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The Ubyssey Nov 17, 1960

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 Grad
Employment
Edition
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLIII.
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  THURSDAY,   NOVEMBER   17,   1960
No. 27
Fraternity Debate Explodes
UNAUTHORIZED PARKING on the Library lawn caused this
vehicle to be impounded by the Engineers' chariot yesterday
noon.   This   was   the   highlight   of   their   "Let's   ALL   BUCK
FOSTER'S"  satire. —Photo by A.  Tanner
yneers
Parking Problem
UBC Engineers emerged as leaders in the campus' fight
against Buster's Wednesday noon when they staged a prank on
the Librarjr lawn.
"Their _ittre «nr. the Buster's
men gavetoirttf to a slogan which
has already spread around the
campus and which will live as
long as cars continue to disappear from parking lotsi" said
D. Stanley, Arts I.
"Let's all buck "lister's."
The "Red Hairy Mass' advanced on the library shortly after
noon, surrounded a roped off
area, and cheered mightily as
one of their number denounced
all UBC engineers as being inept
and unintellectual.
A crowd soon gathered and
began throwing apple cores and
lunch bags at the orator while
he spounted about the engineers
being a mentally sterile group
and totally unnecessary on the
- campus.
TRICYCLE ENTERS
At this moment an itsy-bitsy
teeny-weeny! tricycle was driven
into the cleared area and parked.
The driver abandoned his
vehicle: the speaker ranted for
a moment at this breach of a
'No Parking' zone and then
blasted away on a whistle.
A commissionaire appeared
and ticketed the tricycle.
Then the engineer's red  and
Grad Forms for Totem
ATTENTION GRADUATES:
Those who have not filled out
Grad Forms must do so immediately in order thai their
pictures may be included in
1961   Totem.   Forms  may   be
completed   at   Totem   Office,
Room  168 Brock.
white chariot dashed into the
praking lot. A sign proclaiming
"Staff Parking Only—All other
cars impounded" was placed beside the vehicle and a huge
safety pin was hooked onto the
three-wheeler.
With much strain it was hoisted off the ground.
As the chariot moved away,
two engineers unfurled a sign
proclaiming in large red letters,
"Let's all Buck Fuster's."
Publications
Blasted at
Leadership
Resolutions of the Sixth An-
n u a 1 Leadership Conference
were presented to Student Council Monday.
Council will discuss the resolutions; individually next week.
The following were passed at
the conference:
(a) Whereas it is felt at the
present time there are inadequate facilities to efficiently receive pages of copy from campus
organizations for publication
and whereas it is a recognized
fact that The Ubyssey is insufficiently staffed to efficiently
cover all types of campus events,
be it resolved that The Ubyssey
be charged with setting up a
central receiving bureau for the
purpose of accepting news items
from campus organizations.
TOTEM SALES LOW
(b) Whereas past sales of The
Totem indicate a lack of interest
on the part of the students in
this publication and whereas the
presence of the individual undergraduate societies' publications
is indicative of the lack of interest in the yearbook, be it resolved that a study be made of
the objects, aims and purposes
of Totem to determine the policy
and format which will appeal
to the majority oi students. ,
(c) Be it resolved that UCC
appoint one person to be in
charge of all notices (club meetings, special events, etc.) and be
responsible for seeing that these
notices be submitted to the Editor oi The Ubyssey.
UBYSSEY PUBLIC
RELATIONS
(d) If it is financially feasible
be it resolved that the Open
House Edition of The Ubyssey
be distributed to senior classes
in each high school outside of
the lower mainland area and
that in every other year a spe-
(continued on page  8)
See RESOLUTIONS
M.A.C. Council Resigns
In Discipline Dispute
SACKVILLE, N.B. (CUP)—The question of student responsibility was raised in another Canadian university with
the mass resignation of the Mount Allison Men's Administrative
Council.	
The Argosy Weekly reported  having liquor in the men's residences.
Feathers Ruffled
In Sex Dispute
Wednesday's mock debate, "Resolved that Greek letter
societies are necessary on this campus," degenerated into a
free-for-all with old-favorite "sex" uppermost on everyone's
mind.
The outburst occurred after
a student in the audience questioned Lorenne Gordon, a speaker for the negative, as to where
she obtained her information
about the alleged use of a prostitute by two fraternity groups.
"It is strange that Miss Gordon would know these things,"
mused the girl.
At that point Gail Gordon
arose from the audience to defend her sister's reputation. She
ignored the light remark from
another member of the audience
that "we seem 'to have the makings of a new sisterhood here—
why not start a Gordon sorority?"
TEARS  FALL
The accuser apologized to
Lorenne but let loose her final
remark. Turning to Gail, she
quoted two lines of poetry that
caused Gail to burst into tears.
General opinion was that bad
taste was in evidence on both
sides, and Lorenne was "playing
With fire" when she originally
raised the question.
Debating Union president Peter Hebb later stressed that his
organization had nothing whatsoever to  do with the debate.
"We do not condone mock
debates," he said.
The afternoon's entertainment
started out normally enough
with Ken Hodgkinson, speaking
in the affirmative, stating fraternities and sororities were necessary as a "useful and successful substitute for home" for the
"underprivileged of our community."
GREEKS POOR?
He admitted that Greek society  members  might   not   seem
underprivileged on the surface,
but "we must look underneath
the clothes to really tell."
Larry Rotenberg felt that sororities and fraternities were
both.useless because they filled
no purpose. "Sororities exist
only as a ready source of girls
for fraternities," was his opinion.
Comparing fraternity members speaking in their own defence to having chimpanzees debate the morality of sending
themselves into outer space, affirmative speaker Mike Matthews said that fraternities
should be more aristocratic than
they actually are.
"The   aristocracy   has  fallen
(continued  on page  8)
See DEBATE EXPLODES
Edgar Promises
New Orientation
Student Council president
Dave Edgar stated Wednesday
that Frosh Orientation, one of
"the most important functions
that Student Council performs,"
has "failed miserably."
The orientation program is designed to familiarize new students with the campus.
A committee will be formed
before Christmas to investigate-
the faults of the program and
make recommendations. Bill
MacDonald has been appointed
chairman.
