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The Daily Ubyssey Sep 29, 1948

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 The Daily Ubyssey
VOL. XXXI
VANCOUVER, B.C., WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1948
No. 6
Zooming Costs Scuttle
UBC Building Programs
Board Of Governors Furrow Brows
Over Fund Lack, Tie Up Work
TOUGH WINTER lies ahead for UBC ex-serviceman 'Bill Parker, his pretty wife June and
infant son. Parkers, residents of Acadia Trailer Camp are typical of hundreds of DVA families
feeling pinch of zooming cost of living. Heavy timetable rules out part-time work, cuts off
needed extra income, -Photo  by  Mickey  Jones
Sky High Living Costs Tough
For Typical DVA Household
-«>
LAST   CALL   FOR
COURSE   CHANGE,
TARDY  MUST   PAY
Students are reminded that after
today a fee of $2 will be charged
fo* each change of course.
Each student should make certain that the curses listed n his
registration card are correct. No
credit may be claimed for a course
for which registration has not been
made.
C. B. Wood, Registrar
Gifts To UBC:
Picture Ready
But Stiil No Gym
To Hang It
Although the Memorial Gymnasium isn't quite past the sod-
turning stage, the university has
asquired a picture to hang on its
walls.
A valuable Varsity painting, depicting a World War 1 battle scene
has been presented to UBC by
Dr. Gustav Schilder. The painting
will hang in the foyer of the gym.
A second gift,. a fifty-year old
letter written by Lord Dufferin,
has been given to the university
by W. S. Woods, deputy Minister
of Veteran's Affairs.
The document on immigration
to the Ontario Muskoka region
was an appreciation gift. Mr.
Woods received an honorary UBC
degree last year.
Tough Winter Nears For UBC Married Vets;
No Stretch To $113 Monthly From DVA
How married ex-service students manage their tiny homes in the
face of zooming living costs is a problem of wide interest. Daily Ubyssey
reporter Don Moir chose Bill Parker, with a wife and infant son, as
typical of the hundreds of families in this group. ■■    , ...... ■ ■•
BY DON MOIR
"With prices going up the way they are," said trailer-
camper Mrs. June Parker, "things may be pretty tough this
winter."
Bill Parker, second year Physical Education student, finds
that his $113 a month stipend from DVA and Family Allowance
doesn't stretch very far these days with the cheapest meat at
50c a pound, milk 17c a quart and eggs more than 60c a dozen.
WW*
Toddler   Wolfs   Pablum, Boosts   Costs
Five months old Stephan William Parker wolfing down
some more Pablum added his hearty assent.
Rental of space costs another $5.00, electricity and coal
add a few more, not to mention such incidentals as clothing,
books and the daily expense of just living.
Troiler   Life   Economical,   Happy
The Parkers, along with 27 other
veteran families, live as part of the
trailer camp community at Acadia.
Far from being downcast at the prospects though, both attest to the happy co-operative life of the camp. "We
think we are lucky to be here,"
said June.
Bill adds that "You have to work a
bank  reserve  to do  it."
Parker works in the naval reserve
during   the   summer   but   finds   that
his timetable won't allow him to
take a part time job during the term
as he did last year.
Tight budgets practically put any
i-ort of entertainment out of the question  for  the  Parkers   but   they   say
that they find plenty of recreation
in the camp with their many friends.
Baby sitting is no prohlom anc\ a
labor that is shared, when occasion
urines, among the many families,
-4>
Two .Contest
Soph Member
Council Race
Campaign Speeches
Set For Noon Today
Two candidates had tossed
their hat in the ring for the
empty Student Council position
of sophomore member at press
time Tuesday.
First in the fight was Alec Freeman,
former pre-medical representative
on the undergraduates society committee. He was joined in the contest
late Tuesday by Alvin Nemetz.
The two will slug it out today at
noon at election speeches in Arts
100.
