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The Ubyssey Mar 18, 1920

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume II.
VANCOUVER, B. C, MARCH 18, 1920
Number 21
FIRST TRACK MEET HELD
AT BROCKTON POINT
WEATHER UNABLE TO DAMP
SUCCESS OF FIELD DAY
In spite of the showery weather,
'Varsity's first annual track meet was an
entire success. The heavy going prevented any records being made, but the
competition in most of the events was
keen. Of the field events, the high jump
called forth the greatest efforts. "Cy"
McLane took first place in the senior
and then overcame Wallace's stiff opposition in the junior jump. On the
track, Dave Wilson won first in the
senior sprints, while in the junior Weir
made great time. Weld and Palmer
earned blue ribbons in the senior 440
and 880, while H. O. Arkley took the
junior, besides winning the mile hands
down.
Three or four hundred people braved
the rain to see the first meet U.B.C. has
ever held. The events were run off on
schedule time, and right here is where
Dr. J. G. Davidson played such a large
part in making the meet a success. It
was largely due to his energy, assisted
by Jimmy Mitchell's megaphone, that
the contestants were hustled to their
places on time.
One of the most interesting and
closely contested events of the day was
the half-mile inter-class relay. Each
team had been carefully chosen and
represented the best material in the
respective years, Arts '20, '21 and '23.
After the pistol shot, and for the first
half lap, the three men ran neck-and-
neck; then Smith put on a bit of speed
and gained a substantial lead for '21.
This was lost in the second lap, when
Melville Saunders, '23, finished even
with Milley. In the third lap, Joe
Schell's ability as a sprinter was shown
in the way he regained the lead first set
up by Smith. This advantage saved the
day for '21; Wallace, the last man for
'23, put forth his best efforts to catch
Fisher, but the twenty-foot lead was too
much, and Arts '21 finished first, with
lots to spare.
The marathon was won by Cassidy, of
'23, with J. O. Wilson second and
"Chub" Arnott third. Wilson was leading when he reached the gate, but turned
the wrong way and lost his place. By a
good sprint he managed to come second,
but could not gain much on Cassidy.
The Freshmen made a clean-up, carrying off most of the events, with a total
of 75 points to 44 points of the other
years combined, besides taking both
junior and senior championships. J. M.
Wolverton won the senior championship
with 8 points as against his nearest
rival, Dave Wilson, who has 7 points.
The junior championship was not decided until Tuesday noon, when the
pole vault was held on K.E.H.S. campus.
By winning this event, F. M. Wallace,
'23, carried off the junior honors with 11
points, as against 10 for "Cy" McLane
and 9 for H. O. Arkley. Wallace was
given the Track Club medal for the best
all-round performance. The winners of
the championships are entitled to wear
the small block letters for inter-class
athletics.
Special credit for the success of the
meet must be given to the executive, E.
Solloway '21, W. R. Smith '21 and H.
W. McLean '21; to the committee, Allen
Buchanan '23 and Cliffe Mathers Sc. '23;
and to Dr. J. G. Davidson, who kept the
events moving swiftly, and who put so
much energy into the arrangements and
the carrying out of the plans.
Mr. Elliot acted as starter. The timekeepers were Dr. McDonald and Mr.
West, from O. B. Allan's. The judges,
Dr. Boggs, Dr. Sedgewick, Dean Brock,
Mr. Ridington and Willson Coates. Art.
Lord acted as marshal, and Jimmy
Mitchell handled the megaphone.
120 Yards Hurdles—First, H. Ross '22;
second, L. McLennan '22; third, C. Mathers Sc. '23.    Time, 19 1-5 seconds.
Shot-Put (Open)—First, J. M. Wolverton '23; second, C. Mathers Sc. '23;
third, O. H. Rae Sc. '23. Distance, 38
ft. 8 in.
100 Yards, Senior—First, D. Wilson
'23; second, L. J. Fisher '21; third, H.
Ross '22.    Time, 11 1-5 seconds.
100 Yards, Junior—First. C. Weir '23;
second, F. M. Wallace '23; third, C.
Goldstein '21.    Time, 11 2-5 seconds.
High Jump. Senior—First, P. McLane
'23; second, J. M. Wolverton '23; third,
W. Rebbeck Sc. '20.    Height, 5 ft. 1 in.
220 Yards, Junior—First, C. Weir '23;
second, F. M. Wallace '23; third, H. C.
McCallum Ag. '23.    Time, 25 seconds.
220 Yards, Senior—First, D. Wilson
'23; second, L. J. Fisher '21; third, A. M.
Russell '21; H. Ross '22. Time, 25 2-5
seconds.