After Christmas the committee1
will begin work with  students
and  administration   to  achieve
a   satisfactory   program,   before
next year.
MAC president Ron Brownstein
resigned over a discipline case
which was dealt with by a residence dean. It was said the
dean's action violated MAC
precedents set earlier in the
fear.
The remaining nine council
members resigned in support of
Brownstein's   position.
In a letter to the Argosy
Weekly Brownstein said: "It is
obvious that certain members of
the University administration
have no faith in the council."
The case in dispute dealt with
a football player charged with
The dean had him dropped
from the football team and suspended for violating the rules
of the dorm.
In a similar case which the .
Men's Council tried, a football \
player charged with the same |
offence was fined $15 and post-!
ed a $25 bond.
In a front page editorial The
Argosy Weekly claimed the
student body had been insulted
and demanded a statement of
policy from the University administration.
The editorial also called for
"resounding approval" to be
given to Ron Brownstein's actions,'
—'Photo by Cliff Arrowsmith.
CHAIRMAN BHL GORDON seems happy here before the fraternity debate turned into chaos yesterday. Speakers pictured
here are Ken Hodkinson, Mike Mathews and Lorenne Gordon. P«g» 2
THE UBYSSEY
Authorized as second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa
. MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three times weekly throughout the University year
in Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of the Ubysey and not necessarily those of the Alma
Mater   Society  or   the  University   of   B.C.
TELEPHONES: CA 4-3242, locals 12 (news desk), 13 (critics-
sports), 14 (Editor-inChief), 15, 6 (business offices).
Editor-in-Chief: Fred Fletcher
Managing Editor Roger McAfee
I News  Editor Denis   Stanley
Features Editor   ..,,....    Ed Lavalle
I Photography Editor Byron Hender
Senior Editor Ann Pickard
Sports Editor Mike Hunter
? Critics Editor Dave Bromige
f CUP Editor Bob Hendrickson
Layout: Clarence Buhr
STAFF: Dick Arkley, Joe Bolduc, Susanne Clarke,
Christine Chester, Coleman Romalis, Bill Scott, Nico
Snoek, Kitty Watt.
1. FEATURES DEPARTMENT: Diane Greenall, Assistant,
Sandra Scott, Ruth Robertson, Frank Findenigg, Dave
Taylor, Lee Dobbs and Derek Allan.
Why Do They Hate?
We read that white mothers in a southern U.S. State
■    are pulling their  young  children  out  of  an elementary
school because four small Negro girls have started attend-
:    ing the school.
The little girls had to be escorted into the school by
;. U.S. marshals for fear that they would suffer physical harm.
Mothers of white students are planning a protest march
1 - against the local school board to vent their "righteous in-
' dignation" at this mixing of black and white, we read.
Further, we read that white children were seen desecrating the effigy of a Negro child.
' We don't intend to criticize these actions.   We  can't.
They are absolutely beyond our comprehension.
I What living hell those little Negro girls must be going
.through.  It is impossible to comprehend the unreasoning
hatred—or the nameless fear—that lies behind the treat-
r   ment they are receiving.
'  *        No wonder that" Negro parents hesitate _ to put their
children into integrated schools. .
What possesses human beings to be so cruel to other
human beings? Who among us could find it in him to
harm a little girl, any little girl?
.But these little girls had to be protected from harm
by U.S.. marshals.
What is it that makes this possible? We can't grasp it.
We are not indignant.  We're just stunned.   We can't
fathom the situation.  It is utterly beyond us.
; Can anyone here explain it?
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 17,  19-60
Theatre Under The Stars has asked the citizens of
Vancouver for a vote of confidence.
Student Council received a letter from TUTS last
week, asking for support. Council felt it could offer nothing.
■The Ubyssey would like to raise its small voice in support of the, drive to keep TUTS alive.
rThe success of the membership drive so far and the
response to the recent benefit vshow would indicate that
%ere are a great many, who would like to see TUTS continued.
,guying a membership would be one tangible way to
support it.
_ ^Staging  a benefit  show  on campus  would probably
bring mass .student support.
vThe letter states: "Over the 21 years of its operation
- TUTS has spent at least 95% of its revenues in Vancouver
and, the surrounding area.  We have made it possible for
hundreds of talented young Canadians to get a start in the
professional theatre . . ."
It is apparent that the existence of TUTS has been
beneficial to local entertainers and to local businesses. But
most,important, it has provided many memorable moments
for local theatre-goers.
"The problems facing us could be considerably
lessened if we felt that a large number of interested citizen
groups .were prepared to give us moral support in maintaining a Jpcal. professional summer theatre," says the letter.
Students should, and probably are willing, to .give
encouragement, both moral and perhaps even financial, to
this organization. A campus benefit show would give them
a shar^ee to dp this.
Letters To
The Editor
Democracy
Breached?
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
It was with dismay that I
read in Tuesday's letters column that a political hierarchy
known as the ADVISORY
Committee has dictated that
we, the student body, are entitled to vote for some, but not
all, political parties on the
campus. This is a disgraceful
breach of the principles of democracy.
Mr. Allen of the Parliamentary Council stated that the
committee wants to see if the
AIF can provide a "serious" record of campus political participation. It only logical, therefore, that they should want to
see the AIF participate in
Model Parliament this year so
that they may judge its seriousness. How "serious" is the
committee about making the
Model Parliament work as a
model of Canadian democracy?
This is another example of
a campus bureaucracy promoting apathy towards any new
ideas. The effect will be to
drive the Model Parliament into a state of stagnation.
In the best interests of democracy, let the Parliamentary
Council reinstate the AIF as a
member,   and   let the  student
voters   decide   which   party's
principles they wish to endorse.
Yours truly,
Murray Ross,
Com.  4.
(Editor's   Note:—The   Advisory Committee to Parliamentary   Council   consists   of   five
voting    members—the     presi-
dents of the five political clubs
on campus last  year).
'Gross Distortion'
Editor,
The  Ubyssey,
Dear Sir,
I feel compelled to point out
that your report on Harold
Winch meeting is a gross distortion of the actual meeting.
While it is true that the individual items are probably accurate in themselves, the combined effort is unjustifiable.
