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The Ubyssey Feb 21, 1967

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 Vol. XLVIII, No. 49
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   TUESDAY,   FEBRUARY   21,   1967 <*>Ǥ^*4?
224-3916
CIA funds back CUS
—kurt hilger photo
DRIBBLE, DRIBBLE poster paint, who's to be arts president?" mumble
anarchist Steve Garrod and bearded friend Richard MacKellar as they
paint in the cafeteria to install candidate Stan Persky.
Munton defeats Larsen;
AMS fee hike rejected
Third-year arts student Don Munton was elected AMS first vice-president in last Wednesday's second slate
elections.
Munton got 2,737 votes to 1,767
for runner-up Ray Larsen, also arts 3.
A total of 240 were spoiled.
A referendum to raise AMS fees
was defeated by
2,533 votes to 2,262
with 33  spoiled.
Munton was elected on a campaign
of equaliza-
grants for out of
town students, a
residence survey to
provide a basis for
design of new residences, and a student ombudsman for any student problems   with   the   administration.
AMS treasurer Lome Hudson was
"extremely disappointed" at the defeat of the fee increase referendum.
"We're in tough shape financially,
especially in the realm of promoting
higher education."
Hudson said next year will be "critical".
"Some budgets are already overspent with still two months to go,"
he complained.
Hudson said the AMS might consider reducing its commitment to
Canadian Union of Students.
"The membership is a tremendous
price — $12,000 a year."
Hudson said he and treasurer-elect
David Hoye would meet to discuss
which budgets would be cut. A report will be made to the AMS in the
near future.
;*
MUNTON
FACULTY
SECRET
The UBC faculty association
will maintain its policy of secret
meetings.
Association president, Dr.
Robert Stewart, told The
Ubyssey Monday that future
meetings of the body will remain behind closed doors without newspaper coverage.
Stewart indicated that the
question of open meetings could
be discussed but said "this
would not be an executive decision — it would have to be
decided at a general meeting".
Stewart's restatement of association policy follows a similar
move by president John Macdonald last week when he said
that UBC board of governors
will maintain closed meetings.
Ward protests
covert intrusion'
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian
Union of Students is among 25 organizations identified as receiving
contributions from foundations connected with the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.
The New York Times reported
Sunday CUS was one of the student
organizations receiving contributions
from CIA-connected foundations.
A Conservative member of parliament promised Sunday night he would
renew questioning of Prime Minister
Pearson on alleged CIA grants to
Canadian university groups.
Eric Winkler (GreyjBruce) claimed
in a telephone interview that $220,000
had been made available to student
groups in Canada under CIA auspices
"to carry on surveillance work of Red
infiltration in university organizations."
Leaders beat draft
See page 3
The Times report included the National Federation of Canadian University Students, as CUS was known
until late 1963, in. a list of groups
receiving grants from the New York-
based Foundation for Youth and Students' Affairs (FYSA), allegedly a
CIA-front organization.
CUS past-president Pat Kenniff,
contacted in Quebec City, said CUS
had applied for and received a grant
from FYSA to sponsor two seminars
on international affairs, one in 1964-65
and the other in 1965-66. CUS received about $1,500 from FYSA.
CUS president Doug "Ward in
Ottawa Sunday said, "We figured
they had a great interest in giving
money to student organizations and
since there is little money available
in Canada, we applied for the grant."
Last week Ward denied CUS had
received CIA money.
Commenting on Winkler's allegations,  Ward  added,  "To the best of
my knowledge, none of this money
has ever been offered to CUS."
Kenniff denied too that any CIA
funds other than the FYSA grant had
been given to CUS during his tenure.
Both Ward and Kenniff said they
hadn't known FYSA was connected
with the CIA until last week, and
Ward added, "I don't think the CIA
got very good value for their money."
David Jenkins, 1963-63 CUS president, contacted Sunday night in Calgary, said during his year in office
CUS had regular communications with
the U.S. national student association,
but that "at no time
was I aware that
it was involved
with the CIA."
CUS wrote a letter Monday to prime
m i n ister Pearson
protesting a "covert
intrusion by the U.S.
government into the
private affairs of
Canadian organizations." WARD
CUS president Doug Ward and
vice-president Dave Young told Pearson in their letters they are "deeply
distressed ... by the disclosure that
ostensibly private philanthropic agencies are actually tools of the U.S.
intelligence network."
Their letter asks Pearson to give
them "assurance that the RCMP is not
engaged in any similar operations."
The CUS officials say a check of
CUS records has revelaed a contribution "on at least two occasions."
Apparently the check was made
sometime between the day Ward said
CUS hadn't received CIA - tinged
money and Sunday, when the Times
story appeared.
Said the letter: "The problem lies
in the growing influence which could
be exerted — especially in youth and
To page 3
See: GOV'T WON'T
Free coffee  percs    lately
for night-time Brock types
The Brock growly ladies produced
gallons of free coffee Monday night.
And hundreds of late studiers stood
stood in line to gulp down the brew
and take advantage of the cafeteria's
new late opening schedule.
Brock, which formerly closed at
4:30 p.m. weekdays and 12:30 p.m.
Saturdays, will now stay open until
10 p.m. Saturday closing time is 5
p.m.
Brock has also added an entree of
meat and vegetables for supper.
Dietician Olga Rumen said the experimental schedule will continue at
least until exams begin in April.
"Things always drop off then anyway," she said.
The late opening was proposed by
students   on   the   student-administra
tion food services advisory committee. It was reluctantly accepted by
food head Ruth Blair.
Miss Rumen said because of the
free coffee, an opening night special,
she was unable to tell if the cafeteria
collected enough to break even. Miss
Blair said earlier it would show a
profit if the evening's take was more
than $175.
The bus stop coffee shop is the only
other campus eatery open until 10
p.m.
LIE DETECTOR
See page 4 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1967
$5  STIMULUS
NY aids poor students
NEW YORK (UNS) — Poor students who
have strong potential despite lagging grades
will be given a chance to go to college under
a program bringing together the board of
education, two Roman Catholic school systems and 39 colleges and universities here.
The plan, going into effect next fall, will
affect 2,000 to 3,000 ninth and tenth grade
students who would not ordinarily go to
college.
Each year this number will ibe placed in
small classes where they will receive more
courses and greater individual attention than
usual.
In some cases the students may be paid
five dollars a week as a stimulus.
