keith Bradbury and a few close friends.
Letters to the Editor
Invitation
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I am writing in response to
your editorial in The Ubyssey
of November 27, inviting
"professional B i b 1 e-spouting
theologians" to participate in
open discussion. Though I hope
I do not qualify under your
title, I would be glad to take
part in discussion through
your pages.
•      •      •
Having issued your editorial invitation, I hope you will
be prepared to back it up by
providing a forum in the pages
of The Ubyssey, where issues
of religious belief can be debated openly, honestly and
courteously. As you suggest in
your editorial, it is important
that this discussion reach as
many students as possible.
There is no better way of
achieving this than through
the pages of The Ubyssey. I
would therefore suggest that
you set aside a certain amount
of space in half-a-dozen issues
for this purpose, determine
the length of statement you
will publish, invite contributions   representing   various
Thumbnail sketches —on driver types
By TONY BUZAN
Thumbing gives me a lift.
As the long wait on the sidewalk  can   become   boring,   I •
often play a couple of games
with the passing cars in order
to  keep  me  amused.
The first of these is called
"arm. robbery." With my arm
carefully crooked in the thumbing position, I wait for someone to make an attempt at hitting it. If he hits me then he
wins, but if he misses he loses,
and there is no arm done.
•      •      *
The second game is called
"puddle-spray dodging." Here
the car directs itself away from
the puddle by which I ' am
standing, but at the last minute swerves into the middle of
it and tries to drown me before I can run. As the car passes, some smart-aleck usually
makes a comment like "Hey
cheapskate! thumb thing
wronk?"
But I do eventually get a
ride,   and  I  find  myself with
one of a variety of driver-types.
Some of them have the car
radio on loud, and they turn
it up louder when I get in.
And when I say "thanks" they
turn it up louder, and when
I say "what are you taking
at UBC?" they turn it up.
still louder. And then when
I cough they turn the damned
thing up so loud that everyone gives us a queer look as
we thunder through the night,
and I end up feeling like some
kind ,of nut.
And others are the taciturn
type without a radio, and
when I say "thanks," they nod,
and when I say "going far?"
they say "yup," and when I
say "what are you doing at
UBC?" they say "flunking
out," so I say "oh, heh heh"
and clam up.
*. * *
And others immediately start
a conversation and ask me how
come Russia had missile bases
in Cuba as if I were Khrushchev,  and. we get into a   big-
argument about international
affairs and when I get out I
don't say thanks and he tells
me not to slam the door but
I do anyway. /
•      •      •       /  '
And then there is .the vo-
cabularian. I say something
like "thanks—crappy weather
isn't it?" and he says "I can
see that the present meteorological conditions are not conducive to elation, but I fail
to see any correlation between
inclemency and biological ex-
cretia." At which point I mutter something about Hell, and
spend the rest of the trip listening to a sermon on the Kingdom of Beelzebub.
Or else there is the nervous
type who has picked me up
because he is lonely, and he is
a poor driver anyway and he
keeps saying "God those bastards are crummy drivers" as
he almost runs down pedestrians and other sundry objects,-
But sometimes I get pickeu
up with a bunch of other guys,
and this is the most interesting
of all.
Everyone piles ino the car
saying "thanks," and "how far
do you go?" and so on, but
then they run out of things to
say and they don't know anyone else in the car and the presence of numbers makes them
shy so they all sit around saying nothing and each one is
wishing that someone else
would say something but none
does, so some of them start to
hum a little and some of them
pretend to be tired and close
their eyes so that they can't
see anyone else looking at them
and waiting for them to say
something but finally the silence is broken because the
door slams when they leave.
•      •      *
But there are still some
people who can't see why I
thumb. I guess I don't really
know myself — something just
drives me to it.
viewpoints, and then publish
the statements, if they are
within the required length,
without editorial cutting or
revision.
If you will sponsor a serious
debate like this, free from unnecessary name-calling, you
will be making a very construe t i v e contribution, in
which I and my colleagues
will be most happy to participate.
In response to your editorial,
I would like to make two further  very  brief comments.
(1) I do not understand your
suggestion that Christians
have not had the courage to
express their faith publicly.
If you will check the list of
meetings held by student societies this autumn, you will,
I think, find that the number
of meetings in which positive
studies of Christian faith have
been presented considerably
outnumber the meetings attacking Christian views. 1
thought your journal would
be aware of this.
•      *      •
(2) We believe firmly in
the right of a professor to express his views freely when
invited to speak to a student
society. As a consequence, we
feel it would be a breach of
professional courtesy if we
were to comment hastily, in
a sentence or so, on what
seem to be controversial statements made by a colleague, of
which we have learned only
through necessarily abbreviated press reports. We feel that
freedom of speech is better preserved by reserving comment
till we can be more sure of being fair.
I   hope.   Sir,   that   you  will
serve   the    whole    University
community  by  sponsoring  the
type of discussion which I have
suggested through your pages.
Yours   truly,
W. S. TAYLOR,
Union  College.
Correction
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Without impugning your
quality in the slightest, but in
deference to the quantity of
my mother, what I actually
said was "What if the other
were my  mother?"
Yours truly,
C. W. J.  ELIOT. Friday, November 30, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
£8^&SS^&ws«^^&Ss6;S*
Letters to the editor
Smug
*"   Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I would like to protest the
arrogance with which you have
treated Miss Webb in the modern art controversy. Your dis-
>■ > agreeing with her is understandable: you don't know
much about art. But your treating her as a kookie poet is un-
„ excusable, if only because it
is an escape from meeting honestly the charge she brought.
Like Life magazine lecturing
American   novelists   t o   write
- "positive" novels about business, you assume a superiority
of insight to the mere artist.
To be specific, your assumption that only one child could
- have climbed on the statue is
logically untenable. Worse, it
allows you to take refuge in
smugness and condescension.
]|ut the key question remains:
Do children show more understanding of modern art than
rarejudiced university students?
3?he answer is YES.
At the Seattle Fair a nine-
' Sear-old heard adults mouthing
the usual stereotypes against
an abstract nearby. With no
coyness or journalistic holier-
than-thou, she exclaimed that
*" they were wrong, the color and
texture made the painting alive.
(She is no relation to me, but
I can introduce you to her parents, should you feel the need
to verify^ the accuracy, of my
report.)
Yes, this girl had been in an
art class. She had learned from
it not that art must say or represent something but the obvious point that it may give
simple visual pleasure. But we
important intellectuals know
better than that, don't we Mr.
Editor.
Yours   truly,
N.  D.  PLOOM
Editors note: Our treatment
*     of Miss Webb may be inexcusable. But  the  use  of  unexcus-
able   by   the   writer   is  also
inexcusable.
Academic freedom?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
In the light of the present
religious controversy at UBC
I would like to ask a question.
It came as a surprise to me
to learn that the teaching of
theology as a regular part of
the curriculum is expressly forbidden by the constitution of
our university. As a result, we
have all noticed how religion
has become the Departments
of English, Anthropology, Psychology, Sociology and Philosophy. Since God cannot be
defined or defended in our
classrooms by theologians, we
cannot expect competence in
this area.
But of equal importance,
what has happened to academic
freedom?
This university forbids the
teaching of theology. Is it not
time for the administration to
consider whether or not this
violates academic freedom? If
theologians were permitted to
teach at this university, we
would undoubtedly have a
more competent discussion of
the Bible and the nature of
God.
Yours   truly,
JOAN RIPLEY,
' Arts   3.
Mistaken
Editor,
The   Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
Your editorial of November
27 takes the view which I have
not so far held, that it would
be appropriate for academic
people of Christian persuasion
to make some sort of reply to
the recent addresses given to
the Philosophy Association,
and widely reported. I believe
you are mistaken in supposing
that the attitude of "No comment", which has also been my
own, proceeds from smugness.
I personally unhesitatingly
agree with Dr. Stroll that Dr.
Remnant, (and he himself), are
entirely free to express their
religious convictions on campus. Nothing can be more objectionable than the attitude
revealed by some so-called
Christians in the correspondence columns of the local press.
.In refusing comment to the
press, I had in mind not only
the danger, alluded to by Dr.
Stroll himself, of having a complex position distorted in a
very brief report, but the possibility that any expression of
disagreement might be taken
as encouragement to those who
would limit academic freedom.
You should be reminded that
Dr. Remnant and Dr. Stroll
spoke, not in the academic forum itself, but by invitation of
the students at a meeting of
a student club. It is the privilege of students to invite whom
they wish to speak to them. If
they want to hear a different
point of view, it is for them
to issue the invitation to speak
in the same series, and not for
faculty people to demand the
right of reply.
On the other hand, you can
hardly expect those who think,
differently to express their
views in a two-sentence epigram.
Dr. Stroll, in addition to expressing his personal convictions, touched on academic matters, apparently with considerable competence and fairness,
in view of his lack of professional qualification, to which
I understand he drew attention,
in the field of Christian origins.
Inevitably a person who is
so qualified would wish to modify Dr. Stroll's conclusions at
many points, on the basis of
more recent, and in some cases
more authoritative scholarship
than Dr. Stroll had at his disposal. Students interested in
such matters have the opportunity of going into them more
deeply in the appropriate
courses in this Department,
where these matters are dealt
with academically, and not as
a form of apologetics, whether
Christian  or anti-Christian.
Finally, Sir, it may be fun
for you to have us attack our
friends in public, but it isn't
fun for us.
Yours  truly,
WILLIAM NICHOLLS,
Professor, Department
of Religious Studies.
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for
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MARKETING
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on
January 7, $, 9 and 10
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from the U.B.C. Placement Office
This is an unpaid testimonial. Name: supplu d on lequesi.
