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The Ubyssey Nov 22, 1962

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 UBC arena
will look
like this
ARTIST'S CONCEPTION of
UBC's new winter sports
arena was released for first
time today. The $500,000
building, to be located near
new rugby fields south of the
C-lot extension on Agronomy
Road, will be ready for use by
late next summer. Construction is due to start this month.
Arena wiil contain hockey
rink with 1,500 seats, and six
curling sheets. .
As we go
marching
THE UBYSSEY
across
Georgia
(Strait)
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1962
No. 31
Prof calls for third Trek
Bennett pulls
a new switch
Premier Bennett may have
^jftaTe power than we thought.
^!;7Pr. Peter   Remnant   called
Bennett "a superman" during
his noon-hour speech on athe-
J    ism Monday.
Just   then   the   auditorium
lights flickered.
Student
crackdown
in
pubs
By SAN CAMERON
Vancouver hotels have cracked down on beer-drinking University students.
Eight Vancouver hotels, traditional students' haunts, say
they are fed up with students.
The hotels say they are tired
of phoney identification, broken
glasses, stolen glasses and chairs,
and spilled beer.
Only the Fraser Arms had no
complaint.
"We've had nothing but trouble from the students," said Jack
Mangles, manager of the Abbotsford.
"We've had our windows kicked in twice. We've had glasses
broken, beer thrown around and
furniture stolen.
"We're not going to serve students any more."
He continued: "And we're going to make history by calling
the cops on the first guy who
comes in the door and can't produce ID."
Joe Francesco, manager of the
Belmont, is not going to bother
accepting identification.
"I don't care how much ID
they've got," he said. "If there
is any doubt at all about their
age, they don't get served."
Yale Hotel beverage room
manager Fred Gougeon says students act like morons in h i s
place.
"We've had glasses broken,
beer thrown at walls, furniture
stolen,   and   trouble   with   the
Continued on Page Three
SEE: CRACKDOWN
McGeer says Socreds
'weaseling'  on  grants
By  TIM  PADMORE
An angry young UBC  professor- has  called for another
student march on Victoria.
KISSIN'  KID
.  .  . caught in Webb
Poet caught
in own Webb
Phyllis Webb's kissin' kid is
a phony.
The little boy that UBC poetess Webb saw kissing the statue
in Buchanan concourse wasn't
doing it for art appreciation—
as Miss Webb suggested to The
Ubyssey.
He was doing it for his
mother.
Mrs. Carol Ellingson had
posed her four-year-old son,
Carey, for a picture to send
California relatives.
Miss Webb said little Carey
would most probably have kissed the paintings in Brock Link,
the same paintings panned by
The Ubyssey.
Maybe he would. But poetess
Webb will never know. Mrs.
Ellingson didn't pose Carey in
Brock Link.
Dr. Pat McGeer, a neurology
professor, said Wednesday that
a march might be "the only
way" to get desperately-needed
funds for the University.
The government won't move
unless the public demands it, he
said.
"If something won't get votes,
it won't get done," McGeer
said.
"If the government  sees that
UBC  students  are prepared  to
get out and rally votes, we will
get some action."
CONTEMPT FOR UBC
McGeer charged the government has contempt for UBC and
what the University means to
the future  of this province.
McGeer is the liberal candidate for Point Grey.
"Almost five years ago they
promised to match any money
we could get from the public,"
he said.
"So far they've paid less than
half the $10 million we raised."
"They protest they didn't say
'when' it would be matched.
"That's  weaseling."
Said McGeer  of  his  part  in
the march: "Nothing would
please me more than to meet a
delegation of students on the
steps of the legislature in Victoria."
LAST TREK IN '57
(The last 'trek' to Victoria
was in 1957 when a delegation
was sent to present a brief on
finances to the government. Another, in 1958, to protest the fee
hike, was cancelled at the last
minute).
McGeer suggested students
march on Victoria during the
coming session of the legislature, which opens Jan. 27 "before the budget is passed."
ANGRY PROTEST
"This should be an angry
protest, not a student caper,"
he said.
"But it could be a lot of fun,
too."
McGeer also criticized the
government's handling of UBC's
residence problem.
"There are 2,000 students
living in substandard housing,
and the government hasn't done
a thing to help," he said.
DAVE WAY
. . . back for battle j
Birds meet
hoops best
The UBC Thunderbirds will
meet the best basketball team
in Canada at 12:45 today in
Memorial  Gym.
They meet Lethbridge Nationals, the team that won the
Canadian championship last
year.
Three of Lethbridge's starting five will be players who
were expected to play at UBC
this year—Dave Way, Bill Mo-
Donald,   and   Lance   Stephens.
Only one enters aetheism controversy
Churchmen stay mum
Where were campus churchmen when God came under
fire?
Only Rev. John Shaver,
United Church chaplain of
SCM, defended his beliefs
against the onslaught by Dr.
Peter ("I don't believe in God")
Remnant.
•      •      •
Anglican College theologians
"were in a meeting" and
wouldn't leave to make a comment.
A Roman Catholic priest and
a Baptist minister flatly refused to say anything.
Two more theologians declined comment because they
were "personal friends" of the
athiest philosopher and "didn't
want to become involved."
Dr. Remnant told students at
a noon lecture: "When I read
the Bible, unflamed by a sense
of supernatural illumination, I
find in it about as much as I
find in the sacred writings- of
a primitive tribal people."
But Rev. Shaver contends
the Bible provides man with
the comfort of a benevolent
Force or Being "which is the
justification for man's existence."
"The Bible gives man a God
who is Love," Rev. Shaver
said.
"It demands of man he become part of that love through
a life modelled on Christ's, a
life of acceptance, of tolerance
—but not one of a negative resignation."
In effect, the minister said,
the Bible gives man a criteria
for judgment of his actions.
*     *      *
Rev. Shaver said Dr. Remnant's argument that scientific
explanations were squashing
religious theories was a logical
conclusion.
"But this is small comfort
to man," he said.
"Science cannot provide man
with strength and courage 	
the Bible can."
Next installment: Did Christ
Exist? Monday noon. Poge 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 22, 1962
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver
by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed
are those of .the Editor-in-Chief of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater Society or the Universitv of B.C. Telephone CA 4-32-12.
Locals:  Editor—25;  News—23; Photography—24.
Member Canadian university Press
Editor-in-chief:   Keith   Bradbury
Managing Editor    Denis Stanley
Associate Editor  .. Fred Fletcher   "*
News Editor         Mike Hunter
City .Editor M. G. Valpy
Picture Editor  Don Hume
Layout by: Bob McDonald
REPORTERS: Hal Leiren, Ian Cameron, Ian Sandulak, Karen   -*
MacConnachie, Lorraine Shore, Anne Burge, Tim Padmore,
Greydon   Moore,   Mike   Horsey,   Gerard   Hivon,   Heather
Virtue, Graeme Matheson, Jo Britten, Shannon Pigott
TECHNICAL: Mike Atchison.
