UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 19, 1965

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125726.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125726.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125726-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125726-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125726-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125726-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125726-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125726-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125726-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125726.ris

Full Text

 WE UBYSSEY
on the
way to the
quorum
VOL. XLVII, No. 63
VANCOUVER,  B.C.,   FRIDAY,  MARCH   19,   1965
CA 4-3916
SUB bonanza hinted
Meeting quorum
met by a hair
AMS President Roger McAfee revealed at Thursday's
general meeting he is completing a mystery deal to net
$250 thousand for the construction of the student union
building.
Hey rube
cry fills
Armory
By LORNE MALLIN
The general meeting Thursday noon had all the color of a
three-ring circus.
A pep band, more than four
hundred engineers, a wooden
water tank and a cage led by
a small red convertible car
stormed the Armory.
The steel cage contained
AMS co-ordinator of activities
Graeme Vance, treasurer Kyle
Mitchell, first vice-president
Bob Cruise and second vice-
president Byron Hender.
Amid cheers from the more
than 1,500 present the cage was
hoisted onto the speaker's podium and the blue-blazered inhabitants released.
After members of the student council removed the cage,
redshirted engineers carried a
wooden structure shrouded in
canvas onto the podium.
Engineering Undergraduate
Society vice-president Bob Seymour moved to the microphone.
"We would like to present
this as a token of our esteem
to   Roger  McAfee,"   Seymour
said.
LOVING CUP
EUS president Steve White-
law removed the canvas to reveal an eight foot silver-paper
covered loving cup.
A large card attached to the
cup read:
"To Roger with love from
Roger."
The undraping brought gales
of laughter and applause from
the enthusiastic audience.
AMS president Roger McAfee, who chaired the meeting,
thanked the redshirts and proceeded with other business.
As AMS secretary Marilyn
McMeans rose to the microphone to read the minutes of
the last general meeting, a
three-foot long paper plane
glided over her head.
Ignoring   the   paper   plane
and several smaller ones, Miss
McMeans    fought    a    verbal
battle with hecklers.
IBM CARDS
The meeting continued with
the discussion of constitutional
revisions while paper planes
and IBM cards piled up on the
podium.
The proceedings came to an
abrupt halt when Science Undergraduate Society president
Don York dropped several
small containers of something
akin to tear gas onto the floor
around the podium.
Several water bombs exploded over student councillors on
the podium.
Engineers stormed the podium    and    removed    McAfee,
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: DUNKINGS
—bert mackinnon photo
AMS PRESIDENT Roger McAfee was presented with
giant tinfoil over oilcan loving cup at Thursday's General
Meeting by Engineers- Message on card drew prolonged
applause.
McAfee refused to reveal
further details of the transaction.
"It might compromise the
negotiations if I said anything
more," he said later.
McAfee made the disclosure
in his annual report to the
General Meeting.
Thursday's general meeting
of the Alma Mater Society attracted a bare 1,500 students,
just enough to make the ten
per cent quorum.
An amendment to raise the
required academic average of
candidates for student offices
was passed.
The motion set the necessary
average to 60 per cent for a 15
unit course in the previous
year's examinations and an
over-all average 65 per cent
for less than 15 units.
Engineering Undergraduate
president-elect Art Stevenson
proposed a sub-amendment to
tjjje revision that the required
academic averages of 60 and
65 per cent be lowered to 55
and 60 per cent.
The amendment was defeated.
The perennial motion to give
frosh a non-voting seat on
council with speaking privileges only was defeated while
a non-voting council position
for a residence representative
was voted in.
Honoraria go down
Urging the acceptance of the
residence representative, AMS
first vice-president Bob Cruise
said: "The residences should
have representation because
they have problems that other
students don't have—such as
food and expenses of dorm
life."
AMS president's and treasurer's reports, and a speech
by Canadian Union of Students
president Jean Bazin completed the agenda for the meeting.
The non-controversial revisions were passed unanimously in one all-inclusive motion at the beginning of the
meeting.
The revised constitution now
says the AMS secretary must
be a female rather than a
member of the now-defunct As
sociated Women Students, the
name of Law Undergraduate
students has become Law Students Association; and the
honorary vice-president's position has been abolished.
Most of the proposed revisions for By-law 20 (the
granting of honoraria) were
defeated.
The only one passed was the
deletion of a subsection calling
for the granting of a $200 honorarium to the co-ordinator of
publications, a position which
no longer exists.
By-laws proposing full honoraria for the coordinator of
activities and a $100 honoraria
for each undergraduate president were defeated.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: BONANZA
Secretarial runaround
Reporter bleats
Haar leaves big, confusing hole
By JOAN GODSELL
Director of Housing John
Haar is leaving UBC.
But exactly when he's leaving or who his successor will
be . . . well, we don't know.
That seems to be top secret.
I phoned the Housing office
Thursday and innocently asked when was Haar leaving
and who was his new successor.
•   •   •
But a secretary said I'd
have to speak to his private
secretary.
The private secretary was
out.
Five minutes later, I called
back.
Now the private secretary
was "in conference with Mr.
Haar in Mr. Harr's office."
Five minutes later, I called
back.
"I have no authority to give
out that information," said
the private secretary, importantly.
•   •   •
"Who has?"  I said, unimportantly.
Five minutes later, I was
talking to the Information
Office secretary.
But she hadn't heard anything about John Haar or a
new successor.
Naturally, I was beginning
to get suspicious.
Was UBC's secretarial staff
out to get The Ubyssey?
Again I called Housing.
I asked to speak to John
Haar.
But now the secretary said
John Haar has left town and
a Knute Buttedahl occupies
his office.
Effectively confused, I
stumbled over to the Information Office.
"Do you know," I pleaded,
"ANYTHING about the Dir-
ector of Housing, present or
future?"
•   •    •
"Anything," I bleated.
An efficient Information
Office secretary eyed me
sternly and said The Ubyssey
had already been given the
information I was now requesting.
"Everything?" I asked,
naively.
"Everything," she said,
efficiently.
Tears in my eyes, I made
for the office door in blind
confusion; when, from the inner depths of the information
office, who should appear but
the information officer himself, Jim Banham.
•   •   •
"What did you want to
know about John Haar?" he
said kindly.
"Anything," I said, meekly.
"There's been no succeseor
appointed to John Haar's
position yet," he said, "And
there won't be until the Board
of Governors sits at the end
of the month."
"No information now?" I
asked.
"None," he said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 19, 1965
RAY LARSEN
. . . AAC head
5 appointed
to AMS jobs
by council
Five AMS bureaucrats were
appointed to their new positions at Monday night's council
meeting.
CUS means survey director
Ray Larsen beat out unsuccessful first vice-presidential candidate Charlie Boylan in the
bid for the leadership of Academic Activities Committee.
Ubyssey ski-columnist Tim
Roberts was appointed president of the UBC World University Service Committee.
Radsoc's new president is
student Paul Thiele, Arts III,
presently program director for
the amateur radio group.
Roger Lancaster, Physical
Education III, was named head
of intramural athletics.
Graham Nixon, Arts IV, was
appointed chairman of the
Leadership Conference.
UBC student
wins $9,000
A $9,000 scholarship has
been awarded to a UBC geology student.
The International Mineral
and Chemical Corp. Award,
which pays for three years of
post-graduate study in geology,
was given to David Mustard,
Science IV.
He was selected over 16
other applicants from Canada
and the U.S.
More 'tween dosses
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Thomson Classic Friday; everyone welcome. Tickets in
Gym office.
• •   •
GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
Faculty Reps meet in Bu.
224 Monday noon. Important.
• •   •
SOCIALIST CLUB
Berkeley student speaks on
U.S. Student March to Washington Friday noon in Bu. 100.
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs • Inspections
B A Service Sfn.
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
CA 4-7644
AMS whips up
cook book' rule
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
AMS is placing a restriction  on "cook  books" sold  in
the College Shop.
A motion was passed by
council Monday night requiring that the full name and address of the publisher of locally-published course-aids (cook
books) be placed on the books.
The fact the books are not
endorsed by the faculty or student council must also appear.
A letter from associate professor of chemistry L. G. Harrison, read to council, said a
committee of ten chemistry
professors were concerned the
sale of cook books was apparently condoned by the official
student body because the books
were sold in the AMS-operated
College Shop.
The committee said it was
also disturbed because the
cook books "failed to meet the
minimum standards of accuracy, proof-reading and so forth
to such an extent that the authors are not prepared to put
their names to them."
"We are leaving ourselves
open to discredit by the sale
of the books as they are now,"
said grad studies president Jim
Slater.
The motion was passed by an
11 to eight vote.
TRADSVILLE
IS WHERE TRADS ARE
On the campus, in the classroom, at the
hop, down where the malts are frosty -
in fact anywhere where there's one or
more smart-style young men, you'll find
TRADS, now available in stretch materials fora full measure of superb comfort.
Available at your favorite men's store
ir
ROYAL   CANADIAN AIR FORCE
Careers for Graduates
The Royal Canadian Air Force has many attractive
career opportunities for graduates from all faculties.
Consider an Air Force Career in a technical personnel
or administrative branch or if you are under 25 years
of age you may apply for Aircrew Training. The
RCAF is Canada's biggest aviation business. A graduate starts at a jr. executive level {Flying Officer) and
a planned career provides for advancement in rank
and in responsibility. Your inquiries will be most
welcome at the
RCAF RECRUITING UNIT
545 Seymour Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
Telephone: 684-7577
BE THE FIRST
to see the very newest in Sport Coat
or Slack Co-ordinates, Silk Suits,
Casual Jackets, Madras Shirts etc.
THE
All WAITING for YOU at
LIONS DEN
771  GRANVILLE ST.
MU 1-2934
Open Friday Night till 9:00 p.m,.
ARTS NOTICES
• • •
ARTS U.S. GENERAL MEETING
Tuesday, March 23rd, Noon, Bu 106
ft President's Report
ft Constitutional Revision
ft Anti-calendar
ix Minutes of Joint Executive Meeting
ft Private Relations of Public Relations Officer
•   •   •
Applications for the following positions will be
open until Thursday, March 26th.
ft ARTISAN EDITOR
ft PUBLIC RELATIONS OFFICER
it ANTI-CALENDAR CHAIRMAN
ft LAST LECTURE SERIES  CHAIRMAN
ft MEN'S SPORTS REPRESENTATIVE
ft WOMEN'S SPORTS REPRESENTATIVE
ft SOCIAL CHAIRMAN (Harvest Ball, etc).
Applications should be addressed to the Secretary
through Buchanan 115 or Box 54, Brock HalL
mmmm Friday, March 19, 1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
COMING UP for air and finding water AMS first vice-
president Bob Cruise is blasted from both sides by fire
hoses.   Engineers  kidnapped  Cruise  and   other councillors
—clerek webb photo
after the General Meeting and dunked them  in portable
tank. "Fap," said Cruise.
Forms sent out
to tardy students
CUS means survey forms are being mailed out to students who have not yet filled them out.
: CUS
DUNKINGS
(Continued from Page 1)
Vance, Cruise and Peter
Braund, AMS second vice-
president-elect.
The struggling councillors
were carried out the back entrance to a wooden water tank
and thrown into the chilly
water.
The AMS bureaucrats were
showered with confetti, producing an iced-cake effect, as
they came up for air.
After the supply of councillors was exhausted, individual
onlookers were baptised in the
tank.
The engineers soon found
themselves with only fellow
redshirts in the audience.
When the tide went down,
Cruise and Braund, both dripping wet, dragged the cumbersome loving cup to Brock.
chairman Ray Larsen
said Thursday 66 per cent of
more than 1,000 survey questionnaires have yet to be completed. The students were selected at random and asked to
come in to the CUS office and
fill out the forms.