When students emerge from the program
with grades as low as 70 or 75 per cent, they
will be guaranteed admission to the 39
higher institutions — including Columbia
University, Sarah Lawrence and City University.
Assistant superintendent of schools Jacob
Landers, said the program will ultimately
include all disadvantaged children with
potential.
"Although the bulk of the affected students will probably be negro or Puerto
Rican, poor students of all ethnic categories
will be sought out and encouraged," he said.
The Rev. Timothy Healy, executive vice-
president of Fordham University and steering
committee chairman of the program, said
funds would toe sought from federal, state
and city sources.
The initial grant of $40,000 was made by
the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The
board of education has allocated $1.5 million
to the program.
Starting next  September,  selected  stu
dents will toe placed in special classes of ten
to 12 students.
The students will be given an enriched
academic program — probably six major
courses instead of four — during an extended school day.
Emphasis will be in English, mathematics,
science, intensive guidance and counselling,
cultural subjects and remedial work.
Financial aid, in the form of scholarships,
loans and work-study grants, will also be
given.
Faculties added
HAMILTON (CUP) — Students entering
McMaster University this fall will no longer
identify themselves as arts and sciencemen.
They will belong, instead, to the faculty
of science, humanities, social sciences or
business — depending on which course of
studies they have chosen to pursue.
Brits to boycott
HULiL, England (UNS) — A meeting of
British student union presidents here has
laid plans for a nation-wide boycott of
classes tomorrow.
Students and university staffs are angered
over government plans to increase fees for
overseas students from $210 to $750 per
year. The government says the increase
would save $55 million annually.
Manchester University vice-chancellor
Sir William Cooper said the decision to raise
fees is "discrimination aimed at destroying
the toest that universities stand for."
Low Marx
POINT GREY (staff)—People
are stupid, ignorant, and dumb,
noted lecturer B. M. Lee told
a distinguished audience in
The Modern Cafe Monday, continuing her Marxists are Idiots
theme of the previous week.
"I am insincere," she added.
Vancouver Inner-City
Project
— Limited number of scholarships
available for full time summer
workers.
— For information contact S.C.M.
Room 350. Brock Ext.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
nqvru
lui
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23
at 12:30 -3:30 -6:00 -8:30
AUDITORIUM - 50c
SPECIAL       EVENTS
PRESENTS
JAZZ
with the
BYRON POPE
QUARTET
From New York, L.A. & San Francisco
One   Day   Only
TODAY-12.30 AUD.
Coming    Feb. 28 - Don Crawford
THEY'RE
COMING!
300 NEW FOREIGN STUDENTS
WILL ARRIVE THIS FALL
JOIN THE  OVERSEAS STUDENT
RECEPTION PROGRAM -
BE A "BUDDY"
See us now at International House
2244535
Wednesday, February 22
COMMON LOUNGES
Auditorium — 8:31  p.m.
Lower  Mall —   10:01   p.m.
NO CHARGE
Sfmmi if Cnttftt Gmtis fat Cktitt lat$mflntt
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
* •<,->
s*M& ^ Tuesday, February 21, 1967
THE      U-BYS5EY
Page 3
Referendum hits U.S.,
bombing halt supported
— powell hargrave photo
TRACK STARS Kipchoge Keino (seated) and Daniel Rudi-
sha, in Vancouver for the Achilles Track Meet, addressed
students at the Memorial gym yesterday. They were guests
of the African Students Association at International
House Sunday.
Fee hike failure
may hit athletics
Tenders for the student union building will be opened
Feb. 24.
Students are invited to the opening bids, which will mark
the beginning of construction on the $4.6 million building, AMS
treasurer Lome Hudson said at council Monday.
Treasurer-elect David Hoye discussed the failure of the
AMS fee-raise referendum and proposed reassessment of the
$80,000 AMS grant to athletics.
"If we could reduce the non-discretionary $5 grant to about
$3. with another amount subject to the discretion of council,
this would reduce the strain on next year's budget," said Hoye.
"It is essential that athletics have some non-discretionary
funds, because some of their programs extend for several years,"
Hoye said.
"However, we will have to trim next year's budget somewhere and athletics is a possible place."
Changes in non-discretionary allocations must be approved
at AMS general meeting.
Hoye said he would try to arrange a mini-budget to bring
before council next week.
The referendum to approve a $3 fee raise had only 37
per cent in favor.
HOUSING ACTION PLAN
In other business council moved to authorize housing coordinator Ray Larsen to form a definite plan of action to expand
the AMS housing service.
Secretary Gayle Gaskell criticized undergrad society presidents for not providing ballot counters for the last election.
"If none turn up for the March 1 election, we will lock the
boxes and bring them to council, and you can count them
here," threatened Gaskell.
She termed "infantile" the resolution of architecture head
Jack Redenback to provide no help with elections as long as
returning officer Pat Meehan remains in that post.
United States Vietnam policy lost in two
out of three questions in Wednesday's Vietnam referendum — despite more than 1,000
spoiled ballots.
The first part of the referendum, urging
the Canadian government to advocate the
U_S. stop bombing North Vietnam, received
the greatest support — 2,639 yes votes,
1,563 votes against and 755 spoiled.
The second part, approving Canada's
sale of armaments to the U.S., won by only
37 votes — 1,787 yes to 1,750 no and 1,150
spoiled.
The third part, pledging "total support"
for U.S. policy in Vietnam, got 1,263 yes
votes, 2,371 no votes and  1,053 spoiled.
Returning officer Pat Meehan, engineering 4, offered one answer for the large
number of spoiled ballots.
"Largely people didn't fill them in; there
were a great number of blank ballots," said
Meehan.
Meehan said voters wrote things across
the ballots like "loaded question."
"They wrote to the effect that there was
no real choice in the referendum."
The opinion of some of the ballot counters was that the referendum was "poorly
worded."
The only irregularity in the voting was
Dissent vs. law
seminar topic
The Individual in Jeopardy will be California philosopher Dr. Joseph Tussman's
topic in a special extension department program Friday and Saturday.
Problems of loyalty and dissent within
a democracy will be the focus of his Friday
lecture at 8 p.m. in Bu. 106.
Saturday's program will concentrate on
the dilemma of loyalty and the unjust law.
It will consist of a series of seminars beginning at 9 a.m. in Ang. 415.
Tussman is presently director of the experimental arts program at University of
California, Berkeley, and previously was
chairman of Berkeley's philosophy department.