Letters to the Editor
Editorials
Let's trade isolation for money
UBC lives in splendid isolation from the
City of Vancouver, walled off by the endowment lands from city pressure
This tower of bushland has shielded us
Somewhat from the anti-intellectualism that
seems to prevail in all big cities.
But this isolation, which is really only partial because of the benevolent interest in our
affairs taken by the metropolitan daily papers,
seems destined to end.
Webb and Knapp, a huge and soul-less corporation of real estate promoters, is going to
bring the city to the University, probably with
all its pressure for less academic freedom.
Well, they may, if the provincial government co-operates.
And we at UBC don't have much choice.
Although we could do without the 'posh city"
envisioned by the planners of Webb and Knapp,
we have to welcome the plan.
If we retain the wall of bush that protects
us from the city, we must continue to survive
on the meagre dole reluctantly handed over
to the University of B.C.'s "debt-free" government.
But, if we accept the creeping advance of
the outside world, we may get endowment
lands that really endow.
This would give the University a substantial
source of income independent of the provincial
government—something it badly needs.
The lands were originally set aside to provide the University with funds through lease or
sale.
The financial crisis of the university is here
and now.
The provincial government has two choices:
Grant the University sufficient money to develop it as an outstanding educational institution. Or, approve a plan for development of
the endowment lands.
The first is obviously preferable, but unlikely. Surely the government will grant the
second choice.
Pathetic, pandering Quigg Newton
We don't condemn Quigg Newton.
We pity him.
Newton is certainly the weakest person to
,emerge from the travesty of the firing of University of Colorado editor Gary Althen.
While other people involved in the controversy were defending wihat they believed in,
Newton buckled under tlhie pressure of political
and newspaper criticism and fired the editor
he had once defended.
He pandered to threats of loss of his job
from ultra-rightist Senator Barry Goldwater.
This firing is riot the usual case of firing
of am editor. It is more serious, because it indicates the extent to which "academically-free"
institutions can be controlled when their leaders lack strength of character and their freedom doesn't suit certain political ends.
Newton, ironically was the first to recognize
that Goldwater was overstepping his bounds
by interfering in the running of the university.
In reply to a letter written to him by
Goldwater, Newton wrote:
"They cry you raise has a very familiar
ring to us: 'You must silence those who do
not agree With me*
"We'have heard it 'from the John Birchers,
from the Wolvingtons, from- the Rozeks, from
the Eakins, from the Bromleys, and from the
local Goldwaters. It is always tthe same: Our
way is the only American way. All others are
un-American and subversive. You must silence
those who do not agree with us.'
"Senator, I shall not silence them."
But his reconciliation of this letter with
the firing of Althen, a short time later was
pathetic, almost tragic.
"In my opinion he (Althen) has all too
clearly demonstrated he is not qualified," he
said.
Newton fired Althen after the Board of
Regents. Board of Publications, Faculty senate
and student government refused to censure or
dismiss him.
Newton's job, it seems, was more important
to him than freedom for himself and his stu1-
dents.
Don't condemn him. Pity him. He is a
broken man
Got
a namer
It's easy to start a group but all the good
names are taken. Want to promote freedom?
Well, Sons of Freedom is out. Citizens for Freedom? That's a John Birch group. Free Democrats? That's a Chinese Communist group.
How about peace? Citizens for Peace is a
Communist front organization. Anything containing 'peace" is suspect.
The Canadian Intelligence Service is Canada's John Birch society. Can't even promote
intelligence without being connected with some
far-out group.
Yes, it's tough to be an idealist these days.
All the good names are taken. Even, non-conforming callithumpiang.
No sale
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
For my part, an emphatic
NO SALE to Webb and Knapp
and their Posh City Plan. First,
I strongly distrust any proposal from a large representative of the real estate business,
whose practitioners have on
the whole shown a considerable money-logged lack of responsibility or conscience, for
example in their piecemeal
asphalting of the lower mainland's more fertile farming
lands.
Second, no matter how inoffensive and smoke-free the
project might be, and no matter
what (very mature tone of
voice) money it might bring
into the University's coffers,
the prospect of an unbroken
expanse of buildings, lawns,
planted trees, sidewalks, roads,
cars, and people from Totem
Park to Boundary Road and
beyond is shocking and revolting. That band of beautiful,
unreconstructed, soggy, cluttered brush is all that protects
this end of the point from the
bloodthirsty attacks of the
barbarians. And outside ol
Stanley Park (tramp, tramp,
tramp . . . ) it is about the
only sizeable area of such
growth left in the city proper.
By   themselves,   the  provincial government and the Uni-"
versity adminstration will undoubtedly accept this plan or
something similar within a few
years.   What   is   required   is  a
great  bellow  of  protest   from
the   students   and  others   concerned, at the first false move.
Yours truly,
ROSS CLARK,
Arts 3.
Poor treatment
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear  Sir:
Concerning recent discussions on campus about the
existence of God, one factor
that is continually ignored i>r
a preliminary clarification of
just what is being discussed.
Neither Dr. Remnant nor
his critics bothered to say jusl
what concept of God they were
discussing or whether "exists"
was being used in a special
sense. And, of two letters in
Tuesday's Ubyssey, one sug- -
gests that defining the topic of
argument is illogical, the
other, that it is in bad taste.
Surely such an important
topic deserves clearer treatment than this.
Yours truly,
STEPHEN PORSCHE
Arts 2.
Oxford tradition: documentation and detail
By LORENNE GORDON
Commonwealth Scholar
Academically, Oxford is very much
of the scholarly tradition. They do not
go in for theses which are general
rather than particular in their scope,
and they pay a great deal of attention
to documentation, the use of original
sources, and careful attention to detail. This is not to say that all Oxford
scholars are buried forever in the musts
of old manuscripts, but this is certainly
the training that they insist on passing
on to those who go on to do graduate
work. Although this is rather a bind, it
is, I think, an excellent approach.
No scholar is likely to do really outstanding work unless he knows where
to find, and how to handle, original
sources and unless he can really assess
critically the workof other scholars in
his field. This is what graduate work
at Oxford tries to train you to do. It
really does not care a whit about your
thesis; they merely want to see that you
can do original work properly. This,
they feel, is what is necessary to equip
you to do significant work when you
leave the university.
The only doctorates that mean anything at Oxford are those (D.Litt's)
which are given to people who have
been Oxford graduates and have gone
on to write significant books in their
own fields. The D.Phil, was instituted
in 1927 as a result of pressure from the
government, which felt that Britain
was losing the opportunity of gaining
North American graduates who went
off to Germany where they could get
doctorates rather than coming to Oxford or Cambridge where only B.Litt's
were offered. Thus, the institution of
the degree was a political move only,
and one which many of the reputable
scholars here very much regret, particularly those in the English faculty.