"UBC has the largest survey
in Canada and the poorest response," Larsen said.
•    •    •
"We have been forced to
mail the questionnaires with a
stamped and addressed return
envelope at the cost of another
$75," he said.
The completed questionnaires are anonymous and
must be in by the end of
March, said Larsen.
"Each student we selected
for the survey represents ten
more of his faculty and is letting them and himself down if
he doesn't complete it," he said.
UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
10k GOLD GRADUATION RINGS
For a
Man
30-00
You may place your order through the U.B.C. College Shop
until March 26 or at Birkl, downtown
Granville at Georgia  -  MU 5-6211
Model parliament's mace
pasted-up ashtray stand
The parliamentary mace, traditional symbol of the
authority of parliament, looks a little less than regulation
at UBC's model parliament which opened Thursday night.
Last year's mace was lost and had to be replaced.
So, lying in state on the mace table is The Ubyssey's
office ashtray stand, topped with a ball of toilet paper
wrapped in aluminum foil.
BONANZA
(Continued from Page 1)
The motion to take World
University Service Committee
off their $1 a head non-discretionary grant was passed unanimously.
However WUSC will still
receive a $1 a student discretionary grant from council.
This grant can be reduced by
the amount the campaign raises next year to a maximum of
$4,000.
AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell said this year was successful financially and next
year's treasurer will have a
much better working budget
than he started with this year.
CUS president Jean Bazin
summarized the achievements
of CUS in the past year.
"More than 29,000 students
in Canada benefited from the
Canadian Student Loan Plan,"
said Bazin.
Bazin said he was encouraged by the enthusiasm UBC
students showed for the AMS
and for CUS.
A.M.S.  Housing Co-ordinator
Applications are being accepted for this position.
Job entails Housing Listing and Inspection Services during the summer months and also in Sept.
and December. Apply in writing to Secretary,
AMS. Applications accepted until Wednesday,
March 24th at 4:00 p.m.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538  West  10th Ave.
For the BEST in
* custom black and white
photo finishing
* fast slide processing
* dark room equipment
* dark room supplies
* expert advice  and   service
DROP IN to the store with
the PHOTO  TECHNICAL
KNOWLEDGE
4538 W.  10th Avenue
224-5858 224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
Your B.C. Ilford Stockist
To its regular service over the shorter Polar Route
Canadian Pacific Airlines
adds the only
to all Europe
STARTS MAY 1
• NEW, NON-STOP FLIGHTS TO AMSTERDAM.
Faster, just 9<4 hours over the shorter Polar
Route.
• AMSTERDAM IS THE GATEWAY TO THE
U.K. AND ALL EUROPE. Canadian Pacific's
Polar Route is the fastest, only one-stop way to
Brussels, Stockholm, Copenhagen, other cities.
• JUST $52 DOWN (balance in 24 easy monthly
payments) for 14 to 21-day jet economy round
trip Vancouver - London including connecting
carrier. Only $57 down to Amsterdam and Paris.
• SEE EXTRA CITIES AT NO EXTRA FARE.
Amsterdam, Paris, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Brussels,
London, Rotterdam.
• See your Travel Agent or Canadian Pacific.
FLY CANADIAN —
Cinadian Gaelic
TRAINS / TRUCKS /  SHIPS / PLANES / HOTELS / TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S   MOST COMPLETE   TRANSPORTATION   SYSTEM THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Kditorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
EDITOR:   Mike  Horsey
News  Tim  Padmore
City  Tom Wayman
Art  Don   Hume
Managing  Janet Matheson
Sports   George Reamsbottom
FRIDAY, MARCH 19, 1965
Asst. City   Lorraine Shore
Asst.  News  Carole Munroe
Asst. Managing  Norm Betts
Page Friday Dave Ablett
Associate  — Bon Rlter
Associate    Mike Hunter
.v-<*.«r-s %x*M«
Press dress
There's trouble in Selma, Alabama.
And there are a lot of people picketing here in
Vancouver.
We don't see the value in picketing the U.S. consul—
especially after president Johnson's speech in congress
the other day.
But if you must feel altruistic and pious, at least
picket in a reasonable, useful way.
This entails knowing why you are doing it.
In this town, the why is to awaken the citizenry to
the problem. The picketer is trying to get coverage
in the local papers—he cannot realistically hope for
anything more.
With this in mind, dress for the occasion.
We don't care what your normal mode is, or what
your principles are. We couldn't care less whether you
wash or not.
But the reporter who covers you will notice. And
he will seize on appearances and make a big thing of
it—he's a square John, too.
The only way to favorably impress downtown, and to
avoid misrepresentation is to dress in the conventional
manner.
Otherwise,   protest   pickets   are   less   than   useless.
They are damaging.
Generally ...
AMS  general meetings are unpredictable animals.
In years past dull and bland proposals have been
transformed into hot issues by some hot-shot oratory
from the floor.
But not this year. It was quieter than usual. Perhaps it was a realization that the society desperately
needed action on some pretty dry housecleaning
motions.
It is unfortunate more students don't watch their
student government in action more often.
The council has met every Monday night all through
the year and scarcely a half dozen students have
bothered to look in.
This is where the real action is. This is where student government has meaning.
Council sessions are free, coffee served at half-time,
and one hell of a lot more interesting than general
meetings.
"There,  there, my  good  man  . .   .  why  d on't yog let me take care of that for you?
You  can  be  sure it'll  be  in good  hands   ..."
Carole's looking glass
Hell, were a quiet lot
By CAROLE MUNROE
What ever happened to the
hell-raising, devil-may-care
atmosphere that is reputed to
be a part of normal university
life?
It may be breaking loose on
other campuses, but it was
noticeably absent during
UBC's recent midterm break.
Almost everyone I have
talked to spent our first midterm  break  buried  under   a
barrage of textbooks, term
papers and assignments.
A couple of letters I received yesterday started me thinking about the break again.
Both were from university
students, one from Oregon
and the other from California.
And both were full of plans
for their spring break which
begins tomorrow.
You've heard of spring vacations,   American  style,  I'm
A one act play
By John Kelsey
The golden hoe and potted plant campaign
The scene: The office of
the editor of a large metropolitan daily.
The characters: Managing
editor Clark Kent; city editor
James Olsen; senior reporter
Perry White.
Clark:  Well,  boys.   There's
this little thing I want to talk
to you about. It's sort of a pet
project of mine, hmm?
•    *    •
James and Perry: Tell us,
tell us boss.
Clark: It's these potted
plants on the sidewalks. I
want to see a pot with a shrub
in it every ten feet on all
downtown streets.
James and Perry: Goooood
idea, boss.
Clark: Now. As you know,
I've approached city council
about it, with several large
financial backers. We even
had them talked into a referendum, after that proposal
from the Toronto backer,
Stufford Shirt.
•    •    •
The people turned it down,
just   when   the   council  was
swayed ....
Now here's what I want to
do. I want to get out the golden hoe, so to speak.
James and Perry: Hehehe,
chortle.
Clark: I want to insert the
golden hoe into the people's
ears, and then I want to twist.
James: Like the old golden
crowbar, eh chief?
Clark: Yes, my plan.
We'll take all the papers
next week. And we'll run banner headlines in three inch
type about the potted plants.
We'll have to find a new
angle to shout about everyday, like the cost, the kind of
plants, the size of the pots.
•    •    •
We'll run front page editorials, huge cartoons of the
backers and the mayor in-
gardener's suit with hoes and
dear little bushes.
We'll smear the whole front
page for a whole week with
the great plant story.
James: But chief, we've got
other news. There's all the
brutality in Selma and New
Westminster. There's Lester's
apoplectic fit, and Alice bill
Bennett . . .
•    •    •
Clark: ENOUGH! Rank insubordination. You must
learn, nothing anywhere in
the world is as important as
the golden hoe.
We must, and will, crusade
with the golden hoe, and
damn the world. Perry, you're
new city editor. James, you're
a church reporter again. You
also have the honor of writing about the dear plantsies,
or you can find another job.
<They slink out, to insert
the crowbar in the city's ear).
sure. They are notorious—and
they are not spent in a library.
Each campus has a favorite
haunt, usually on a beach.
And the students invade
these chosen coast towns with
a wild exuberance that the
citizens take almost a year to
recover from—and by that
time the next spring break has
come around.
So the beer flows, guitar's
strum, beaches rock.
And of course hundreds get
carried away.
Then suddenly the kids
leave their surfboards, head
back to the universities, and
become (miraculously, it
seems) earnest, hard working
students once more.
And the townspeople pocket the students' cash (Daytona
Beach, Florida, made almost
$6 million last year from student vacationers), clean up
the mess, marvel at the steady
decline of the younger generation's morals, and then forgive the erring ones as soon
as they are safely back on
campus.
Such drastic vacation celebrations I would not wish on
the beaches of this area. But
I'd like a happy medium.
Something between a mass
riot of students, and a riotous
mass of assignments, is my
hope for next year's midterm
break. The illiterate
humbug of the
quantifiers
— on page 3
Let's tickle Ceces ego — inside
Uncalled for. unwanted and mostly
unfair, the following
two columns contain
whimsical review
of the past seven days
at  UBC.
week
has
COLUMNS
INSIGNIFCANT:   This
was the week that the
Canadian Union of Students sent its annual mission to the heart of deepest Anglo-Saxia. But president Jean Bazin, whom
everyone expected to bring
a bilingual message, turned up here wearing a Bond
Street look and a Toronto
accent. He, however, saved
the day by smoking Du-
Maurier cigarets.
IN THE SAME VEIN: It
was also the week that
UBC's student council
struck a blow for B and B
by appointing a law student with the very, very
French name of Edouard
Lavalle as local CUS chairman. The CUS newsletter
missed the point by reporting that EDWARD Lavalle
of Port Moody (where?)
was new boss. Like we
said, this is the heart of
Anglo-Saxia.
• •     •
IN EROTICA: Radsoc
sent the temperature up
on campus for a week with
the promise that a call-girl
would bare the facts of
how she put herself
through university by making the best of what came
her way. Came the day
and somehow, for reasons
only known to Radsoc, an
Anglican minister took her
place. He talked about
something else.
• •     •
IN  THE  NAME  GAME:
CUS boss Bazin got the big
sell as featured entertainment at the general meeting this -week and got his
name in the paper 12
times. He beat out AMS
co-ordinator Graeme Vance
with 9, bookstore huckster
John Hunter with 5, and
ramblin' Roger McAfee,
the ex-AMS president, who
finally ran out of breath
and picked up only 4.
Jovial Jack Macdonald
(you know, Wass., the president) got 12 mentions just
like Bazin but he doesn't
count because most of his
comments are manufactured for public consumption by his image-conscious
PR men.
IN A SNIT: The people
described as UBC students,
who marched all week outside the U.S. consulate,
were the same old campus
wierdie-beardies who protest anywhere, anytime for
any reason. Their singsongs about overcoming
sounded    slightly    ridicu
lous 3,000 miles from
where the fight is going
on.
•     •     •
IN TROUBLE: The dar-
ing Demographic Society
("Pass the pill, Bill")
seems to be dying at birth.
The executive changes
periodically and members
are staying away in
hordes. They haven't even
picked up the signs they
ordered from Mamooks
(order marked "Rush,
PDQ, etc.") more than two
weeks ago.
The signs, however, are
not too inspired. Below is
our suggestion for a sign
to put a little life back
into the Stamp Out Babies
movement.
• •     •
IN HIDING: Whatever
happened to Everett Northup? Who?
• •     •
IN THE NAME OF THE
LAW: It took all available
RCMP cops from the University detachment as well
as reinforcements from as
far away as Richmond,
Burnaby and North Vancouver to quell the minor
riot that developed at a
high-school dance in the
Armory Saturday. Sponsor
Ken Dercole, Comm. II,
took the week's understatement award with the
observation: "I don't think
we will ever be able to
stage  a  dance on  campus
again."