Assisting and interrogating him will be
Dr. Alan Afoerbach of Simon Fraser Academy's history department, UBC law prof.
J. Noel Lyon, and Paul Tennant of the
political science department.
Fees for the program are $10 for both
sessions, or $2 for the Friday lecture only.
Further information is available from
the extension department office, 228-2181.
the auditorium cafeteria poll not opening
until  1 p.m.
Meehan blamed a lack of poll workers
for it.
"I was informed before 10 a.m. that the
architects wouldn't manage the poll."
He said he had already used all the
spare workers.
"If people had lived up to their commitments this might not have happened."
Draft deferment
for NSA leaders
WASHINGTON, D.C. (CUP) — Three
more college student groups have been linked to undercover financial backing by the
United States Central Intelligence Agency.
As the controversy mushroomed, a congressman said military draft deferments
have been granted leaders of one group.
But the CIA remained silent about a
report in a Washington newspaper that it
was giving financial aid to three other student organizations in addition to the National Student Association, the largest student organization in the U.S.
The Evening Star identified the three
other groups as the U.S. Youth Council with
headquarters in New York, the World Assembly of Youth in Brussels, and the International Student Conference in Leyden,
Netherlands.
Tuesday the government acknowledged
the NSA had been receiving funds from the
American espionage agency for over a decade.
Thus the ISC, which is American backed, is by implication receiving financial
support from the CIA. But confirmation or
denial of CIA involvement with the two
other student groups has not been forthcoming.
The draft deferment disclosure occurred
when Democrat Robert Kastenmeier said he
had information that top NSA officers automatically received a 2-A occupational deferment from the Selective Service Board.
"It goes with the job," said Kastenmeier,
one of eight House of Representatives members who called on President Johnson to
order an inquiry "at the highest level" of
the NSA-CIA link.
But a selective service spokesman denied
Kastenmeier's charge, saying he knew of
no special treatment for National Student
Association officers.
FROM PAGE I
Gov't won't complain
student affairs where finances
are seriously limited — by an
organization with much available cash and hidden purposes."
Pearson told the Commons
Monday that the Canadian government is reluctant to register
a formal complaint with the
U.S. over CIA involvement in
Canadian organizations.
In reply to questions from
opposition leader John Diefenbaker, 'PC memiber Eric Winkler and NDP frontbencher
David Lewis, the prime minister also said he has "no knowledge" of money given to such
groups by the U.S. spy agency
"or by any other foreign
power."
He acknowledged receiving a
letter from CUS which told of
two grants it received from an
alleged CIA front organization.
But  Pearson  indicated  the
amount of money involved —
$1,500 — and the fact CUS says
the front organization didn't
affect the nature of two seminars it financed, probably won't
warrant further action on the
matter.
RampartsN magazine revealed
last week the NSA had 'been
receiving large amounts of
money from the CIA for the
past 15 years.
The Times article also listed
Crossroads Africa, World University Service and the United
States Student Press Association among 25 organizations
receiving FYSA aid.
USSPA secretary Robert
Gross said his organization had
received $2,900 from a CIA-
affiliated foundation in the
summer of 1965 to finance an
indian student working on a
US campus paper and a study
of USSPA international programming.
In the Commons last Friday,
Winkler asked for an investigation to ensure the CIA and
ROMP don't use students at
Canadian universities to gather
police intelligence.
In reply, defence minister
Paul Hellyer said he had no
knowledge that students were
engaged in undercover assignments for the CIA, but promised to investigate.
"We didn't know the CIA
was backing the NSA or the
ISC (International Student Conference), "commented Richard
Good, former CUS vice-president in Winnipeg.
Good said the Canadian position has been that the ISC was
being used as a tool for cold
war politics, and one of the
reasons for CIA support was to
thwart the Communist-'backed
International Union of Students. THE MYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of B.C. Editorial opinions are the editor's and not of the AMS
or the university. Member, Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized second class
mail by Post Office Department. Ottawa, and for payment
of postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 244-3242:
editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; features, sports,
loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26. Telex  04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
. for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
FEBRUARY  14,   1967
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City        Danny Stoffman
Newt   Al Blmto
Photo—           Powell Hargrave
Page Friday     Claudia Gwinn
Sports        .    Sue Gransby
Managing — Murray McMillan
Focus —   Kris Emmott
Ass't News  Al Donald
Ass't City                                    Tom Morris'
CUP   Bert Hill
News: Norman Gidney, Slipper
Mac, Dave Cursons, Peter Shapiro, Charlotte Haire, Mary Ussner, Margaret Ladbury, Boni Lee.
S p o r t s : Jim Maddin, Ross
Evans, Pio Uran, Bev Feather,
Mike Jessen.
Photo: Kurt Hilger, Don Kydd,
Chris Blake, John Tilley, Derrek   Webb.
Has-Beens: Norm Betts, Pat
Hrushowy.
The lie detector
The statement UBC's board of
continuing secret meetings
The Ubyssey has compared the tmiversity
to a municipality. This is not a valid comparison. The tmiversity is not a legislative
body but an institution devoted to learning.
The board of governors has vested in it by the
universities act the management and control
of the property, revenue business and affairs of
the university. It is responsible "to do and
perform all matters and things which may be
necessary for the well-ordering and advancement of the university".
governors authorized to explain its
is logical nonsense. Here's why:
Municipal councils also have vested in
them the management and control of the
property, revenue business and affairs of
the municipality. The board and the council both perform exactly equivalent duties
for the advancement and well-ordering of
their affairs. The comparison is valid;
both institutions have about the same legislative powers within the laws of the
province.
The board is responsible not to arty particular segment of society but to the people of the
province as a whole and to the tradition of a
university to make judgments and decisions
which are aimed at creating and improving an
environment of learning.
If this were true, all the more reason
for open meetings. But the board in reality
represents only the top level of B.C.'s
corporate elite. It is responsible only to
the segment which controls the industry;
nobody else sits on or near it. In theory,
to the people as a whole. In practice, not at
all, because it is secret.
Its decisions are reported promptly in the
UBC Gazette which is available to all press
media. In addition, decisions and background
material are now reported fully and promptly
in UBC Reports following board meetings, and
the press is provided with fully documented
news releases.
The Soviet theory of the press once
claimed the same reasoning to release only
information favorable to the government,
at none but opportune moments. The cold
war thaw in recent years has slightly
softened the Kremlin's strictures.