I like Eve Burns-Miller
... and I'll tell you why
"As a businessman, I feel that the economic future of B.C. is one of the most
vital issues facing us today. When I see
what Social Credit has done to introduce
new industries, expand hydro projects and
increase public works, I feel very optimistic about the years ahead. All these
projects mean employment and that
means a more prosperous province and a
better future for all of us. We have tan
gible proof that Social Credit is the
government that gets things done. I want
to see strong Social Credit representation
in Point Grey and I know that Mrs. Burns-
Miller is just the person to complete the
team. Her past record is outstanding and
she's willing to work and work hard to
keep B.C. moving ahead* That's why I'm
going to cast my vote for Eye Burns-Miller
and Sociai Credit."   ■• -
Issued and paid hr by the British Columbia Sochi Credit league
iiBfci,: ?^tjti@^
S Q'^fej^^^ Page  6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, Nvember 30,  1962
Cars slide to halt
under snow blanket
Pedestrians without rubbers and   cars without snow tires
slid to a halt Thursday as an unexpected snowstorm hit the
campus.
THE TALE of Mary is not hard to tell as long as you get the
right pieces in the right place. Mary can fool even the very
best of the connoisseurs of the female frame.
The sloppy conditions stalled
cars along Chancellor and University Boulevards all day. Few
drivers got home for dinner.
High winds downed a power
line on Chancellor and blocked
traffic for several hours. Traffic
along Marine Drive was halted
until a fallen tree could be removed.
RCMP reported a rash of
minor accidents, but there were
no injuries.
Buildings and Grounds department was kept busy helping
cars out of slippery parking lots.
And as students splashed into
Brock, most were complaining,
"But I only wore my high heels."
At 5 p.m. traffic was running
smoothly on all roads except
Chanceljor. RCMP did not know
when it would be opened.
The worst snarl occurred dur-
'ng the rush between 3 and 4
p.m., police reported. Many students tried to leave early, but
ended up sitting in their fogged-
iip cars for hours waiting for
traffic to move.
Entrances to the library were
almost as wet as outside as stu
dents took shelter from the
storm.
High winds made conditions
even worse, especially for people with classes in different
buildings. Some didn't try to
make it.
The only people who were
happy were the umbrella vendors.
EOOM   &   BOARD
4Sth Ave. & Granville
yovely home, excellent food, private transportation, available,
aiale, ncn-smcSer, available Sec.
1.  V.ith  lunches,  $70.  AM   6-4675.
TUXEDO
RENTAL  &  SALES
TO   CHOOSE  FROM
O  rull Dress
• Morning; Coats
9  Directors'  Coats
• White & Blue Coats
0   Shirts & Accessories
• 10%   Discount
To UBC Students
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623   HOWE MU   3-2457
When classes end,
cramming  starts
Classes will come to a smashing finale Saturday, Dec. 8,
for all faculties except medicine and law.
Exams will run from Monday, Dec. 10 to Friday, Dec.
21.
Students wishing to study
during the holidays. will have
access to the library, Buchanan and Brock Hall. These
buildings will remain open at
usual times during the holidays.
Second term begins Monday, Jan. 7, with term fees due
that day.
West Point Grey
Baptist   Church
llth and Sasamat
9:45 "a.m All  ages  Church
School.
11:00 a.m.—"THE BLOWING
of HOLY BREATH"
and "THE KINDLING
ot  the  HOLY  FIRE."
7:30    p.m "THE    FOURTH
MAN TN THE FCRE."
The inierim minister is
Dr. J. A. Johnson, BA,
BD, minister emeritus
of Wesimouni, Montreal, near the McGill
campus.
8:45 p.m.—The Young People meet in the Watson
Room. All University
students are cordially
invited lo this vital
Church fellowship.
Dark continent
calls students
A summer in Africa could be
yours next year if you act now.
Crossroads Africa is offering
a non-religious program whereby two students from UBC will
be able to work, study and travel
in all parts of Africa from June
to August.
This, annual proposition offers the equivalent of two $1,800
scholarships to the participants.
Further information may be
obtaineJ from Cltff Garrard,
RE €-9946. Interested persons
are advised to get application
forms from the Student Christian Movement hut on the East
Mall before the end of lectures.
Ridge Theatre
3131 Arbutus RE 8-6311
Student Rates
The Hilarious Peter Sellers in
ONLY TWO CAN PLAY
(Adult Ent. Only)
plus the
Drama Critics Award Play
FIVE FINGER EXERCISE
Rosalind Russell and
Maximillian Schell
ONE COMPLETE PROGRAM
ONLY 7:30
THEATRE RENTED
MONDAY & TUESDAY
Starts Wednesday
Audrey Hepburn and
George Peppard
BREAKFAST AT
TIFFANY'S
Color, plus
The Best of British Comedy •
RAISING THE WIND
Color
James R. Justice/Paul Massie
■*
AT HER
Give Vancouver an EXPERIENCED voice in the
legislature . . . elect the one man with the proven
ability to stand up and fight for YOUR interests.
Reg Atherton's long and distinguished record of
public service means effective representation on
ALL issues . . . twice elected to City Council, the
second time with the highest vote in recent years
. . . twice elected to the School Board, being
Chairman in his final year, Reg Atherton has earned
overwhelming support for his integrity and wide
knowledge, and now qualifies unquestionably as
the man for the job in Point Grey Elect Reg
Atherton on December 17th!
Published   by  Reg  Atherton  Campaign  Committee
ible," Friday, November 30, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
DRIFT Words
Bv MIKE GRENBY
'Christmas," the Mad Hatter,
said, "is all in the imagination."
"Imagine that!" said Tweedl-
jdee.
Alice tried but found it rather
difficult.   She   and   the   others
were gathered outside the rab-
- ^bit's house wondering why and
what about  Christmas.
"The point is," the Mad Hatter went on, "no one with any
sense   would   take  the   trouble
""'even  to   discuss   the   subject,
let alone define it."
'Aha!" said Winnie-the-Pooh,
only he didn't stay very long;
.he   had  dropped   in from   another book to see if there were
any heffalumps in Wonderland.
if Alice had spoken aloud. "If
i too many people tried to take
it seriously the results would be
disastrous."
'Explain   yourself,"   ordered
the Mad Hatter and poked the
Dormouse   who   muttered,   "Ex
plain    yourself,    explain   your
self,"   over  and   over   until  the
Hatter poked it again.
"How can it when it's beginning to disappear?" said
Tweedledee in a hurt tone of
voice, and true enough, the
Cheshire Cat was slowly fading away.
"Just keep smiling," said the
Cheshire Cat,  and then  only a
grin was left.
Ignoring P o o h ' s comment,
the Mad Hatter was just about
'to    continue   when    a    teapot
floated by.
He caught it by its spout and
put it on the ground. I
—•    "Now any spirit;" he began,
"should ..."
"Off with its head!" squeaked
the Dormouse, quite suddenly
popping out of the teapot.
" "That's not your line," shouted the Mad Hatter and promptly poured a glass of water on
the Dormouse.
Alice started  to protest  but
thought better of the  idea  and
kept her mouth shut.
In  the  meantime  Tweedledee had fallen asleep with his
shoulder resting on the rabbit
who  was busily  trying  to put
-both paws into one white glove.
* .   *      it
They're jiapdder   than   ever,
thought   AliA.   and   wondered
* if perhaps it was time to leave.
"As I was saying," the Mad
Hatter began again, "Christmas
spirit has no relevance to
Christmas any more." and turning to Alice he added, "I know
you'll   agree."
Feeling rather bold Alice retorted. "How do you know I'll
•SLgreel"
"Elementary logic, my dear,"
answered the Mad Hatter. "Just
ask him," he continued, pointing at the Gryphon who was
emerging from the house.
"Don't bother me," said the
, Gryphon. "I'm going on a mock
turtle  hunt."
* *    . *
" "The question is," interposed
Tweedledee, who had woken
up when the rabbit started trying to put his glove Over Twee-
dledee's head, "are you going
to hunt Mock Turtles or are
you going to pretend to hunt
-turtles?"
"Who  knows?"  replied Gryphon dreamily, and then; waving  in  Alice's direction,  "why
* not ask her?"
"Yes, what do you think?"
the others chorused. ,
"I   think   that  Christmas   is
still   worthwhile,"   Alice   said,
.-and then suddenly realized her
answer had no relevance to the
question.
"Quite    right,"    purred    the
Cheshire Cat, who had quietly
^materialized  in the middle  of
the group.
"On the other hand," it continued, "have you ever stopped
to consider what would happen
if  Christmas  wasn't?"
Everyone's   asking  questions
but no one is answering them,:
--thought poor Alice. If only they
could   ,talk,    sensibly    about
Christmas!
*      *      *
"i 'But   Christmas   isn't   sensi-
the Cheshire Cat as  :
Gallery gets
new exhibits
Three exhibits. featuring a
typographic exhibition, will be
in the Fine Arts Gallery for
10 days starting Dec. 10.
The typographic exhibition,
entitled "Twenty-six letters-
theme and variations," will
show an imaginative handling
Df existing faces.
The annual Western Books
exhibition is the second display.
The third exhibit, prepared
and circulated by the National
Gallery of Canada, will offer
40 graphic works by German
expressionist   Ernst   Barlach.
YOU ARE just a foot—and a
leg—away from getting this
puzzle together. Let us remind you that Mary is a prize
in any  man's world.
God's waiting
for an answer
VICTORIA (CUP) — The
following letter appeared in
the letters column of the
student newspaper at Victoria College, The Martlet:  i
"An open letter to Premier
Bennett:
"Christmas will be on the
25th of December, as usual,
if this meets with your approval.
"Respectfully yours,
GOD."
"Now here you see, it
takes all the running
you can do to keep in
the same place...
... if you want to get somewhere else
you must run at least twice as fast
as that."
These lines from Lewis Carroll's
"Alice Through the Looking Glass"
just about explain the pace of
developments in IBM, the leader in
the fast-growing electronic data
processing industry.