• •     •
INTRIQUE: The Brock
bureaucracy's rumor mongers are worriedly asking:
"Did Student Fed wheel
Hardial Bains really go
back to India?"
• • •
INCOMPLETE: The Liberal government in UBC's
playparliament announced
cabinet positions this
week. It didn't say who
will play Lucien Rivard. pf
FEBRUARY 19, 1965
ON THE COVER: Sub Sahara
masks — from the heart of Africa, that means. Part of a show
currently on display in UBC's
Fine Arts Gallery. See review
somewhere inside. Don Hume
photo.
Editor: DAVE ABLETT
Criticism John Kelsey
Books,. Movies Graham  Olney
Artwork: Jeff Wall, Gerry Ehman,
Al Hunter
Welcome to Page Friday Number 27.
That means, brethren,
one more to go.
And so as an extra-
special super-dooper second to last Page Friday
treat, we haven't done
anything in particular.
Just filled it to the
gunwales with ads and
things.
The first of the things
is Ron Riter's piece on
our publess SUB to be
and the lack of a name
thereof. Riter has an eminently practical solution
to the name game.
On the same page, English professor George
Woodcock takes a reasoned look at Simma Holt's
Terror in the Name of
God now that all the foo-
farah has died down.
Across the way, mis-
planted Lebanese Jack
Khoury delves into the
Jordan River question,
one that is disrupting the
Arab and Israeli world.
And Dr. W. J. Stankie-
wicz puts forward one
side in contemporary division in political thought
and analysis.
Further back inside,
Claire Weintraub tears
PF film critic Ethel
Bloomsbury to shreds,
Angus Ricker analyzes
Jazz '65, Vancouver's
first and only jazz show
of the season, John Kelsey records the thoughts
of Murray Farr and Chris
Wootten, the terrible
twosome of Special
Events, and other things
happen also.
Next week is Page Friday's last of the year. We
won't have anything special for you then, either.
ARGUMENT
Laurels tor Bennett — first
treeman ot the city; then
Disneyland mouseketeer. UBC
should turn oft the sour gripes
and turn on the praise machine
PF Two
By  RON  RITER
'T'HUNDERBIRD Stadium
*■ and much of UBC's
sports activity will come
crashing down into oblivion
this summer.
Several million dollars later, a phoenix of another
color will rise over the stadium's  ruins.
What will it be.? Why,
UBC students' own Student
Union Building, of course.
It's designed to replace
aging and overcrowded
Brock Hall as the theoretical
campus centre of extra-curricular activity.
Thanks to student council's adroit manipulation of
what is laughingly called
student thought, the time to
argue SUB's merit or necessity is long past.
So, too, the time to question the structure's cost, site,
design or method of financing. Those have been settled
by means ranging from the
high-priced advice of a student union building planner
to the arbitrary dictates of
UBC's Board of Governors.
• •      •
Only one question regarding this multimillion dollar
monument to student autonomy and unity is yet unresolved — on paper, at least.
The cry is hardly on every
student lips, but it can be
heard  nonetheless:
"We're getting a SUB for
better or for worse — what
are we going to name the
bloody thing?"
What indeed?
, Several names have been
advanced as worthy of immortalization in brass and
concrete upon this edifice,
but the obvious suggestion
has not yet been seriously
advanced.
That suggestion is, obviously, the name of one
William Andrew Cecil Bennett.
The W. A. C. Bennett Student Union Building???
Unrhythmical? Possibly.
Incongruous? Maybe.
Hypcritical? Perhaps.
Political bribery? DEFINITELY.
• •      •
That's the point of the
suggestion.
UBC's playful playpen
politicians have long prided
themselves on both their
political astuteness and their
loudly professed desire to
contribute to the university.
Here's their chance to provide proof of the priding.
Premier W. A. C. Bennett has not officially visited UBC since he departed
after a speech in 1958 amid
a shower of catcalls and
lunches provided by the
ever-present campus idiot
fringe.
It is said that he vowed at
that time, quite understandably, never to return — not
even for lunch.
That incident cannot be
construed as the reason why
UBC has fared less than dynamically at the provincial
government's budgetary
hands over the past few
years.
But neither can the absence of any sort of dialogue
between UBC students as an
organized entity and the
Premier's office as the
source of much of UBC's financial manna be construed
as a desirable state of affairs.
Anyone who tries to say
such a dialogue exists need
only look back two years
to the barely polite brush,
off students received when
they presented the results of
the "Back Mac" campaign to
education minister Les Peterson.
• •      •
The campaign cost students more than $10,000 and
a massive number of man-
hours. It collected nearly
one quarter of a million
voters' signatures backing
President John Macdonald's
claim of UBC's desperate
financial need.
Publicly, government reaction to the campaign was
non-committal.
Privately, the government's (i.e. Bennett's) reaction was one of distaste for
the enthusiastic but ill-conceived pressure play.
The government contribution to UBC's operating was
later hiked by $800,000 —
but that was due to the administration's polite wheedling, not to the efforts of a
group of mice who roared.
Naming the SUB after
Bennett could effect a very
worthwhile amelioration of
his attitude towards both
the students and the university itself.
• •      •
The political shrewdness
behind the move should be
obvious to all: it would be
the first structure in B.C.
to bear Bennett's name and
The Man Himself would be
obliged to appear on campus,
overflowing with goodwill,
for the official opening of
His Building.
Besides tickling Bennett's
human vanity, the manoeuvre's political sophistication would not be lost on the
man who is probably the
shrewdest politician in Canada today.
UBC is essentially an anti-
Social Credit campus and
there will be a bitter emotional reaction to the idea
of a W. A. C. Bennett Student Union Building.
This reaction can be overcome if students realize that
our immortalization of The
Man could be our most significant contribution to UBC
since the Great Trek.
Reality is not always
pleasant, but in this case it
should be faced squarely:
Bennett is in THE position
to do more for UBC than
any other man in B.C.
Pressure and petitions
have proven to be vinegar
to this man.
Let's try using a little
honey.
Brothers -
Alosys ranter: Taherever
^BUC}B...<ftepttt
Inokiny dourn vptmjfciu. /
r*
BOOKS
Atter the deluge, a backward
look at some basic false premises
any why terror in the name ot
Simma Holt misrepresents the
Sons of Freedom Doukhobors
By GEORGE WOODCOCK
THERE IS a basic conflict of viewpoints between the historian and the
newsman.
One looks at what is important in the long glance
of time. The other is concerned with what seems important in the passing instant. Good reporters are
rarely good historians; the
desire to record the present
dramatically overbears their
sense of perspective. This is
the case with Simma Holt's
book, Terror in the Name of
God. Mrs. Holt is a reporter
for The Vancouver Sun who
has been covering Doukho-
bor activities for the past
nine years.
Her book is subtitled "The
Story of the Sons of Freedom Doukhobors", and to be
TERROR IN THE NAME OF
GOD. By Simma Holt. McClelland and Stewart, 312
pp. $7.50. Illustrated.
fair to Mrs. Holt one should
point out that, contrary to
the rather misleading publicity her book has been
given, she does not pretend
to be writing the history of
the Doukhobor sect as a
whole.
This sect numbers some
20,000 members in Canada;
of these 2,500 are contained
within the Sons of Freedom,
and of these again, according
to the provincial attorney
General, some 800 to 900
form the hard core of arsonists, dynamiters and repeated nude paraders.
In writing of this minority within a minority within a minority, Mrs. Holt —
though she claims to have
carried out massive research
— is concerned much less
with objective history than
with presenting a passionate expose of the Sons of
Freedom as — to quote the
caption to her first illustration — "a huge crime syndicate of at least 2,500
people" and "a backwoods
Mafia-like organization".
Every means — sensational chapter headings, gro-
t e s q u e nude photographs,
and a breathlessly urgent
manner — are used to give
emphasis to the message the
author feels she has a mission to convey, and to present the drastic solution she
has to offer. The book is so
The main points which
Terror in the Name of God
sets out to prove are that
the Doukhobors have been
subjected ever since they
came to Canada to the dictatorial whims of a series of
leaders regarded as semi-
divine, that these leaders
have ruthlessly exploited
their followers, and that the
violent acts of the Sons of
Freedom have been part of
an elaborately wrought plot,
initiated by the leaders for
their own benefit and kept
going by a ruling elite.
Some of Mrs. Holt's arguments are true.
-It   is   true,   for   example,
that   the   Doukhobors   have
(continued on pf 8)
See: more books 'We must stop
giving credit
to humbug and
illiteracy'
The following is the substance of a discussion (recorded for a Toronto journal) between Dr. W. J. Stankiewicz,
Associate Professor of Political Science, University of
British Columbia, and Mr.
R. C. Cooke, Toronto, concerning the former's anthology Political Thought Since
World War II. published by
the Free Press of Glencoe
and Collier — Macmillan,
1964. The anthology is Professor Stankiewicz's fourth
book.
Cooke: It seems to me that
with  the   present  anthology
you have departed rather
far from your previous book.
Politics and Religion in Seventeenth Century France
(1960).
Stankiewicz: Not so far as
it may seem. You may recall that while the earlier
book was of a 'historical' nature, it was not the kind of
text that a professional historian would have written.
One of them deplored the
fact that I was not content
with simply telling a story
but had to end with a 'lesson'. Yet, surely no reputable historian today would
confine himself to simple
narration.
An historian who only
gave factual accounts of the
past would resemble a so-
called 'empirical' social scientist perennially engaged
in gathering data for their
own sake.
It is not a good sign that
in both history and the social sciences an increasing
influence is being exerted by
scholars who are almost exclusively preoccupied with
factors that can be 'quantified'.
A political scientist looks
at history as an arena of
political man's action: his
ideas on the nature of the
state and government, his
attitude to the latter, the degree of his involvement in
party politics, and the struggle for power.
There are some other
'modern' issues implicit in
my earlier book which build
a bridge between the seventeenth century and our own
time.
The idea of intolerance is
the most crucial issue. What
was formerly religious intolerance has assumed today
the guise of political intolerance. To this can be added
racial intolerance.
The problem of the extent
to which one should tolerate political dissenters belongs to the realm of modern political thought.
OVERSEAS
Israelis. Arabs
like kids — and
Lebanon's caught
in the middle
By JACK KHOURY
n EFERRED to in the Bible
*»■ as the traditional land
of milk and honey, Lebanon today is known as the
Switzerland of the Middle
East, while its capital, Beirut, is often called the Little
Paris because of the similar
night life enjoyed by both
these cities.
The comparison of Lebanon with Switzerland is rightly founded. Like Switzerland, Lebanon is a money
market, with oil rich Kuwaiti sheiks, Saudi Arabian
princes, nervous Egyptian
businessmen and Syrian aristocrats—all depositing their
millions in Beirut's numerous, thriving banks.
And, as in Switzerland,
Lebanese people usually
speak three languages fluently: Arabic, French and
English. Claiming to be one
of the finest institutions in
the Middle East, Lebanon's
American University of Beirut has students representing every Arab state and
most Western ones.
•      •      •
Up until recently, a third
similarity with Switzerland
has been the neutrality of
the country. Because Lebanon is the only Middle Eastern nation where the majority of the people are
Christians (comprising 51
per cent of the 1,750,000
population — the rest are
Moslem), it cannot but be
neutral for fear of stirring
internal  religious  troubles.
However, the Lebanese
parliament ceased to be neutral when it approved on
January 22 to participate
in Arab plans to divert the
Hasbani, source of the Jordan River, thereby foiling the
Israeli project to irrigate the
Negev Desert.