The board wishes to conduct is business in
an atmosphere conducive to sound decisionmaking. Many of the items on each agenda
are necessarily of a confidential nature, e.g.
staff appointments, personnel problems, construction estimates, gifts, salary information
provided by other universities and estimates for
operating and capital purposes. Most other
items represent routine progress reports of
monthly financial and building statements.
Sound decision making should include
an opportunity for the people affected by
decisions to learn of the factors which
made one alternative superior to another.
If the board were omniscient, it could
confidently make sound decisions in
camera. It is not omniscient.
It is easier for the board to consider proposed policies and decisions in an objective and
analytical way when meetings are in camera
rather than in the environment of a public
meeting. Furthermore, the board wants its
advice from students, faculty and others brought
to it through the president. Open meetings
could result in board members being pressed
to adopt a fixed posture in respect to sensitive
issues rather than the board speaking as a
whole.
We seek nothing so radical as the
right to speak at board meetings; and so
would bring no advice. Neither do we
seek to press its members into fixed postures. We simply wish to know what it
talks about and what it says. Broadminded,
liberal men cannot be forced to adopt
fixed postures other than rump.
The board is always concerned to improve
communication between members of the university family and with the whole community.
The president has sought to improve communication with the students by the following
means:
1. Emphasizing role of Dean Gage as liaison
with the students.
2. Making Gordon Selman available for
day-to-day student contact with the
president's office.
3. Setting aside a day a month on the
president's calendar when students may
see the president without appointment.
4. Establishing president's student - liaison
committee — president, William White,
Dean Gage, Selman and AMS executive,
executives.
5. Annual dinner meeting of board of
governors with AMS executives.
6. Encouraging establishment of student
advisory committee on library services.
7. Establishing student - faculty advisory
committees on services of special interest  to students:
a. Residence
b. Bookstore
c    Food services
d.    Traffic and parking
8. Urging each faculty, which does not have
it, to establish student-faculty committee
to consider faculty affairs.
These are useful ways ot seeking student
views before decisions are made.
We have no quarrel with the measures
already taken — as ways to improve ancil-
liary services. We advocate student representation on the senate for a voice in
academic affairs. The university is reportedly considering that, but has not
even included students on a faculty committee now studying the question.
But note the annual board-AMS dinner
meeting — three of the ten board members
attended.
Throughout the president's confused
and contradictory statement, our original
point has not been discussed. It was this:
students and the people of B.C. have a
right to hear the deliberations of the
board, because it is a public body and because it affects our lives.
The board has not explained its ground
for denying its responsibilty as a public
body governing a public institution.
We request that it do so. We suggest
it has not done so because it cannot
justify its position; it is bound by its own
members, mostly corporate officials who
habitually shun publicity. But the university is not a private corporation. Students
and all other citizens of B.C. have a right
to know.
Hello dere, George and Lurleen; welcome to heaven.
I'se de Lawdi  .   .   .
Student voice;
or revolution
By DR. DAVID GAUTHIER
University students have discovered power.
From the war until the sixties, students in North America played a largely passive role, both in education and
society. They accepted an educational system designed for
them by their seniors, and while they talked endlessly — as
students always have — about the shortcomings of society,
they did not presume to do anything.
Dr. Gauthier is an associate professor of philosophy at
the University of Toronto. This feature first appeared in the
Toronto Telegram.
I do not need to tell you the outlook of students has
changed markedly. This outlook is the product of a minority
of opinion-makers, but this minority shows itself to be overwhelmingly activist. In civil rights, in opposition to nuclear
arms and to the war in Vietnam, in American and Canadian
organizations, students have become involved in the larger
world.
But they have also become involved in the university.
The student revolt at Berkeley has already ibeen enshrined
in history.
University administrators across the continent on both
sides of the border, ask themeslves if it can happen here,
and sleep less well at nights.
And it can happen here and everywhere. For as educators have become increasingly concerned- with graduate
students, as professors have become increasingly concerned
with serving as consultants to government and business, and
as administrators have become increasingly concerned with
the sheer mechanics of running their multiversities, undergraduates have become a depressed and neglected class.
But if past neglect of students has been inexcusable, it
would be equally inexcusable to react in panic, and concede
to students a share in the fundamental organs of university
government. Students have no place on academic senates or
on boards of governors.
The role of the student compares with that of the
trainee, the novice, or the apprentice — even the child. The
successful student is brought into educational equality with
his instructors, but he does not begin as an equal. It is a failure in common courtesy not to inform the student about
tmiversity decisions and policies.
Not only are students in the position of trainees, but
they are also transients. Nothing is more ephemeral than
the student world. Its temporal horizons are strictly limited
— an almost absolute unawareness of the actual past life of
the university, and a very hazy view of the university's
future beyond graduation of the present student generation.
These limitations alone would make direct student participation in university government undesirable.
Many persons in the academic establishment seek to
deny the students not only a vote but also a voice. Believing that students should be seen but not heard, they panic
when students seek to run serious extra-curricular activities, to evaluate the educational and social effect of the
university, and to recommend changes in goals and in
methods.
Such academic paternalism breeds and justifies the
students' demands for power. Instead of this obsolete attitude, what is needed is recognition that the student is also
the leading critic of university and society.
To share power is to share responsibility. If students
were to receive a vote as well as a voice in the affairs of
university and society, they could no longer serve as independent critics. But if they are denied both a vote and a
voice, then they can only return to the role of passive consumers — or become social revolutionaries. Tuesday, February 21, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 5
WUS campaign   come-on
with on-campus SHARE
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Focus Editor
WUS is an organization built around the
importance of international communication
and understanding among academic communities.
It works to bring contact and understanding between students and professors in 50
countries.
The international secretariat in Geneva
administers the major WUS project, the international program of action (IPA). This
project is a method of helping developing
countries through self-help schemes. It is
for the action program that universities in
donor nations hold SHARE campaigns.
UBC's campaign, to be held this week
will finance programs of student health and
lodging, educational activities and facilities,
and individual and emergency aid.
Last year WUS distributed 6,000 textbooks, mostly to India and Ghana.
Finances have always been a problem
for WUS. After almost a year of beseiging
the AMS with budgets, briefs and memos,
Hoye was rewarded with a sharp cut in
his grant. In recent years, the grant has been
trimmed from $14,600 to next year's $10,290.