The demands of business and science
have reached such momentum that it
takes constant striving to stay-in the
same place.. .double the effort to meet
the challenges that so often occur.
Our accomplishments of today
seemed impossible yesterday. Other
"impossible" inventions, previously
a challenge, are now on the drawing
boards on their way to becoming a
reality . . . and so on it goes, at a
rapid pace.
Our sales representatives, systems
engineers and scientists have an
absorbing, exciting and satisfying life.
If you would like to become associated with them, write to the IBM
executive named below. You won't
stand still in this organization.
944 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C., MU. 3-3331
Branch Manager—J. L. Yellowlees
IBM
*Trade Mark
DE LUXE SKI CHARTERS TO MT. BAKER
Through buses take you right to the skiing slopes. Plenty of luggage
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BUSES
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Standard bases. De luxe buses with reclining seats.
Fully insured to travel anywhere on this continent
COMPLETELY RELIABLE SERVICE
for information on loco! or out-of-town charters call:
Weekdays 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Urban Transit Division AM 1-5151
Pacific Stage Lines Divisieir     MU 1-6381
AH other times
AM 1-4211
BRITISH COLUMBIA HYDRO & POWER AUTHORITY
TRANSPORTATION DIVISION Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
I rick
or treat,
Mr. Eaton
By ANNA BURGER
It is nearly Christmas.
...    It has been nearly Christmas
sinee   Halloween.
That's because some people
like Christmas so much-— people
like Mr. T. Eaton, Mr. Woodward, Mr. Hudson Bay, and all
their friends.
But   I   don't   like   Christmas
as much  as  they  do.  I haven't
got a big store that sells Christmas presents.
PARENTS READ
Instead I have parents, brothers, and sisters who read what
Messrs. Woodward, Eaton, and
Bay say.
They say I should buy Christmas presents for all my parents,
brothers, sisters and friends.
So I do.
But each time I do, Messrs.
Eaton, Woodward, and Bay get
richer.
Each   time   they   get   richer,
they get happier. Each time they
get happier; they Tike Christmas
. even more.
So they want more Christmas.
So they start Christmas    earlier.
I'D  LIKE   CHRISTMAS   TOO
I don't blame them. If I had
a big store that sells Christmas
presents, I'd like Christmas too.
In fact, I'd like Christmas so
much that I'd have Christmas all
year round.
But don't tell Messrs. Woodward, Eaton, and Bay because
they might steal my idea.
But probably they've already
thought of it themselves. Maybe next year we will have Christmas all year round.
Wouldn't that be fun?
Lost something?
contact Dr. McGregor
Dear Sir:
Let me take advantage of
your spacious columns to report that the following two
items, not owned by me, repose
in  my office at Bu.  267.
1. One umbrella, large, black
handsome with insignia on the
handle; found in Bu. 100, Tuesday, Nov. 13.
2. One pair of spectacles,
heavy black horn rims, in case.
Fr&nklin   Optical   Co.).
I am even more interested
in the return of a lady's wrist-
watch, with name on the back,
left in a Buchanan washroom
recently.
Very  truly  yours,
Malcolm F. McGregor,
Classics Dept.
rloom for Male Student available in January. Cooking
facilities. $35 month. Phone
tarry, RE 3-6534. ' ' "*
FOR   MEN
WHO DRESS YOUNG
THE
■fob (Eoarfj §>\)ap
Welcome to the ALUMNI CLUB
here is a wonderful world of special
sophisticated natural shoulder clothing so often
talked about, so seldom achieved.
t        the look is one of conservatism spiked
with the flair of traditional styling.
the Alumni man is an individualist who
takes an unusual interest in his clothing as well
as everything else about him.
3000 SQUARE  FEET OF STYLES
FOR YOUNG MEN ONLY . . .
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in
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Career opportunities are offered in
GEOLOGY
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Electrical-Mechanica
Mining-Metal lurgy-
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For a satisfying career in the Iron Ore
Industry, address all inquiries to:
PERSONNEL  DEPARTMENT,
IRON  ORE  COMPANY  OF  CANADA,
SEPT-ILES, P.  Q.
or our representatives will be pleased to meet with
you when they visit your campus on       >
January 7 and 8
NOW!
And all Next Week
The Incedible
Bob Gibson
THE INQUISITION
DEC. 3, 4, AND 5
3 performances only on the
Stage of
The Inguisition
The Drunkard
A Melodrama in two acts
DECEMBER 6th
Return Engagement
Don Crawford
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• distinguished resort at Harrison -^ -■
Hot Springs, British Columbia
A157-3B.C Friday-, November 3G> 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page" 9
Probe shows
#rre
HAMILTON (CUP)—An investigation by a McMaster Uni-
versity 'mathematics student,
has revealed that 5 of 13 text
books selected at random from
the university book store are
being sold at prices higher
than suggested in the publishers'  price  catalogue.
Prices as quoted by the publisher are sublet to change,
but a check had not been made
to see if the prices had changed,
however.
Increases in the book store
ranged from 10 to 80 cents
higher than in the catalogue.
Buring the investigation the
same book was found in the
bookstore carrying two different price tags. One tag read
$9.75 and the other $1 cheaper.
The latter price was that
suggested by the  catalogue.
A letter from the vice-president of the publishing company
said, . . . "any business relationship we have had with
"the McMaster university bookstore has been of the very highest order and to my knowledge
there has never been any conscious effort on the part of the
bookstore to derive profits or
to establish selling prices in excess of standard university bookstore procedures  .  .  ."
Parking control will
take turn for worse
The lackadaisical attitude
a sudden turn at the start of
"Rules which have been
passed by will be strongly enforced during the second term,"
said Lloyd Martin, Commerce
president.
Martin has been meeting with
Sir Robert Ouvry Roberts on
parking  problems.
"Cars blocking other cars,
those parked outside tne cement
headers and any parked in the
gravel access roads in ''C" lot
will be towed away," Martin
said.
The Traffic Office has orders
to detect and fine:
• Students parked in visitor's   or   faculty   lots.
• Anyone using the parking
meter  spaces   without  paying,
• Anyone parked so that he
blocks traffic or in restricted
areas.
"The Traffic Office has the
complete support of the student
council,"  Martin   said.
But he noted that "any student who has a complaint may
appeal to Sir Ouvry Roberts or
to  student  council."
"C" lot will be renovated
during the Christmas holidays.
"There will be more signs,
fhe roads at the sides will be
clearly defined and narrower,
the headers will be firmly
placed,"  he said.
IH sponsors
Xmas billets
Invitations for foreign students to spend the Christmas
holidays in B.C. homes are pouring into International House.
IH director Art Sager said
Wednesday the invitations had
come from all over the province.
Any foreign student wishing
to take advantage of the offer
should apply at Sager's office
or to Mrs. Gibbs in International House.
Bradbury Filler
This is a filler. A filler is
something that fills. We have
then again we may not have
any.
This   is   a   filler  filler.
Like most fillers it says nothing.
of the parking control will take
the second term.
Post Office needs
willing workers
The Post Office will take applications for Christmas Employment next week.
Registration will be held on
the following dates: in hut M5
in the  w-est Mall:
Women: Tuesday, at 12:30
noon, and men, Thursday at 8
a.m.
Lillian Casuals
NOW   OPEN
Daytime  and  After-five
4456 W. 10*h
224-5440
1962-63 Evening Class Program
Efficient Reading For
University Students
The Department of University Extension offers -an eight-
week, non-credit evening course designed to improve
reading efficiency with emphasis on reading comprehension.
Sixteen sessions will be conducted Mondays and Thursdays of each week at 8:00 p.m. in Hut M-3 commencing
Monday, January 7.Registration is limited to 40 students.
Fee: $25.00.
For further information contact the UBC Extension De-
apartment, CA 4-1111, local 525 or CA 4-5220.
Whatever "became of:
Lucy Borgia,
CLASS OF '02?
It is a tribute to our Home Ec. course
that the name of this little girl is celebrated
wherever food is eaten and wine is drunk.
Lucy, early in her course, gave unmistakable evidence that food to her was not
merely a means to an end but an end
in itself. Herself a sparing eater, she
encouraged guests to enjoy each meal as
if it were their last. With a few simple
ingredients, Miss Borgia could produce
a banquet to end all banquets. Her
Omelette a la Fine Toadstools is still
talked about in hushed voices. The few
contemporaries who survived her, often
recalled this gentle lady diligently tending
her little kitchen garden of Deadly Night- |
shade, Foxglove and Hemlock. You don't
find cooking like Lucy's in the college
cafeteria these days.
The safest recipe for keeping  MY HAN K
your finances healthy is found  ,0im
in a B ofM Personal Chequing
Account. Open yours today.
Bank of Montheai,
THE    BANK    WHERE    STUDENTS'    ACCOUNTS    ARE    WARMLY    WELCOMED
University Campus Branch, in the Administration Bldg.:
MERLE1 C. KIRBY. Manaeer
ON MONDAY DECEMBER 17th
REMEMBER TO VOTE FOR
PAT
MCGEER
YOUR  LIBERAL
CANDIDATE  IN
VANCOUVER  PT. GREY
This advertisement  inserted  by  the  Vancouver Point Grey Liberal Campaign Committee Paige iljO      i
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
Totem Bail
•*-:«»
on lonig
The Thunderbirds basketball team has something to prove
and this is the weekend for them to do it.
They can prove they are one  with   the   toumament   final   at
of   the   best   basketball   teams  9:15.
bBC   hrs   hatched   simply   by       Starting   for   the   Birds   will
^\J j winning the 1982 Yotem Tourna-[ be   John  Cook   and   Mike   Pot*-
***-■■   I ment.     underway    this    Friday ]kohja.k at forwards, with Keith
and  Saturday  night  at  7:30  in; Hartley    at    Center    and    Keii
War Memorial gym. | McDonald:, an^Gprdgn Betcher
Four  top  teams  are   entered  at guards.