Said Israel's Premier Levi
Eshkol after Lebanon's stand
was made known: "The Israel defence forces will repulse any attack, whether
directed against our territory or the sources of water
that give it life."
Premier Hussein Oweini
of Lebanon retaliated by asking parliament to permit entrance of Arab soldiers —
mostly Egyptian — into the
country whenever there
arose "a possible attack
threatening the security of
the country."
In the course of events,
two fantastic blunders were
committed: Lebanon's giving in to Nasserite pressure
and consenting to divert the
Jordan River tributary, and
Israel's threatening to take
"punitive measures" against
any scheme to ruin its irrigation projects.
•     •     •
At first, Lebanon was reluctant to get involved—the
Lebanese delegates wanted
Syria to divert the Hasbani
within its own territory
rather than in Lebanon,
keeping Lebanon free from
the Arab-Israeli dispute.
But the Lebanese, who
are considered part of the
Arab league, finally consent-
ed when the other Arab
leaders pointed out the only
place where pumping stations could be built in Syria
was too close to Israeli guns
for comfort.
The diversion plans, once
put into effect, mean a costly, six-year project for building    pumping    stations    to
make the Hasbani go around
Israel instead of through
it.
The only practical use the
participant nations could
make of diverting the river
is antagonize Israel and possibly start another Arab-
Israeli all-out war.
Israel on the other hand,
which plans to irrigate
thousands of acres of the
Negev Desert into arable
land, is completely unjustified in threatening with war
any scheme to divert the
Jordan.
Appealing to the United
Nations would foe of no use,
since whatever solution is
offered is bound to be rejected by the Arab nations
or by Israel, which has invested too much time and
money in its project to back
out now.
The dispute is essentially
a childish one, with Israel
and the Arab countries haggling instead of putting their
heads together and using the
Jordan River for their mutual benefit.
In the meantime, by weakening under Nasser's pressure, Lebanon has become
a victim of a fight not its
own. Lebanon, in addition,
may seriously hurt its commercial and touristic activities, the two chief sources,
of  its thriving economy.
But there is still hope for
the future, for six years is
a long time, and in the mysterious politics of the Middle
East, anything may happen.
Cooke: In your earlier
book you coined the term
tolerationism. What are the
chances of its being widely
adopted?
Stankiewicz: I have tried
to 'promote' this concept by
including it in the newly-
published Dictionary of Political Science. (The Philosophical Library, New York
1964). On the same page appears a definition of 'tolerance' written in the manner
of linguistic analysis, which
explains the concept away.
This has drawn at least
one reader's attention to the
cleavage existing within the
discipline of political science
—a cleavage introduced by
the new behavioral or 'empirical' orientation.
This brings us back to my
recently - published anthology, which has two aims. Insofar as the general reader
is concerned, it gives a broad
picture of critical thinking
on the main 'isms' of today.
As regards the professional political scientist, it tries
to focus his attention on that
vast area of political thought
which can generate worthwhile research by both the
behavioral and non-behavioral  persuasions.
Cooke: Let us deal first
with the less controversial
of these two aims: that of
the main 'isms'.
Stankiewicz: It certainly
is the less controversial of the
two issues. In fact, it is not
controversial at all. What
has become debatable is the
extent to which one should
study  political  ideologies.
There are some political
scientists and sociologists —
particularly active on this
side of the Atlantic — who
contend that ideologies are
dead; they speak of the 'end
of ideologies'. There is another group which is not interested in ideologies and
which investigates what it
considers more "research-
able" problems, where factors can be quantified.
The whole Issue is a 'live'
one and cannot be lightly
dismissed. It must present itself to any social socientist
who tackles the problems
requiring at least a fairly
wide background. (A behav-
ioralist applying his 'empirical' fact-gathering method,
looks to a small segment of
the politico-social scene and
faces no similar dilemma:
in most cases, he seeks only
to confirm what is already
known.)
The problem must be
faced by anybody who is not
prepared to sacrifice 'thinking' for so called 'research',
merely in order to follow
the fashionable trend.
It is the concern of those
synthesizers and generaliz-
ers who are accused of being
'non - scientific litterateurs'
and who have to defend
their positions against the
encroachment of parochialism and new scholasticism
posing as the new, behavioral social science.
Among the beneficial results of this situation will, of
course, be keener competition, easier exposure of the
incompetent, and the relegation to oblivion of those
loose, uncritical -writings
from which post World War
II political thought is not
free.
(continued on pf 5)
See: more books
PF  Three
• Eyes Examined
• Contact Lenses Fitted
Armstrong & Reo
OPTOMETRISTS
Uptown office:
1522 West Broadway
RE 3-1611
Kerrisdale office:
2263 W. 41st Ave.
AM 1-1911
WEST POINT GREY
BAPTIST   CHURCH
Eleventh Avenue at Saaexnet
Rev. A. J. Hadley
9:45 a.m. Elective Study
Courses
11:00 a.m. "Unsheathe That
Sword"
7:30 p.m. "Nicodemus,
B.A."
8:45 p.m. Young People's
Fellowship
Europe on Your Own?
$5 a day covers hotel, break-
f
fast and  sightseeing.
HAGEN'S
TRAVEL SERVICE LTD.
2978  W.   Broadway 736-3631
Open   Saturday  9-3
TEL: MU 5-5814
891   GRANVILLE ST.
OPEN DAILY
MID-DAY to MIDNIGHT
MAURICE
EVANS
JUDITH
ANDERSON
of WILLIAM SR\KESPEARES
macBetlt
v TECHNICOLOR!'
Part,
•76-2747
CAMIIE at 18th CINEMA
Viridiana? non
shock unless
you're the one
BunueVs after
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
Dear Ethel  Bloomsbury.
Or whoever you are.
THIS IS ABOUT VIRIDIANA.' (The film which you
said you were reviewing in
last week's PF.)
HAS IT NEVER OCCURRED TO YOU THAT there
was nothing really terribly
shocking in the film, unless
you happen to have a lot of
the notions which the film
was trying to shake out of
you?
Obviously not. Otherwise,
you wouldn't have bothered
listing every detail guaranteed to raise standard eyebrows, pain standard eyeballs, disconcert standard
minds. What was exceptional about the film, if the most
that could be said about it
were anti- Catholic anti-
corruption symbolisms?
The point of the film, my
dear Ethel, is not that the
Church of Spain is corrupt
(O really, now) but that despite corruption, people are
people.
It is the story which deserves attention, not the details (although meticulous
attention to detail is nearly
always the sign) of an accomplished director.
The story concerns Viridiana, who wanted to spend
her life in solitary, swathed
in white, praying. Her Uncle
is not inclined to agree with
her, because she happens to
be exceedingly fair to look
upon. It's always a shame
that nuns are pretty, or so
runs some adage or other.
The Uncle gets his wish,
and Viridiana sets to Work
being saintly without the aid
of solitude or white robes.
But along comes Uncle's bastard-son, who happens to
be very good-looking and
very, very sexy, and step by
salacious step Viridiana and
her cousin start walking
along the same (wide is the
gate but strait is the way)
path.
Let us not ignore the singular political issue of the
film: it seems particularly
relevant in view of the recent hassles of another beggarly segment of the world's
population.
In a world of power-machines, singularly little can
be accomplished without
power. Viridiana's efforts to
teach the beggars how to
live cleanly are wasted:
they cannot be taught by a
woman they consider a fool.
They are not interested in
living with bare necessities
when luxury abounds
The most striking element of the film is perhaps
the little girl, who jumps
rope as though it were a
consecrated ritual. Having
all the qualities of a little
witch-child, it is she who
embodies the unintentional
evil of Viridiana's saintli-
ness.
PF  Four
>  »  »    ■     >   T   * fe
You win, Claire! - E
HONEYMOON AT THE HARRISON
Spend lazy days golfing, riding, strolling by the lake, swimming in the hot pools and the sparkling outdoor pool. \0
Enjoy fun-filled evenings in the gay Copper Room with dancing
and entertainment nightly. c&? Memorable food, a relaxing
resort atmosphere, and The Harrison's magnificent mountain
scenery. CO For that most special holiday, plan to stay at
The Harrison. '^ Just 2 hours drive from Vancouver, B.C.;
3Vi from Seattle.
June honeymooners receive a special wedding present - 50% off room rates
THE HARRISON Hotel
a distinguished resort at
Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia
In Vancouver:
Call   toll-free   521-8888,
see your travel agent
WARD   MUSIC   LTD.
We carry a complete stock of
SHEET MUSIC, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS,
RECORDS, RECORD PLAYERS,
TEACHER'S SUPPLIES
MAIL ORDERS OUR SPECIALTY
412 WEST HASTINGS STREET
MUtual 2-5288 - VANCOUVER, B.C.
*ta*o^*ita*******dtaM|ia
■U^^^
1111 11' r
MU 4-4145
FAST SERVICE
• THESES TYPING
• ESSAY TYPING
• COPY TYPING
• XEROX COPYING
Call tor rates . . .
Katharine Cook Ltd.
415 - 355 BURRARD
Are you a candidate for
assistance under the
CANADA STUDENT
LOANS ACT?
Under this Act, each qualifying student may present a
Certificate of Eligibility to the bank branch of his (or
her) choice. Royal Bank, with over 1000 branches across
Canada, offers you convenient service combined with
practical counsel. Visit your nearest branch.
required reading
Chances are you won't find this AIR CANADA schedule among the intellectual nourishment available in your university or college library. Yet, in not too many years, it could be an important
bread and butter item on your everyday reading list. And for this very good reason: AIR CANADA
can take you quickly, comfortably and conveniently to 35 Canadian cities, 7 major U.S. cities,
and to Britain (with BOAC), Ireland, France, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Bermuda, Nassau,
and the Caribbean, on matters of business, pleasure and profit.
Al R CANADA MORE BOOKS
(continued from pf 3)
Cooke: Do you feel that
the papers collected in the
volume meet your requirements?
Siankiewicz: If an anthology is i;o be more than a
mere collection of papers on
related subjects, if it is to
be coherent and have unity.
Of course, no book of this
sort can ever be entirely homogeneous. But I tried to
avoid contributions of a
transitory or esoteric nature:
the anthology had to consist
of significant interpretations
unified by one idea: the
present-day conflict between
two ways of life, the totalitarian and the democratic.
Cooke: This is certainly
one of the crucial issues of
our time. The importance of
a book of this kind is that it
offers insight to those who
are not content with being
merely unconscious participants in the social process.
They are interested in the
norms and values that permeate society and therefore
cannot accept the 'negative'
attitude to ideologies now
prevailing in Western democratic societies.
•      •      •
Stankiewicz: Yes, the ir-
rationalism of the democratic man makes him believe
that commitment to an ideology is unbecoming to citizens of a democracy.
Ideological 'disengage-
ment' , explains democratic
values away, and in the long
run leaves the door open for
extremist views and doctrines.
Without commitment,
there is no effective defence
of democracy and our 'way
of life'.
Cooke: Yes, the political
myopia so much in evidence
in our society is attributable
partly to those who simply
take democracy for granted
—representing the uninformed point of view—and partly
to those who equate any
ideological orientation with
the attitudes of a totalitarian society.
Stankiewicz: This may
have something to do with
the rather unsatisfactory
meaning which the word
'ideology' has acquired. It is
a fact that the term 'ideology' fits totalitarian regimes
best.
The role of a student of
political theory is not only
to describe political currents
with precision but to expand
the vocabulary of politics,
seeking new labels and
terms. This, of course, is a
delicate job.
One should avoid lapsing
into a meaningless jargon or
simply becoming ridiculous
by inventing pretentious
new terminology. But the
need is there and the anthology stresses it, pointing out
the necessity for reclassifying certain concepts.