They feel that to train one to do
work is all the function the university
should have and they are very much
against making concessions to North
American commercialism of academic
degrees. The point, I think personally,
is well taken, although it does most
certainly bother many North Americans who think to go back to the States
bearing doctorates "Oxon." Occasionally, if the scope of a thesis for the
B.Litt. is seen to be simply too big for
a B.Litt. thesis, they will transfer you
to a D.Phil, but only reluctantly. Here
they do not regard graduate degrees
as necessary assets.
If a student of Oxford, Cambridge,
London, or Dublin does well as an undergrad, obtaining first class, or high
second class honors, this is considered
sufficient! Even the B.Litt. is a relatively new degree, having been instituted just before the First World War,
but it is quite reputable because the
work it entails is strictly training in
scholarly techniques, and very rigorous; English and History really do need
further training in the handling of
these matters as it is now a very complicated business looking up original
records and working from original
documents.
But even at that, it is only the first
class or the high second class that they
regard with anything like favorability.
Thus, with very few exceptions, all
persons intending to do graduate work
are admitted as probationer B.Litt;
students. They then take courses appropriate to their fields. Mine, for example, are as follows:
Prolegomena to Literary Studies
1500-1660 (given by Helen Gardner).
Prolegomena to 18th Century Studies (given by Mary Lascelles).
General Aids to Literary Research
1500-1900.
History and Resources of the Bodleian Library.
English Handwriting in the 16th
and 17th Centuries (from original documents).
Bibliography (all about the making
of books, not about what bibliographical materials are helpful; this is handled in General Aids . . .).
Textual Criticism (assessing dating
and so on of manuscripts).
These courses are taken for two
terms at the end of which the students
take a qualifying examination in which
they are presented with a fascimile
document in 16th or 17th century handwriting which they must transcribe
into modern English, give all bibliographical information on, and make a
textual criticism of!
Last year they gave the students a-
German document written by an Englishman^— this is to ensure that the student cannot guess at letters or words
from the context and must transcribe
each letter accurately! At the same
time, each student must submit a 20-
page essay on a subject related to the
thesis.
If he passes these two halves of the
exam satisfactorily, he is then accepted
as a full B.Litt. student and goes on to
write the thesis and nothing more, but
he does take two sets of vivas (orals),~
one at the time when the board considers the exact topic of his thesis, and
one after the thesis is completed.
So,   as  you   can   readily  see,   t h e"
training is indeed rigorous! Thursday, November 22, 1962
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Residential lots
not paying off
UBC is getting no endowment from its endowment land.
Residential lots aren't payiii;
LABOR LEADER Pat O'Neal persists, insists, and twists at noon hour lecture.
We've no time for labor wars'
says union secretary O'Neal
Labor unions have no time
for labor wars, says Pat O'Neal,
secretary of the B.C. Federation of Labor.
"What we want is a new
minimum wage law and adequate pensions," he told UBC
students Wednesday.
"We want to make sure you
•♦people can afford to have higher   education   and   good   education.
"But, he added, "if people insist  on   persecuting   and  prosecuting   us,   we   will   not   turn
tail."
WAS A  GOOD MAN
He continued: "We might
, even have to emulate those
freedom fighters in Saskatchewan who received their support
from the very people who attack  us  today."
J. V. Clyne, said O'Neal, was
.a good man when he was a
justice of the Supreme Court.
"Then he only made $18,000 a
year," he  said.
"But since that time he's had
a promotion.
"Now he has a $75,000 a year
salary (as chairman of MacMil-
lan, Bloedel and Powell River),
a $25,000 a year pension and a
half million dollars worth of
stock.
"I don't think he's a good man
now."
O'Neal said Clyne was personally responsible for kicking
out Powell .River Co. officials
when the company merged with
MacMillan and Bloedel.
NO CHANCE FOR WORKER
"If men like the Foley
brothers and Ray Jones (Powell
River executives) can't protect
themselves from Clyne," tie
said, "what chance has the man
who carries his lunch to work
in a pail?"
O'Neal laughed at "our little
shopping spree" at Zeller's
when hundreds of union members posing as shoppers dumped
goods on cashiers' tables when
they "heard" the store was being struck.
"There are still a lot of
people who have not seen the
true light,"  he said.
He attacked use of police
dogs to enforce no picketing injunctions.
"People have no objection to
paying  taxes  for  police  depart-
j ment dogs to track down criminals,"  he said.
"But they do object to being
; made a dog's breakfast when
| they try to protect honest men
I'from scab  labor."
He said neither he nor the
labor movement had ever advocated violence, but . . .
"When you have a big Alsa-
tion nipping at your heels you
get a different viewpoint."
Police dogs were recently
used at labor demonstrations at
Allied Engineering Ltd.
off.
One lot is on a 99-year lease.
The other 443 residential lots,
have been sold outright.
But, UBC gets no tax revenue
from them, says Merv Ferguson.
manager of the Endowment
Lands.
He said taxes plus slight income from utilities such as water and scavenging go toward?
costs of maintaining the
Lands.
PROFITS  RETURNED
"Any  profit  shown  at  year:
end is returned to the property
Y: owners    as   a    tax   reduction,"
■| Ferguson added.
j     UBC apparently gets no rev-
; enue from the Victoria-managed
Endowment Land fund either.
It is $1 million in the hole
Ray Williston, Minister o±
Lands and Forests, said Monday.
Some  commercial   acreage  is
now leased   on short  and  long
term   contracts.
NOT TO  UBC
But lease revenue goes to the
endowment fund, not to UBC,
Ferguson said, adding, he did not
know the amount, or how it
was used in the fund.
Lands ana Forest Department
oficials Wednesday were unable
to provide ready figures on short
notice.
Public Interest in the endowment land was sparked by an
earlier report that the giant
real estate firm of Webb and
Knapp were proposing a $150—
300 million self-contained city
and secondary industry conv
plex.
It would utilize 1,728 acres of
undeveloped area between
Spanish Banks and Forty-first,
and  Marine Drive.
Total endowment land area
is 3,464 acres. Seven hundred
and forty-one acres have so far
been developed. One thousand
acres are reserved for present
and  future  campus expansion.
CrackdoY/n
(Continued from Page One)
licencing     board     because     of
them," he said.
Cecil Hotel manager Leonard
Norman is thinking of following
the Abbotsford lead. His hotel
lost several chairs over the
weekend to UBC students.
"These students think it's a
prank," he said. "But a $25
prank isn't funny."
. John Radomsky of the Inver-
may Hotel said: "I don't mind
two or three, it's when there's
about 10 of them that I worry.
They spill beexj break glasses,
and'make too much noise."
Roy Korness, barman at the
Castle Hotel, had a different
slant on the student situation.
"They walk from table to
•table, and drink while standing.
They sing and make a noise.
And they're impolite to our
staff," he said.
The only good words came
from Fraser Arms manager Joe
Haramboure.