-Don Hume photo
THUNDERBIRD GOALIE Ken Smith sprawls on the ice in a desperate attempt to stop the puck
during hockey practice Thursday. It has become team policy for all goal tenders to wear a
fibreglass mask every time they are in the net.
Hockey club
returns to
papertown
The Thunderbird hockey club
would rather play hockey than
pass exams.
The, Club flies up to Powell
River for a return engagement
this weekend.
Assistant co a c h Bob Hind-
march says the team is much
improved Since Its last encounter
in the paper town.
"Many of the rough edges
have been worn off and we are a
smooth unit now," he .said.
The Birds won their first
game with the Powell River
Regals 3-2 earlier this month.
*~ Snow stopped" the club from
putting finishing touches on their
offense as half the players
couldn't make it to the arena,
yesterday.
The* players who made it to
the practice spent most of the
time shooting and skating.
"Shooting was the big problem in Powell River before,"
said Hindmarch. "The forwards
made many breakaways but
failed to put the puck into the
net because of the weak shots."
Swim team to vie
for new trophies
The UBC swim team will take to the water this Sunday
in an attempt to win their own trophy at the first annual Thunderbird Relays, said Pomfret, "but with no pool
to use during the winter months
we are at a disadvantage compared to teams that can train
all year round."
At present ten teams have accepted the invitation to attend
the meet. Five more are expected to enter.
In the meet, held at Percy
Norman Pool, heats will begin
at 10 a.m., diving at 2 p.m. and
the finals start at 4.
* •     •
Entered in the 200 yard individual medley for UBC are
Dave Collier, Steve Lydiatt and
Brian Griffith.
"They should all dp well in
this event," swimming coach
Jack Pomfret said.
Something new this year will
be the men's and women's teams
oompeting as a unit against
visiting teams. In the past they
have always entered separately.
• •      *
For many UBC team members
it will be their first taste of competition. They have been spending as much time as possible
in circuit training and in the
pool to be in as good shape as
possible when they meet the
tough competition.
"They are a good team and
they work hard at the training,"
in the annual tourney—the
Western Washington Vikings,
defending champions, the Central   Washington   Wildcats,   the
\ New  Westminster   Bakers   and
I the Birds.
BIRD  VICTORY?
UBC coach Peter Mullins refused to make a prediction
about the winner of the tournament, but did say, "We expect
to do very well."
Thunderbirds have won the
Totem title only twice over
the years.
"Western has a new coach
and some new tactics this year,"
Mullins said, "so we don't
know what to expect from them.
The team we are really worried
about is Central Washington."
TALL WILDCATS
Two of Central's starters are
six feet seven, and they have a
six foot ten inch reserve on the
bench.
The Bakers from New Westminster are comprised of the
cream of UBC's basketball
alumni and, while not as
last year, are currently on top
of the Vancouver Senior "A"
League.
Friday night, Central Washington will meet the Bakers at
7:30, with UBC and Western
tangling at 9:15. Saturday the
consolation game begins at 7:30
Ten Birds on
WCIAA all-stars ;
UBC Thunderbirds placed
three, men on the offensive
and seven on the defensive
squads of the 1962 WCIAA
all-star listings.
" Guard Fred Sturrock made *
an v encore;  in   the ".offensive
allstars listings.
Other Birds were end Tom
Thompson and halfback Norm^
Thomas.  -    '
Defensively the Birds made
seven positions. Stand out
tackle Roy Shatzko repeated
with the squad.
Other Birds were Ken Lee,
Dave   Gibbons,   Peter  Lewis,-
Al   Eger,   Gary   Bruce,   and
Ray Wickland.
Thunderettes lose
The Thunderettes Senior
Women's basketball team
dropped their third straight
game by 23 points to the
French Maids Wednesday nighl
in King Ed gym.
The,score  was 60-37. '
The Maids scored the majority of their points in the third"
quarter.    The   half-time    score
had been  17-16 for  the Thunderettes.
i-
EDUCATION STUDENTS
% Applications are now being received for
< delegates to the 1963 Western Canadian
I Student Teacher's Conference.
Apply to:
GEORGE BOECHLER,
\ New Education Building.
Applications should include:
—Educational background
—Extracurricular activities
—Interest in Conference
CLOSING DATE: THURS., DEC. 6
Shop" with an EATON Account
you'll find it simplifies your shopping, wheiier
visit the store or write or phone in your order.
You can choose a Deposit or Charge Account or
that allows for "spread-over" payments. A tele-
call, letter, or visit to our Customer Accounts
will open your Eaton account promptly.
EATON'S Gift Certificates
Just the answer when you're doubtful about size or colour, ov
even likes and dislikes. These problem-solvers can be purchased
in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $25, $50 and $100 and
are gift-packed in a gay envelope or tree-trimming cylinder.
You can Shop with Assurance
at EATON'S
Canada's Christmas Store Friday, November 30, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
ISeries last
rugger tilt
■sr
Saturday
»     The   last   regularly-scheduled
game of the Miller Cup rugger
series  takes  place  Saturday  at
UBC   stadium.
■ *    Birds take on the West Van
Barbarians on  a  probable  wet,
muddy   field.   Thursday's   snow
coupled with predicted rain will
make  the  field  greasy.
*     The most important game of
the   series has  been  postponed
until      after     Christmas.     The
UBC-Kats   game   has   not   been
'. re-scheduled  yet.
The game was postponed from
last weekend because of wet
grounds. It will .probably be
the game to decide first place.
Kats play Rowing Club Saturn-day- and Rowing Club are currently tied for second place
with UBC.
Birds should be in good shape
» for this game. Last week's rest
will help them for this week's
game.
LAST GAME FOR ALL
All other UBC teams will be
* playing their last games this
. Ayeekend. Braves host Richmond
at Wolfson field. Braves have
a 3-3 won-lost record in
league, competition while the
Siirds have a 5-1 won-lost record,
Frosh I and Frosh II round
out their season playing each
other on the gym field.
* Women's bowling
The UBC Women's bowling
team   is   in   desperate  need   of
- new members. Will any interested girls please Icontact Arlie
SyversonH CA 4-9826 or leave
: their name at the WAD office.
Bowling will be one day per
week.
TELEMRRK
By GEORGE RAILTON
We have seen the signs coming upon us slowly.
First there was the lonely ski parkas about campus, then
the barrage of ski movies followed by the annual posters heralding the Rossland ski trip, and finally—yesterday—the snow
£e[L ' top half of the lift will be skied
for  the   whole season.
Runs were cleared from
Mystery Peak last summer so
now the skier will have a better selection than the Unicorn
and  the  Cat  Track.
New areas have opened up
outside of Calgary. The Pidgeon
Mtn. development promises to
surpass the Banff area in a few
years.
•   ■ •      •
The Thunderbird Ski team
has five international meets
planned. They wind up their
Rossland spree with the Triple
I meet. This invitational International, Intercollegiate meet
goes at Red Mt. Jan. 5-6.
Other meets on the north
western schedule are at Banff,
McCall, Idaho, White Pass, and
Bend, Oregon.
People ha»ve been heading
south to Baker and Stevens for
two months now, but this weekend the ski season should begin in earnest.
• •      •
Again   the • Thunderbird   ski
team is sponsoring the trip to
Rossland.
For the modest sum of $77.00
skiers are promised sunshine,
powder snow, parties, and
practically the best skiing in
Western Canada Red Mountain
in  the  Selkirks.
Information can be obtained
from the posters or from the
athletic  office.
• •      *
From behind Brock we hear
storjes of other ski trips. The
Varsity Outdoors Club has
about a dozen different excursions planned.
The big trip this year is going to be a tour of the Rossland-
Kimberly area, with some
people staying tjie whole holiday  at either place.
Other trips on the schedule
are to Banff, Yoho Park, Garibaldi Park, Vancouver Island,
the Okanagan,: and of course to
the cabin on Mt. Seymour.
Most of the trips begin on
Dec. 26 and will carry on until
lectures start the second week
in January.
• •     •
New  ski   areas   are  the  talk
of the town this year.
Tod Mountain in Kamloops
has added a 2000 ft. poma lift
to  their  existing  facilities.
Earl Pletsch, operator of the
Seymour concessions, built an
intermediary station for the
often bare porno lift. Now the
WESTINGHOUSE
Will Be On Campus January 7, 8, 9, and
10 To Interview 1963  U.B.C. Graduates
A well-defined training program is  offered to  prepare
candidates for positions of responsibility in:
DESIGN   ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
MANUFACTURING   ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL   ENGINEERING
APPARATUS   MARKETING
CONSUMER MARKETING
FINANCIAL   ADMINISTRATION
ACCOUNTING  SYSTEMS
COMPUTER   PROGRAMMING
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
These positions will afford opportunity for career development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on performance as well as excellent employee fringe benefit plans.
Contact  the  Placement  Office  for  detailed  information,
brochures, and interview appointment.
See how pleasant
banking can be at the "Royal'
ROYAL BANK
Branch near the University at
4520 West  10th  Ave.
£eaMnA (jwetinqA
May m take time tc thank ifcu {fw
if cut patronage and M*h tyw eifetif
pcMilfle McceM in the %eut t/eat...
$adk £hon Md. Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
'Tween dasses
Buy legs for the children
"Leg Auction," noon todey
at Newman Lounge. Proceeds
for annual Children's Christmas
Party.
Tt* •*• *♦*
RIDING CLUB
General* meeting to discuss
•Christmas ride and dance at
Steelhead Ranch, Dec. 30.
Everyone welcome. Monday,
12:30,  Bu.  219.
Zh   CIRCULO
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
214 for those interested in going to Mexico.