Cooke: This i s of great
importance. Instead of projecting their wishful thinking, their own anti-ideological ideology, the prophets of
the 'end of ideologies' would
do better if they thought out
more deeply and constructively the main political cur
rents or tne contemporary
world.
Instead of blindly denying the obvious, they should
accept the inevitability of
doctrines and use their tools
to analyze them. They would
have the chance to show the
value of their 'empirical' approach.
• •      •
Stankiewicz:   The   trouble
is that the empirical tools
devised by the positivists,
linguistic analysts and be-
havioralists are not always
applicable; those who devised them did not make
them generally useful.
Hence the triviality or
even irrelevance of their
findings. Confusion created
by the concerted efforts of
the sociology - and psychology - trained behavioralists
spreads to political science,
creates a rift among its
scholars, and makes the cooperative study of warring
ideologies difficult, if not
impossible.
• •      •
Theoretically,   the   whole
vast area of political
thought, political ideologies
in particular, should provide an excellent ground for
research for both philsoph-
ical and positivist orientations.
In practice, obstacles
loom larger, as the conflict
between the 'theorists' and
the behavioralists become increasingly 'ideological'. The
'theorists' become desperate
when they see the 'empiricists' reiterate their method-
o 1 o g i e s which inevitably
turn out to be mere declarations of intention regarding
their research techniques.
The empiricists stubbornly refuse to deal with values
and   consider   the   theorists'
concern with doctrines 'unscientific'. They are unaware
that a methodology can also
become a doctrine, which is
precisely what happens in
their case.
Moreover, there is a wide
gulf between the theory and
practice of the empiricists:
their declarations of intention as to their research
techniques are usually fuzzy
and obtuse. When they finally begin to practise what
they preach, they usually
prove to be merely elementary technicians.
•      •      •
Cooke: In your anthology
—which you consider as a
sort of workshop of political theory — you expressed
the hope for a rapprochement
between 'institutionalists'
(or 'theorists') and behavioralists. How could this be
achieved?
Stankiewicz: There is
little hope for any rapprochement, let alone co-operation, unless behavioralists
learn to write clear, simple
and meaningful English.
Behind their pseudo-scientific verbiage there is confusion of thought and a disturbing paucity of ideas.
What do you make of the
following sentence taken
from a paper by Robert S.
Cahill and Harry J. Friedman, "A Strategy for the
Comparative Study of Local
Government".
"The key components of
the method we propose
might best be encapsulated
by the phrase multi-variant
explanatory analysis of cumulative and creatively reconstructed case histories."
First we must stop giving
credit to illiteracy and humbug. Only then can we talk
on an equal basis.-
JAZZ
Angus takes a closeclose
look at Jazz '65 and despite
CHQM and Bateman it turned
out to be an artistic —
and financial — success
howie bateman presents
PF   Five
By ANGUS  RICKER
SUNDAY, March 14, saw
Vancouver's first and only
jazz concert of the season at
the Queen Elizabetth Theatre.
Singularly titled Jazz '65
and sponsored by CHQM
and Howie Bateman, ('nuff
said) it still managed to be
a financial and artistic success.
Pianist Vince Guaraldi
abetted by Brazilian guitarist Bola Sete opened. Guar-
aldi has gained considerable
commercial acceptance with
such tunes as the initial
"Alma-Ville," his own "Cast
Your Fate to the Wind," and
latterly,  "Linus and  Lucy."
The "commercial" tag is
hardly disparaging. Guaraldi has a considerable, if
fleeting swing (his nickname
is Dr. Funk) and his compositions are catchy and
right.
The surprise of the evening, Bola Sete, complemented Guaraldi with an exotic
flavor that comprised bossa
novas and a classical guitar
style.
S e t e ' s introduction to
"Morning of the Carnival"
was liberally  and imaginat
ively atempo, while his clos-
sical solo, "Leyenda," (my
spelling) was freighted with
an almost passionate attack.
"Carnival" highlighted the
set with Guaraldi returning
to the piano to provide some
extended fireworks in the
closing exchanges. Locals
Don Thompson (bass) and
Terry Clarke (drums) ably
accompanied the San Franciscans. Thompson showed a
big sound and Clarke's bossa
novas revealed a new found
(and most welcome) sense of
restraint.
Restraints aside, there is
a definite uniqueness to the
Guaraldi four that sets them
apart from most other quarters. And singularity was to
be a strong undercurrent
throughout this swinging
evening.
Uniqueness has long been
stock in trade for Gerry
Mulligan. Since 1947 he has
been handling the unruly
baritone sax with a facility
and agility that few musicians have approached.
And in the interim Mulligan has evolved a most unlikely   style   that   has been
(continued on pf 7)
See:   more jazz
FRIDAY, APRIL 9  -  8:30 P.M.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Tickets now on sale. $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00. At The Vancouver
Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton Street, MIT 3-3255, All Eaton's Stores
(where you can charge them), and Kerrisdale Travel, 2292 West 41st
Avenue.
For Graduation . . .
Go with Fashion...
Go Iridescent
Who said men's suits are drab and dreary?
The ladies! Well, wait until they see — and
admire — you in a Glentest or Silk and Wool
suit. The suits glow and radiate with flashes
of tiny flecks of blended colourings. Each
carries the Progress Brand label. Need we
say more about the fine tailoring and styling.
Treat yourself to an early visit.
Glentest
rrogressDrand
Expressly for
Clinton's
742 Granville St.
nriEn s uuegr
Phone: MU  1-5625 PEOPLE
We're special because we're the
greatest says the terrible
twosome ot Special events. But
they're just amateur impressarios
nothing especially eventful here
A condensation of two
views of a year of Special
Events—brought to you from
the inside. Chairman Murray
Farr and Chris Wootten talk
to Page Friday's John Kelsey.
•      •      •
"What's the philosophy
behind Special Events?"
"We're trying to bring
things to stimulate people—
intellectually and culturally.
"Like Robert Theobald on
automation, then the Four
Preps.
"This is why we brought
in Rockwell — maybe it's
sensationalism, maybe it is
making people think, stimulating them.
"We don't really know or
care.
"We're special because we
bring things which wouldn't
otherwise come to UBC.
"We appeal to only a segment of the campus with
each event, but in a given
year, everybody finds something to enjoy.
"Once we have a general
idea of the costs, arrangements, and times, we try to
find other organizations and
colleges to arrange package
deals. Makes low costs. In
town, we work with Howie
Bateman and other impressarios. The next step is to
try and find the real going
price. This usually involves
phoning other agents and
trying to book the artist
through them — and then
dicker. Bateman, for example, does help out quite a
bit by keeping us up on the
prices of popular entertainers. We do this with all our
speakers,   all  our  contracts.
"Our guide for what to
bring in is what's available.
Very seldom do we go out
hunting. We hunted for
Rockwell, but we can't really afford to hunt much. Like,
Stan Getz. We routed him up
here from San Francisco.
"Another way is if we're
talking to a local impressario
or club owner, and he's
bringing someone here. Then
we make a deal for an additional contract on campus.
"We only have one concert
of anything we bring—but
in terms of the number of
different performances, entertainers, speakers — we're
running close to Famous Artists.
"Best deal we've made
was with Carlos Montoya.
His going concert fee is
around   $1,400.   He'll   some
times come down if he's got
a good full schedule and if
he's playing for colleges.
Victoria was thinking of
booking him, and because he
was in Seattle the day before and Tacoma the day after, they got him for $1,000.
So we offered his agent
$1,400 for the day.
"Victoria paid $700 for the
afternoon concert and we
paid $700 for an evening
concert.
"He was a real problem
because he doesn't speak
English. Translaters and all.
"The funniest thing we've
ever done was the Big Fanny
Storgoff and the Doukhob-
our concert. We'd gone down
to get them to come to speak.
The plans were set for them:
she'd speak, and their 40
voice choir would sing. They
didn't know where they
were going, and so we were
supposed to go down to Victory Square with a bus to
pick them up. Big Fanny
didn't understand. When we
got there, the bus arrived,
and they'd all gone. We're
there with the bus looking
for Fanny. They had their
own bus, and they got here
at curtain time, natch. Big
Fanny was hoarse, and
couldn't sing or speak. Choir
was OK, though.
"The greatest hazard of
being special events chairman is that (since we've gone
extremist anyway) we get
our names on the nut lists.
"People phone us trying to
get sponsored. Like, a couple
of weeks ago David Stanley,
the Jew hater, tried to get
here. Tried to get me to
bring  the   attorney   for the
(continued on pf 7)
See:   more people
ART
Contemporary vs.
primitive: sub-
Sahara tries to
find how close
By  GLENN ALLISON
In keeping with the ever-
increasing calibre of his recent exhibits, Alvin Balkind,
Curator of the Fine Arts
Gallery in the Library, is
currently displaying artifacts from sub-Sahara Africa.
Please note — the epithet
is not "Primitive Art", because anthropological terminology is being spruced up.
As every anthropology student knows, the word primitive in reference to such art
is passe — pedants now use
ethnological!
In any event, the Gallery
houses a random selection
of African art to present its
general characteristics. The
grouping is somewhat forced
in that a wide range of unrelated tribal cultures, each
with autonomous principles
inherent in the individual
societies, have been rudely
jumbled together. However,
the admixture is not without
purpose.
Taken in total, the stylized
art forms are, in every case,
the products of rigid tribal
conventions.
Each article, whether of
domestic or magico-religious
function,    has    a    standard
meaningful form. The average, uninitiated European
spectator is completely ignorant of the work's intrinsic value. In that event, the
first criterion that one
should adopt would seem to
be handling of the raw material. In the works displayed, technology ranges
from the crude to the virtuoso.
In Africa, generally, the
artist and artisan are one
and the same, and beauty of
material is one of the chief
aims. With the search for
beauty inevitably comes the
search for supernatural aid.
Thus, the main interest of
the show, apart from the
costumes and articles of
domestic function, focuses
on sculpture motivated by
magico-religious complexes.
To this end, African artists
present an unending variety
of human images. Whether
they are masks or statuettes,
whether they are called fetishes, idols or ancestral figures, they have one thing in
common, and that is the direct antithesis of the Western or European concept of
the body image.
The Africans have none
of the encumbrances of rational, intellectualized representations, but rather a mys-
t i c a 1 association between
spirit-image and material.
In the eyes of their creators, those creatures now on
pedestals and in glass cases
were far from mere narrative embodiments. To them,
each figure stands as an em-
pathetic realization of a conceptual image.
What you see is not a per
sonification of a material
force or a symbolic evaluation of a particular human
being.
Instead, they are empa-
thetic responses, ideas, some
as diffuse as "soul" or "energy". The sculpture is the
spirit itself. As a result the
works are neither naive nor
technically deficient, as
their design and formal organization  bears witness.
Radical anatomical exaggeration, distortion or suppression can be logically
accounted for within the
context of the mother culture.
This validity of abstraction is the undercurrent of
the entire show, perhaps as
a justification of such showings, as the recent Bruce
Conner exhibit.
A handful of reproductions of 20th Century masters are displayed to press
the analogy. But the modern
artist tends to base his selection upon his personal reaction, and as a result, his
compositions are sometimes
unintelligible to the greater
part of his audience.
Among the "primitive"
artists, abstraction rests
upon the consensus of his society, and his work is correspondingly intelligible to
his audience.
The gap between contemporary and "primitive" use of
abstraction cannot be denied. And for that reason,
the 20th Century prints included in the display of sub-
Sahara art presents the only
discordant note in an otherwise delightfully interesting exhibit.