"We have no complaints about
the students. They come in.
drink up, and leave. But our
waiters are very careful — the
only ID we accept now is a birth
certificate."
Nigerian gov't
offers scholarship
A commonwealth scholarship
has been announced by the Nigerian  government.
It provides an opportunity for
Canadians to do advanced work
in the specialties of Nigerian
universities.
Applications a r ,e available
from Dean Gage and must be
returned by by Dec. 31.
Bolero Party Lounge
Available   for   Parties
Weddings—Banquets—etc.
NIGHT   CLUB   ATMOSPHERE
CATERING  OPTIONAL
Re 8-7910
Welcome Students to
Cafe Dan's
Come to the Club and meet
your friends. Good music and
entertainment.
Admission $1.50
With AMS card $1.25
Every   Friday   and   Saturday.
352 Water Street, Vancouver
Telephone MU 4-4034
Home   FA   1-1923
HANS GMOSER
Presents   in   person
"To The Forbidden
Snowfields"
A   color  Ski   Adventure   Film
THURSDAY,   NOVEMBER   22,.
and  FRIDAY,  NOVEMBER  23
8:30 p.m.
at
JOHN OLIVES HIGH SCHOOL
AUDITORIUM
Admission $1.50—Rush $1.00
Tickets   at  ail   ski   shops
including
THUNDERBIRD SKI SHOP
Note    that   previously    published
prices  were  incorrect.
tmi MILDEST BFST-TASTING cioaritti Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, Nover
OF I llllll UH AIR
The  Lady's not for Burning
It has been remarked that
Fry's The Lady's Not For
Burning, is a mere "collection
of glowing witticisms," but
that these, when "collected
with their proper images," lead
nowhere. Happily, the play
does progress, and it's just as
well; for the casual playgoer,
content to rest upon the impression he receives from the
stage, is likely to leave the
theatre feeling that some sort
of humanity has triumphed.
As a matter of fact, as a careful
reading of the play reveals,
Fry's couples are among the
most monstrously-paired human beings ever to be misjoin-
ed upon the stage. A splendid,
soulless, earthy girl leaves the
dirt behind for Stardust and a
fine passion, while her chosen
partner drags hihiself down to
the roots of the daisises from
the airy region of the planets
which he has inhabited; a woman in her fifties is denied that
bright gaiety which her speech
demands, and prepares — we
may imagine—for'yet another
holiday in vacuo; an elderly
mayor desires an unnatural
liaison (that's the source of all
his troubles); a chaplain cuddles, in lieu of Cleopatra, his
instrument. The Richard-Ali-
zon pair provide the standard
which the others cannot meet,
but they are allowed to depart
so quietly that no one notices
they have gone.
The trouble with the University Players Club production of
the Lady is that no one, least
of all the director, seems to
have stood back at a distance
from, the play in order to get
an all-round view of the movement within."; The notion obviously ran through the director's head that this was to be
played as a series of funny
scenes in which the serious
element might be conveniently
submerged. The atmosphere
was set by a gratuitous addition to the play before the
opening scene, and was doggedly sustained for 24 hours
exactly, instead of something
less than 20. Once rid of t h e
first, impudent intrusion of
Michael Fullerton, we watched
and waited some time for Fry's
play to begin, only to discover
that we had been mistaken in
Richard's character, and that
he, rather than being a young
man of some figure and determination (he is, after all, the
one person who knows his
worth), is to be seen as a milksop or worse. His Alizon was
similarly wepwessed, and we
were forced to ask ourselves
where on earth the pair of
them ever found the courage
to^top the thing spinning and
get off. Was this altogether the
fault of David Fitzpatrick and
Gail Hill? We thought not altogether — there was some,
steadfast genius working behind the scones.
Scott Dougias, as the Chap-
Iain, apparently was told to
create a character which might,
by means of a gentle sadness,
draw the audience's affectionate laughter. But how gentle,
in fact, is this chaplain? Does
he really draw back in distaste
from the sight of blood? What
are actually the sins for which
he wishes to chastize himself?
Douglas   had,   I   think,   asked
himself some of these ques-,
tions, and dared to show a little of what he had discovered.
The inevitable result was that
he isolated himself from the
play, as did Alan Scarfe as
Tyson and Patricia Dahlquist
as Margaret. This couple fully
exhibited the fault of the production; Scarfe gave a wonderful and comic performance of
a confused man determined to
be upright; and Miss Dahlquist
presented us with Lady Bracknell, in spite of all that Fry
could do to prevent it. Neither
had much in common with the
play that Fry wrote, or with
the other characters on the
stage. Neither is to blame, for
they were allowed to get away
with it.
The twin strands of the
thread that sews this play together were Derek Allen and
Cecil Berry. Both seemed to be
perturbed at what was going
on about them — particularly
Miss Berry, whose early earthy
charm as Jenet Jourdemayne
froze too quickly into Stardust.
Unfortunately, everything else
froze at the same time, and her
movement became too pedantic
and precise, her tone too detached, her feet altogether too
light. There was nothing in her
to attract the tongue of Jamie
Reid—who played his wicked
self.
Derek Allen's Thomas might,
under different circumstances,
have succeeded. But an actor
needs something to react
against, and it was always puzzling to see him being violent
towards people who were engaged in their own, private performances, and who had. nothing to do with him at all. This,
I think, is why so many of his
fun lines failed to come off.
Excepting those few unfortunate instances in which Fry
makes gross mistakes, the humor of the play depends upon
reaction to someone else's position; position implies relation,
and on Thursday night relation wasn't evident. A pity, too,
that a number of Allen's lines
were lost to all but the prompter.
A great deal of the fault of
the production lay in the director's choice of a play. There
are problems that have to be
solved — e.g., whether to be
more or less 1400, which is no
light decision—and many of
them, once decided upon, must
always leave a touch of doubt
in the mind. Very skillful acting is required to put this play
across, so that as much as possible is squeezed from it, and
the current crop of players
don't seem sure enough of their
own abilities to develop what
the playwright offers. But certainly, the decision to treat this
comedy as a light farce was the
alpha and omega of error.
philip cahill
horn blowers go
on big toot Friday
This Friday at 12:30 and
8:00 p.m. in Brock Hall the
University Concert Band will
present a program of music
both traditional and contemporary.
TO LAUGH or not to laugh, that is the question pondered by Critics' Editor William Littler as
he peruses the art display, "The Unquiet Canvas," recently being shown in fine arts gallery
of the library.
You all of you will persist in
setting upon Bowering as if he
were some village idiot to be
kicked about at your pleasure,
and   not   the   chief   and   con-
stantest   prose   stylist   on   the
Critics   Page.   Whatever   posj
sesses   you,   beyond  the   slow
and patient sugary fires of the
stillborn     mind     and    heart?
George   Bowering   is   a   saint.