High Jump, Junior—First, P. McLane
(Continued on Page 2)
U.B.C. Debaters
Are Victorious
WASHINGTON DEFEATED  IN
INTERNATIONAL
DEBATE
After three successive defeats in the
field of international debating, U. B. C.
turned the tables last Friday night by
easily overcoming the team sent up from
the University of Washington to discuss
the Shantung question. University Hall
was well filled, and the audience showed
its interest by close attention to the
speakers, and perhaps a trifle too much
enthusiasm. It is worth while considering whether applause ought not to be
restrained until the conclusion of a
speech, especially in cases where the inevitable bias of the audience unconsciously confines the expressions of appreciation to the points of one side only.
Such was the case on Friday.
But, to be sure, our own speakers
provided most of the occasion for these
outbursts. They most decidedly had the
advantages of the visitors on matter.
On the other hand, while Peardon's rebuttal was as good a bit of debating as
has been heard this year, still, taken on
the whole, the Americans were the more
forceful and convincing speakers. The
training south of the line seems to give
their speakers a confident bearing and
vigorous, direct manner, which contrasts
favorably with the rather hesitant attitude of our own debaters.
For the benefit of those of us who
were not very sure whether Shantung
was a Balkan state, or one of the newer
types of imagist dancing, T. F. Peardon,
opening the debate, explained that it was
the intention of the affirmative to prove
that the Peace Conference, in disposing
of certain rights in this Chinese province, previously possessed by Germany,
should have restored them to China,
rather than have given them to Japan.
Past history has proven, declared Peardon, that China is justified in reclaiming
these rights, and that they would be advantageous to her. In the possession of
imperialistic Japan, they threatened not
only the commercial security, but the
sovereign independence of China, as well
as the commercial interests of the Western powers; finally, that it was in
Japan's own interest to give up her militant ambition of an all-Asia Empire.
(Continued on Page 5),
Don't Miss the Debate with Alberta on Saturday ! THE   UBYSSEY
March 18, 1920
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VANCOUVER, B. C.
Thos. H. Foiter G. N. Jarman Fred Foster
'Varsity strengthened its position as
leader, in. the. Wednesday. Afternoon
League by defeating the R.C.M. Police
4-2.
The first goal was due to an error on
the part of the R.C.M.P. defence, but
the remaining three goals were obtained
only after much effort. The work of
Cameron, our tricky outside right, was
such as to arouse enthusiastic cheers
even from the opposing rooters when,
single-handed, he dribbled the ball from
centre-field, evaded the opposing defence and scored the second goal for
'Varsity. The other two goals were
scored bv Jackson by aggressive working.
The left wing missed the services of
McLeod; but 'Varsity's stonewall defence made good the loss. Crute more
than ever demonstrated his reliable
ability. He was ably backed by Baker
and Wolverton.
The Wednesday Afternoon League
standing is as follows:
5 5
o ■$■
'Varsity          5 3
Firemen        4 2
Spencer's         4 1
Ladner        3 0
R.C.M.P     4 0
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FIRST TRACK MEET
(Continued from Page 1)
'23; second, F. M. Wallace '23; third, C.
Weir '23.    Height, 5 ft.
440 Yards, Junior—First, H. O. Arkley '23; second, H. C. McCallum Ag. 23;
third, C. Goldstein '21. Time, 57 2-5
seconds.
440 Yards, Senior—First, J. N. Weld
'20; second, A. M. Russell '21; third, D.
Wilson '23.    Time, 57 2-5 seconds.
Broad Jump, Junior—First, P. McLane '23; second, F. M. Wallace '23;
third, H. C. McCallum Ag. 523. Distance, 17 ft. 8 in.
Broad Jump, Senior—First, J. M. Wolverton '23; second, L. McLennan '22;
third, H. Ross '22.    Distance, 18 ft. 3 in.
880 Yards, Junior—First, H. O. Arkley '23; second, J. Mitchell '23; third, P.
McLane '23.    Time, 2 min. 32 2-5 sec.
880 Yards, Senior—First, R. Palmer
Ag. '21; second, D. Siddons '20; third,
M. Saunders '23. Time, 2 min. 22 2-5
sec.
Marathon—First, H. Cassidy '23; second, J. O. Wilson '23; third, "Chub"
Arnott '23.    Time, 16 min. 48 sec.
One Mile (Open)—First, H. O. Arkley '23; second, J. N. Weld '20; third, A.
N. Russell '21.    Time, 5 min. 15 2-5 sec.
One-half Mile Inter-Class Relay—
First, Arts '21 team (W. R. Smith, C. E.
Milley, J. M. Schell, L. J. Fisher); second, Arts '23 team (A. Buchanan, G. W.
Rowley, M. Saunders, F. M. Wallace);
third, Arts '20 team (D. Siddons, J. N.
Weld, W. H. Coates, H. L. Keenleyside).    Time, 1 min. 48 sec.