*     *     #
U HILL UNITED
CHURCH  YPU """'"■■'
Speaker: Dr. William C. Gibson, head of Dept. of History
of Medicine, on "Medicine and
Religion"   Sunday,  7 p.m.
The
Bu.
Student congress supports
British common market bid
QUEBEC (CUP)—Students attending the Laval Congress
on Canadian Affairs have voted to support Britain's entry
into the European Common Market.
The Congress voted to establish federal and provincial
ministries of economic affairs, along with ministries of Do-
,   minion-Provincial relations, to plan the country's economy.
The congress passed a resolution stating insufficient attention was being given technical training in high schools.
The resolution said this type of training could do much to
alleviate unemployment.
Included in this resolution was a suggestion to re-training
for the chronically unemployed.
Students condoned nationalization, with the proviso "that
v.;-.   is must be- justified by the particular circumstances.
UBC SOCREDS
The   Hon.   K.   Kiernan,
Case   for   Social    Credit."
102,  noon today.
3£    *$•    3£
PHRATERES
All-Phi meeting, noon today,
Bu.  102.
•J* *T* *T*
"Spanish Fiesta." Spanish
costumes. Dance with George
Cuba's band. Tonight 8:30 p.m.
•** *X* •*•
PRE-SOCIAL   WORK
Speaker from Children's Aid
Society on "The Unwed
Mother." Monday, 12:30, Bu.
202.
•J* *T* •*•
SCM
Attention English 200 students:
"John Donne's Poetry," Dr. J.
DeBruyn. Monday 12:30, Bu.
104. *    *    *
GERMAH  CLUB
General 'meeting, noon today,
Bu.   203:     *     *    *     ■'   .
LCM  ....■'	
"A Wise Man." Speaker Rev.
Deneff. Monday 12:30, Bu. 222.
CLASSIFIED
WANTED: Ride from vicinity Cornwall and Arbutus. Working hours
S:45 to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday.
Call local 25S/25ji on UBC exchange, or evenings after G p.ni.,
T3S-3625.
WANTED: Ride from v'cinitv 35th
and Dunbar. Please call AM 6-50S4
or AM   6-4546.
RIDE WANTED: Monday to Friday,
S:30 to 5:30 p.m. Vicinity of West
15th and Granville. Please phone
Chuch   St.   John.   AM   t>-«492.
ENGLISH 200 NOTES: 34 pages of
clear concise facts. A real, bargain
for Christmas exams. C.111 TR 4-
77;<0  between   7   and  S  p.m.
EGST: ,In Brock, Friday noon, a reversible raincoat. Contact Jim,
AM   6-0457.
TAKEN: From Caiey Hail loun-e,
lauie and large speaker unit. Any-
hi-ti am jliiier, - i//-U tuner, turFi-
one knowing- where these are phone
CA 4-9974.
MEXICO: Hitihiiikins to Mexico
durns Christmas holidays and
want female company. Phone Peggy,     C-A.     4-!..iV
FOR RENT: Two-storey suite, two
bedrooms, near Acadia. Phone CA
4-7202,   Miss   Ford.
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Self-contained. Bedroom, living1 room, modern kitchen, fridge, gas stove,
shower, W.C. Separate entrance.
$55.   Phone   Ken,   RE   3-3125.
LC'ST: Thursday, Nov. 22. Main library. Green looseleaf binder con-
ta'nine- notes. Please phone Bob,
RE  3-9968.
LOST: Brown wallet, little money,
but essential identification. Needed urgently, please take to Lost
and Found or jhone Juclv at CA
4-6469.
Ti'TORING: Mathematics, Statistics, Spanish. First and second
year  courses.   CA   4-3393,   evening's."
Diamonds stolen
MONTREAL (CUP)—An esti-'
mated $2,000 in uncut diamonds
has   been  stolen  from the   McGill   University   science   centre
lobby showcase. - -»
'iue feems were part of a collection donated to the- university by the late Dr. J. T. Williamson, discoverer of the
world's largest diamond mine;
5T)F-'
BOOK-TIME
Ready for you and your gift list, THE BAY has
this season's greatest new looks for schussboom-
ing, cabin skiing, op spectating; See our Scandinavian cardigans and pullovers-nis at 49.50, hers
at $45 — and Al Menzies' ny-lo-cord ski parka at
29.50 in ACTIVE SPORTSWEAR, second floor.
NEW
FILTER.
...the best-tasting
filter cigarette Thousands outraged by speech
V
Th
ere is no
_>.     **$* tA-- „«■* %.-.
On   Lincoln,   on   Caddy,   on Corvette and Chrysler.'
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY,  NOVEMBER 30,  1962
No. 35
Claus found to he
on the wrong trek
The University of B.C. has hired a well-known 20th century Pied Piper to lead the student trek on Victoria.
S.   Claus,   notorious   philan- t^ '-—zr~. ——r
Ihropist,   has *een  signed  hy *aimess,to u»lvf^J studen*s
University officials to lead the , L^*,?^-t0 _thf ™^S
" march
Doug Stewart, AMS president,
has assured The Ubyssey that
the leader will definitely not
be Malcolm Scott in disguise.
The real S. Claus will arrive
on Campus Dec.   25  to recruit
"helpers for the organization of
the Trek.
He informed The Ubyssey by
telephone today that he will
need reindeer handlers, coach
drivers, Ban the Bombers,
guided missile experts, Radar
technicians, and anti-missile experts.
-, Claus said he plans to make
a Jrial run by himself on Victoria, Christmas Eve to survey
the situation.
He  said  he  has received re-
^ guests from most of the Cabinet  and doesn't want  to disappoint them by not showing up.
Premier   Bennett   has   asked
for Diefenbaker's head, Gaglardi
has asked  for his  dream car,
Williston  has   asked for  peace
over . the   Peace,   Peterson  has
' asked for a job with, the union.
And the rest asked for Bennett's
job he said.
■fg.   "I  want   to   fulfill   their  requests   but   I   feel   that  in   alt' year
because they have not lived up
to their promises.
When asked if he -would reveal his future plans for the
trek Claus said, "We must first
make arrangements for getting
the students across the Strait,
I intend to bring down my extra
reindeer and sleighs for the
crossing, we should be able to
move about 15,000 students
across the waters in one hour."
Arrangements for the planned
Trek have all been made from
the President's office
Backing from The Ubyssey
and the Alma Mater Society
came immediately. The Liberal
Club failed to commit their support until after Dec. 17.
Doug Stewart was so enthusiastic he exclaimed, "I will
lead the march." But Claus said
that honor remained in the nose
of Rudolf although the resemblance was striking.
Malcolm Scott, AMS treasurer said, "I don't know. I'm not
so sure we should go ahead with
this plan. I don't think the budget will take it. We have only
got   a  margin  of  $150,000  this
Second Section
Santa'
Santamentalists
seriously shocked
An angry UBC professor declared today he doesn't believe in Santa Claus.
Dr. Peter (I really -wonder if I believe in myself) Rembrant said there is no scientific basis for the existence of St.
Nick.
"PEEEENNINGTON ! !"
Ole  Mississippi
Christmas Song
No. 1 on the Ole Miss hit parade . . .
I'm dreaming of a white
Christmas ...
Just   like  the ones we   used  to
have  .  . .
"It is an Irrational facade
which people perpetuate so they
can give gifts to their children
under a cloak of anonymity,"
the far-seeing professor  said.
"I was brought up in a family
that believed in Santa Claus,
|-but I haven't been taken in .1
haven't believed in Santa since
I was 17," he said..
SOON SEE ■-,''.
Dr. Rembrant said people will
soon see that he is right in believing there is no Santa Claus.
He said sooitiSanta Claus will
be so disproven that not even
children will believe in him.
"We are making real progress
in this direction. Even some of
the most ardent Santa-supports
ers are beginning to have their
doubts," he said.
"Why I know of one departs
ment store that never began advertising Santa until the middle
of November this year he said.
"I think they were really torn
about whether he exists or not."
One girTnTtne auSience who
began to cry during Rembrant's
speech was told "We all have
to face the facts sooner or later.
We cannot rely on irrational
things such as this. Faith is not
enough," he said.
PROOFS
Dr. Rembrant gave some specific proofs of his new theory
called athesantaism:
That Santa is transported in
a sleigh pulled by eight white
reindeer:
"There is absolutely no
scientific basis for the justification of such a belief. To begin
with reindeer can't fly, I have,
discovered after years of research. In fact, .there is. no
scientific evidence to support,
this idea at all.
There is also no support for
the idea of a reindeer having a
red nose. It has also been proven
by scientists that it would take
times y pounds of thrust to
lift a sleigh loaded with x
amount of merchandise to a
level of z feet in altitude. How
could eight little reindeer (and
remember they are little) do
that?"
FATMAN
That Santa is a roly-poly fat
man who flies from rooftop lo William Duke.
rooftop, sliding down chimneys
to give children toys:
"In the pictures I have seen
of Santa Claus, he is noticeably
overweight. I am led to believe
that he suffers from high blood
pressure, as a result, and his
red nose makes me think he's
Improbably an alcoholic.
Any way,, suffering from -high
blood, pressure,-there is-probably little likelihood that he could
stand the strain of such activity.
Some night, the gifts would just
inot be delivered- Santa would
keel over—probably fall ouiTof
"his sleigh-^fcrom an attack,; 7
But has that ever happened?
And any way, I don't think much
of this idea of setting up some
kind of a booze-hound as an
example for children."
SOOTY SUIT |
That Santa's red; and white
suit does not get dirty as he
slides down chimneys:
This is fantatstic. I'll tell you
a little story. Once I was up on
our roof at home cleaning ©tit
the chimney. Well. I dropped
this .rope, dawn with a brush-«n
the end of it. Well, you see, we
have this dog and he picked up
the brush when it dropped into
the fireplace and started pulling.