The  what  and  why of  it are
nobody's    business,    certainly
not his, hardly mine, and none
of your concern, except where
it shows in the writing; Bowering   writes   pure   Bowering,
and what,  O children suckled
of Daniells,  what do  the rest
of you write? -
SO    IN    MY    VEINS    RED
LIFE     MIGHT     STREAM
AGAIN    AND    THOU     BE
CONSCIENCE - CALMED—
SEE HERE  IT  IS—I  HOLD
IT   TOWARDS   YOU.
Does     the     instrument     and
world that Shakespeare, Chaucer   and  Matthews  used  have
no   appeal    to   you?    Do   you
hope happily to remain beasts
all    your    lives,    to    roll    in
snouting   solitude   with   your
oceanic smug secretions?  This
solitude     no     disgrace    if    it
weren't   the   retreat   of   them
with   no   wit  about   them,   of
those  who   aren't  with  it.   So
they   whine   a   little  and   stay
away in droves. So why, you
say   with   a   sneer    on   your
knife,  must you fuss?  Life  is
very   pleasant   in   West   Vancouver.
FROM WRONG TO WRONG
JHE     EXASPERATED
SPIRIT     PROCEEDS,    UNLESS RESTORED BY THAT
REFINING    FIRE    WHERE
- p 1 a
ce
b
quest column by — mike matthew
The Language of Men
YOU MUST MOVE IN
MEASURE, LIKE A DANCER.
Because George is gentle,
and I count every man my
enemy. I am nasty and out to
win. Language is an automatic
rifle and my only concern is
to write as well, which is to
say as violently, as possible.
Did Connie Irvine never remind you that every argument
contains the rejection of the
loser's total personality? What
do you do in your leisure
hours, read Salinger and the
BC Bar Review? (If you take
the Critics Page away from
me I will come after you personally).
TRY TO DIE OH CHILD OF
APHRODITE, TRY TO DIE:
TO DIE IS LIFE.
It is nothing less than a
question of personal style:
John Haar wants to legislate
it out of existence wherever
it is manifested in the landlords and ladies of students;
Michael Maguire has apparently never head of it. A book of
criticism on Dostoyevski denies its existence in that writer
by yapping, in all ten articles,
e.bout his ideas, for God's sake.
As if a critic were beyond but
a single human voice telling a
single human truth, as any
writer. (Thus I refute not only
Descartes, but the entire brute
universe of critical theory
which   produces   a   title   like
"The Politics of Vision.")
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern
had style, Barrie Hale had
style even after a winter in
Alexis Creek, David Bromige
IS style. Even you, following
her across the library, brand
new pennies glittering in your
blue blue eyes, thumbs at:
tractively hooked in your Tom
Mix belt, can have style.
NOW PARIS, OUR BLACK
CLASSIC, BREAKING UP
LIKE KILLER KINGS ON
AN ETRUSCAN CUP.
Perhaps I'm too didactic,
trying to seduce you with
common sense, but the voice
of idiocy multiplies and divides
and it comes harder to cross
that lonesome valley by yourself, for weight of company
blithe and sloven pounding on
your back; you face what Mackenzie called "an infinite Shadow-Line." Style can help you,
it can kill off old trouble and
bring you new. Style can make
you fail in school. Can you ask
more?
THE SONG OF THE FOUR
FAILURES
Will you then deny a critic'
his style? A critic is only
obliged to amuse you as any
writer amuses you, by trap*
ping life in a sort of laughing
aspic and feeding it to you in
manageable form, while you
grunt out your pleasure in theitv
slow healthy grunt of  aesthe- t 22, 1962
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
* C
R
I
T
I
C
PAGE
*   KINEO - *
Boccaccio '70 combines mediocrity
with length to become one of Italy's more
successful failures in 1961. It seems to
me that Carlo Ponti realized the weaknesses of the three acts in the film and
decided to play them under one title to
give the viewer the impression that he
was seeing a good film. If any one of these
vignettes of Italian life, adapted from the
writings of Boccaccio, had been slightly
lengthened and marketed as a single it
would doubtless have been a financial
failure as well as an artistic failure. In
their present "co-operative" state, "The
Job," "The Temptation of Dr. Antonio"
and "The Raffle" are doing quite well
although they are still artistic failures.
• * •
The best playlet of the three hour-long
^episodes is, without a doubt, "The Job,"
directed by Luchino Visconti who did
Rocco and his Brothers. This act stars
Romy Schneider in the role of Pupe, the
rich wife without property and Thomas
Milan as the Count, a poor aristocrat with
property. Romy Schneider, the top box-
office attraction in Germany today, plays
the desperate wife in search of affection
so well that "The Job" almost becomes
cinema and not merely a screen adaptation. In one pf the final bedroom scenes
the camera movement is reminiscent of
Truffaut in its rapid back-and-forth tracking of the restless Count. This erratic
spontaneity is lost after a brief interval
and the film becomes Visconti's once
again.
The first act, Fellini's '"The Temptation of Dr. Antonio," is simply a humorous story and nothing else. Showing the
comic results of narrow-mindedness, it
tends to be somewhat long and boring.
The plot unfolds slowly and deliberately,
dragging the audience through the allotted 60 minutes. When Anita Ekberg, as
the bosom-conscious billboard girl, comes
alive to taunt Dr. Antonio (Peppino de
Filippo), the film lapses into unnecessary
phantasy. "The Temptation ..." would
have been a successful film if it had been
cut at this point and not carried to its
nonsensical climax. De Filipo does a fairly
good characterization of the frustrated
prude but this also falls apart at the midway point.
• • *
Act III of Boccaccio '70 is, in t w o
ways, the last film of the program. It
comes last both chronologically and cine-
matically. The bad color and unsynchron-
ized dubbing didn't bother me at all
during Vittorio De Sica's "The Raffle."
as it did with "The Temptation" and "The
Job." Sophia Loren fails in her attempt to
portray the practical girl who raffles off
her charms for some extra pocket money.
The supporting players, except for one,
joins Miss Loren in her two-dimensional
acting. At first I didn't believe that De
Sica had directed such a bad film. What
a letdown after Tb,s Bicycle Thief and
Umberlo D! graham olney
orchestras sing too
Although previously better known to Vancouver audiences as an operatic conductor,
through his work with the Vancouver Opera
Association, Otto-Werner Mueller demonstrated
last Sunday an equal claim to respect in the
symphonic field.
Mendelssohn's Fourth Symphony combines
the lightness and clarity of Mozart with the
composer's own melodic charm and lightly-
conceived style of orchestration. The buoyant
character of the work can be heard from the
initial leap of the violins into a joyous opening
theme, to the vigorous Saltarello which, forms
the finale.
Mr. Mueller's reading was both straightforward and crisply articulated. There may not
have been much development of subtle phrasing in the opening movement and there may
have been too much impulsiveness in the Andante, but the performance held together well
as a whole and maintained a brisk forward
drive.
A more challenging work presents itself in
Stravinsky's  Symphony in Three Movements.