Pole Vault (Open)—First, F. M. Wallace '23; second, C. Weir '23; third, N.
T. Grimmett '22.   Height, 7 ft. 9 in.
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Etc., etc.
BOYS!    Give us a call before you
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Phone, Seymour 189 March 18, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
ARTS TIME TABLE
Sessional Examinations, April, 1920
First Year
Second  Year
Third and Fourth  Years
ft a.m.      Greek 1   English 3.
Tuesday, April  13   Heg's Greek...	
  ? r>.m.        English   1     fG^nln^v  4
Economics 3, tGeology 3,
English 22.
Enerlish  17.
9 a.m.       Algebra 1  Algebra 2 (p).
Wednesday,  April  14.
^ 2 p.m.     tGeology 1    ...fG^olngv 1
1) n.m.       Chemistry  1 ....
Tnursday, April  15	
 2 p.m.       Katin 1   (An.)..
n a.m.
Friday, April  16	
2 p.m.
English  9.
Mathematics 3 (Calculus'*.
Chemistry 6, Economics 6.
Chemisiry  1        Chemistry 7,  tGeoIogy 6.
Chemistry 2      Latin 4.
Latin  2 (Au.)  Latin  3,  Chemistry  4.
History 1    History 2	
Phil.   1 (Logic)
French 4.
Physics 4.
English 13.
9 a.m.
Saturday, Anril 17
2 p.m.
French  1    French 2. 	
Spanish (a) and (b).
.. Frencn 3.
Spanish  (a) and (b),
♦Zoology 21   (b).
J) a.m.
Monday. April  19	
2 p.m.
Trigonometry 1
Latin  1   (Vr.)	
Phil.  1 (Psych.)..
haMn 2 ( Pr.)	
tGeology 2.
Biology 4.
T4istorv   3,   History  6.
tGeology 8.
9 a.m.
Tuesday, Apnl  20.
2 p.m.
English  5,  English  10.
English 2    English  4.	
Potany 10 (a)	
Zoology (21 (a)    ^otanv 10 (a)..._     Potany 10 (a),
Zoologv 21 (a)     Zoology 21 (a)
Greek   2 (Au.)      ....     Physics 3.
9 a.m.       Physics 1 .
Wednesday,  April  21.
2 p.m.
Physics 2. _	
Greek  2 (Pr.)
9 a.m.
Thursday, April 22	
2 ri.m.
9 a.m.      German 1	
Friday,  April  23	
2 p.m.       Peg's German..
Economics 1...
English  3 (d).
Economics 2,  History 5.
Chemistry 3.  Greek  4.
Economics 4.
History 4.  Chemistry 5.
Phil.  1 (d)	
Algebra 2 <d)..
(11 a.m.)
"is tor v 7.  Zooloerv 24.
•Hotany 10 (b), Phil.  3.
Cerman 4,  English  21.
Phil.  4.
Maths.   3   (Anal.  Geom.).
Saturday, Apr;l  24..
2 p.m.
English   14.
A dvanc^d  Mai hematics  to  he arra nged  later.    A I so   Pact eriology.
tEvaminations  to he  held   in  Geol.   laboratory.
♦Examinations   to  be  held  in   Biology Laboratory.
All  ot^^r examinations will  be held   in  the Arts   Building   according   to   the   seating   plan,
which   will   be   posted   shortly.
APPLIED SCIENCE TIME TABLE
Sessional Examinations, April, 1920
First  Year
Second   Year
Third   Year
Fourth Year
9 a.m.
Tue., Ap. 13...
2 n.m.
Drawing 	
...   Meo'l  Engineering
l.t^cdngy 3	
M^c'l Entrineorinir 2
Electrical
Engineering.
9 a.m.
Wed.. Ap. 14.
2 n.m.
Algebra 	
... Metallurgy   1	
Mec'l   Engineering  ?i
Metallurgy 2.
Chemisiry 6.
9 a.m.
Thur., Ap. 15.
2 p.m.
Chemistry 1 ....
....  Chemistry 2	
Chemistry 4	
..   Chemistry 7	
Chemistry 2	
Chemistry 2	
(A. S.)
... Chemistry 4	
Chemistry 7.
9 a.m.
Fri., >p. 16
2 p.m.
9 a.m.
Sat., Ap. 17....
2 p.m.
1 tescriptive
Geome
Shop-work 1	
Gen'l   Engineering
ry
Mechanics 2 ...
. .. Shop-work 2	
1   Gen'l   Engineering 2.
... Mec'l  Engineering 4
... Mine  Surveying	
Mechanical
Engineering 4.
Geology 7.
Hydraulics,
tGeology 8.
9 a.m.
Mon., Ap. 19-
2 p.m.