Heh, Heh, Well, he's a pretty
big dog. Well, I guess you know
what happened eh. But, boy did
I ever get dirty. You've never
seen anything like it. Well, my
wife, she screamed blue murder.
Well, I think that's enough proof
of that."
MORE LECTURES
Dr. Rembrant's lecture was
sponsored by the Philosophy Association which is sponsoring a
new series of lectures beginning
this week:
Monday: The Easter Bunny,
fact and fiction, by Dr. Peter
Rembrant.
Wednesday: I never saw Santa
Claus up there by Yuri Gagarin.
Thursday: Monetary denial
as a form of self-realization: by
John Diefenbaker.
Friday: Buchanan statues as
a form of art: by Phillis Webb.
Saturday: Philosophy as an
irrational    facade:    Archbishop
The story of Social Credit
One day when William Aberhart was giving a speech on
the beauties of the Socred movement, a young man came up
to him.
This young' man had a round face and a big smile.
"What can I do for you?"   said the great  man.
"I want to be like you, and say things about the Social
Credit party,  and have a government," said the boy.
"Good, said Aberhart. "What's your name?"
"Bennett"   was  the   answer.
"What's the first name?" was the next query.
"Joe,"   replied  the  lad.
He was  never heard of again. •Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
minister
blasts Medicare
SASKATOON (CUP)—-Former Saskatchewan minister oi
health, J. Walter Erb, says the hasty implementation of the
province's Medical Care Insurance Act, in the face of the
majority of the province's residents, was an example of unadulterated political expediency.
Erb said the act was rushod
onto the statute books in time
for T. C. Douglas to enter federal politics.
Erb resigned from the CCF
cabinet last May in protest of
the government's handling of
the medical dispute. He has
since joined the Liberal party.
The- former nealth minister
said even the representatives
on the Thompson advisory
committee, with the exception
of those appointed by the college of physicians and surgeons
were picked because t he y
agreed with the CCF stand.  .
"More recently, members of
the medical care insurance
commission were selected because they too shared the view1*
point of the CCF government."'
"I advised the premier that
the plan possibly should be
scrapped and a more, acceptable one drawn up." Erb said
ifiafllW ftinbme
Marriage
Witti a Career?
'Most men wosrk and are married
i — yet how effective are they m
this dual role ? How efficient ?
H ow happy? December Reader's
Digest asks some embarrassing
questions ahd provides some
pointed answers. Women —* and
their husbands will enjoy this
feminine opinion of male be-
havisw.^JGet your copy of
Beajjew^igesttbdiyj ana read!
"Et tu, Brute", and 38 other
artieies^of lasting interest sold
on iisJwsstands everywhere.   	
BUY 4 TICKETS
ill FREE
THEATRE
TICKETS
NOW ON SALE
ATfHf
BOX-OFFICE
... BOLSHOI
fitful .BALLET
=»W evening 8:30
mmtntTuzeummaa JViat.   Sat.  L\V\.
Time You Want!
A small tablet helps keep you awaka
and attentive just when you need
it most. Behind a wheel! Examinations! Social Dates! or quick stimulation at anytime. Over 2 million
Bold every year. No prescription
needed. Ask for Wake-ups 49 i at
your store. Adrem Ltd., 20 Eglinton
R, Toronto 12.
on hearing of the determined
opposition from the province's
doctors. I
"Confronted with Premier
Lloyd's incomprehensible statement that the plan would go
ahead with or without the cooperation of the doctors, I had
.no choice but to leave the CCF
party."
Erb said after he left the
party he had been labelled a
'•'traitor and a Judas" by former supporters.
Erb-was-speaking to a group
of University of Saskatchewan
students.
"WE'LL GET those scabs out of
there," well-known labor leader Paddy O'Kneele told students yesterday.
Christmas in Contemporary Crete
-, all
broads
who are built
like   this   are   not
really   very   sexy   but
man they sure are Christm.asy
ho
ho
ho
The Lone Calathumpium
3K
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NEWS. . .
News like the above is important to those seeking immediate practical experience at an advanced level in their
chosen technical or scientific field. Although the construction work is now underway, it will result in new processes being developed on the periphery of man's knowledge of chemical cellulose. Furthermore, a new S02 recovery system of the most advanced design has been incorporated as part of the project.
UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITIES
Here are many rare opportunities for graduates in
Chemistry or Mechanical, Civil, Chemical or Electrical
Engineering. This is not just another expansion project,
but another stage in the development of highly technical
processes.
ABOUT THE COMPANY
Columbia Cellulose is a medium-sized producer of
forest products including sulphite dissolving and paper
pulps, kraft paper pulps and lumber products. It operates
mills at Prince Rupert and Castlegar, British Columbia,
employing over 2000 persons. Capital investment in both
areas is close to $120 million. Columbia Cellulose is a
Canadian company operating the only wood cellulose
mills within its group of affiliates. However, valuable
technical and marketing associations exist with Canadian
Chemical Company at Edmonton, Chemell Fibres in Quebec, and Celanese Corporation of America through Chem-
cell Limited in Montreal.
FOR INTERVIEWS:
Graduating students wishing to discuss employment
will be interviewed on campus by W. D. Stothert, Mill
Manager; R. Chalk, Technical Superintendent; and L. S.
.McGill, Director of Administration on
Contact  Your  Campus   Employment  Offices   For  An  Appointment
^COLUMBIA CELLULOSE CGMPANY, LIMITED Trday, November 30, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  15
Michigan students balk at
administration
EAST LANSING, Mich (CPS)
—The Humanist Club of Michi-
Ik _
gan. State University has said
it plans a second defiance  of
the university rule prohibiting
'speakers   not   cleared   in   advance by a special committee.
The group was one of six disciplined by the school administration last week for inviting
speakers to a previous meeting
without prior clearance.
*      *      *
The   six   groups,   including
the student government, were
told they might lose their
charters for a second offense.
* The speaker policy, adopted
last year over student objections,   requires   that   speakers
invited by university groups
must be previously cleared by
a student-faculty committee.
Student government offie.vala
have refused to sit on the committee, charging it is an organ
of censorship.
•      •      •
The president of the Humanist club, Peter Werbe, was
among six students put on
strict academic probation, prohibiting the holding of student
office. Werbe resigned and a
new president was elected,
who plans to continue with
plans to bring in an uncleared
speaker—an official of the
Protestants and Other Americans United for Separation of
Church and State.
GIGANTIC STORE-WIDE
BOOK SALE
Smoke & Water Damaged  Books
PRICES SLASHED
UP TO 80%
Fantastic Savings on Thousands of Damaged (many only
slightly) Books, Art Prints and Paper Backs!
Sale Starts Sat., Dec. 1st - Ends Dec. 22nd
Store hours.9 to 5:30 Daily — Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
PEOPLE'S
307 W. PENDER ST.  VAN., B.C.
JUST    OFF    VICTORY    SQUARE
CO-OP BOOK STORE
MUtual 5-5836
UNITED AIR LINES
Accepting Applications For:
STEWARDESSES
For Spring and Summer Training Classes
Quniifieat'cns   Include:
Rinale. aae 20-26. heieht 5' z" to 5' 9". Weight, in
proportion. University or Registered Nurse Training
Pesirfible. Mi'"t he personable and Attractive. A
cheerful disposition, tact, maturity and good judgement are essential.
Starting salary $325 per month with periodic increases.
i —it——.
For further Information, please
write to United Air Lines
Stewardess Employment Office
Seattle-Tacoma Airrort, Seattle 8£
Washing-ton.
An   Equal   Opportunity   Employer
The speakers at last week's
meeting were.to be from the
Student Non-violent Co-ordinating Committee.
Students frisked before game
KINGSTON (CUP)—All students attending the Queen's-
McGill collegiate football playoff were "frisked" before enter-    •
ing the stadium.
The action was taken following a serious injury to a
woman in a parking lot outside the stadium during the previous football game. The woman was helping her child into
her car when she was struck and severely lacerated by a
flying quart beer bottle thrown from the stadium.
Obtain a copy of this informative brochure now from the University
Placement Office where you may also make an appointment for an
interview with th* Naval University Liaison Officer who will visit the
campus.   10 and 11 January
:l;i
'<©
du MAURIER
A  Product  of  Peter  Jackson  Tobacco  Ltd. Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
Frosh to Fourth year
I am a premier.
I  don't give gifts for
Christmas.
I  hate Boxing  Day.
Santa was
a Xmas Caret
Each Xmas I look forward to
the arrival of Santa Claus with
keen anticipation. j.;
Each Xrnas 7'lSatata Clans
comes. He hri^7*a© ;W*y, toys,
and such. ;^7
I keep writing him and telling him that I am a university
student.
Santa Claus keeps bringing
me candy, toys, and such.
He is a nasty man.
I hate Santa Claus.
WORSHIP ON CAMPUS
EVERY SUNDAY AT
St. Timothy
Lutheran Church
11:00 Worship
10:00  Bible Study
Hut L4 - East Mall
Rod Taylor
6164 Fraser
FA 1-6249
Special o n Continental
styled slacks made to measure $10.00 and up. We do
any kind of alterations on
ladies and men's clothing.
Lowest Prices In
Town
Sex in a ice idfeam tilisb in Brock
A fourth year student and
a freshman were walking outside a cafe when the senior
suggested going in for some
ice cream. When they .were
seated the senior asked the
waiter if the ice cream was
pure. "As pure as the girl of
your  dreams," was the reply.
"I'll have a dish," said the
frosh.
The senior said, "Give me a
coffee."
People are inclined to laugh
when they hear this. They
think it's funny. They also
think there might be some
truth in it. But is there? Is
there any more sex in university than anywhere else? Does
the typical UBC student think
of sex all the time? The
answer is a resounding YES!