Shifting rhythms, various percussive effects
and fugal forms pervade its neo-classic texture.
Conductor and orchestra captured many of the
brilliant sonorities of the first movement as
well as the lyricism of the Andante and the
climax of the finale.
But the real test of the afternoon's concert
came with its last item, Beethoven's Seventh
Symphony. Rivalling in popularity the Fifth, it
is a work so familiar to a symphonic audience
that conductor and orchestra face an especially
difficult task in making it sound fresh. Sunday's
performers had no need to fear lack of favor
for their reading however, if the extended applause which concluded the concert was any
guide.
The most obvious observation one can make
about Mr. Mueller's reading is to note the great
care he took in constructing its architecture.
His was not a performance of Toscanini-like
drive but of gradually built up momentum and
carefully   worked   out   dynamics.  If  his  first
movement opening, for example, seemed too
slow, Mr. Mueller compensated with the detail
he was thereby able to develop.
Particularly noteworthy was his reading of
the Allegretto, where splendid balance was
maintained in the string choirs as the movement's gradual crescendo developed.
It may seem ungenerous to keep referring
in Vancouver Symphony reviews to the imperfections of the brass section, especially of those
difficult-to-play French horns. Suffice it to say
that their importanfrole in this symphony was
not too badly handled. In fact the generel level
of orchestral playing showed substantial • improvement over the Vancouver Symphony's
performance of Beethoven's Seventh Symphony
a couple of seasons ago.
Otto-Werner Mueller may have enjoyed a
greater reputation in Vancouver until now as
a conductor of opera. But he demonstrated Sunday that the voices of a symphony orchestra
can sing also. Under such a conductor the Vancouver Symphony seems anxious to sing.
William littler
D  -
If Bowering and Matthews
l't   amuse  you,  it  may   be
ir fault, or it may be yours.
one except a School Board
Id be so fatuous as to expect
^adolescent   to   dig  Shake-
are, and I don't bellow my
ff to the hogs out on Agro-
n'y   road   (though   I  cannot
certain of this).
SUNG   IT  THEN   AND  I
UNG     IT     AGAIN     I'M
KDER THE ICE AND FAR
WAY CATCH ME IF YOU
VN
m here on in I disguise
self as a review of some
r- at the Freddy Wood,
ed "Brontosaurus," I think.
French are a banal race;
ould rather spend an even-
watching the creeps in the
jr Pan or Rubin's Smoked
it'joint than at the Theatre
he Absurd.
3 play is just another
ance of confusion—a writ-
cvho doesnt know his job,
;nt have any respect for
thing as itself. I mean if
re going to show a man
the stage, make him in-
l"a man, and not a walkie-
ie paradigm. In the avant-
le theatre of the abstract
ice simply thrown a sparse-
lothed idea which purports,
a transport of beatific
cy, to the shape of the
l<£ This approach has cer-
fascistic   advantages  and
neatnesses, but its the death
of art and dull as dodobutter
unless you give the play some
kind of a psychotic and overpowering production, which
the Freddy Wood didn't.
PROPERTIUS. CYNTHIA IS
HERE; SHE SHAKES HER
BLOSSOMS WHEN MY
WATERS   CLEAR
Even with its predisposition
to clarity, the play is sloppy
and ambiguous, but clearly
enough a tension (oh joy of
critics) emerges: individual vs.
herd. Berenger won't romp; his
concern with his individual
significance kills his potency.
Ionesco's quite valid point being that humans are among
other things animals. The
cliche "social animal" takes
on a respectable insinuation in
the play, with the accent on
both words. This is fine, but
Ionesco will not work through
character; he shows us Berenger's problem without ever
showing us Berenger. The
flatness of the production does
not help—Berenger and Jean
are played by two of the more
lifeless actors in town. There
is some flavor of vitality-
John Parker contributes a big,
logical French mouse with
veins gurgling with proteiny
blue cheese, and Peter Ajello
plays Papillion with spidery
sexuality. The rest is a cartoon.
TAKE EXAMPLE, ALL YE
THAT THIS DO HEAR OR
SEE, HOW THEY THAT I
LOVED BEST DO FORSAKE ME, EXCEPT MY
GOOD DEDES THAT BI-
DETH TRUELY
opera s coming
Beware ye lovers of aesthetic pleasures, for time grows
short. On the evening of Oct.
29 in UBC's inimitable auditorium the Canadian Opera
Company will present a fully
professional production of Puccini's opera La Boheme.
This is a unique campus
event and tickets (selling for
$1.00 and $1.50) may well be
insufficient to meet the demand. As the Madison Avenue
men say, Act now."
NOW!
And all Next Week
The Incedible
Eob Gibson
THE INQUISITION
DEC. 3, 4, AND 5
3 performances only on the
Stage of
The Inguisition
The Drunkard
A Melodrama in two acts
DECEMBER 6th
Return Engagement
Don Crawford
FREDERIC  WOOD  THEATRE PRESENTS
Ionesco's
RHINOCEROS
NOVEMBER 16-DECEMBER 1
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCE
MONDAY, NOV. 26 — 7:30 p.m. — TICKETS 50c
Other nights — 8:30 p.m. — Tickets $2.00 - $1.50
Box Office: Buchanan 171, CA 4-1111, Local 796
a (HI ffl ffl
PRESENTS
The Renowned Novelist
BRIAN   MOORE
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26
The Author of "The Luck of Ginger Coffee"
"An Answer from Limbo", and many others will
speak on "The Writers Point of View"
12:30-1:30 Auditorium
FREE
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 29
A brilliant highlight of U.B.C.'s musical year will be a
visit  on November 29  to  U.B.C.'s  Auditorium of THE
CANADIAN OPERA COMPANY who, with a cast that
includes Jan Rubes, Sheila Piercey, and John Arab,
will perform
\\
LA   BOHEME
n
Music lovers of all kinds can look forward to an evening
of one of the truly great operas, written by Pucinni, which
combines laughter and tears with beautiful arias and
ensembles.
8:30 p.m.    Reserved Tickets on sale at AMS Office for
special prices of $1.00 and $1.50. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 22, 1962
Verwoerd gov t
7 JOHANESBURG (CPS)—Tte National Union of South
African Students, famous for its struggle against apartheid, is
leading opposition to the Verwoerd government's newest, most
unusual law. and h9ve refuSe{j to join in the
protest against the law.
Meanwhile, 3,000 students
matched through the streets of
Johannesburg to protest the
Act, in Gape Town several
students were arrested for
demonstrating. Similar demonstrations were staged in Durban, Pietermaritzburg, an d
Grahsmstown.   ' .
Debaters seek
applications
Applications for the McGoun
Cup debating team trials will
be available Friday from the
Debater's Union mailbox in the
AMS office.
The McGoun Cup is held annually by-universities of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta
and B.C.