Trigonometry	
... tGeology 2 	
Surveying 1	
...tGeology 2 	
Structural
.... Engineering	
9 a.m.
Tue., Ap. 20...
2 p.m.
Advanced Heat
Structural
Engineering 1
Minim- 1	
r* a i 1 wa y
Mining .
Designing and
Draughting.
9 a.m.
Wed., Ap. 21.
2 p.m.
Ore   Dressing	
. Chemistry 3	
Ore  Dressing.
Chemistry 9.
9 a.m.
Thur., Ap. 22
2 p.m.
Electricity and
Chemistry 5.
Chemistry 5.
(Ap. Sc.)
Chemistry 5.	
C» em is try 5 	
(Ap. SO
9 a.m.
Fri., Ap. 23
2 p.m.
German _
9 a.m.
Sat., Ap. 24
2 p.m.
Bacteriology to be arranged
fExaminations to be held in
later.
Geology Laboratory.
If there are any subjects
in which you need special
coaching, try the new
SPROTTSHAW
ACADEMIC
DEPARTMENT
All our teachers are highly
qualified
Special  Evening  Classes
This   department,   as   well   as   our
Business   Department,   bears   that
well-known
SprottShaw Stamp**QuaIity
R. J. SPROTT, B.A., Mgr.
Phone, Sey. 1810
1 0% off to Returned Men
E. C. KILBY
"Good Goods"
The Hosiery Specialist
628    GRANVILLE    STREET
Vancouver, B. C.
TO-DAY AND
TO-MORROW
You may not think it necessary
to save to-day, when you are
young and things are going well
with you. How about to morrow?
Life is not all sunshine, and you
should prepare for a rainy day by
opening an account in our Savings
Department.
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
CONTINUED   ON   PAGE   8
Remember to sign your letters to the
Correspondence Column if you want
them published. THE   UBYSSEY
March 18, 1920
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Issued every  Thursday  by  the   Publications   Hoard
of  the   University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural subscriptions, $3.00 per session.
For  advertising rates,  apply  Advertising  Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief A.   A.   Webster
Senior   Editor Patricia   H.   Smith
( Lillian  Cowdell
Associate  Editors <  A.   H.   Imlah
(c.  D.  Taylor
Chief  Reporter A.   Evan   Boss
Exchange   Editor G.   G.   Coope
BUSINESS STAFF:
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Circulation   Manager A.    Crawford
Editor for the Week Miss L.  Cowdell
ADVERTISING OUR ALMA MATER
Examinations1 are but three weeks
distant. The session of 1919-30 is nearly
over, and U.B.C. seems no nearer Point
Grey than it was last September. Our
hopes have been raised many times this
term by the inspections to which our
accommodations have been subjected by
various committees and civic bodies.
However, no definite action has yet been
taken by the Provincial Government.
Whether we like it or no, we have to
face the certainty of commencing the
session of 1930-21. with a fresh influx of
Freshies, in the old cramped quarters.
We have an intense desire to 'waken
up our Legislature. We could best serve
U.B.C. by "'wakening up" the communities which the members of the Legislature represent. Here is an opportunity
for out-of-town students. Vancouver, at
any rate, is fairly well aware of the
needs of the Provincial University; but
possibly the smaller centres may not yet
realize that U.B.C. is a provincial University, whose needs should receive provincial attention; and that it is no longer
a Vancouver, or, at best, a lower mainland institution. Out-of-town students,
advertise your Alma Mater! Make your
community aware of U.B.C.'9 needs. Let
your "folks at home" know what an
asset British Columbia has in its University, and what a greater asset it might
have were that University given the consideration that is its due.
Dr. Eastman has received the following telegram from Sir George Foster,
acting Premier of Canada, in answer to
one sent by the University Service
Club, endorsing the request of the returned soldier students:
"I have to acknowledge receipt of
your telegram of the 35th with reference
to Government assistance to returned
soldier students, and will be glad to give
the matter my most careful consideration."
It is encouraging to see that the influence of this new club is already being
•felt, and that what they are doing for
our returned students is likely to be
effective both in the establishment of
the scholarship and in obtaining Federal
aid.
EX CATHEDRA
Allan   Russell   advocates  a   pneumatic
suit for high-jump contestants.
Was it Doc. Sedgewick's cigar that
made Art. Lord late for French on Monday?
In answering hymns at the Mission
Study Class last Sunday, why did Jimmy
Mitchell say, "1 by Arts '23"?
Why do the  Freshmen call Buck Buchanan "the father of them all"?
Art. Lord, aided by the rain, kept the
crowd off the field.
"How dry I am!" sang the judges, as
the rain ran down their hats and up
their sleeves.
All correspondence must be written
legibly, on one side of the paper only, and
may be signed by a pen-name,- but must
be accompanied by name and class of the
writer. Letters must not exceed 400 words
in length.