"In the past we have sent $5,000 in student money to the action program," said
SHARE manager Gill Richmond.
"This week's SHARE campaign will
solicit funds from students in noon-hour
blitzes. We will go door-to-door in residences
and canvass all the cafeterias and eating
places."
SHARE proceeds will help buy agricultural equipment for University of Ceylon
agriculture graduates, as well as supporting
90 other action programs in 30 countries.
Experiment
conceived
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
University of Saskatchewan
hospital is looking for at least
10 women — married or single
— to volunteer as guinea pigs
in experiments with a new
once-a-month oral contraceptive.
Although the new drug
doesn't eliminate side effects
produced by the once-a-day
'pill', it will cut normal dosage from 20-25 a month to a
more convenient one or two.
Women between the ages of
19 and 40 are being recruited
as subjects on which to test
the drug. If the volunteer
meets examination requirements, she will be administered the drug and asked to report three to four times monthly for further examination.
Each test subject will be
paid $10 a visit and must participate in the experiment for
a minimum of six consecutive
months.
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Graduates in Arts and Science, Pharmacy
Commerce, Business Administration,
Physical Education
THE UPJOHN COMPANY OF CANADA
A rapidly expanding ethical pharmaceutical manufacturer
offers:
• A challenging, stimulating career in technical sales.
• Excellent opportunity for advancement.
• A position that rewards individual achievement.
• A well-established company in a stable industry.
• Excellent retirement and fringe benefits.
• Expenses — automobile  furnished.
• Excellent salaried   position.
Our representative will visit your campus on
Friday, February 24, 1967
For  interview  appointments,  apply to
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
North-Rite "195" passes 23 strict quality and endurance tests before it is finally
packaged and shipped to your dealer... that is why we have no hesitation in giving
you a written guarantee for life. Even the ink cartridge is guaranteed to write for
one full year or we send you a replacement free. The new stainless steel ball and
socket eliminate ink leaks on hands, clothing and paper.
ffORth-RitE.WE COMPANY THAT MAKES A POINT OF OUAUTK
JOHN STARK Presents:
Eugene O'Neill's
A TOUCH
OF THE
POET
starring Barney O'Sullivan
Feb. 22-Mar. 4th at Centennial Theatre, North Vancouver. Tickets from Vancouver Ticket Centre outlets
or rush seats at Box Office—988-6166.
ffeeents:
& guide to guided, -toxtt-g
around acaxnt
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J* [i^ttieeri-ttg building-
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$ our money is &*»* >» & ver1/ && o£ <x»n?*ntf. #
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g-f-^eirsoti, manner Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1967
BURLESQUE ...
...AND CARNIVAL
'Lysistrata a grab bag'
By NORMAN GIDNEY
A combination of musical
comedy, burlesque, town meeting and carnival — that's how
director Donald Soule describes his unique production
of Lysistrata opening tonight
at the Freddy Wood Theatre.
"Aristophanes used obscenity, low farce and lyricsim —
it's a grab bag," he said.
Soule said the basic script
is very close to Aristophanes.
"We tried to find the modern English equivalent. Obviously topical Greek jokes in
the play are not funny now."
Lysistrata ridicules war and
male agressiveness and vanity.
"One of the healthiest attitudes about something bad
is to ridicule it," he said.
"Like all of Aristophanes'
plays, Lysistrata is about sex.
The    Greeks    had    a    more
Gallery
presents
Pisano pix
An exhibition of 13th century Italian art will be presented in a photographic study at
the Fine Arts gallery 'February
22 to March 4.
Loaned by the New York
office of the Instituto Italiano
di Cultura, the exhibition of
the "Pulpits of the Baptistry
and the Cathedral at Pisa by
Nicola and Giovanni Pisano"
represents a detailed study of
these significant works on the
theme of redemption.
During the exhibition two
special events are scheduled.
On Thursday, Feb. 23 at Las-
serre 104, Prof. George Rosen-
burg of the Fine Arts will
speak on "Tradition and Innovation in the Pisano Pulpits."
Thursday March 2 at the
Fine Arts gallery Prof. Ian
McNairn will speak on "The
Meaning and Purpose of Nicola
Pisano's Pulpit in the Baptistry."
Social work head
takes sick leave
Director of UBC's school of
social work Prof. William
Dixon has been given sick
leave for the rest of the year.
Dean of arts Dennis Healy
made the announcement Monday.
"We are not at liberty to
disclose the nature of his illness," said a Social Work
spokeman, "but the sick leave
is granted until the end of the
academic year."
Healy has named Dr. George
Hougham acting director.
Things no better
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Twelve effervescent licorice
blorgs and three paranoic puce
blorgs have choked to death
following a five-day banana
cream pie-throwing battle in
this island capital between
factions disturbed over a book
recently published on the
effects of strontium 90 on
pepsi-cola.
healthy attitude to sex. They
saw it as a joyous function but
also a ridiculous one."
Soule's version uses such un-
Greek devices as film, song
and dance numbers, a small
orchestra  and  sound   effects.
The costumes are "basic
Greek with pop variations."
"The set's a kind of monster — God knows how many
feet of steel pipe we used. It
has something of a circus, bur
lesque show runway and Los
Angeles freeway interchange.
"It has a cast of 43 people—
the largest of any play before.
The films were made by Filmsoc and the original music and
choreography were done by
John Chappel and Grace Macdonald."
Soule has made Lysistrata
a satire on war, specifically
the Vietnam war.
Your car is waiting
in Europe
Lease or purchase
a Renault: either way
you're money in pocket
Step off the boat or plane into a sporty Renault and
drive in Europe like a European. Leasing prices start
as low as $23.50* a week. Go where you like. See what
you want. There's no mileage charge. Or take delivery
on the Continent of a brand new Renault (equipped to
Canadian specifications and under factory guarantee)
for as little as $1,167. And Renault is responsible for
shipping it home. You save over buying it here and
see Europe on a shoestring. Send the coupon now.
*6 months lease Renault 4
RENAULT'
OVERSEAS
DEPARTMENT
1305  Marie-Victorin   Blvd.,  St.   Bruno,   P.Q.
FREE: please send complete information on lease plans and
purchase prices
NAME	
ADDRESS.
_TEL:_
CITY_
-PROVINCE-.