UBC SPECIAL EVEIVTS
presents a
£prihf %Atttal
ojf the Art*
* from France: on WORLD TOUR
PARIS de PERCUSSION
Tuesday, March 23 — Auditorium * 25c
■^r A Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation Concert Recording by
JULIAN BREAM
World  famous  master   of
the lute and guitar
Tickets at AMS or CBC
Wednesday, March 24
Auditorium  -   FREE
^r first time in Canada
JAPANESE GAGAJU ENSEMBLE
EXOTIC COURT MUSIC of 12th century Japan under the
direction   of   Professor   Robert   Garfias,   also   featuring
MUSIC OF THE EDO PERIOD (17th to 19th centuries) with
KODO   ARAKI   playing   the   shakuhachi   and  SHIZNKO
YAMASE on the koto.
Saturday 8:00 p.m- — March 27 — Hebb Theatre — 75c
presented by Special Events,  UBC Dept. of Music,
Department of Asian Studies
^ A Canadian Broadcasting
Corporation Concert Recording of
The University Madrigal Singers
Sunday 8:15 p.m. - April 4 - Hebb Theatre - FREE
Tickers at AMS or CBC MORE PEOPLE
(continued from pf 6)
Ku Klux Klan too. He's a
grand vizier and all of that."
"What is going on about
next year's program?"
"Well, it's really hard
starting cold to write letters
to people. You've got the
same money to do a better job
than the guy who had it last
year.
"That's $7,000 from the
AMS directly, $4,000 from
admissions, giving 10 to 11
thousand working capital,
and we've got to have this
amount behind us.
"We've got a downtown
advantage because we don't
have to pay for halls and
ushers.
"Our main function is,
since we are a university
booking agency, we have to
try to bring to the campus
attractions which the students and the faculty
couldn't ordinarily see downtown.
"Here's where speakers
like James Baldwin, Robert
Theobald, George Rockwell
come in. I think it is invaluable to bring a man like
Terry Southern to UBC.
We're going to try for him.
"Another function is the
classical side. Ravi Shankar
was last year's coup in classical concerts. Never before
in Canada and all of that.
"We also take advantage
of La Jeunesse Musicale, in
Quebec. They bring in musical groups from Europe.
Like Paris Percussion, next
week. We don't have the
money to bring in American
groups. Paris Percussion will
only cost us $400.
"Then there's a great lot
of other things, such as pure
entertainment, the Festival
of the Contemporary Arts,
super academics.
"All of a sudden, we get
unlooked for bonanzas. This
year, CBC has come to us
several times. Julian Bream,
English lutist, normally
costs $1,200. CBC is bringing
him here, and needs an audience. So what better place
than UBC? All of a sudden,
we've four events in 10 days,
where there is normally
nothing. It's the new, vital
spring festival of music.
Wow."
MORE JAZZ
(continued from pf 5)
described as a "fascinating
pastiche o f mainstream,
quasi-bop and Dixieland-
modern."
In short—the works.
This was the first Vancouver appearance for the
Quartet and the opener revealed a surprisingly mature
looking Mulligan. Similarly,
his now bespectacled musical alter-ego, valve-trombonist Bob Brookmeyer, resembled more your friendly
physics prof than one of the
West Coast jazz renegades of
the early '50s.
However, it didn't take
more than a couple of choruses of "Bweebida Bobbida"
to reveal the continuing vitality of the Mulligan approach.
The idea of a pianoless
quartet   remains   extremely
valid and the fluid low register blends of the front line
ensemble quickly dispelled
any naive preconceptions regarding the lack of contrast
between baritone and trombone.
There was also an engaging polyphony created as
Mulligan and Brookmeyer
alternately underlined each
other's solos with softly stated chords of counter-melodies that created an even
bolder relief for the  soloist.
Further, bass and drum
solos were frequently punctuated by quasi - dramatic
riffs from the horns.
All this additional effort
created an air of relaxed,
intricate, busyness that is a
most welcome alternative to
the common modern jazz
practice of allowing soloists
to woodshed at excessive
(and generally vacuous)
lengths.
In any case, these characteristics coupled with the
group's subtle dynamics provided most rewarding listening.
The set included two uptempo swingers "17 Mile
Drive" and "Blueport." The
quartet bossa nova'd in and
out of an elaborately structured "You'd Be So Nice to
Come Home to" and there
was a pair of interesting
numbers on which the horn
men played piano.
Mulligan's "Night Lights"
had a reflective, wistful
quality and "Subterranean
Blues" framed Brookmeyer's
piano in moody, Monkish
terms. Brookmeyer's trombone work was marked by
his nasal tone and a penchant for "half-valve" effects
that seemed to preclude any
need for a mute.
The amalgam of traditional and modern elements in
Brookmeyer places him
stylistically akin to Mulligan
and no doubt accounts in
some degree for the group's
fundamental rapport.
The interpolations became
outrageously sly and it became evident that central to
the conception of the Gerry
Mulligan Quartet is the idea
that jazz should be an inside joke that is not too well
kept.
The Modern. Jazz Quartet
closed the concert and on
balance the general proceedings suffered a letdown. The
reasons for this are inextricably bound up in the personality of the MJQ's musical
director, John Lewis. In
essence, Lewis misreads audiences.
There is a certain high
level of performance that the
MJQ of which is always capable and their technique is
close to flawless. But on this
particular evening they came
off rather badly owing to
poor placement on the program and because they
sounded just a trifle stale.
Except for the above
scheduling gaffe this was an
excellently produced concert. Personally, I would
prefer to hear two groups
at a greater length as musicians require a certain
amount of time to become
attuned to their surroundings but I don't know how
this reconciles with effective
promotion.
Anyone who doesn't particularly feel like rumbling
at Granny's Pad this Saturday nieht can catch the MJQ
on CBUT's "Studio 41" at
10 p.m. Gerry Mulligan follows with an equally imaginative show next week.
(Joqjusi
FLOWER
SHOP
2197 W.   BROADWAY
10%  Discount to Students
736-7344
Europe Bound ?
Large selection of economical student
programs for study or pleasure. (Top
notch ones for rich Faculty members,
tool)
HAGEN'S
TRAVEL SERVICE  LTD.
2978   W.   Broadway 736-5651
Open   Saturday   9-5
BAY
COLUMBIA PICTURES
A WILLIAM G0£TZ PROOUCTW
Song
Without
"17l^r|>7*e5toa'ttf!
JUrf&vJL^ Franz Liszt
»CMEMASC0PE Eastman COLOR.
BE ASSURED! Contact lenses can be so comfortable you
clon't feel them! Properly fitted they satisfy the most
exacting requirements (at a reasonable price).
LAWRENCE CALVERT
705  BIRKS  BLDG.
MU 3-1816
THE BAVARIAN ROOM
(MODEKISV.CAFK)
EUROPEAN and CANADIAN CUISINE
3005 W. Broadway Phono RE 4-9012
He is a thinking man, and thinking right, for his
distinguished grad suit will be from ' Richards &
Farish Men's Wear", 786 Granville St.
"Where the Big Selection Awaits You".
RICHARDS & FARISH
786 Granville St., Vancouver 2, B.C., Phone 684-4819 MORE BOOKS
(continued from pf 2)
lived under a theocratic system, and nobody who knows
them or has studied their
history had any doubt that
the leaders have often exploited this situation.
It is equally impossible to
deny or condone the acts of
violence that have taken
place. But this does not
mean that a closely-knit
Mafia of the kind Mrs. Holt
presents actually exists or
that all Sons of Freedom
acts of violence are inspired
by mysterious orders from
above.
Her contentions are based
primarily on confessions, notoriously the least reliable
of all forms of evidence, and
confessions, moreover, given
under conditions of mass
emotionalism by people with
a taste for martyrdom.
Attempts by the Crown to
prove cases of mass conspiracy against the Sons of Freedom have been thrown out
by the courts precisely because of the complete unreliability of evidence of
this kind.
The fact is that the Doukhobors are not the kind of
steel - minded rationalists
who maintain well-laid plots
over years of single-minded
effort; they are moved rather by irrational group impulses linked to a deep sense
of grievance.
Into that sense of grievance and its causes Mrs.
Holt does not care to look.
In fact, she has a disturbing
tendency to see everything
moralistically, in black-and-
white tones, and to gloss
over completely the errors
on our side which, as every
serious student of Doukho-
bor affairs well knows, have
played their part — through
governmental ineptitude, police stupidity and popular
prejudice — in aggravating
the situation.
Most disturbing of all is
the solution she offers, which
is likely only to harden resentments and to delay any
real reconciliation between
Doukhobors and other Canadians. She recommends
that the Sons of Freedom
children should be forcibly
taken over for re-education.
"It may mean enactment
of special laws," she remarks, and she adds that
such laws "might well upset
decent Canadians who resent
infringements on human
freedom."
That is putting it mildly.
Special laws against minorities have bad associations
for people who have lived
through the past thirty
years. They carry dangers
both to the people against
whom they are enacted and
to the community as a whole,
since such laws often form
the basis for wider attacks
on civil  liberties.
Europe Bound?
Specialists In travel to E. Europe and
USSR. Full information on simple vita
procedures. (We know about the  rest
of the world, tool)
HAGEN'S
TRAVEL SERVICE LTD.
2978 W.  Broadway 736-5631
Open Saturday 9-5
MADRAS
SHIRTS
Choose from Madras Belts,
Bermuda Shorts, Traditional
Sport Shirts and Sport
Jackets
at
4$ASht
41st at Yew
Young Men's
traditional clothing
in Kerrisdale
Western Canada's Largest
FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full Dress Shirts & Accessories
Morning Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors' Coats 10%  UBC  Discount
OVER 2000 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 HOWE  (Downstairs)  MU 3-2467
2608 Granville (at 10th)   4683 Kingsway (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by Sears) HE 1-1160
DIAMONDS  WITH
CONFIDENCE
UjoIwh
Qualify
Stulhtn
FIRBANKS
Downtown
Brentwood and Park Roral
HOUSE OF STEIN LTD.,
Orig. 1879
A Sound Spectacular
AT 1005 GRANVILLE
TAPE RECORDERS
j
STEREO & HI-FI COMPONENTS-eonfd
Reg.
Sale
LAFAYETTE AGS - 4 Track,
Full Stereo.  Complete w/2        _     _
mikes. 3 only    249.50
UHER    -   4   Track   Mono.
Model 734     295.00
TELEFUNKEN - Stereo Deck.
Model 85, one of finest .—    329.00
SONY-Model III     129.50
SONY-4 Track Stereo Deck
(playback)       139 50
PHILIPS - 400 Stereo, play
and record, used     399.50
PHILIPS-200,  used     189.00
166.00
195.00
189.00
78.00
88.00
248.00
88.00
TRANSISTORIZED
PORTABLES
PIONEER—80 watt integrated stereo amplifier and
tuner, w/MPX. Latest 1965
Model.   1   only    449.95
MIDLAND - 12 watt stereo
amplifier           59.50
GARRARD - AT 6 Mark II.
Lab. stereo. Auto, or man.
changer, complete with cartridge and diamond stylus.- 79-50
BSR — Latest VA-25 stereo
auto record changer, w/
cartridge   needle          43.50
JENSEN-10" HI-FI woofer.       1 2.95
SYMPHONY  -   12"  HI-FI
woofer         14.95
ELECTRA-6/2" speaker system. Slim line with walnut
enclosure. 20-20,000 CPS.
Response—outstanding        69.50
ELECTRA-12" co-axial, one
of finest speakers. Come in
and listen to the system—       89.50
12" de luxe walnut speaker
enclosures           49.50
300.00
38.00
48.88
27.88
7.88
8.88
44.00
72.50
32.00
 Reg.
CARSEN-2 speeds, 5" reel.
Ideal for lectures, as well as
music. Remote control     124.50
VICTORIA-2 speed, 3" reel.