Editor  "Ubyssey."
Dear Sir: May I, through your columns,
commend the action recently taken by the
Students' Council re pins for the intercollegiate debaters? The Men's Literary
Executive should certainly realize that students who take part in a debate against
another university are representing IJ.B.C,
and not the Men's Literary Society. That
the arrangements for these debates are supervised by the society is an accident arising from the chaotic conditions under which
our University was laboring when intercollegiate debating was first started here. I
would suggest that the executive of the
society go over their amended constitution
and re-word it, to make it express the spirit
which prompted the Council to refuse the
request made regarding the pins. The constitution should not read, debaters "representing this  society."
The defeats which U. B. C. has recently
sustained on the debating platform should
cause our Literary executives to do some
good hard thinking. That these defeats were
due to inferior ability on the part of our
representatives we do not believe. The fault
must lie in the training. May I, then, put
into words an idea, which is not original
with myself, but which has been suggested
by a number of graduates and undergraduates? In the absence of a department of
Public Speaking, and in. view of the fact
that several members of our Faculty have
enviable records as debaters, would it not be
advisable to form a Board, comprised of,
say, three members of Faculty and three
members of the student body, and give to
this Board complete control in intercollegiate debating? Three Faculty members
could undoubtedly be found who would
sacrifice a portion of their well-earned rest
to help select and train the various teams,
and certainly the result would be beneficial.
Under this system we would have co-ordination in control and not divided authority as
this year; training of debaters would be
assumed and not left to individual sporadic
endeavors.
Sincerely yours,
HUGH Ij. KEENLEYSIDE. March 18, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
U.A.P. NEWS DESPATCH FROM
ALBERTA
J. R. Davidson, Correspondent
University of Alberta: The 'Varsity
ladies' team captured the ladies' city
hockey championship when they easily
defeated the Edmonton Monarchs 3-0.
Although onlv a poor crowd turned out
to see the team perform, the University
girls had no difficulty in disposing of
their Edmontonian opponents. The
'Varsity team were considerably stronger than when they fell before Saskatchewan.
Calgary, March 6.—The Calgary Regents kept up their winning streak when
they disposed of the Alberta ladies'
hockey team to the tune of two to
nothing. The game was very fast and
was in doubt during the entire space of
the game. Though the Alberta girls
played a very good game, the Calgarians
were able to show their superiority.
University of Alberta: The present
staff of "The Gateway" are out on the
warpath to establish "The Gateway" as
a tri-weekly paper, and are meeting
considerable opposition from various
sources. The question will be finally decided in about two weeks when the question comes up before the Students'
Union—the  students'  parliament.
University of Alberta: One of the
best social affairs ever held at the University took place last Saturday night,
when the Junior and Senior girls entertained their friends at a leap year dance.
This is the first time that such an affair
has been held at Alberta, and things
went off with a great swing.
University of Alberta: The last
edition of "The Gateway" is published
this week.
University of Alberta: The Meds. are
having their annual Med. night this
week, when they present a great programme to the rest of the University.
The Meds. are the only faculty at Alberta that try to have such an affair.
INTERNATIONAL DEBATE
(Continued from Page 1)
E. L. Blaine, the first speaker of the
negative, based his argument on two
main points-—first, that Japan possessed
these rights by agreement entered into
by China, without Japanese compulsion,
and that the Peace Conference had simply refused to release China from this
voluntary contract; secondly, that this
decision was necessary for the preservation of the League of Nations.
A. E. Richards, supporting the affirmative, claimed that avowed principles of
the League of Nations had been violated
by the decision in question: principles of
the vindication of national rights, protection of weaker nations, and self-
determination. Richards spoke rather
too rapidly and with apparent nervousness in his first five minutes, but later
regained confidence and brought home
several telling points.
E. J. Hoover, the second Washington
speaker, has an agreeable conversational
manner. He stated that China was herself incapable of exercising these rights,
and denied that Japan was seeking, or
could obtain, dominance. But if Japan
were a powerful and ambitious nation,
that was all the more reason why the
Peace Conference should placate her.
The affirmative failed in their rebuttal
to attack this final point, weak and inconsistent as it was.
Prof. J. K. Henry presided, and welcomed the visiting Americans. The
judges were Mr. M. A. Macdonald, K.C,
Mr. D. MacDonald, K.C., and Mr. Frank
Lyons. To a rank outsider, the president of the Lit. Society would seem the
natural man to preside at these meetings, and Mr. Rive appears quite capable
of performing this office, but doubtless
there are good reasons for adopting the
present policy.