The Sophomore position became
vacant when Pete Mufphy elected
last 'year did not return t'o UBC.
'tween    classes:
Rod Young Back
On Campus Today
Rod Young, CCF MP for
Vancouver Centre and last secretary of Student CCF Club
will address student CCFers in
Applied Science 100 today at
12:30.
He will discuss CCF general policy
and the results of the Winnipeg convention..  ■   -
v *f* *p
Civil Liberties Union will meet in
Arts 103 at 12:30 today.
*I* •** *t*
PHILATELISTS (Stamp Collectors)
will be welcomed in Hut L-2 today
at 12:30.
•T* *T* *TT
COMMERCE WOMEN will choose
this year's executive in hut G-9 today
at noon.
^f* "r* flr
MUSIC APPRECIATION CLUB
members are requested to be in the
Double Committee Room, Brock Hall
at 12:30 toay.
•T* •** *TT
JOIN THE RIGHTEOUS is campaign
slogan of the Jazz Society which will
meet today at 12:30 in hut B-3.
Their budget won't allow buying
.my more prepared foods than arc
essential and June docs her own baking.  She   is  very  proud  of   the  tiny
Mikemen Produce
New Nervecentre
jfiu
Best  equipped  college  radio
beneath the floor of Brock Hall.
A   brand  now  $1,875  console,   dial- j~
decked behemoth nerve centre for the |
two studios, now gleams  in  the  control   roam   of   the   University   Radio
Society station In the south basement
of Brock Hall.
REPLACES OLD MODEL
This piece of equipment replaced
last ye'wr'.s consol which was found
unsuilcrl   to   standard   broadcast.
Now all proerams staged by the
U.R.S. will be channeled through
this cdnsol to the large transmitters
of Vancouver's radio studios and
broadcast on the airways.
WILL/MIX SOUNDS
With this addition a men efficient.
effective   blending   of   ssnnul    effects
Needs   Dough, So   Kneads   Dough
new electric stove.  "I can show him
that I really can cook now," she said.
She shares the laundry ficilities
provided by the University, with her
neighbors. Washrooms for men and
women, a study and a lounge are
also provided for thc use of the
trailerites. Theuniversity health service Well Baby Clinic does a rushing
business with 19 children in the
camp ranging from six down to practically nothing and more on the way.
Greater locker space is apparently
one of tho immediate needs of the
camp.
studio  in  Canada  now  lies
and voices will be possible. It is capable of taking sounds from one studio
and voices from another and combining them in to a coherent result.
David Shearer and other students
have spent many hours installing and
completing the intricate wiring involved in the installation of thi.s con-
sol.
MTKEMEN TURN OUT
A mobile PA is a second project
recently completed by Radio S )ciety
Engineers.
The high-power speakers and p.vl-
sl'la amplifier will reduce need of
hiving systems fur dances, nvvtings
and   nd\ 01 i ising   stunts.
Racism May Cause
West To Fair
Western civilization must' rid itself of racism or fall before tho rising
masses of Asia—according to Pandit
Rishi Ram, world peace worker and
noted  Indian educator.
The west is in a minority position
both in numbers and in cultural
achievement and must realize that in
the new "one world" there is no
plr.ee for racial division, he fold 900
students packed into UBC Auditorium, Tuesday.
Speeding Students
Warned By Police
Stem waiting against speeders in
Ihe university area, came from provincial  police  Friday.
Local officers warned that any student exceeding the speed limit of
thirty miles per hour will bc dealt
with to the full extent of the law.
Officers stated that they always have
trouble during the first few weeks of
session  each  year.
JOKE IS ON THE JOKERS
ZANIES HINTED BROKE
The jokers arc on thc financial rocks.
A rumored split between the crackpot club and the AMS,
or even the dissolution of the club are hinted following money
grant differences with Council.
Tlie club's fate will be decided at a meeting in Arts
103 al 112:30 Friday. New members are welcome to add
their gags to the agenda.