At the end of June, the government .enacted what is known
popularly a<s the "Sabotage
Act," which makes "sabotage"
punishable by death. Juveniles
are not, excluded from the
death penalty.
The purpose of the law, according to NUSAS, may be seen
in the definition, it makes of
"sabotage"—w h i c h includes
poster displays, slogan painting,
or practically any non-violent
campaign whose object it is to
change the social and economic
structure of the Republic.
The law, of course is primarily directed against "liberals" and students, or at least
the students at English-speaking universities, who are members of NUSAS.
The Afrikaans—speaking universities have their own NUS,
ibe   Afrikaanse   Studentebond,
1
7r7-7 7 ''77777777^7. ,    .7:''/    .:7     .    \:. _ - p  O &0 \J A T ^ S
(or■**»«*il' '     7  / 7 ^
Obtain a copy of this informative brochure now from the University
Placement Office where you may also make an appointment for an
interview with th» Naval University Liaison Officer who will visit the
Campus.    10 and 11 January
#?\
*
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He had the lyiack of
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You can always tell
a champion by his
performances — and
our handsome Aqua-
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consistent winners.
They score for serviceability, for top
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the wide variety.
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MU   1-5625
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
at
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT LABORATORIES
NORTHERN ELECTRIC COMPANY LIMITED
OTTAWA, CANADA
Fields of major interest include:
TELEPHONE & DATA TRANSMISSION AUDIO & VIDEO
MICROWAVE RADIO # COMMUNICATIONS SWITCHING
PHYSICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH it WIRE & CABLE
SUBSCRIBER APPARATUS # SOLID STATE DEVELOPMENT
The scientific staff at the Laboratories
is working on research and product
development for communication services and power transmission to meet
the specific requirements of the Canadian economy.
To support the development of our
systems and products the staff is engaged in fundamental studies in the new
arts of integrated electronic circuitry
and basic research in the fields of solid
state physics and information theory.
We invite you to arrange for an interview through the Placement Office
of your University, or write directly to:
"^ The College Relations Department, "^ Department 8450,
Northern Electric Company Limited, Research and Development Laboratories,
P.O. Box 6123, Northern Electric Company Limited,
Montreal, Quebec P.O. Box 3511, Station "C", Ottawa, Ontario
Northern Electric
COMPANY    LIMITED
6062-12 Thursday, November 22, 1962
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Homeowners want peaceful co-existence
Council given suite plan
By KHRISHNA SAHAY
Owners of illegal suites in
Vancouver have proposed a
nine-point plan for peaceful
co-existence with city council.
The plan calls for registration of suites with city council
and a licence fee.
It also calls for regular
checks on the sanitary condition of the suites and for the
rezoning of suites in the University area.
• •      •
The Vancouver Homeowners' Suites Association in a
circular blamed the sudden
crackdown on illegal suites
on small minority groups.
"This attack was provoked
by two small minority groups:
one afraid their property values would decrease, the other
concerned with profits," the
circular said.
No person was named as belonging to either of the
groups.
• *     *
"What is to happen to the
150 university students who
are to be evicted by Christmas
1962, and 1,500 more next
fall,"  the group  asked.
Many   students   are   unable
Mayor denies
radio rumor
Vancouver mayor Tom Alsbury has assured UBC he will
be out here next year.
"Contrary to rumor, I am not
running again as mayor," he
said Wednesday.
"And I'm.looking forward to
taking up my new duties at the
University."
A Greater Vancouver radio
station claimed Tuesday Alsbury
was considering running for
mayor and quoted him as saying his University job would be
waiting for him whenever he
wanted it.
Mayor Alsbury has been appointed director of UBC's Development Fund, replacing Aubrey Roberts. He starts Jan. 1,
1963.
to pay $100 or $150 for apartments; the circular said.
* * *
It attacked statements that
the suites were responsible for
the untidy apearance of the
city.
"Suites   do   not   necessarily
indicate  overcrowding  or  un-'
kempt   premises—the   reverse '
is often true. Two roomers or i
boarders   are   allowed  in   any
home according to the present
by-law," it said.
NFCUS mag
new offices at UBC
First steps are now being taken to make UBC the editorial
headquarters for Canada's first quarterly student magazine.
An   editorial   staff   has   been
appointed.   A   printer   has   been
selected. Work is being done to
attract   contributions   from   universities across Canada.
HEADQUARTERS HERE
National advertising is being
solicited by the Alrrta Mater
Society advertising department.
The magazine, named Campus
Canada, will be distributed on
•campuses across the country
about mid-February, says production co-ordinator Ed Lavalle.
Lavalle is hoping Campus
Canada, published by the National Federation of Canadian
University Students, will make
its permanent head quarters
here.
BALANCE OF ARTICLES
The purpose of the magazine,
says eidtor Fred Fletcher, is to
provide a forum for student
opinion from all parts of Canada.
Fletcher said he hopes to keep
a balance of articles from Canada's major regions. "'But I'd
like to see a good representation
from UBC."
He added that 30 per- cent of
Will do typing in my home at
reasonable rates. Call Sylvia
at TR 6-6043 after 5:00 on
week days.
FOR SALE
1950 A40 Austin, new tires,
new engine. Modern turn signal lights, Al shape. $95.00.
Phone YU 7-4824.
WRIGHT'S
HHS EUROPEAN
STUDENT
TOUR
PLUS FARE
316
•EIGHT WEEKS  •TWELVE COUNTRIES  •TWENTY-TWO CITIES
You leave London May 29th on the trip of your life.
Arranged under the auspices of the Overseas Visitors
Club, Wright's special tour takes you to England, Holland,
Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, Italy, Austria, Germany,
Spain, Yugoslavia, Switzerland and France. You'll see the
world's great capitals travelling by modern motor coach,
staying each night in carefully selected hotels and pensions . . . with breakfast supplied. Your bi-lingual courier
will see you miss nothing. The cost is so low there'll be a
rush for bookings. Do contact Wright's Travel Service
today.
Contact Peter Macpherson at AM 6-0534, or
.WRIGHT'S TRAVEL SERVICE: LTD.
818 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C. ■ Ph. 684-5185
the magazine will be in French.
Deadline for contributions is
Dec. 15. Articles of opinion on
political, social or economic
subjects are being sought as
well as humorous essays, short
stories, poems, limericks and
"almost anything that might
interest students," Fletcher said.
UNDER 2500 WORDS
Cartoons and pictures will
also be printed.
Articles should be under 2,500
words and typewritten.
Further information on t h e
magazine may be obtained from
co-ordinator Ed Lavalle, at the
AMS office, or editor Fred
Fletcher, in The Ubyssey offices.
Radsoc offers free*
air time to campus
Bulletin Board, a University Radio Program, will publicize any student activities
free-.
Written material should be
brought to UBC Radio, in
south Brock basement, or
phoned to CA 4-3242, local
33.