PAPER ON LORD DUNSANY
At the home of Mr. R. L. Reid, K.C,
1333 Pacific Street, kindly loaned for the
purpose, the members of the Letters
Club heard an excellent paper on Lord
Dunsany read by Mr. Bernard Pratt, '31,
at their regular fortnightly meeting,
March 9th.
It is no extravagance to say that this
was one of the very best papers that has
been given this session, and its author
is to be congratulated for his painstaking efforts. Mr. Pratt sprinkled his
paper with many well-chosen readings
from "The Gods of the Mountain," "The
Fifty-One Tales," and others of the
writer's works; and went into minute
details, impressing his audience finally
with the many merits of this "Poet of
Dream and Wonder."
At the next meeting of the club, on
March 23rd, Mr. Lacey Fisher will deliver a paper on the Irish poet, who was
killed in the war, Ledwidge.
PLAYERS'  CLUB   IN   ROYAL  CITY
The reception given to "Green Stockings" by New Westminster theatregoers last Thursday evening was equal
to that which this popular comedy received during its three nights' run in
Vancouver. The production marked the
re-opening of the opera house in that
city, which has been taken over by the
Westminster Operatic Society, under
whose auspices the play was produced.
The Players' Club was greeted by a
crowded house, and the progress of the
comedy was frequently interrupted bv
well-deserved applause. The U.B.C.
orchestra supplied the music for the
evening.
Between the first and second acts
Mayor Johnston introduced President
Klinck, who cave a short address on
"New Westminster and the University
of  British  Columbia."
When the nerformers had removed the
"make-up," or part of it, from their
faces, the members of the Players' Club
were entertained at the home of Miss
Janet Gilley, where the orchestra played
during a short dance. After the refreshments many pleadings of "Aw, please,
Mr. Wood, just one more dance," were
heard, when the honorary president of
the club suggested that it was time to
leave. Several members of the Players'
Club were not present at early lectures
on  Friday morning.
The New Spring Models in Footwear
For Young Men and Young Women
are a gathering of the best Shoe Values and the choicest Shoe Styles to be
found anywhere.
We will take the greatest pleasure in showing you the handsome new
creations for the Spring season.
<ike INGLEDEW SHOE CO.
666  GRANVILLE STREET
"VANCOUVER'S    SMARTEST    SHOE    STORE" THE   UBTSSEY
March 18, 1920
T. SCOTT EATON, B.A., Principal
Success Business College
Limited
Corner  Main  Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,   B. C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
CUSICK
SERVES
HOT LUNCHES
692   BROADWAY,  WEST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Bridgman's Studio
AT   YOUR SERVICE
Same Address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
Keystone Covers
Are Handy
•JThere is a size for every use,
with top or side opening.
<|They refill in a moment, are
strong and sturdy, with good
looks ihrown in.
CJInsist °n getting  Keystone
Covers and Sheets.
Smith, Davidson & Wright, Ltd.
Manufacturing  &  Wholesale
Stationers, and Paper Dealers.
Vancouver   and   Victoria,     -     B. C.
R.e.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made. Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
THE COTTRELL APPARATUS
675 GRANVILLE STREET
At the meeting of the Chemistry
Society last Tuesday night, Dr. J. G.
Davidson of the Physics department,
gave a demonstration of the Cottrell
apparatus for the electrical precipitation
of smoke. In order that the meeting
should understand the princiole of the
nrocess, Dr. Davidson explained the
electrical apparatus which he used, and
terms—the commutator and transformer, voltage, potential and current. He
demonstrated the simple experiment of
the pith ball and the electrified sealing-
wax. Particles are first attracted, then
rebelled by an electric charge. The
Tottrell apparatus takes advantage of
tlvs fact to precipitate the floating particles from smoke. The apparatus consists of a pine about twelve inches in
d:ameter; a wire is1 suspended down the
centre of the pipe; this wire is connected
to the negative nole of a direct current
generator; the pipe is connected to the
positive pole; the pipe and wire are insulated from each other, and the circuit
is completed through the air or smoke
•nside the oipe. The current used by
Dr. Davidson in his demonstration was
"nc hundred and ten thousand volts, being steoped up from one hundred and
ten volts in a transformer in the lecture-
room.
The speaker showed the efficiency of
the nrocess by experiment. By passing
air through solutions of ammonia and
hydrochloric acid he made a smoke of
ammonium chloride. He passed this
into the pipe and allowed it to pour out
the top of the stack; then he turned on
the "juice"; almost immediately the
smoke ceased to pour out the top of the
pipe; he pulled out the switch; smoke
appeared again, but stopped as soon as
he  restarted  the  machine.