Your report creates the impression that Mr. Winch criticized the United Nations as a
whole.   The   fact   is  that   Mr.
Winch repeatedly stated his
wholehearted support for this
institution.
In your report, there is not
one constructive statement, not
one word of praise, not one
positive part of Mr. Winch's
speech recorded. All you have
chosen to print are the crti-
cisms, the negative items.
I hope you realize that such
a report will do untold harm
to both Mr. Winch and the organization sponsoring him by
creating the entirely erroneous
impressions I have already described above.
In my opinion, some sort of
apology or clarification would
be in order here.
Bill Piket,
President, CCF Club.
FIVE-THIRTY CLUB
By MALCOLM SCOTT
A pressing problem of long term importance faces the
current Student Council: What is to be the future form
of student government?
This problem has faced prior Student Councils.
What did these Councils do about this problem?
They set up commissions and investigations. These
produced reports and recommendations, which to date has
been the sum total of any Council's effort.
No move was ever made to implement any of these
recommendations. Will this Council again pass this mass
of material on without taking any positive action?
I think not. This Council seems determined to stop
this trend towards laissez-faire. They feel that this is the
year these problems must be solved and that they must
lead the way to an effective solution. This refreshingly
different attitude on the part of the Council has resulted
in a positive move.
Acting upon the recommendations of last year's
Haskin's Commission, the council has set up a new body,
the University Student Activities Committee, on a trial
basis.
To date it has not proved too successful. However, the
essential thing is that some action has been taken. Regardless of the success or failure of USAC, an important step
has been taken. The trend has been reversed, procrastination has been replaced by action.
The setting up of USAC is not the only positive move
that Council has taken. They have agreed to meet every
Saturday in special session until they have formulated a
proposal of their own. If it becomes necessary, they will
present this to the student body.
Some may feel that this is a move to perpetuate the
influence of the present Council. Nothing could be further
from the truth, i '
In the long run, it is the student body and no one else
who will have the final say on any revision of student
government. The student body should, however, appreciate
the experience of the councillors in the field of student
government and give careful consideration to any suggestions that might originate from this group.
* * *
This column will attempt to keep you fully informed
of the significant developments as they occur. Any changes
in our present form of student government should be of
vital concern to all of us. We must look ahead. What is a
barely satisfactory system now can hardly be effective five
years from now, when the student body is increasing at the
rate of 10 per cent per year.
* * *
Do not allow the tenor of the above remarks to lead
you astray. I have no intention of becoming an apologist
for the Student Council. The Council is by no means perfect and will be criticized in this column whenever its
actions warrant criticism and the criticism can be of a
constructive nature.
An area in need of such criticism is the method of appointment by council of the heads of important committees.
All too often the chairman of important committees
are appointed from a small circle comprised of the personal
friends and acquaintances of the more influential Councillors. Undoubtedly many capable people are in this
group, but it is a very limited group. When these positions
become vacant they should be publicized and applications
should be accepted from students who feel themselves both
willing and competent. Each applicant should then be
judged on his own merits.
I feel that this would be a major step towards student
eradication of student apathy with respect to participation
in student government.
COUNCIL QUICKIES
There is a possibility that a radio broadcasting station
will be started on Campus—perhaps by Radsoc.
* * *
Treasurer Robinson stated that foreign-language
notices in the Ubyssey "might be smutty, you know."
* * *
When USAC was brought up several interesting remarks were made, e.g. no meeting this week as we have
nothing to do. Chris Davies, USC President stated: "We
need some directions." Thursday, November 17, 196*6
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Employment   Supplement
■„^
„*»$ s^*--
MR. J. F. McLEAN, head of UBC Employment Service will arrange studeni employment interviews.
Your Future Fulfilled
At Placement Office
More than 3500 students will obtain employment through
the personnel office this year. Of that number about 400 grads
will get permanent jobs and about 400 more will be placed in
summer jobs.
"The personnel office is to
aid students," said Mr. J. F.
McLean, Personnel Manager.
"Since the department started
in 1948 we have obtained about
10,000 jobs for students."
The personnel department
Was set up in 1947 and dealt
with the war veterans only. The
following year the service was
Sxpande'd to take in all students
«n the campus.
DEPARTMENT GREW
From then on the department
just grew. In 1954, the first-year
records were kept, there were
1,472 interviews; in the 1959-60
term ' 3,086 students made use
of the service.
The personnel office aids students in their efforts to find
jobs on three separate levels.
Grads are aided in their search
for permanent employment. In
this respect*more than 400 jobs
are made available each year.
This represents about 80% of
the jobs needed, said McLean.
SUMMER JOBS
Students wishing summer
employment have the opportunity to apply for jobs from over
300 listings and firm interviews.
The personnel office also lists
casual and Christmas jobs. Last
year there were 247 casual jobs
listed and 635 Christmas jobs
were made available.
McLean pointed out that the
'self help' program at UBC is
one of the best in the country.
442 on-campus jobs were made
available to students last year.
This service was first started
in 1949 when 12 students requested this type of employment.
COUNSELLING TOPS
"Employment service isn't the
•nly thing we do," said McLean.
•-We have brie of the best coun
selling services on this continent."
All counselling and testing is
purely voluntary but it-was
pointed out that any information
the office has on a student could
be an aid to him in the future.
"We get calls from employers
enquiring about so-and-so and
if we have information available
that will aid the student, it is,
of course, to his advantage."
GRADS NOTE
McLean pointed out that
forms will be circulated through
the graduating classes and said
that these forms are not employment applications unless
the student so desires. They are
merely information forms.
"All these files are fully confidential,"   said  McLean.
Students are advised and aided in their search for the correct program. Some effort is
made to explain the difference
between the high school and the
university and to aid the student in any problems of adjustment to the different routine.
INTERNATIONAL
Through the Canadian University and Counselling and
Placement Association, the UBC
Personnel and Placement office
is closely connected with similar offices throughout the country.
This association is, in turn,
connected with a similar American employment group.
The UBC Counselling' and
Placement office puts out two
major publications. One, Career
Planning for the Student at the
University, is an aid" to students
in choosing a career. The other,
Student Information Bulletin, is
aimed at the frosh.
Even though McLean agreed
with the policy of aiding students seeking employment he
urged that students "try to find
their own jobs before coming
to the office."