ECONOMIC HISTORY profes*
sor Dr. Herbert Heaton speaks
to Vancouver Institute Saturday at 8 p.m. in Bu.  106.
Rental Service
TUXEDOS
Black Suits, Foirnals,
Costumes, Make-up
Special Student Rates
New York
Costume Salon
4397 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0034
Near UBC Gates
The Ideal Place To
Meet   Your  Friends
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak with  Coffee
$1.35 — It's Realty Good
Full Course Meals
within your income.'
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
Campus Barber
Shop
Monday - Friday 8:30 - 5:00.
Saturday 8:30 - 12:00
tOCATEDIN
BROCK EXTENSION Page 8
THE     U B Y SSEY
Thursday, November 22,. 1962
'tween dosses
US. (Jroir
sings in
Auditorium
The Baptist Student Union
presents the Golden Gate Choir
on tour from California noon
today in the Auditorium. No
admission charge.
* *    *
FINE ARTS CLUB
Last meeting this year, Friday, 12:30, LS 301. Everyone
attend.
* *    *
GEOGRAPHY DEPT.
Dr. Forrest Pitts, U. of Oregon, speaks on Agriculture in
Korea. Friday, 12:30, F&G 100.
2f»       *f*      *f>
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Woodlands School field trip
—meet noon today on Marine
Dr. below Grad centre opposite
Fort Camp. Bring your car.
* *    %■
AWS
Musical program by fourth
year students from School of
Music—-Piano and vocal solos.
Noon ixjftlay, Bu. 106. Admission
free; all welcome.
•J*        *T*        *F
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Full-length film "Checkpoint,"
noon today, Chem. 250. Members free; non-members 25
cents.
* *    *
NEW  DEMOCRATS
Meeting noon today in Bu.
104. All members please attend.
UBC CLASSIFIED
FOUND: Pair of men's glasses, 1 pair
women's  glasses.  Collect proctor s
office,   Brock   Hall.
LOST: Would anyone knowing the
whereabouts of the briefcase belonging to Murray Hanna taken
from Brock, at noon Friday, Nov. 9,
please phone AM  1-4509.  Reward!
LOST: Snow is coming. Lost In or
near Law hut 13 and desperately
needed. 1 small navy blue ski jacket. Phone Scott, AM 6-9048after «
p.m.
LOST: An opal ring with 'A stones
in a gold setting. Please, phone
FA   7-4018.
LOST: Sheaffer's cartridge pen, blue
with silver top, Sat. a.m. between
Buchanan and Wesbrook. Phone
HE.   1-7861.
LOST: From clothes rack at north
end of Brock Lounge. White "London Fog'' raincoat. Phone Bud at
CA. 8-8249. Reward offered.
LOST: Would the lightfinger who
lifted my purse Nov. 7 from the
bus stop cafe please, please turn
in the contact lenses to the Lost
and Found.
LOST: 1 "Woodsonia" raincoat with
red lining Monday in library. Phone
Dave, AM  1-7445.
SORD CLUB
Meeting cancelled today—
guest speaker, Mr. B. Fraser is
unable to attend.
•1*        V        V
ROD   & GUN
Important meeting noon today, Bu. 217. Films.
LOST- I left my clear plastic umbrella in your car Monday about
4:30. My number: FA 7-4081. My
name:  Gail,. Thank you.
ROOM AND BOARD: $65 a month.
Excellent food. Transportation to
and from campus. Call Jack, AM
1-5611.
ATTENTION STUDENTS: Room, $30
monthly. Phone RE 1-6375 after
5  p.m.
FOR RENT: 2-bed sitting-room, priv.
bath and entrance, vie. 12th and
Sasamat. CA 4-0974 after 6 or
weekends.
ROOM AND BOARD: Single room,
good meals, quiet district, $75. Call
CA 4-0139 or see 3S53 W. 2nd.
SEX WANTED: Two more types to
complete West Van car pool for
8:30 lectures Mon. to Sat- Prefer
females. Phone Heartly, WA.
2-6050.
WANTED: Student for light housework 3 hrs. Saturday mornings.
Near MacDonald and 16th. RE
3-2966 evenings.
WANTED: Two drivers from West
Van to complete a carpool. References are not required. Phone Jack
at WA 2-8392 if interested.
WANTED: Ride from vicinity Glen
Dr. and King Edward Ave. Your
time is my time. Phone Walt any
time in the evening. TR 6-7706.
WOULD the girl who was given a
life from 10th & Alma Wed. 21st at
12:30 in Red Valiant phone Greig,
RE   6-4401   Fri.   4:30-12:00.
FOR SALE: Man-eating Piranha,
Complete with fully-equipped ten-
gallon aquarium, $25. No triflers.
Please phone RE 3-3125,  Ken.
ST. ANSLEM'S CHURCH
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
REV.  JACK  BISHOP
Anglican Chaplain to  U.B.C.
SUNDAY,  NOV.  25,   7:30  P.M.
Coffee and Discussion to Follow
RAINCOAT
TIME
Drop in and
see our
Fabulous Selection of
Raincoats,
Loden Coats and
Light-weight
Laminated
Coats
Richards &
Farish
802 GRANVILLE
"Dedicated Exclusively
to the Young Man"
WANTED: Car pool or ride from the
Capitol   Hill  area   (8:30   lectures).
.  Call 299-6346.
FOR SALE: Top tray! Kastle combination metal skis. One new, other
used twice. Marker harness, etc.
Value $200. Sell for $100. Phone
Roger, YU 7-0663 evenings.
WILL  COACH:   In  Math   120.  Phone
Frank Wagner, CA 4-0959.
University Hill United Church
5375 University Boulevard
Services   11:00 a.m.  Sundays
Evening Service 7 p.m.
All Welcome!
The Broadway Theatre League
of the Vancouver General Hospital Nurses
Alumnae Association
PRESENTS THE FIRST OF 4 BROADWAY HITS
A SHOT IN THE DAR
Queen Elizabeth Theatre, Nov. 26th
Starring Annie Farge, a French Actress
well-known as "Angel" in the TV series
Subscription seats for 4 shows still available at bargain
prices from $6.50 to $18.60 for the 4 shows
Single seats for this Show from $2.25 to $5.50
Tickets and Information at Vancouver Ticket Centre
249 West Georgia, phone 683-3255
Subagencies in all Eaton's Stores where you may use your
charge account.
4r**¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥Vvv.mY¥¥V¥vvm¥¥¥¥¥¥-»¥¥¥¥¥¥¥¥mr~
, meet
MISS PHANTOM
a brand new stocking
for the
slender, slim, trim leg
The seamless nylon you've been waiting for — especial)/
constructed for the young miss or woman with a slimmer
enkle, calf and thigh — MISS PHANTOM will fit you as no
other stocking has until now — and you'll love Ha style,
particularly the lace-like runstop at welt and toe — and K
•elis for only ONE DOLLAR A PAIRl
MISS   PHANTOM

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