Complete with foot switch,
case and AC pack. 1 only.-       99.50
PHILIPS - Continental 100,
demonstrator     139.50
MINICORDER-4 Transistors,
push button. Excellent for
speech           29.50
Sale
STEREO & HI-FI
COMPONENTS
MISCELLANEOUS
Reg.
Sale
Reg.
Sale
LAFAYETTE-44 watt stereo
amplifier, solid state.   -
169.50
138.00
ELECTRA—De luxe 50 watt
stereo integrated amplifier.
Model SA-225. 3 only.
259-50
148.00
ELECTRA - FM-MPX Tuner,
1.9 mv.  sensitivity. Slightly
dented case 	
119.50
68.00
HARMAN • KARDON   -   50
watt stereo amplifier kit. 2
225.00
149.00
199.00
159.00
79.00
139.00
EICO—30 watt stereo amplifier, integrated. 1 only—
CLAIRTONE-Amplifier   and
tuner, w/MPX. Complete
chassis. 2 only	
KENWOOD-De   luxe  automatic   FM-MPX   tuner.   One
of finest. 3 only         .
199.50
148.00
B.O. stereo magn. cartridge
w/stylus '(diamond)        32.95
EMPIRE 880 magn. cartridge
w/diamond            3495
SHURE M-7D magn. cartridge w/diamond        26.95
TAYA moving magnet stereo
cartridge          19.95
BSR crystal stereo cartridge 6.95
Mono  tape or  phono  pre-
amp.            19.50
Tape head demagnetizes A
must for every tape recorder 5.95
Professional   studio    micro-
phone. 40-16,000 CPS        39.95
OMNIDIRECTIONAL—Broad-
east type crystal microphone
w/dual element        14-95
LAFAYETTE  - Top  quality,
1200* Mylar recording tape.
4 to a customer only—,— 3-95
NANAOLA  —  8  transistor,
super sensitive radio, w/RF
stage           29.95
SCOOP! 4 track pre-recorded STEREO TAPES. Top hits,
light  classical,  etc. 4 to  a
customer     5.95
SCOOP!!    Super    powerful
WALKIE TALKIES, 9 transistor, up to 6 mile range. All
metal  inner case  plus  lea-     ,noKn
ther carrying case. Only--_     109.50
Portable stereo battery or
AC transistor record player
and radio combination      1 29.50
16.88
18.88
18.50
12.88
3.88
11.88
3.88
19.88
8.95
1.89
18.88
1.98
Pair
89.50
98.00
AT 949 GRANVILLE
TAPE RECORDERS
Reg.
Sale
TELEFUNKEN-4 track stereo
playback-3 speed     299.50
FUJIYA 771-2  track  mono
-2 speed      139.50
GRUNDIG - 4 track full
stereo tape recorder. 2 only.
Model TK-27     289.50
MINY — Transistorized portable        49.50
SANYO—Smallest transistor
tape recorder — ideal for
speech          59.50
198.00
78.00
195.00
28.00
34.95
STUDENTS! . . . 10%
Discount with this Ad
HI-FI STEREO
COMPONENTS
Reg.
Sale
AGS-FAX-100 AM-FM, MPX
integrated amplifier and
tuner   	
TRIO WX14G-Com. stereo
amplifier and tuner w/MPX
LAFAYETTE-70 watt stereo
MPX amplifier and tuner.
One of finest. Demo	
Latest 1965 Westinghouse
portable T.V. "Instant On"
Model.  Special  	
Magnificent GRUNDIG
stereo console w/MPX. 60
watts of power	
Stereo headphones for easy
listening to your favourite
program    	
249.50
269.50
399.00
469.50
24.95
178.00
198.00
298.00
138.00
338.00
1488
HUNDREDS of other SOUND Specials!
Come in and Look Around!
Easy Credit of Course
HOUSE  OF STEIN  LTD
1005 Granville
MU 3-6120     MU 3-6311
2 STORES
949 Granville
MU 5-5611 •at-
Friday, March 19, 1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
COMMERCE GRAD Robert
Lee has been appointed
head of the UBC alumni
$500,000 campaign drive
for the Three Universities
fund.
'B.C. still
has teacher
shortage
Education Minister Les Peterson said about one of every
four university students is
training to be a teacher.
"Although this is helping to
relieve the teacher shortage in
BC, we still need about twice
as many teachers as are coming
out this year," he said.
"A lot of students are staying at university to complete
their degrees, and this is part
of the problem. A few years
ago, they would take a year or
two of training, and then go
out teaching.
"Eventually the school system will benefit from this, but
in the meantime it is difficult
to fill all the teacher posts
available," Peterson said.
'Diet to lead Tories'
Green predicts
June election
Former external affairs minister Howard Green said
Wednesday he believes the Liberals will call a June federal
election. | —■	
J BAA to drop
policy tips
He also said Conservative
leader John Diefenbaker will
head his party's campaign.
"The leadership question
was settled for good at the
party executive meeting in
February," Green told The
Ubyssey in an interview.
Earlier, speaking to the UBC
Conservative club Green said
his party will fight the campaign on three issues: morality
in government, Liberal cynicism and today's attitude toward institutions such as the
monarchy.
An example of the Liberal's
cynical approach to government is their excessive raises
in MP's salaries, Green said.
"This was one of the Liberal's first bills and they raised
salaries so opposition MP's
would not vote them out of office," the former MP added.
A major policy speech by
UBC President John B. Macdonald is expected to be given
in a panel discussion Tuesday
noon in Brock.
Topic for discussion is "Academic goals for UBC".
Speakers are: Dr. Macdonald; Mr. Justice Nathan Nem-
etz; Dr. J. F. McCreary, dean
of Medicine; F. R. McCourt,
graduate student; and D. F.
Miller, a member of the Board
of Governors.
Macdonald will speak for
half an hour and is expected
to include in his discussion, his
aims for future development at
UBC.
GRAD CLASS
MEETING
TODAY-NOON
MARCH  79
HEBB THEATRE
3>oh. ^haduaiion.
The Doorway to a College Man's World . .
4^ ^ <ty&s~c&*,
/
MG^&fc*^
Whatever your preference, we have your
graduation suit selection in stock . . . One,
two or three button styles. $£0-95 to $ ] QQ
1^6
Murrag Goldman
"Granville
774
Up  Half a  Block from Birk's Clock
GO FORMAL
RESERVE FOR GRADUATION NOW
Tuxedos - White Dinner Jackets
Tails • Morning Coats - Director Coats
Complete Sise Range and Latest Styles
McCUISH   FORMAL  WEAR   LTD.
2046 West 41st Avenue Telephone: 263-3610
Berkeley Student Speaks on the
Student March on Washington
Viet Nam Protest for April '65
Friday Noon- Bu.  100
- SOCIALIST CLUB -
• •••
• • • •
Pure Wool's the thing for Spring!
•••••#■
• •• •
And now it's yours in a V brand new look — a brand
new style! The look — naturally handsome. The style —
Caldwell-designed for comfort-in-action, fashioned in Pure
Wool for warmth without weight! The very thing you've always wanted on spring's "coolish" days and summer's chilly
evenings! Actually, Caldwell has created the missing link in
the man's wardrobe — a garment featuring pure wool's
natural resilience and shape retention, full bodied textures
and deep-dyed color vitality! The al! new Sweater-Jac gives
you year 'round wearability — plus comfort fit — a must
for your wardrobe!
the Caldwell
SWIATERJAC
proves it!
CALDWELL SWEATER-JAC in 100% pure Botany Wool, double knit
Tyrol collar, raglan sleeve, button front in sizes S,M,L,XL. (Mode!
DK32). Colors: Foggy Green, Madonna Blue, Black, Banana. Abou'
$13.95.   Also  available  in  long sleeve  at  about  $15.95.
Quality begins with pure wool
(2aldlDell HAND FASHIONED
by ^^ KNIT-RITE MILLS LTD.
^^       WINNIPEG CANADA
AT FINE STORES EVERYWHERE! Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 19,  1965
KAYAKING - - A CRAZY NEW UBC FAD?
By ERIC BROOM
No, he's not offering her a tasty pastry or
inviting her to join in the latest dance, this
is a different kind of build up, the use of the
persuasive male tongue to get her to try one
of the more spectacular skills of kayak
canoeing.
It seems strange to me, a newcomer to
Canada, that in a land where the canoe played such a vital role in early development,
and where there is so much water, canoeing
as a sport is virtually unknown. In Europe
where, relatively speaking, there is little inland water, the right to canoe on rivers,
canals, reservoirs and gravel pits is jealously
fought for and guarded, and the sport has a
large following both recreationally and competitively.
The sport has many facets: In the Olympic
Games, Kayaking forms the bulk of the
programme, with singles and doubles for
both men and women, plus a relay, covering
distances from 500 to 1,000 metres.
A division of the sport, fast gaining prom
inence in Europe, is canoe slalom, where in
fast flowing "white water" the canoeist
negotiates a series of gates in similar fashion
to a skier.
Recreationally the sport is often linked
with camping, and expeditions of varying
length are undertaken. School groups, under
experienced leaders, have explored all the
major rivers of Europe. There, as in British
Columbia, the canoeist can explore areas
which are inaccessible by other means.
To learn more about this fascinating activity you should attend a lecture illustrated
by color slides and films which has been
arranged by the British Columbia Kayak and
Canoe Club in the Coronation Room, Y.W.-
C.A., 997 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver, on
Friday  April 2nd, 1965 at 7:30 p.m.
Anyone wishing further information on
the '■';..C Canoe fnd Kayak Club and its programme, or anyone interested in forming a
kayak and canoe club at UBC should contact me in Room 308, Memorial Gym, School
of Physical Education and Recreation, Local
434.
-ft***        iLiKkI
—bert mackinnon photo
HITTING THE WIRE in the 100-yard dash at noon Wednesday is a competitor in the women's intramural track meet.
Donald and Mosher
new MAA wheelers
New president and vice-president of the Men's Athletic
Association are Ian Donald and Dick Mosher respectively.
Donald and Mosher, along with secretary Paul Beckow,
were elected at the MAA general meeting Tuesday.
Donald, who has been a member of the Thunderbird
football team for the past two seasons, is in third year Arts.
Mosher, who has played two years for the soccer Birds, is
a third year physical education student.
In World Cup rugby
Bears too tough for Birds?
Final game
Saturday
UBC Thunderbirds came
through with a sporadic effort in World Cup rugby
yesterday, and failed to upset the mighty University
of   California   Bears.
Cal, with a great second half
upsurge, overpowered 'Birds
18-3. 'Birds struck first, with
the game only two minutes old,
when Dave Murphy scored on
a fifty yard run.
Throughout the first half, T-
Birds appeared to have a
slight edge in play, but Cal
scored eight points before half
time, on a penalty goal and
converted try.
In the second half, UBC often had positional advantage
on the field, but they couldn't
keep the pressure on long enough to score.
Although California did not
score again until late in the
second half, when they counted
for two converted tries, they
frequently had scoring opportunities.
Miskicked penalties and bad
luck near the goal line on the
part of California were all that
kept UBC in the game.
'Birds tackled poorly and
half-heartedly, but at times the
forwards and backs combined
for great displays of rugger.
However, no credit can be
taken away from California.
Usually, they forced UBC to
play their power game, with
its slow pace, and although unfamiliar with finer rugby techniques, the plays they know
they executed well.
Still, there is no reason why
the 'Birds cannot come up with
an all-out effort for a whole
game, and if they do so on
Saturday, they will give the
Bears a good fight.
Although 'Birds were missing key players such as Chuck
Plester and Dick Hayes, Coach
Brian WigKtman avoided excuses, making no comment on
the 'Birds inconsistency.
Tomorrow's World Cup
game goes at 2:30 in Varsity
stadium.
BRIAN WIGHTMAN
.. what's the answer?