— Interview Schedule —
The object of this supplement is to give grads an opportunity to find out about some
of the companies who will be
looking for your services when
you graduate.
To the undergraduate, there
are summer jobs and information for future use.
This list of interview times
is  only tentative.  Watch  The
Ubyssey   for   future   employment information.
November   19
Mobil Oil
Pan American Petroleum
January 6
Pacific  Semi  Conductors
Pan American Petroleum
January 9 . 10
Proctor & Gamble
Northern Electric
Canadian  Industries
Pan  American Petroleum
CSC Engineering
CSC Research
January 11-12
Northern Electric
Pan American Petroleum
Proctor & Gamble
CSC Engineering
CSC Research
CSC  Meteor
January  13
Northern Electric
Cyanamid
CSC Engineering
CSC Meteor
January 16-17
California Standard
Proctor & Gamble '
Upjohn Co.
Parke Davis
Dominion Engineer
Texaco
January   18
California  Standard
Canada Packers
Upjohn Co.
Dupont
Texaco
January 19 - 20
Imperial Oil
Canada Packers
CPR
Dupont
Ortho Pharma
January 23 - 24
Union Carbide
Shell Oil
Aluminum Co.
McMillan Bloedel & Powell R.
Columbia Cellulose
January 25
Shell Oil
Aluminum Co.
CGE
McMillan & Powell River
Int'l Factory Sales
ColumbiaCellulose
January 26-27
Shell Oil
Royal Canadian Navy
Canada Pratt
CGE
McMillan & Powell River
Int'l Factory Sales
HBC   Retail
January 30
Robin Hood Flour
McMillan & Bloedel
January 31
Canadair
Trader's Finance
Zellers
February  1
Steel Co. Canada
Hudson Bay Oil & Gas
Canadair
McMillan & Bloedel
February 2 - 3
Steel Co. Canada
Hudson Bay Oil & Gas
McMillan & Bloedel
Burroughs
Crown Zellerbach
February 6-8 ,
Bell Telephone
Cominco
February 10
All State
Bell Telephone
Atomic Energy
February 13
Ford Motor Co.
February 14
Ford Motor Co.
Can.   Allis Chalmers
February 15 - 16
Dow Chemical
Can.  Allis  Chalmers
March 1
Dunn & Bradstreet
B.C. Forest Service
Shell Interviews Engineering
Science Grads Jan. 23-26 1961
Shell of Canada has openings for 1961 graduates in engineering and the
sciences. These positions, in the company's exploration and production,
manufacturing and marketing departments, offer scope and opportunity
for the graduate interested in a challenging and rewarding career. A
few summer positions for 1962 graduates are also available. Your university placement office can supply further details, arrange an interview,
and provide a copy of "Opportunity With Shell," a booklet which contains full details on many Shell career jobs.
SHELL   OIL   COMPANY   Of   CANADA,   LIMITED Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 17,  1960
PERMANENT AND  SUMMER  EMPLOYMENT
Pan American Petroleum Corporation
Calgary, Alberta
GEOPHYSICS—      Students  in  Physics; Mathematics;  Mining,
Electrical or Geological Engineering —
Interviews January 5 and    6.
All  branches applicable to petroleum  production. — Interviews January 9 and   10.
Students in Commerce, majoring in Accounting. — Interviews January 9, 10 and 11.
Postgrads and grads. in Geology or Geological   Engineering.   —   Interviews  January
9 and 10.
See University Placement Office
for further particulars
ENGINEERING-
ACCOUNTING-
GEOLOGY-
Protter & Gamble
Offer Interviews
New developments are causing a greater need for university
graduates in Proctor and Gamble Company of Canada Limited.
UBC students will be interviewed in two stages.
On January 9-12 Engineer and
Chemistry graduates interested
in the fields of Production, Product Research, Industrial Engineering and Technical Packaging
On July 16-17 Arts and Science grads for work in Advertising, Purchasing, Finance Traffic and Sales Management have
their chance.
PROCTER & GAMBLE
OFFERS THE GRADUATE:
1. HIGHLY DEVELOPED TRAINING
2. A CHANCE TO GROW IN DIRECT RELATION TO HIS ABILITY
3. THE SOLID BACKING OF A GROWING COMPANY RECOGNIZED
AS A LEADER IN INDUSTRY.
Products such as Tide, Cheer, Ivory, Camay and Crisco are known and used
in every household. The successful development and marketing of these
brands is directed by university trained men whose abilities are constantly
challenged by new responsibilities.
^Graduation may be many months away, but we urge you to give serious con-
sideration to your future now. The Placement Office has copies of booklets
jwbich have been disigned to give you detailed information.
INTERVIEWS
ENGINEERING AND SCIENCE-JANUARY 9,10,11, T2
COMMERCE AND ARTS - JANUARY 16, 17
T"
m
■^
_l_D JVL seeks success with and for
\\ __   ? those it employs
Graduates who are ready and eager to work,
men who seek to expand their knowledge
through additional study and practical application are given every possible assistance at IBM.
These men have as their associates other men
of great skill and experience in the absorbing
and challenging field of electronic computing.
They become part of a forward looking company
whose operations are world wide and whose
engineering and research facilities are second
to none.
Arts, Commerce and Engineering
graduates who wish to learn about
the success possible at IBM,
write for this booklet.
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES COMPANY LIMITED
444-7th AvenueWest, Calgary, Alberta
Western District Manager—W. Dinsdale
IBM
Oil Companies to
Open Positions
Two petroleum companies offer graduates employment in
the fields of petroleum engineering.
Pan American Petroleum Cor
poration at present employs 575
people working out of Canadian
branches at Calgary, Edmonton
and Drayton Valley, Alberta.
Employment opportun i t i e s
take workers into Northern
British Columbia and the North
West Territories.
Work has just commenced on
a multi-million dollar gas processing plant at Windfall in
northwest Edmonton.
Past   employees   of   Imperial
Oil Limited will fill the majority of vacancies in this company
during 1960. Current recruitment will be directed towards
students enrolled in courses related to the interests of Imperial
Oil and who will be graduating
in 1962.