Tracing the development of the process, Dr. Davidson told of some of its
early successes and failures. It was first
tried out in the Solvay smelter in Quebec, to precipitate sulphuric acid fog; in
this it was completely successful. Such
good fortune did not attend the first attempts to quell the smoke from the big
flues at the same place. But further
work developed means to solve all these
problems. At the Tacoma smelter there
are 1,632 of these treaters installed in
sections of 32, so that any section can
be kept idle for repairs. This installation caught enough material in eight
months to pay for itself. The system
has been successfully used in the cement
works at Riverside, California, where it
has cleaned a million cubic feet a minute for the past ten years, incidentally
providing a source of potassium richer
than the famous German deposits. The
process is also used in the smelting of
mercury and the manufacture of powdered milk.
With the exception of the meeting for
the election of officers, the Chemistry
Society will hold no further meetings
this year.
GRASS HOCKEY
The Women's Grass Hockey Club
have accepted the challenge of the Victoria Ladies' Club to a return match.
The game will be played at the K. E.
H. S. grounds on Saturday next at 12.30.
Art  and  Style  Clothes Shop
Holeproof
Hosiery
SAY,  BOYS!
We don't like to say too much
about the goods we sell, but feel
that we must say a few words
about
Holeproof
Silk and Lisle Socks
They are the best that your money
can buy. All colors, for 75c and
$1.50 pair.
Yours  for real  service,
Ben  Petch
LIMITED
752 Granville Street
(Castle Hotel is next door)
Trob Cut Tlowcrt.     funeral Hlork a Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
florists, nurserymen, Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head Office:
48 HASTINGS STREET, EAST
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Sey. 9513
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For Light  Refreshments
Ice  Cream  and   Candies
at
774 GRANVILLE STREET
U.Morimoto & Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
MAIN STORE:
673   Granville   Street      Phone,  Sey. 6410
BRANCH STORES:
57 Hastings St., W.       Phone, Sey. 2313
932   Granville   St. Phone,   Sey.  8723
VICTORIA BRANCH:
J235   Government   St. Phone 4742 March 18, 1920
THE   UBYSSEY
DEER MERTEL—JOE
Deer Mertel:
Well, Mertel, my hearts broke. I dont
mind that so much but my poket book
is broke to. I was in the eliminashuns
for the trak meat and had a lot of money
bet on myself and wood of won but they
is some fellos in this University witch
is alwase doinp- things witch they think
is smart and think they is the hole
chease. I was standeing round waiteing
for my race and all the girls was looke-
ing at my manely form and talkeing to
themselves. You no what I am, Mertel.
A fello witch is in the counsel, witch is
the government of this University,came
up to me and slapt me on the back and
gave me a segar. They is1 fellos alwase
slappeing me like that, Mertel, including
Messers Coats and Lord. I didnt want
to affend him, Mertel, so I smoked his
segar. When the race came I wasnt feeling well but started to run anyhow. You
no what I am, Mertel. I was ahed of
everybody when I got week and had to
stop rite in front of the hole crowd. I
couldnt see very clear, Mertel, but I
think they was all feeling sorrey for me
because they was all bent over double
and the girls was rubbing their faces
with hankercheefs. I cood of beet the
fello witch one the finals at Brockton
Point.
Ceveral times this yr. I have been
broak but never so bad as now becus
besides haveing no money I owe 45 cts.
to a fello witch he says I better pay soon
or he will confiskate my books whatever that meens and my karere will be
ruined. I have tryed to borrow money
but the fellos onley laff at me and tell
me to rite home and get the old man to
paun the cow. Now I dont no how
much money you have Mertel, but if
sumbody was to send me about $2 I
wood apresiate it. Of corse I wouldnt
think of askeing you or any of your
familey to send me any becus I never
like askeing for help. I am indepen-
dant. You no what I am, Mertel. I
wish I had $2.
They is going to be a gleeful thing
on Fri. nite and I wish you could go. I
asked a bunch of girls but they is al-
reddy going so I gess I will go alone
and think of you. I hope nobody sings
a sad song. Well I hope sumbody sends
me $2 becus when Im disapointed you
no  what  I  am,  Mertel.
JOE.
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers and
Printers
Students' Loose-Leaf Binders
Educational Stationery
School Equipment
Drawing Instruments and  Materials
320 SEYMOUR STREET
(Opposite C. P. R. Depot)
VANCOUVER, B. C.
PHONE. SEYMOUR   78S3
C.  HERMANN, Proprietor
Pvj&m * fes" *****l' i££
U.B.C.  Students Should Patronize
HERMANN'S    BARBER    SHOP
ROGERS   BLOCK, 464  GRANVILLE  STREET
The members of Science '21 forgot
their many troubles for a few hours last
Friday evening when they, with some of
their fair friends, were entertained by
Prof, and Mrs. Matheson at their home.
The Science men went expecting a good
time, and they certainly were not disappointed. Excellent music was provided, and the greater part of the evening was spent in dancing.