But that doesn't tell half
the story. It doesn't explain
the vicarious thrill of a frosh
discovering D. H. Lawrence,
or the psychology student as
he finds that not only are
there others like him, but they
even have a name all their
own!
These people can't even begin to realize the feeling of
self-righteousness experienced
by a freshette as her newfound boy friend tells her going to bed is not wrong, it is
merely a healthy way of relieving' tensions. Of course,
that's nothing to the feeling
her boyfriend has.
Go into the Brock coffee
shop, and hear the angry young
lions expounding on freelove.
Go into the Brock lounge and
see their older brothers and
sisters  practicing  free love.
Go over to the education
building. Look, look, look.
See, see, see. Oh, oh, OH!
Take a look at the sociology
department getting a fir'st haad
view of the population explosion, or the Asian studied see'
ing  how  the   Mongols .spend
their spare time.
And stand on the Mall, and
hear the professors telling that
The Bomb Is going to drop.
And hear also the budding
young Engineer telling his girl
that if they don't get busy
very soon, the fallout will fix
it so that he has nothing to .jet
busy with. He has the facts
and charts to back him up, too.
Amazingly thorough, these
Engineers.
Or look at that forester,
getting experience by taking
DBH's on his girl friend.
He'll have something to remember on those long winter
nights in the bush.
And if you really want ah
experience, come down to the
Pub and watch some of those
layout girls at work. On a cu>
cular table, yet!
So next time someone asks
you how it's going out at UniW
versify, yoii can tell him .-. .
Frats kicked off
Memorial campus
. St. JOHN'S (CUP)—Student
council at Memorial University
of Newfoundland has rejected^
the constitution of a new fraternity and stated it wishes no
further frats on the campus.
The council rejected the constitution of Ceve Cadem on the"
grounds it did not wish to, assume responsibility for the
group's   actions.
In a statement: issued to the
Memorial " student newspaper,*
The Muse, spokesmen for Cave
Cadem said the fraternity would
continue to operate despite the
council action.
;W$'i$?(
Consider the time you invest getting
your degree as a percentage of your
working life. It would be about 11%. To
get the most out of the remaining 89% your
work should provide the opportunity and
the scope to use your professional knowledge
and natural ability to best advantage.
Cominco is one of the world's largest
mining, metallurgical and chemical enter
prises. It is growing and diversifying. Its
range of activities provide interesting and
challenging opportunities for graduates in
engineering, geology, physics, chemistry,
commerce and many other professions. We
suggest you make it a point to see our personnel representatives when they visit your
campus. Cominco has much to offer you.
.
THE  CONSOLIDATED   MINING  AND  SMELTING  COMPANY  OF  CANADA  LIMITED
Trail, British Columbia ..     ,      .   -     .
A Great Canadian Enterprise Montreal, Quebec Friday, November 30, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
*■> '
ryl»   ■
»«'     *   .-
lii#Ws
UBYSSEY SPIES discovered
Hurleburte Blotz soaking up
culture in Brock card room.
"I'm broke," he said, "but
don't worry. I have cm ace up
my sleeve."
Empty Bottle Fund expose
By SNOOKI MOYER
Christmas hasn't been a
happy time for the Blotz family since daddy died 28 years
ago.
This Christmas the Blotz
family will live again with
their memories.
Like the memory of the full
case of Scotch that Hurlburte
Blotz always brought home
Christmas Eve. This always
heralded the yuletide for the
happy family.
• •      *
_And what a treat is used to
be for the seven little Blotz
children to sit around the kitchen table and hear daddy,
, with his red nose and foul
breath, tell funny dirty jokes.
Then one Christmas daddy
wasn't there. Christmas Eye
he had fallen 3,342 feet from
the roof of the Bennett Building.
Mrs. Blotz has tried her best
since then. But it hasn't been
easy.
Twenty-eight years of trying
to feed and clothe sevenv children on the $15 a year the welfare gives her has aged her.
Once she was beautiful but
time has Wearied her and the
years forgot.
• •      •
As I spoke to her, she
looked around the one room
basement flat and patted her
few remaining wisps of grey
hair.
"Sure/we've had it rough,"
she told me. "But at least the
whole bloody family is still together."
International house
opened at Queen's
KINGSTON (CUP) — The
fourth international house in
Canada was opened last week
at Queen's University, Kingston.
A temporary centre, donated
by a Kingston Rotarian, and
furnished by city service organizations, was opened by the university president.
FOR
THAT
SMART'
LOOK
IN
GLASSES
LOOK
TO
Mw*^ «**—**.
PteMlibtieH Ohticd
We  use  GENUINE   CORECTAt   lenses
Clear from EDGE to EDGE
"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special Discount to Undergraduates
Established 1924
to her knees and wept
Herman, 47, is the oldest of
thechildfen, He graduates this
June from high school and
wants to go on to university—
if the family can afford it.
Since he had his bout with
elephantitis 31 years ago, he
has been unable to work.
The youngest daughter,
Mary, 23, supplements the
family income with a few odd
jobs along Cordova Street
during the night.
"She doesn't get much," said
Mrs. Blotz. "But every little
bit helps."
As the two of us watched
Mary peacefully sleeping on
the floor, her mother murm-
ered sadly: "If only she could
get rid of that acne, then maybe ... "
•     *     +
Not one of the Blotz family
has escaped hardship. But
While other families have
drifted apart they have; stayed
together, clinging to their
mother for support, guidance,
money, booze, cigarets, food.
And does Mrs. 7 Blotz complain? "Why, life wouldn't be
the same without those rotten
little free-loaders," she says affectionately.
This year, the welfare
people will try to make Christ
mas happier for the Blotz
family, after ignoring them
for 25 years.
Mrs. Amelia Gooch, a district supervisor, said the agen^
cy hopes there'll be enough
money to buy Mrs. Blotz two
pounds of pig liver for Christmas dinner.
"ButWe'll; have to have
help??;M;rfc: Gpoeh told me.
I'vie 4©ne my pgrt. As I left
the Bfetz hovel, *I slipped *
mickey of rye behind the
chesterfield.
You can help by contributing
to the Empty Bottle Fund,
care of this paper.
REQUIRES
Undergraduates, graduates and post graduates in engineering and honours science for summer, and permanent employment.
INTERVIEWSWITH REPRESENTATIVES ON
January 8, 9, 10, 11.
Your University Placement; Office can provide details and
literature about Gominco and arrange an  interview.
THE CONSOLIDATED MINING AND
SMELTING COMPANY OF CANADA
LIMITED
Vancouver Citizens
"There's Two Sides to the Coin,
That's what I always say. Let those people
that want to go to a movie on Sunday—go
to it. Those that don't want to, can still stay
at home. ,j
A lot of my regulars will be here if the show
does open Sundays, I'm sure of that. Most
of them are just ordinary folk, like myself.
They can't afford to go charging off to the
golf course every Sunday, or spend the
weekends at their cottages—because most
©f them don't have one!
Let people do what they want to with their
spare time, is what I always say. As long as
it's not something that's really bad for them
of course. I'll bet a lot of people that think
it's wrong to open the shows on Sunday, sit
at home and watch movies on T.V.
Like I always say—there's two sides to the
coin. I'm on the side of movies on Sundays
for those people that want them . .. How
about you? ,
VOTE YES ON DECEMBER 12th
FOR SUNDAY MOVIES • PLAYS •
CONCERTS • SYMPHONIES • OPERAS
B. C. Exhibitors Association Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30,  1962
MSI holder or not
Health Service free tcr all students
By BOB BURTON
Ubyssey Feature Writer
.•  Are   you. bothered   by   migrans   head aches,    measles,
schizophrenia,    or   lack    of
sleep?
Chances are the University
Health Service can help you.
Its staff of 33, including,
physicians, a full time psychiatrist, nurses, technicians, and
aides are always ready to be
of service to you.
A recent tour of this establishment convinced me that I
had none of the above ailments,
but the speed and completeness of the organization
thoroughly surprised me.
"We have to keep things on
the move," explained Dr, A. M.
Johnson, Health Service director, : "or we would be
-quickly swamped."
IAt- the reception desk the
"Health Service works with
production line techniques.
Each student is requited to fill
"WELL, SOME PEOPLE leaf
through libraries, I leaf
through gardens."
Toronto Library hits
million book mark
TORONTO (CUP)—A $5,000
manuscript on a little-known
facet of Canada's early history
has become the one millionth
volume in the University of
Toronto's central library.
The university has another
890,000 books in various libraries scattered across the campus
and in .affiliated colleges.
.     GETTING 1NGAGED?
-4<V% Discount pins -3- years Insurance
on f ine -Quality Diamond ringra.
Also 25%. Discount on Famous Brand
Name   Watcties.
BUoSe   Mel   Battenstoy,   Sc.   4
PA  7-2589
Ejrening-s and Weekends
Bolero Party Lounge
Available   for   Parties
Weddi ngs—fta nq uets—etc.
NIGHT   CLUB  ATMOSPHERE
CATERING  OPTIONAL
Re 8-7910
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.        MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We   specialize
in
v        Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
West Point Grey
United Church
"Just Outside the Gates"
4595  West   Eighth   Ave.
Minister: Rev. Wilfred Fearn
Services: 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
Young Peoples Union to
which all students are invited meets Sundays at 8:45 p.m.
Choir practice Thursdays
at 8:00 p.m.
out a card marking down vital
information for the doctor.
Usually.one sees the doctor
on the first visit, provided he
reports before 3 p.m. on any
day. Further consultations are
handled on an appointment basis.
Even with 32,000 visits per
year, students are not taking
fullest advantage of the service.
Dr. Johnson, said that although the Health Service was
instrumental in setting up the
University MSI plan, care at
the Health Service is provided
at no cost to the student,
whether he has MSI coverage
or not.