Students graduating in 1962
who plan a career in the oil
industry should seek summer
employment with the Imperial
Oil company.
Imperial Oil Limited
Offers opportunities for a career in the Oil
Industry to a limited number of students
enrolled in:—
CHEMICAL   ENGINEERING
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
ENGINEERING  PHYSICS
HONOURS GEOLOGY
COMMERCE
Our Representative will be on the Campus on January
16   and   17,   1961   to   make   appointments   with
interested  students from  the  above courses, and
our   Interviewing   Team   will   carry out interviews
on January 18,  19 and 20,  1961.
The California Standard
Company
Calgary, Atberta
offering  careers  in
Petroleum Exploration in Canada
will conduct campus interviews on
January 16 and 17
FOR POST GRADUATES, GRADUATES AND
UNDERGRADUATES  IN:
Geological Engineering Permanent and  Summer
(Options  1, 2 and 3)
Honours Geology Permanent and  Summer
Physics and Geology Permanent and  Summer
Candidates   will   also   be   considered   for   employment   in
operating geophysics in Canada with Chevron Oil Company
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS MAY BE MADE
THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY EMPLOYMENT OFFICE, HUT M-7 THE      UBYSSEY
Page   5
Research, Development Jobs
Available at Chalk River
ATOMIC ENERGY of Canada Limied offers positions at Chalk
River to graduates.
Engineer Positions
Open in Mobil Oil
Mobil Oil of Canada Limited stands fourth in the amount
of oil reserves held in Canada, third in production and second
as an operator of its own and other owners' wells.
Mobil   Oil's   exploration   and
producing operations require
the services of geologists, physicists, geophysicists, mathematicians and geological, petroleum, mining, chemical, electrical
and mechanical engineers.
Company interviews at UBC
will be on January 4-5.
The initial stages of employment training will involve extensive'.field work in many isolated parts of western Canada.
EXPLORATION
Mobil's  exploration activities
were instrumental in early oil
discoveries in Saskatchewan and
in Alberta. At Pembina, 75 miles
southwest of Edmonton it discovered Canada's largest oil
field.
Mobil Oil is also active in
northwest British Columbia and
in the Northwest Territories.
Mobil Oil of Canada has a
wide network of exploration,
producing, research and marketing enterprises and is staffed almost entirely by Canadians.
Atomic Energy of Canada
Limited offers a wide field for
the university graduate.
Ten of the company's twelve
divisions are at Chalk River,
about 130 miles west northwest
of Ottawa. Other major locations
are the Commercial Products
Division at Ottawa and the Nuclear Power Plant at Toronto.
Atomic Energy of Canada
Limited employs 2,400 people,
nearly 500 of whom are university graduates.
Graduates and post-graduates
are needed in fundamental and
applied research, design engineering, operation of nuclear reactors and metallurgical investigations.
BUSINESS FIELD
In the business field, finance,
personnel, administrative and
public relations positions are
available.
Details of positions currently
available may be obtained from
the company's Employment Supervisor, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario.
Summer positions are available for graduates and students
near their graduation year in
the fields of pure science and
engineering facilities. Travel allowance is provided for those
students attending UBC who
stay three; months or longer in
the employment of Atomic Energy.
Company benefits to the full-
time employee include group in-
Employment Opportunties
with
o b i I   O i I   o f  C a n a da, Ltd
ON JANUARY 4 AND 5
Company  Representatives  will interview
Graduate, Senior And Junior Year Students
Interested in Careers in
GEOLOGY
GEOPHYSICAL        ENGINEERING
PETROLEUM AND PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
THERE ARE OPENINGS FOR BOTH REGULAR & SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
INTERVIEWS ARE BEING  SCHEDULED  THROUGH
THE PLACEMENT  BUREAU  OF  THE  UNIVERSITY
Mobil
surance,  superannuation,   medical plans, leaves and recreation
facilities.
RESEARCH OPEN
The field of research branches
into many of the sciences. Physicists and mathematicians conduct fundamental research in
experimental and theoretical
nuclear physics, solid state research and development work in
applied physics.
Biologists investigate the physiological effects- of radiation on
various organisms, study the
biochemistry   of   nucleic   com
pounds  and   do   statistical  studies on mutation rates.
Chemical engineers work in
a variety of fields such as processing of fuel elements, the
technology of reactor operation
and the disposal of radioactive
wastes.
Civil Engineers supervise
construction and design engineering.
Reactor research and development presents problems for people with post-graduate training
in engineering and nuclear
physics.
Atomic Energy of Canada Unified
CHALK RIVER, ONTARIO
requires
Graduates & Post Graduates
in
Biology
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Electronic Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Metallurgy
Metallurgical Engineering
Physics
for
Permanent positions in its Research, Development, Design,
Reactor Operation & Maintenance Divisions engaged in
the development of atomic power.
also
Applications for summer employment are invited from
both graduate and third year students.
Further details and application forms may be obtained
from your University Placement Office.
Interviews will be held at your University on the 9th and
10th of February, 1961, -
1961    GRADUATES
CANADA'S   LARGEST   EMPLOYER
FEDERAL PUBLIC SERVICE
Requires
CIVIL - ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL
ENGINEERS
An interesting and rewarding career may await you in the
Federal Government if you are graduating in Civil,
Electrical or Mechanical Engineering in 1961. New graduates in these fields will be employed at various Canadian
centres on vital and challenging projects involving design,
development, construction, research application and contracts engineering.
STARTING  SALARY APPROXIMATELY $5,000 	
allowances will be made for those completing relevent postgraduate training.
CANDIDATES MUST WRITE A GENERAL OBJECTIVE
TEST AT 9 A.M. ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19,
LAW BUILDING.
Details regarding the examination, application forms and
information circulars and folders are available from:
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
OR CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, OTTAWA Page 6
T HE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 17,  1960
Shell Oil Gives
On-Job Experience
WELL  IF ALL THIS fails there's ALWAYS plenty of ditches around campus.
Northern Electric
Needs Gradr
Northern Electric is one of
Canada's leading manufacturers
of communications equipment
and wire and cable.
Over 80% of the top management of the Northern Electric
Company Limited are university
graduates.