Needless to say, Structural Engineering will be a particularly popular subject with  the Juniors  henceforth.
MAKE    OUR    STORE    YOUR
HEADQUARTERS  FOR
LOOSE-LEAF   NOTEBOOKS
AND SUPPLIES
We   specialize   in   fine   Stationery
the Uancouver Stationers Ctd.
683 GRANVILLE STREET
Phone, Seymour 5119
Do not" elis^rocr >«e  •■*■ «»»   -"-r j~,
'    Paroc<ime1'hyl<lmino-a5<H>er>5ene-Pqr*qg"'Ph
okiic   Acid
owaoouTfhie^rpJvBUrtr THE   UBYSSEY
March 18, 1920
AGRICULTURE TIME TABLE
Sessional Examinations, April, 1920
First Year
Second Year
Third Year
Botany 11 (b).
Tuesday, April 13	
2 p.m.
Dairying ?,.
9 a.m.
Wednesday, April 14	
2 p.m.
Algebra 1	
1 >airyin£ 1	
Agricultural  (ieology.
Botany 12 <b).
Thursday, April  15..
9 a.m.       Chemistry  1
Chemistry 2_
2 p.m.
Animal Husbandry 5.
Friday, April 16..
9 a.m.      Animal   Husbandry  1.
2 p.m.
Horticulture 2..
Horticulture 4.
Animal   Husbandry 7.
Saturday, April 17
9 a.m.       French _  French
2 p.m.
"Zoology  (21 b) ...
 *ZooloKy 21 (b).
i) a.m.
Monday, April 19	
2 p.m.
Trigonometry	
Biology 4.
Agronomy ;l.
9 a.m.
Tuesday, April 20
•  2 p.m.
Knglish 2	
   English 4	
Botany 10 (a)	
  Zoology 21 (a).
9 a.m.      Physics 1
Wednesday, April 21	
 2 p.m.
Thursday, April 22..
Chemistry :j.
Kconomics 1.
Friday, April 23
2 p.m.      German
German..
Saturday, April 24..
9 a.m.
2 p.m.
•Examination   to   be   held   in   Biology   Laboratory.
Bacteriology to be arranged later.
HISTORICAL SOCIETY
The annual meeting of the Historical
Society of the University will be held in
Glencoe Lodge during the first week in
April. As nine of the present undergraduate members of the society will
graduate this spring, there will be that
number of vacancies to be filled for next
Studio
ATHENAEUM
319  Pender St. W.
tttlh. ITlarie de hjochc
LATEST BALLROOM   DANCES
For Appointment
Phone between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Seymour 7640
year. Also, according to the constitution, one member of the executive will
be selected from Arts '22. Nominations
for membership will be signed by two
members of the club and voted upon at
the annual meeting. The nine names
receiving the highest number of votes
will become members. The election of
officers will also take place at this meeting.
MISS ANDERSON
Teaches the latest Ballroom
Dances at her home. Small classes
arranged for.
1299 Seventh Avenue, West
Phone, Bayview 3104R
.  COACHING
in French, German and English
Composition,     Literature    and
Conversation.
MISS GREGG, GLENCOE LODGE
Phone. Seymour Q022
M.  PERRIN,  Manager — 20 years with  the leading Hotels of Europe and America
BARRON HOTEL RESTAURANT
A   DIFFERENT  PLACE
Often you hear it said:  "The Barron is different!"
MAYBE it's the quality of the cuisine.    Perhaps it's the superiority of the music.
Again,   it  may   be   the   dance   floor—or  the  atmosphere   that   pervades—or   the
character of the people.
PERHAPS   it   is   all   three—for   the   BARRON   is   different,   and   that   is   why   this
expression has become so respected.
"More than a Restaurant — a Vancouver Institution"
Matinee Luncheon, 11.30 to 2.30
FRENCH DINNER  Every Day, including Sunday
5.30 to 9 p.m.
GRANVILLE AND NELSON STREETS Phone, Seymour 2011
Everything in
Haberdashery
that  will  improve  your  whole  appearance.
Arrow and W. G. & R. Shirts,
Holeproof Hosiery,
Irish Poplin Neckwear,
Tress Caps (English), and
English   Neckwear    that    will    be
sure to please you.
The Store that Handles the
Nice   Stuff
Orpbtum
fiaberdasbers
Orpheum Theatre Building
759   GRANVILLE   STREET
A perfect fit guaranteed.
Where quality counts, we win.
The  "Combination"
CJ A Shoe made two sizes smaller
over inslep, heel and ankle than the
regular size.
CJ This insures that perfecl glove fit
around the inslep and ankle. The
maximum of comfort and sltyle.
Cluff Shoe Co. Ltd.
649    HASTINGS   STREET,    WEST
Opposite  Bank  of  Commerce

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