DICK HAYES
. . . missed
Sports shorts
Gymastics in gym
soccer at Callister
UBC War Memorial Gym
teams this weekend.
From 12:30 to 5 p.m. Saturday, the third annual gymnastic age-group competition, sponsored by the School of Physical
Education and Recreation at
the University of British Columbia, takes place on the UBC
gym floor.
Individual    students    from
ages 12-19 will compete in this
B.C. closed meet.
SOCCER
The first round of the Anderson Cup soccer schedule
will be played Saturday at Callister Park.
hosts high school gymnastic
First place Vancouver Canadians of the Pacific Coast Soccer League will play last place
UBC Thunderbirds.
Kickoff is at 2 p.m.
UBC THIRD
The Thunderettes gymnastic
team of Bonnie Dertell and
Marie Ramsey placed third in
U of Vic's Invitational Meet.
UBC ranked behind the Seattle
Club and North Shore Amalgamated but beat out collegiate
rivals U of Alberta, Vic College, University Turners,
Shadlepark and Bothell.
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING/ HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Book Now for Your Club
Phone Local 365 or 224-3205 Friday, March 19, 1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
r
FOR
1
THE
\ BIRDS \
By
GEORGE   REAMSBOTTOM
Since unveiling the, by
now notorious, Reamsbottom critique on UBC sports,
I have been waiting anxiously for some kind of reaction.
At first I had visions of
President John B. Macdonald
himself calling me to his office. There, over a cup of coffee, we would quietly agree
on a radical but sane, new
course for athletics at our
campus.
John and I would, after
some discussion, jointly appoint a President's Committee, with full powers to investigate and institute means
of bringing about a new system for UBC sports. I, after,
at first, modestly declining,
would finally agree on my appointment—as Chairman of
this committee.
Unfortunately, or fortunately, depending on one's
point of view, this has yet to
come to pass.
As the deadline approached
for letters-to-the-Editor yesterday not even McAfee had submitted his usual letter of protest.
With 10 minutes left to
deadline and not one letter
about my critique, favorable
or unfavorable, received, I
was frustrated, deeply depressed, and raving wildly about
never writing another column
for the rest of my miserable
life.
• •   •
Then it happened. My Editor, at the last moment, found
a letter that had been thrown
to one side beneath a pile of
sandwich wrappings. The letter praised my graceful and
sensible manner of presenting
my argument and fully agreed
with my "well taken" points.
That there was only one
person inspired enough to
send a letter is of little significance. That I was able to
move at least one fellow-
human is all that matters.
There are, of course, those
nit pickers who would argue
that a letter of support from
one's mother leaves something
to be desired but I have no
ears for such drivel. My day
was made and I basked in my
moment of glory.
• •   •
Turning   to   a   somewhat
more serious tone 1 would
like to point out that my critique is not yet finished. At
first I intended to devote two
columns to the problem of
UBC sports but now I am
planning a third.
Before my third and final
article devoted to the Reams-
bottom critique on UBC
sports appears next week I
hope to have further information on three recent developments involving our athletic
system.
These concern, firstly, a
new stadium for UBC, secondly, a new statement of policy
towards athletic scholarships
by the Senate and, thirdly,
the appointment of a President's Committee to study
UBC sports.
Pimm's No.1 has a Gin base
Pimm's No. 5 has a Canadian Whisky base
(both are absolutely delicious!)
Two things about Pimm's: easy to
serve, and a taste you'll enjoy.
Just pour into a tall glass and add
ice and fill up with your favourite light
mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to
make the traditional Pimm's, famous
throughout the world. But don't bother
unless you're in the mood.
A new generation is rediscovering
Pimm's... and enjoying every moment
of it.
DRINK
PIMM'S
simply because you'll enjoy
the taste of it.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board
or by the Government of British Columbia.
Nickel stainless steel isn't chicken
It will stand up to anything. Stains, rust and ware, and many other fine household prod-
corrosion have no chance against nickel stain- ucts, are made of nickel stainless steel. And
less steel. That's why beautiful modern flat-    in all of them, nickel's contribution is quality.
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED
55 YONCE STREET, TORONTO Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 19, 1965
'tween classes
Cuba music for dance
International House presents
an informal dance tonight at
7:30 with George Cuba's Band.
Admission is 50 cents.
• •    •
CLASSICS CLUB
English prof Dr. Roy Dan-
iells speaks on Ariadne's
Thread, in Bu. Penthouse at
8:00 tonight.
• •    •
GRAD STUDENTS
Those interested in summer
canoe trip contact Grad Center
Wednesday.
Curling at Thunderbird
Arena, Friday, 9:30-11:30;
Bowling in Gym, Friday, 9:00-
11:00; Social Evening, 11:30-
1:30. Tickets at GSC.
• •    •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Paris Percussion Tuesday
noon in Auditorium. Julian
Bream in a solo recital of
works for lute and guitar. Admission free.
LMT's for the Cave, Isy's,
Vancouver Symphony and
Marion Anderson.
• •   •
MUSIC STUDENTS
Concert of Japanese Music
Saturday, March 27 at 8:00
p.m. in Hebb Theatre. Tickets
on sale now at MSA office,
Hut 0-15, and Special Events
Office; 75 cents.
• •    •
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
General meeting Monday
noon in Bu. 3205.
• *    •
STUDENT ZIONISTS
Ulpan Hebrew classes noon
today in Bu. 225.
CURLING CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 102. Elections for next
term.
• •    •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
All members requiring competition licenses meet noon today in clubroom.
• •   •
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK
Executive director of B.C.
Borstal Ass'n J. A. Willox will
speak on delinquent boys Monday noon in Bu. 202.
• •    •
SCIENCE US
General meeting Thursday,
March 25, noon in Hennings
200.
• •    •
CHINESE VARSITY
Movies on Republic of China
Monday noon in Bu. 205.
• •    •
GOSPEL STUDENTS
See free film, Teen Revolt,
Monday noon in Bu. 106.
• •    •
EAST ASIA SOC
Talk on current Malaysia-
Indonesia situation by Dr. D.
G. Hall followed toy informal
discussion, tonight at 8:30 at
3306 W. 15th.
• •    •
EL CIRCULO
Slides on our play, Dona Ros-
ita La Soltera, and film noon
today in Bu. 204.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Color films Friday noon in
Bu. 205; general meeting Wednesday.
DEBATING UNION
Intramural Final Debate
winner receives Ligion Cup,
Zeta Psi fraternity vs. Alpha
Delta Pi Sorority in Bu. 104
noon today.
• •   •
UN CLUB
MP Grant Beachman will
lead current affairs discussion
Monday noon upstairs in IH.
• •   •
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Final meeting this year in
Bu. 214 Monday noon.
• •   •
FENCING CLUB
Last meeting of the club this
year on Wednesday; club tournament and elections for next
year's Executive. All equipment must be returned on this
date.
• •    •
PRE-MED SOC
Discussion and display of
group reduction buying of
microscopes for honors, grads
and students entering Medicine
Tuesday noon in Wes. 100.
Pique mag
coming soon
A magazine said to contain
many of the features of Playboy plus penguins goes on sale
on campus next week.
The publication is Pique, the
product of the AMS-affiliated
Young Bourgeois Authors and
Artists Association.
Association president and
Pique editor Wayne Nyberg,
Arts III, said the magazine
contains 36 pages of humor and
satire.
"It also has a photographic
fold out section," he said.
"The book is the only publication on campus not connected with a faculty," he said.
Court ruling
Coroner Len McDonald has
classified the death of a UBC
math professor as a "misadventure due to an over dose
of barbiturates?.
Loraine Schwartz, 35, of
2475 West First was found dead
in bed on March 8.
No inquest will be held.
Slocks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
PRESCRIPTION
EYEGLASSES
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE  OPTICAL
881 Granville MU 3-8921
■ear Money Back Guarantee■■■
Chemist
Position for Plant Chemist
available in Vancouver with
a National Food Company.
For particulars phone:
RE 1-4631 - Local 003
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
LOST—An Alpha Phi Sororiety pin
somewhere between Geography
building and village on Monday.
Finder please phone' 224-9939.
WOULD the person who has Text I
left in Dean Gage's class Tuesday
please call 224-9055. Reward.	
FOUND. Geog. notebook outside Bus
stop Wed, morning. RE 1-1246.
CHEM. 205 Sat. Lab thief return
Welcher & Hahn copy. No. 5 to
College Library or 1 will report
you.	
LOST. One sorority pin, a gold and
pearl key. Reward. Please contact
Ruth,  AM 1-4518. __
LOST. Lady's navy blue duffle coat
outside Zoo. 105 Lab Bio. Sc. Bldg.
Tues. a.m. March 8th. Flnden-
please \phone Ginny,  AM  1-9665.
LOST. Gold University of Western
Ontario graduation ring, between
Brock and the library. Please contact the Library School, local 712.
Reward.
LOST. Indian Sweater, Bio.-Med.
Building, Thursday; $5 reward.
Contact Wolf, CA 4-4245.
FOUND—Took a Woodsonia raincoat from Buchanan 106 Saturday
night, March 13, by mistake. Left
a similar coat with gloves in pocket. Telephone 224-4903.
Special Notices*
13
WILL BUY return half of one charter flight London to Vancouver
leaving August 5th.   Phone 224-1278.
Wanted
WANTED. Amateur talent, folk
singers, jazz groups, etc. All welcome. Contact Irving, LA 2-0433,
or Evenings,  LA 1-8393.
WANTED IMMEDIATELY. Used
Hammond or other electric organ
for R&B band. Phone 876-4082
5-7 p.m. Power an asset.
AUTOMOTIVE  &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
1953 AUSTIN A-40 Convertible. Good
condition. Completely overhauled.
1965 licence. $150. Phone LA 1-3908
after six p.m.	
B.M.W. 700, (I960)—2-cyl., 4,000 mis.
on re-condit. engine. $650 cash or
terms. 224-5214, view at Union College.   	
FOR SALE.  1954 Anglia. Good condition.  Call Marsh,  224-9845.
JUMBO Harmony Sovereign Guitar,
excellent condition, case — Phone
James, CA 4-6460 after 6.
Motorcycles 8c Scooters
HONDA 90 for sale cheap. New condition. Phone Dwight at CA 4-9856
after 6 p.m.	
MUST SELL '64 Honda 50. Only 2000
miles, carrier, $200 or best offer.
John, 224-7965'.	
Scandals
BUSINESS SERVICES
GRADUATION IS SOON — Reserve
now, GIRLS, beautiful formals (rent
or sales). FELLOWS—Tux's, white
jackets or tails. Discount on all
formals. Also discount on corsages
with above orders. DELUXE COSTUMES AND FORMAL WEAR,
1292 Kingsway. Phone 874-6116.
WOULD ANYONE witnessing accident between car & pedestrian
on Wesbrook corner on Feb. 12
A phone 943-2392—or leave message
at Rm. 22. Hut 7, Fort Camp. '
TO WILLIAM Cardinal Inglis, our
pontifical blessing on your 21st
birthday and love from Bonnie,
one of your vestal virgins. 	
LOOICING for travelling companions
around Europe June - July. Dave.
CA 4-6757.
ACADIANS. I'd like to thank everyone on behalf of Les. Thanks
everyone. Jan.
Transportation
Typing
EXPERT typing, immediate delivery
25c per page. Phone Betty (TR 4-
5633, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.) and (434-9903
after 6 p.m.)
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
WANTED—Girl to help look after
2-year-old boy & do light housework from May 15 - Sept. 15. $20
per week, lunch & carfare. Phone
AM 6-0182.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Tutoring
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
LUDWIG flrum set.  Phone 876-4082
5-7 p.m.
14   Room & Board
39A

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125726/manifest

Comment

Related Items