University graduates may be
employed in telephone systems
engineering, design engineering,
xnaufacturing engineering, plant
engineering, research and development, ad sales engineering.
All departments employ 'on
the Job* training, lectures, and
training sessions to the new employee.
MONTREAL JOBS
The majority of this year's
job opportunities are located m
the Montreal area. 'Starting minimum salary for engineering
graduates is $395 per month,
with many opportunities for
rapid advancement.
As the company is primarily
a manufacturing concern, approximately 60% of its non-
supervisory engineers are engaged in engineering functions
directly related to the manufacture of its products. Communications systems engineers, sales,
and research positions employ
the other 40%.
ATTRACTIVE CAREERS
IN
FEDERAL   PUBLIC   SERVICE
FOR
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION OFFICERS
JUNIOR ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS
ECONOMISTS AND  STATISTICIANS
DOMINION CUSTOMS APPRAISERS
TRADE AND COMMERCE OFFICERS
COMBINES INVESTIGATION OFFICERS
FOREIGN SERVICE  OFFICERS  F#fc'CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION, EXTERNAL
AFFAIRS, TRADE AND COMMERCE
ARCHIVISTS
FINANCE OFFICERS
CLERKS 4
These posts offer interesting work, numerous opportunities
for advancement, and generous  fringe   benefits
STARTING SALARIES
$4050 for Clerks 4 and $4560 for all other classes
Under-graduates in their final year of study are invited to
apply but   appointment will  be  subject   to   graduation..
Students from all faculties are elegible to compete.
WRITTEN EXAMINATION, SATURDAY, NOV. 19
9 a.m.   Law   Building.
Details regarding the examination, application forms and
descriptive   folders   now available  from
OR CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION, OTTAWA
If you write to Ottawa, please specify the classes in which
you   are   interested   and  quote   competition  61-2650
Shell Oil Company of Canada
has opened Exploration Manufacturing and Marketing offices
in Vancouver.
Services under the Shell Oil
Company include exploring for
and producing crude oil and natural gas, refining of petroleum
and marketing of petroleum products.
College students are employed
in various positions. Geologists
and geophysicists are needed in
the exploration department. En-
gineerig graduates are employed
i production and gas departments.
Technologists, process supervision, design, construction and
maintenance engineers are selected in marketing positions.
Marketing requires Industrial
Sales, Retail Supervision and
Marketing graduates.
Training by the Shell Oil
Company includes on-the-job experience and specialized theoretical instruction during the
first two years.
Summer positions are open
to students graduating in 1962
or taking post-graduate work.
Interviews for summer Exploration and production jobs will be
at UBC January 23-26.
Horthern Electric
offers
for GRADUATES in -
• ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
• ENGINEERING PHYSICS
• HONOURS MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS
Northern Electric, as a major manufacturer of
Communications Equipment and Wire and
Cable, offers opportunities in the fields of:
MANUFACTURING - PLANT ENGINEERING
DESIGN - COMMUNICATIONS
SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
• Most assignments are in tbe Montreal area,
although openings are available in Ottawa,
Belleville and London, Ontario. Transporta*
tion allowance is paid.
• Excellent salary schedules and a formal evaluation program providing ample opportunity
for individual advancement are combined with
generous employee benefits and good working
conditions to make employment with the
Northern Electric Company worthy of your
investigation.
• GAMDHIS INTERVIEWS
January 9-13 inclusive
For further information and interview appoint'
ment, please contact your Placement Officer.
Northern Ehe trie
C6M PA NY     LIMITED
-tl
6660.9
UNITED AIR IMS
Accepting applications for stewardesses to be trained
in Spring and Summer classes.
QUALIFICATIONS:
Single
Age 20 through 26
Height 5'2" to 5'8"
Weight in proportion
High School  graduate
Some university preferred
Must be personable, attractive, capable of dealing with the
public. Some public contact work experierice beneficial
INTERVIEWER ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS AT GEORGIA
HOTEL FROM  11:00 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M.
No Appointment necessary
National Employment Service
N
E
S
GEARED TO CANADA'S EMPLOYMENT
NEEDS OFFERING THE GRADUATE A
BROAD EMPLOYMENT PICTURE IN
THE FIELD OF HIS CHOICE.
OVER 200 AFFILIATED OFFICES FROM
COAST TO COAST. Thursday, November 17, 1960
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Intellectual Stunters
Gain Many Members
A barrage of garbage and laughter hailed the campus
appearance of the Intellectual Stunt Committee Tuesday noon.
— Two   Hundred   students  came
2 Chosen for
McGill Talks
Jim Meekison and Michael
Clague have been selected to
represent UBC at the McGill
Conference on World Affairs,
Nov. 21-24.
Meekison is Chairman of
Frosh Orientation and a former
Council member and Clague is a
third year  Arts student.
Taking parts in the debates
and discussions on this year's
topic, "Democracy in a Changing World: A Study of North
American Society," will be
more than 100 delegates and
observers from 40 Canadian and
American universities.
Speakers at the conference
will be Professor Fred Watkins,
former head of the Political
Science Department at Yale University and author of "Political
Tradition of the West," Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, Associate Director of the Harvard Centre of
International Affairs, author of
"Nuclear Weapons and Foreign
Policy" and Professor Max Ler-
ner, columnist for the New York
Post.
Conference plans also include
a panel discussion featuring
leading figures in the field of
French-Canadian politics.
to the first general meeting to
see and hear what constituted
this   new  campus  organization.
Topics of the speakers ranged
from the more practical "Aims
and Purposes of ISC," to "ISC
Through the Ages," and "ISC as
a Force for World Peace."
Speaker Stu Robson pointed
out ISC's effect through the
ages, from the burning of Rome,
done by ISC member Nero,
right up to the discovery of
America toy Columbus, who it
is purported used an ISC map
to get  to  India.
Although the beginning of the
meeting showed considerable
disorganization, the speakers did
manage to get across the purpose of ISC.
1. To  dispel   student   apathy.
2. To do the above through
well-planned, humorous, un-
offensive stunts.
3. To have a "helluva" good
time.
Sex segregation at the meeting was partially enforced but
the one-leg speaking rule was
soon abandoned.
Members of the organizing
committee were somewhat apprehensive about the reception
ISC would meet at its first serious public appearance.