• " • ■■ •
"We encourage immediate attention to illness and injury,"
said Dr. Johnson, "for a student who waits for corapBoa-.
tions of a minor ailment may
endanger his own health: and
that Of his fellow students"
Although! every effort has
been tnade; by the University
to familiarize students with
the organization and procedures of the University Health
Service, there seems to be
some confusion amongst the
students as to the services offered by the U.H.S.
•      *      •
"Our service is the most
comprehensive varsity health
plan in action in Canada,"
stated Dr. Johnson.
Services to the student even
include psychiatric consultation. The resident psychiatrist
and the part-time consultant
handled.over 1,000 visits last
year.
Free TB tests, X-rays, free
allergy shots, and an immunization clinic every Thursday
afternoon are also offered to
the student.
The Faculty of Pharmacy
and the University Health Ser
vice have obtained permission
from the Board of Goverhara
to supply prescription drugs
on the campus at a reduced
-• cost to the  student.
The Health Service worka
closely with the Physical Education Department, and takea
the responsibility of examining, members of the University
athletic teams.
The 27-bed hospital on the
third floor of Wesbrook is
primarily for the treatment oi
medical illnesses. Minor surgery (simple fractures, operations not requiring general
anaesthesia) is handled in the
clinic on the main floor.
•      •      •
The hospital is open 24 hours
a day and a physician is available at night for emergency
cases.
Within the next five years
a 300-bed hospital and research centre will be completed near the present site of the
Wesbrook building. It is likely
that the organization will be
relocated in the new building
and only the 27-bed infirmary
will remain at the present
site.-
Choose an
Engineering Career
with a Progressive
Company
Northern Electrie,aname to consider
We make the things that make
communications possible: from underground cable to tropospheric
scatter systems. This diversity employs over 17,000 skilled people in
our seven manufacturing works in
Canada. As Canada's prime communications supplier, we have a place
for creative-minded graduates in
engineering and science.
If you have an advanced degree,
you may join the scientific staff
of our Research and Development
Laboratories in Ottawa, which
are one of the finest and largest
communications research facilities
in Canada.
Northern's production includes
everything required by telephone
operating companies: from crossbar
automatic exchanges through cable
to handsets. Electronics production
includes radio and TV broadcast
equipment; microwave, radar and
control equipment. There are excellent career opportunities for graduates-in all branches of engineering,
for Honours Science graduates, and
for advanced degree graduates in
Engineering and Science.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A view of the communications .research laboratories,
near Ottawa.
One of three manufacturing locations in Montreal,
producing telephone exchange equipment and associated apparatus.
The Belleville Works, where electronic equipment is
engineered.
Lachine Plant where wire and cable for power transmission and communications is produced.
London Works-manufacturing plant for telephone
apparatus.
SEE YOUR PLACEMENT OFFICER or the NORTHERN ELECTRIC REPRESENTATIVE
when he visits your campus. Ask for a copy of "Your New Engineering Career".
6062*11
Hortftern Electric
COMPANY   LIM4TED Friday, November 30, 1962
THE      UBYSSEY
Page   19
30 percent agnostic
Acadians probe Christians
WOLFVILLE (CUP)—A survey by Acadian University
student newspaper, The Athenaeum, has shown that only 51
per cent of the students interviewed consider themselves to
be Christians. The remaining
were divided as follows: Agnostic, 30 per cent; atheist 4 per
cent and others 15 per cent.
"Others" includes persons
of religions other than Chist-
ianity and also  diests.
The survey, a random sampling by year was given to 100
students.
It showed that a higher per- '
centage of girls than boys said
they were Christians. 48 per
cent of the boys said they were
Christians while 55 per cent
of the girls claimed the same.
Among the boys 28 per cent
said they were agnostic, 3 per
cent atheist and 19 per cent
others.
Girls had 31 per cent agnostic, 5 per cent atheist and 9
per cent others.
The survey showed that students in second year prayed
less often, attended church
less often and read the bibJe
less often. Second year students showed the lowest per
centage of professed Christians.
Fifty-three per cent of the
students said they believed
the bible to be, in some cases
outmoded, 11 per cent answered a definite yes to the
question while 36 per cent held
that the bible was not outmoded.
Seventy- three per cent said
they believed the bible to bs
a book of morals based on
bother fact and myth.
Half the students interviewed
said they believed the story
of Adam and Eve to be one of
poetic expression. Sixteen per
cent accepted the story as fact
while 34 per cent said they ac
St James' Church
Gore Ave. & Cordova St.
ANGLICAN    EPISCOPAL
Sunday Services
7:30 a.m. Low Mass
8:00 a.m. Matins
8:30 a.m. Low Mass
9:30 a.m. Family Mass
11:15 a.m. High Mass
7:30 p.m. Solemn
Evensong
Mass Daily at 7:15 a.m.
Confessions: Saturday 7-8
p.m. and 8:30 - 9:00 p.m.
Double Breasted Suits
Converted to
Single Breasted
Slacks Narrowed
1
JNITfcP TAILOR
549 Granville St.
s
Wanted
Student for light housekeeping, in return for desirable
room and board in quiet
home. Surroundings conducive   to   study.  Some  salary.
Beginning Spring Term.
References essential. Apply
by letter 4572 West Second
Ave.
ART - SUPPLIES
Oil-Colors,   Brushes
and  Canvasses,   Pastels,
Water   Colors   and
Charcoal—Courtesy   Discounts
to Students
The Canada Paint
CO.   LTD.
2380   West 4th     RE   8-1818
cepted neither answer.
Three-quarters of the students said they believed in the
theory of evolution.
Fifty-five per cent of the
students interviewed said they
believed in an after life. 19
per cent did not and 26 per
cent said they didn't know.
Forty-six per cent of the
students said they believed
Christianity would advance in
years to come while 30 said
it would not. Twenty-four per
cent did not have an opinion.
There
is
no charge
for
our
services
11101
fr
rn irai
rel
lit)
tited
4345 Dunbai
' Street
VI
Vet
ncouver 8, B.C.
Telephone 224-3110
HufacHA fiaifOii&fa
Ccmpahif iitnited
tohlf
CALGARY
Has
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
for
GRADUATES
and
UNDERGRADUATES
in the fields of
Petroleum Production Engineering
Pipe Line Engineering
Geophysics
Geology Accounting
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD ON
January 29, 30, 31, and February 1
Students wishing advance information may write the company  Recruiting  Co-ordinator  at  320,   7th  Ave.,  S.W.,
CALGARY, .ALBERTA
APPOINTMENTS FOR
INTERVIEWS SHOULD BE MADE THROUGH
THE PLACEMENT OFFICE
NICKEL  IN   WORLD   MARKETS...JOBS   FOR CANADIANS
How Canadian Nickel helps irrigate 1000 sq. miles of Australia
The multi-million dollar Snowy Mountain Scheme will irrigate a thousand square
miles of previously unproductive land in south eastern Australia. And nickel alloys
will help, just as they do in similar projects in other parts of the world. Why
nickel? Because nickel alloys provide strength and corrosion resistance for conduit
shafts and other vital equipment. The growth of nickel markets at home and abroad
helps strengthen Canada's economy and helps provide more jobs for Canadians.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
55 YONGE STREET, TORONTO Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 30, 1962
■r-i'ii.1.1.".   ■ .. J :
■'-rii
"PERFECT MILDNESS
IN YQtfR PIPE"
■*♦.'■
IS
7 i%;;, :#Kihadi'sy, mmc
^tSllstt^vjs7.* special
'^Cavenclish" Mend of
Mild tobaccos.:Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
50< a pouch
Suggested Prlc»
Also available in
vacuum packed half pound tin
"Get out of my way, baby.
I'll make my own TCA reservations***
A/ways a good idea to make certain you travel the fasti
economicaf way Sy TCA.
Vancouver to Calgary
$62  Return  Economy  Fare
Ask about even lower grouj> fares
for  groups   of  10  or  more,  flj ing
in  Canada.
TRANS-CANADA AIRLINES
AIR CANADA
WRIGHT'S
g EUROPEAN
STUDENT
TOUR
'316
PLUS FARE
•EIGHT WEEKS  •TWELVE COUNTRIES  ©TWENTY-TWO CITIES
You leave London May 29th on the trip of your life.
Arranged under the auspices of the Overseas Visitors
Club, Wright's special tour takes you to England, Holland,
Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Italy, Austria, Germany,
Spain, Yugoslavia, Switzerland and France. You'll see the
world's great capitals travelling by modern motor coach,
staying each night in carefully selected hotels and pensions . . . with breakfast supplied. Your bilingual courier
will see you miss nothing. The cost is so low there'll be a
rush for bookings. Do contact Wright's Travel Service
today.
Contact Peter Macpherson ai AM 6-0534, or
^WRIGHT'S TRAVEL SERVICE I/TD.
818 Hows Street, Vancouver 1, B.C. - Ph. 684-5185
WRIGHTS  57day
EUROPEAN
STUDENT HOLIDAY
• Twelve Countries
• Twenty-two cities
©   Leaving  London May 29th
FROM  LONDON
CLIP and MAIL I
For   further   information   regarding   "EUROPEAN   '
STUDENT1 HOLIDAY" or other tours '
NAME 	
ADDRESS
 , ... PHONE No   I
I
YOUR    PREFERENCE    OF    TRANSPORT    TO  ,
LONDON                     RAIL-SEA Q AIR □   •
TO LEAVE VANCOUVER 	
ENJOY EUROPE 1963 -
THE WAY EUROPEANS DO
For Further Information Regarding This
"European Student Holiday" Or Other Tours
Please Fill In The Coupon And Mail Tm
Date
WRIGHT'S TRAVEL SBBTICB LTD. 818 Howe Street. MU 4-5185
4  WRIGHTS TRAVEL SERVICE LTD
818   HOWE  STREET,
VANCOUVER,  B.C.

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