CAREERS IN PHARMACY'
"field   with   a   future"
SPEAKER
FILM
TOUR
FACULTY OF PHARMACY
in
George Cunningham  Building
COME & SEE WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT
THURS., FEB. 23rd, 1967
12:30-Rm. 171
Education Committee of the
Pharmaceutical Association of B.C.
410 Dominion Bank Building,
207 West Hastings St., Vancouver 3,  B.C.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
OPTICAL DEPT.
LONDON »DRUGS
J Limited
I
Vancouver
677 Granville
Opp. THE BAY
681-6174
TWO CONVENIENT LOCATIONS ONLY
LA 1-0751
New Westmintter
675 Columbia
Opp. Army A Navy
mmm,
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN ALL THE WOMEN SUDDENLY SAY
NO?
lySiStrata
DEPARTMENT  OF  THEATRE  STUDENT  PRODUCTION
ARISTOPHANES FARCICAL
SEX STRIKE WITH MUSIC
DANCE AND ET CETERA
ADAPTED AND DIRECTED BY DONALD SOULE WITH
ORIGINAL MUSIC BY JOHN CHAPPELL. DESIGNED BY
DARWIN REID PAYNE. DANCES BY GRACE MacDONALD
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE - FEBRUARY 21-25
Matinee Feb. 23 at 12:30.  Student tickets 75c Everyone else $2.00
Book Early—Only 6 performances. Box office FW Theatre, Rm. 207. Ph. 228-2678 Tuesday, February 21, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC athletes dig Quebec;
discover wealth of medals
VOLLEYBALL NETS GOLD
Six UBC volleyball players joined
the B.C. team and brought back the
gold medal. They are: Ken Witzke, Mike
Rockwell, Mark Bell, Dale Ohman,
Robert Boyle, and Kit Fortune.
WRESTLERS PIN DOWN   TITLES
The B.C. wrestling team placed
second overall at the Canada Winter
Games and two UBC wrestlers were
among the medal winners.
The big win was scored by Ken
Kerluke in the 175 lb. class in which
he pinned down the gold medal. Chris
Nemeth took the silver medal in the
heavyweight class. Ontario proved to
be the home of the wrestling champions
as they won the most matches.
SILVER CINCHED ON ICE
QUEBEC (CUP) — It was champagne for the Alberta Golden Bears
and the usual post-game cola drink for
the UBC Thunderbirds following Sunday's hockey final at the First Canadian Winter Games.
The high-scoring Bears were forced
to stout defensive play to salvage both
their reputations and hockey's gold
medal. They earned the top award by
defeating the Birds 4-1, but only after
St. Dunstan's Saints allowed them to
enter the finals. UBC also entered the
final game through a back door, which
was opened to them by tiny St. Thomas
University, representing New Brunswick.
An open net and a deflected pass
in the last minute let Alberta score its
impressive point total in the hard
fought final. A first period goal toy
Brian Harper and one by Ron Cebryk
early in the second period were all
Alberta could muster before UBC began to dominate play halfway through
the game.
The hard-checking, fast-skating
Thunderbirds kept the Bears in their
own zone throughout the third period,
btu were unable to add to defenceman
Doug Purdy's second period goal.
Darrell LeBlanc's ringlong shot into
an open net with 28 seconds to play
secured the game for Alberta.
The tourney's leading scorer, Gordon Jones, shot the fourth with nine
seconds remaining when his attempted
pass deflected back to his stick in front
of a hapless Russ fprk in the UBC goal.
Alberta and B.C. were presented
gold and silver medals respectively
after the contest by the Games vice-
president Andre Marceau.
CALLADINE SWINGS SLALOM
Bob Calladine, a member of the
UBC Thunderbird ski team, skimmed
the Quebec slopes to return with a
gold medal for B.C. He finished ahead
of natives Dave Bruneau and Pierre
Lebrun in the giant slalom.
WOMEN WINNERS
Three UBC women athletes were
members of the B.C. gold medal-winning basketball team at the Canada
Winter Games.
Pauline Gensick, Elaine Stewart
and Janet Douglas helped contribute
to the team's record of eight wins and
no defeats.
The B.C. Volleyball team won the
•bronze medal. UBC athletes competing
were Connie Bryde and Arnice Way-
staff.
X* »>'><«
Sportsmen bounce thru break
JV's TAKE FIRST FINAL
The UBC basketball JV's refused to break their winning
tradition as they entered the
B.C. Championship finals Saturday.
It was the first game of a
best of five series. Sam Vandermeulen led the JV's to a
64-48 victory with 24 points,
followed by Rick Inrig's  15.
The second game goes Saturday, 8 p.m. at John Oliver
gym.
WALLABIES WIN RUGBY
Powerful defensive play on
the part of the UBC rugby
Thunderbirds dampened the
Australian Wallabies' 11-6 win.
UBC obstinately held the
Aussies back, halting their
tough opponents' storming tactics. Fred Sturrock and Don
Crompton scored for the Birds.
Starring in individual play
were T. K. Kariya, Chuck
Plester, Bob Sandilands, Sam
Davidson, and Ray Wickland.
The Birds finally fell when
the winning try was made six
minutes from full time.
ACHILLES TRACK MEET
26 UBC track and field men
entered the Achilles International Indoor Track Meet last
Saturday and took away five
medals.
In the long jump Pete Spencer came in third with a jump
of 22 feet 9% inches. Another
third place was taken by the
UBC 4 x 440 team with a time
of 3:30.7.
Ray Stevenson won a silver
for a second place in the triple
jump when he hopped, stepped, and jumped 46 feet 7V4
inches.
The 4 x 880 Thunderbirds A
and B teams finished second
and third, respectively, with
times of 7:58.8 and 8:14.8.
Another outstanding UBC
man was Dave Aune, who, although finishing fourth in the
440, set a new Canadian Native and Open Record of 51.1
sec.
UBC women athletes Pat
Pinsent and Joanne Heather-
ington reached the finals of
their events.
Jill Murray placed fifth in
the high jump with a jump of
4'10" and Leona Sparrow placed seventh in the shot put with
a put of 37 feet.
ALBERTA SYNCHRONIZED
UBC finished second behind
the University of Alberta in
the synchronized division of
the WCIAA Swimming Championships held here this weekend.
Pat Huffman of UBC won
the top individual award by
placing first in tooth strokes
and figures. Other team members placing in the top three
were Angela Raino, Georgia
Marvin, and Joly Symons.