Over 100 students indicated
they wished to join the club.
Fellowships Open
To U.B.C. Theologs
A University  committee will interview  students desiring
nomination for Rockefeller Brothers Theological Fellowships
J'riday afternoon, November 25.
chanan 2276 between November
('relit:  A. Tanner.
ISC    SPEAKER    ERIC    RICKER
made students "flush" with
excitement during his address, "Aims and Procedures
of ISC." Eric laterally
"bowled" them over.
Engineers Cover   Dry Cleaning Bill
Jim Meekison's clothes will
be cleaned courtesy of the Engineers.
Council   ruled that   the  EUS
pay Meekison $4.50 to cover the
cost of having his clothes cleaned after the Engineer's prank of
October 26.
Dickenson Speaks
On Rocket Engines
L.A. Dickinson of the Canadian Armament Research Development Establishment, will be
talking to chemistry students
and other interested people
Friday on "Rocket Engine Development in Canada."
Mr. Dickinson will be speaking
in Chemistry 250 at noon. He
is coming all the way from Quebec for this speech and is sponsored by the Chemical Institute
of Canada.
CIC is composed of Chemists
and Chemical Engineers both in
industry  and  college.
There are two chapters of CIC
on Campus. They are the Chemistry Club and the Engineering
Club and because of their affiliation with the national organization they are not included in
AMS.
Next week Dr. Griffiths of
the Physics Dept. will speak on
"Nuclear Sunshine."
18 and November 25.
The fellowships are intended
for students who will attend any
of the acredited theological colleges of the protestant American
Association of Theological
Schools.
The Rockefeller program offers more than 60 fellowships
each year, covering expenses for
room, board, fees, books, and
some   spending.
TAKE IT TO
SPOTLESS
ELVI RA'S
Palma de Mallorca
Special selection in
IMPORTED GIFTS
from Spain, French Morroco,
Italy, etc.
ful"And for the man who has
everything" there are colorful leather wine bags with
real bull-horn stoppers . . .
guaranteed to keep the wine
al its fragrant best for SO yrs.
4479 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-0848
EUROPEAN TRAINED
BARBERS
Individually Styled Haircuts
UPPER TENTH
BARBER & TOILETTRIES
4574 W. 10th
CorNette
Beauty Salon
Now Joined Our Staff
"MISS   BARBARA"
World Travelled Beauty
Consultant
We also specialize in:
• Advanced  Styling
• Tinting
• Permanents
• Eyebrow Arching
• Razor-cutting for
difficult fine hair.
A Student Favorite
PEWTER  TANKARDS
from England
"GLASS BOTTOM" ,  $4.95
Hammered  ; $5.59
Other Styles to $10.00
Catering to Student Taste
at Student Prices
POTTER'S
695 GRANVILLE ST
FORTUNE MAGAZINE CALLS US...   "the  most  hellishly  modern
old   fashioned   company   in  the   world!"
... AUD THEY'RE mm!
We believe in the old fashioned virtues that pioneered a
sprawling trading empire across Canada. Virtues such
as dependability . . . determination . . . integrity . . . and
the spirit of adventure.
We are looking for aggressive young men . . . willing to
accept a challenge . . . men who will fit into a
progressive management team.
If YOU are willing to accept a challenge, then join a
modern company as a Junior Executive in Retail
Merchandising.
YOU'LL FIND WE'RE MODERN IN GIVING YOU
• continuous and rapid advancement opportunities
• a good starting sglary
• interesting and challenging work
• formal management training
Come and discuss the many fields open to Graduates
this year. YOU can have a brilliant future with the
Hudson's Bay Company!
Call Your Personnel Office on Campus Today!
INCORPORATED   2??    MAY   1670. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 17,  1960
'TWEEN  CLASSES
Boost Boosters Ball
BOOSTER  CLUB
General party tickets in club
room until tomorrow noon—25
cents each.
* *  *
AQUA SOC
Special meeting today in Bu.
217 at noon.
* *  *
PHYSICS SOC
Lecture changed to'Rm. 302,
Phys. Bldg. this noon.
* *  *
'BIRD BOOSTER CLUB
Dance Saturday, 8:30-12:00 in
dance club room. Tickets at office and all welcome.
* *  *
UBC RADIO
Radio  exam  at noon in  Bu.
212.
* * *
FILM SOC
"Death of a Salesman," Tues.,
November 22.
* * *
PRE MED SOC
Field trip to Oakalla Prison
Farm Saturday afternoon. Bus
tickets on sale in Brock 166 at
noon hours.
* *  *
CCF CLUB
Film on life of Ghandi tomorrow noon, Bu.   102.
* *  *
BACTERIOLOGY  SOC
Dr. Campbell talks in Wes.
100 tomorrow noon on "Openings in Industrial Bacteriology."
* *  *
JAZZ SOC
Concert tomorrow noon in Bu.
104. S. Perry, R. Grierson, T.
Hill. Non-members 25c
Debate  Explodes
(continued from page 1)
under the desert boots of the
olive and' gpk|: lelgions of the
riouveau riehe," he stated, but
added that there was "no point
of exclusion in a democracy of
morons." H
Final speaker Lorenne Gordon
raised the prostitution question,
as has been already noted. She
also said} that the only possible
purpose oi Greek societies, in
her opinion "a gay and frivolous life," was useless when it
was only for the few on a "pay-
as-you-go plan."
The audienee voted in fayor of
the resolution, but at 4 p.m., the
argument was still being carried
«a by proponents of both sides.
Resolutions
(continued from page 1)
cial  edition  informing  students
Of  the life  and   administration
of the university be distributed
to same.
(e) Resolved that Totem be
made more representative of
that year with emphasis on
specific events of that year.
(f) Resolved that a Co-ordinating Committee of Publications
and Communications be investigated.
A motion for the discontinuation of Pique and Raven was
defeated.
"Pull   My   Daisy"
Like . . . pull my daisy, man.
Want to find out what the
'beats' are all about? Today at
noon, Bu. 106, Cinema 16 presents its first beat film, "Pull
My Daisy."
'Daisy is based on an unpublished play by Kerouac and stars
Allen (Howl) Ginsberg,, Gregory
Corso and Kerouac himself, who
narrates extemporaneously.