U. of Alberta placed first
in speed events with 110
points. Second with 76 points
was the UBC team. Top individual award went to Rae Edgar of Alberta. Sheila Campbell led UBC along with Caroline Kerr and Bonnie Bertram.
SWIMMERS SPLIT MEETS
The UBC swimming Thunderbirds recorded a two win-
two-loss split last weekend,
trouncing Western Washington, and losing to Puget Sound
and SFA.
Phil Winch scored four
wins, three seconds, and a
third overall — leading the
Birds with ease.
The WCIAA Championships
come up this weekend in Winnipeg.
JUDO MEN AT GARDENS
UBC's top competitor, Yoshi
Okita, showed well at the 16th
Annual and Centennial Tournament defeating Doug Rogers
but losing the championship to
him in overall points.
Okita won the championship
in his weight division, at the
Garden Auditorium.
Bruce Harwood, a UBC team
member, was eliminated in
his second round. Paul Mus-
grove, also from UBC, fought
his way to the semi-finals.
Someone's
birthday
this week?
Show that you care
- phone that night!
B.CJEL^
WHEN THE NIGHT BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE   SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
LIVE BAND
NO COVER CHARGE
SPECIAL
U.B.C.  STUDENT DISCOUNT
10%  to  15%  on weekdays
ITALIAN PARADISE
CABARET
1047 Granville       685-9412
SPECIAL   NOTICE
TO
U.B.C.   GRADS
The UBC Alumni
Assn. Has Moved
from: Room 252
Brock Hall
U.B.C. Campus
to:      Cecil  Green   Park
6251 N.W. Marine Dr.
U.B.C. Campus
Effective: February 20, 1967
NEW     HOURS
BROCK SNACK BAR
STARTING MONDAY, FEB. 20, 1967
Monday through Friday: 8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m.- 5 p.m.
Suppers available 5-6 p.m.
Hamburgers   and   short   orders   available   all   dayl
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
COMMITTEE CHAIRMANSHIPS
Applications are now being received for Chairmen of
the following Committees:
Canadian Union of Students Committee
Canadian University Service Overseas Committee
Frosh Orientation Committee
High School Conference Committee
Homecoming Committee
Intramurals Committee
Special Events Committee
World University Service Committee
Academic Activities Committee (applicants for this
Chairmanship must submit a proposed program
for 1967-68 with approximate costs)
OTHER POSITIONS AVAILABLE
Applications are now being received for:
College Shop Manager
Ubyssey Editor
Student Union Building Chairman
COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Applications are now being received for Committee
members for the following Joint A.M.S.-Administration
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Book Store Committee
Library Committee
Parking and Traffic Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reason for applying,
and, where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility
forms are available from the A.M.S. Office (S. Brock)
and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
LETTERS OF APPLICATION AND ELIGIBILITY
FORMS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THE SECRETARY, BOX 54, BROCK HALL BY MARCH 3rd. 1967.
AMS-FACULTY STUDY GROUP
CO-ORDINATOR
Applications are invited for co-ordinator of a joint
A.M.S.-Faculty study group investigating the financial
and sociological barriers to higher education. Experience in survey analysis, sociology, and/or economics helpful, but not mandatory. Applications to
Assistant-Treasurer, Box 53, Brock Hall. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 21, 1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Popes new notes flow
SPECIAL EVENTS
A wild program of New
Stream Jazz with the Byron
Pope Quartet, today, noon,
auditorium. Admission 35
cents.
GUEST LECTURER
Professor L. P. Harvey,
UVic, speaks on Roderick, the
last of the Goths — a study
in mythography; today, noon,
Bu. 102.
HENRI'S  COMMITTEE
Henri's own expanded Chi-
coutimi Kazoo Band blows its
collective mind, tonight, 6:30,
Hamber 211.
SCM
Rev. Jack Shaver discusses
questions of theology and belief, today, noon. Bu.  2202.
HEALTH SERVICE
Immunization clinics are
held each Tuesday and Wednesday, 2 to 4 p.m., Wes. 114.
PRE DENTAL SOC
Film on  orthodontics,  Wednesday, noon, Bu. 204.
ECONOMICS SOC
Dr.  diPierro discusses  welfare   economics   today,   noon,
Ang. 213.
UN CLUB
The films Algeria and Hour
of Independence, today, noon,
Bu. 202. Admission five cents.
WUSC
Coffee   party   to   meet   exchange   scholars   and   international   students,   today,   noon,
Mildred Brock.
UBYSSEY
Positions on next year's
Ubyssey staff are now being
filled, if you can write, or
want to learn, come and work
for your campus newspaper.
See us anytime in north Brock
basement.
JUDO CLUB
Senior   belt   members    are
asked to attend regular workouts, bring donations for film
rental.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Phone Berk at 224-9029  or
731-9347 regarding  March   10
trip to Seattle.
BRIDGE CHESS CLUB
Meeting    Wednesday,    7:30
p.m., Brock TV lounge.
COLLEGE LIFE
Andre, Kale, America's leading illusionist speaks Wednesday.    Auditorium   8:31    p.m.;
Lower   Mall   common   lounge
10:01  p.m.
WUS
Bill    Horsewill    speaks    on
Chile,   Wednesday,   noon,   Bu.
205.
CROSSROADS AFRICA
Slide   showing   on   Liberia
1966, Wednesday, 8 p.m., Bu.
100.
PRE  LIBRARIANSHIP
Talk and tour of the micro-
f i 1 m     division,     Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 225.
NOON CONCERTS
Robert   Rogers   and   Harold
Brown play Stravinsky's Cap-
riccio for two pianos, Wednesday, Bu.  106.
ONTOLOGY
Ron and June Polack reveal
the power of agreement, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
YUKON PCSF
K. McKinnon of University
of    Manitoba    discusses    Can
ada's colonies  —  the  Yukon
and   North   West   Territories,
Wednesday, nnon, Bu. 214.
GAMMA DELTA
Pastor C. Eifert discusses Divorce  —  what's  wrong  with
marriage,    Wednesday,    noon.
Lutheran campus center.
NDP
General   meeting   noon   today, Bu. 218.
Immunization Clinics
Regular Immunization Clinics are
helti at the Health Service, Room
114, Wesbrook Building.
every Tuesday and Wednesday
from 2-4 p.m.
Students requiring immunization for
international travel certificates this
summer are advised to start their
immunization   programme   now.