] Admission is by membership
pass or fifty cants.
SCM
Discussion    L-5    on    "Racial
Tension in S. Africa."
*  *  *
VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
R. Page speaks on "Dynamic
of Christianity" at noon tomorrow in Bu. 106.
* *     *
CARIBBEAN STUDENT ASSN.
Discussion  at   meeting   today
on "Immediate Abolition of Colonialism."
LSA *  *  *
"Martin Luther"  will not be
shown today.
* *  *
GERMAN CLUB
Free film on Barlach's sculpture, newsreel. Tomorrow noon
in Bu. 204.
* *  *
CIC
Illustrated talk by L.A. Dickinson on "Rocket Engine Development in Canada," at noon tomorrow in Chem. 250.
* *  *
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
Dr. Divinsky lectures on "The
Philosophical Implications of
Chess," Monday noon in Bu.
225. *  *  *
NISEI VARSITY
Dr. S. Lyman speaks on "A
Venture into the Japanese Family Structure," tomorrow noon
in Bu. 205.
CLASSIFIED
Dr. Mathur
For Indian
Democracy
The Indian Trade Commissioner to Vancouver, Dr. Mathur,
stressed that India will rely on
democratic methods ahd persuasion to further her aims, in
a panel discussion sponsored by
the Commonwealth Club noon
Tuesday.
Speaking on "The Future of
Democracy in India," Dr. Mathur said that although there
is a considerable inequality in
the distribution of income, and
much unemployment, the Indian government's approach of
democratism is gradually raising the general standard of living.
Parkash Mahant, president of
UN Club, speaking for the opposition, said, "The people have
given Nehru the same blind
obedience that they gave Ghandi. As long as he lives, the Communist Party will retain its
hold."
A thesis of dictatorship for
perhaps twenty years was advocated by Kevin Jones, UBC
Law student. He saw this as
the only way to move India
out   of  its   extreme   backward-
"THE FLIES"
Players Club Will present
their fall play, Nov. 17, 18, and
19,  in the Auditorium.
"This year we are presenting 'The Flies,' a play written
by the brilliant French existentialist, Jean-Paul Sartre. It is
a creation patterned after the
ancient'Greek Drama, and is a
real audience terrifier," said
Barney Baker, PRO for the
Players Club.
"Tickets have been selling
well downtown,"  said Baker.
Student tickets selling for 50
cents, can be bought at Modern
Music, and will be on sale in
the AMS office, 11:30-1:30,
Thursday through Saturday this
week.
ONE furnished room with view
and kitchen facilities for girl.
Ride to classes. Phone CA
4-4948.
LOST—Light grey car coat from
outside Phys. 205 Thursday
afternoon. One left hand glove
in pocket. Please phone Chris
Lok at AM 6-0581.
FOR RENT—Large cabin on Mt.
Seymour. Sleeps 10. AM
1-6026.
LOST—One gold and pearl
broach in the shape of a
sword. Sentimental value. Call
Al at RE 3-8280.
KINDLY return "Barracuda"
raincoat taken from Chem.
Bldg. on Thursday Nov. 10.
Contact H. Schemitsch, St.
Mark's College. Phone CA
9-9944.
FOR SALE—White tube ice
skates, size 9, like new, for
$10. Phone RE 6-9428.
FOR SALE—'55 Volkswagen,
new engine, mechanically A-l
condition, full price, $800.
Phone Dave, at WH 6-3013
(Ladrier).
STILL available—good student
accommodation for two or
three girls or boys, private
washroom and kitcheen, spacious bright rooms, $35 each.
Call Mrs. Buhler, CA 4-0687.
FOUND—One lady's wrist watch
at southern door of library.
Phone CA 4-9540, 6-9 p.m.
HAVE car—will travel. Homeward bound to San Francisco
December 21st. Wish 2 or 3
passengers to share expenses.
Returning by Jan. 3rd. Phone
Joan, RE 3-7744.
GIRLS—Do you like engineers?
Would you like an intelligent
handsome ahd (the impossible)
civilized one? Then, write to
one in Sofia, Bulgaria (Soy
phoqing Mitch, CA 4-9049).
WOULD the person who took
the wrong overcoat from P20G
during the 2:30 lecture on
Monday, Nov. 7, please phone
RE  3-8958.
SET of 20 American People's
Ecyclopedia ahd coffee table
book case. $150 or best offer.
Call Mrs. Stark, MU 1-9000.
WOULD  the person who  took.
a navy aquaseutum raincoat.for
their navy Croydon, please
see Ian McDonald, Totem office, basement, Brock Extension.
Room for male student (s).
Ind. priv. bathroom, laundry,
ironing, free garage, single
$45, double $60 per mo. Dunbar and 41st. Phone: AM 6-
5514.
Countrymen!
Your Friends   Will* Meet
For Coffee, Steaks
and Other Treats
at
Deans
4544 W. 10th
Open until 11:30
U RTP
A limited number of vacancies are available in the
University Reserve Training
Plan to First Year Applied
Science students
For   further   information
about    pay,    commission
and   employment   contact
F/L J. BINCH
The RCAF Support Officer
at the UBC Armouries
Photographs
for Christmas
To the discriminating student who knows and appreciates fine photography, we are pleased to
offer our personally created, expertly finished portraits at special student
prices.
Phone for an appointment
RE 1-8314
Atlas Studios
Photographers
3189 WEST BROADWAY
Vancouver 8, B.C.
THIS SUNDAY AT 8:30
Hollywood Theatre
3123 WEST BROADWAY
Cannes Film Festival Award Winner
"THE CRANES ARE FLYING"
(Russia 1954,  English subtitles)
Tickets $1.00: from HK Books, 750 Robson
Owl Books, 4560 W. 10th or
admission by "donation" at the door.
The student well equipped t
avoid economic trauma carries
a case-history note-book entitled
"Bank of Montreal, Savings Department" JJ
and sees to the making of
regular entries therein.
2 miiim axADiw
Bank of Montreal
gonadal "P&i4t S<uc4 fan St«de*tt&
Your Campus branch in the Administration Building
MERLE C KERBY, MANAGER

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