ALL THESE METALS
ARE AVAILABLE AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it bo
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come :~
and ask for it by nam*.
in
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271
ImA
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT
Opportunities for employment  in  summer training  programs
will be offered in the following areas:
ENGINEERING -
Logging,  Pulp     Paper Manufacturing, Wood  Products Manufacturing
FORESTRY -
Logging,  Forestry
General Summer Employment will be considered for students
in any faculty who are willing to put in a summer's work.
'INTERVIEWS are being held on campus Februaity 20th to March 3rd.   Phase regrster at your Student
Placement Office.
About Tom Hah" Stylists
4603 W. 10th Ave.        Call 224-4384
Presents • SCIENTIFIC BEAUTY METHODS
• EXPERIENCED STYLISTS
• PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS
• REFRESHING ATMOSPHERE
YEAR ROUND STUDENT RATES
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ONE BROWN SUEDE
jacket two weeks before Christmas In Woodward Library. You
have my new one. Phone Judy,
Rm.   289,   224-9980,   Please.	
LOST: SHOES AND BAG LEFT IN
Mustang when hitchhiking Wed.
nite. Feb. 1. Please! Jan, 922-8827.
Coming Dances
12A
S?I?P?D     D?S?0?H?Q?E
L?F?E I?C?T?E?U
MARCH 11
THE   DANCE   WITH   A
DIFFERENCE!
(It's not in the Armouries.)
Swing this Sat. nite to the "turn-
on" sound of the STAQS in Brock
Hall,  9:00-12:30.   $1.25' per person.
Special Notices
13
WHT PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted EUiott 224-6707.
Transportation
14
TWO BOYS WISH TO FORM OR
join carpool in Shaughnessy area.
Graeme, 266-4787; Doug. RE 3-
6050.
RIDE WANTED FROM CAPE
Horn area of Coqnitlam, phone
521-1007   after   6   p.m.	
NEED RIDE FROM 1049 Connaught
Dr. Mon.-Fri., 10:00 a.m., return
3:30 p.m., 224-4748 days, evenings
733-7617.
Travel Opportunities
16
AVAILABLE — ONE TICKET ON
AMS charter flight Vancouver-
London-Vancouver. Leaving May
11th, 67, $395.00. Please Phone
Margarete,    261-5286.	
EXPO CHARTER IS NOT YET
filled. A meeting will be held in
Buchanan 104 at 12:45 Wed., Feb.
22. Sufficient interest Will have
to be shown, otherwise the charter  will  be  cancelled.
AUTOMOTIVE   fe  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
MUST SELL 1965 AUSTIN 1100.
Excellent cond., radio, 1967 plates.
Phone   Art,   evenings.   RE   3-8672.
49 DODGE CPE., GREAT SHAPE,
runs well. New rear seal, battery,
much more. Phone Don, Rm. 19,
224-9853.
1958 VOLKSWAGEN. NEW:
Brakes, tires, radio, battery,
plates. Excellent running gear.
Offers? John(K). Room 207, 224-
9049.
"54 JAGUAR AUTO. RAD. TACH.
Good  condition,   phone  RE_ 8-4967.
1953 CHEV. SEDAN. CITY TESTED. Good condition, $100. AM 6-
0732.
Bodywork, Glass
23
UNDERWATER BODY REPAIRS.
Psycho special. Auditorium
Thurs., Feb. 23. 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30,   50c.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed. Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39-A
FLAPJACK! SGT. FURY LIVES.
Pook is doing it but does he do
it? 69th Beaver Patrol.
HOW DO YOU KNOW UNLESS
you compare? Free estimates on
all Volkswagen repairs. Auto-
Henneken, 263-8121, 8914 Oak St.
by Oak bridge.	
CONGRATULATIONS PUMPKIN !
A Teeny-bopper no more! Now
switch from 'LG to 'QM. Love
Willy.	
DEAR JIM P. EUS3. I MISS YOU.
Won't you please throw away the
peppermints.    Love  C.F.   (Arts  I)
THE FIVE SWAVE AND DEBON-
er don't knock our raee—wanna
do battle? Ho ho ho 7.5 hee hee.
H.A.M. 	
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EP-
ficlent,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8684   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4IS0
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.,
low   rates.     Phone   733-0734   any
time.
GOOD, EXPERIENCED TYPIST,
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
TYPING THESIS AT MY HOME.
Speed: 65 wpm. Contact after 5
p.m.   at   255-8853.    Call   Rosle.
NORTH VANCOUVER — WILL
Type thesis in my home. Rates
reasonable,    phone    988-5420.	
THESIS   TYPED.   PHONE  942-8583.
WILL TYPE THESIS, REASON-
able   rates,   929-2757.
FAST,    ACCURATE   TYPING,    321-
2298.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
LIFEGUARDS — HEAD GUARD
City of Kamloops refer to placement   office.
ARE YOU A VOLUPTIOUS FE-
male between 18 and 22? Can you
dance? Make good money a-go-
going! For audition phone Barry
or   Bill,   224-5932,   4-6   p.m.	
PSYCHIATRIST PLEASE: FOR
consultation during psycho.
Thurs., Feb. 23, Auditorium, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30,   50c.
Music
63
Instruction-Tutoring
14
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering.. $3/hr. Mini-
roum 5 lessons. 876-1859.	
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
Special Classes
65
Instruction Wanted
66
TUTOR WANTED FOR GRADE
eleven math student. $3.00 per
hour.   Ph.  433-9485.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
SEE THE BODY IN THE BASE-
ment. Thurs., Feb. 23. Auditorium,  50c.   12:30,  3:30,  6:00,   8:30.
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle  Drive-in
  at Rear of Store
PARIS ORIGINALS—FROM "HOW
to Succeed"—for sale. Many sizes,
tailored to fit. $10, reg. $30.
Sign list In clubroom above Auditorium   or   phone   224-0246.
RENTALS  fc  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
"ii
FURNISHED ROOM, LIGHT
cooking in a new quiet home
near gates.     Phone   224-0477.
SLEEPING ROOM, MALE ONLY,
vicinity 10th Avenue and Crown
Street.     MU   4-6736   or   224-0956.
ROOM & BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 W. 6th, phone
224-4866.
Room 8c Board
12
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2260 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 betweei. 5:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
FOR RENT—2-B.R. HOUSE. MAR.
1 to May 15. Ideal for couple and
child. 263-8979,  evenings.
Unfurn. Houses St Apts.       84
Real Estate

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