Zooming costs have bogged UBC's giant building program.
A harried Board of Governors furrowed brows late
Monday night seeking additional means of stretching depleted
budgets.
Plans have bogged as appropriations
have dissappeared before an ever
mounting toll of labor and material
costs.
PHARMACY OFF
Pharmacy building plans may have
to be shelved while other projects
are almost certain to meet prolonged
delays.
Near chaos has resulted from eon-
slant juggling of appropriations to
cover labor and material costs.
SECOND MEET  PLANNED
Board will meet again this week to
ponder the problem further.
Construction officials report that
they have orders t'o continue excavations for Biology and Pharmacy
building pending decision of the governors.
New Applied Science Building is
nearing completion but funds are
lacking to complete the top story
and work is expected to cease soon.
Some parts of the building are being used unfinished.
500 Dodge Camera;
Warned AMS Passes
NG With No Pix
M6re' than '500 UBC students are
just plain shutter-shy.
These students, still lacking AMS
pictures are asked to visit the photo
shop   behind   the   Brock,   this   week.
Besides them, are a few whose pictures were damaged during processing.  These will  be notified by  mail.
President of the AMS. Dave Brousson, said that the passes will be void
if there is no pix on the card, if it is
not a poli-phofo and if there is anything peculiar about the card.
The city theatres have been notified not to accept any card that is not
up to these standards.
The photo studio will start to shoot
thc Grads next week. This must be by
appointment only and will take about
three weeks.
4>
LONG WEEKEND
HOLIDAY SOON
FOR CLASS - WEARY
Class-weary students will give
thanks in more ways than one
October 11
In observance of Thanksgiving
holiday, the university will close
Saturday moming, October 9 until
Tuesday, October 12.
Redmen Bunching
Muscles For Rally
To Pick Chieftans
Junior edition of the campus red-
men, the engineers, are "'girding thfir
loins today.
First year applied science class will
jam AP SC 100 at noon today to elect a full slate of six chieftans.     ''
First rally of the year will fill of-
honorary president, secretary-treasurer and UBC representative.
'Better' Films
Cheap To Students
The National „ Film Society announces a lowering of its membership
rates  for  university  students
Fees are now $2.50 with one free
Guest Ticket, good for one performance, given free with each membership.
Fees will be accepted at the Quad
box office from October 4 to 8 inclusive.
Increased response to the showings has enabled t'he society to obtain use of the university auditorium
with its modern projection system
and   greater  seating  capacity.
Shows are every third Friday of
the month at 8; 15 p.m. starting October 15th.
Butterfly   Trick   In   Armory;
Frosh Pupate Tonight;
Become Undergrads
Frosh become the Class of '52 tonight.
The dance is slated for thc Armor- <3>-
ies at 8:30. Joe Micilli and a 14 piece
orchestra -headlines a gala program
for the evening.
GREEKS PICK QUEEN
Attractions include the crowning
of the "Freshette Queen of Lamda
U'i," the annual doffing of the re-
) alia, spot dances with special prizes,
■ in other entertainment arranged by
MC's Don Cunliffe and Chick Turner.
Patrons for thc affair include Dr.
N. A. M. MacKenzie, Dean and Mrs,
Chant, Dean Curtis, Dean Clement,
Dean Mawdsley, and Dean Walter
Gage. The Students Council of thc
AMS are also acting as honorary
visitor.'!.
NAME  STILL  UNKNOWN
Sparkling addition to the traditional
programme will be the Freshette extravaganza. Lamda Chi Fraternity
will announce the winner of their
contest—"the freshette we would
mast   like   to   fraternize  with."
At press time today the name of
the winner  was not available.
Tickets to the reception are available at Ihe Quad Box Office and the
Alma Meiter Offices in the Brock,
a'nl will also he sulci at the door.
Prices arc ''ifl\ cents each, Dutch
trial, for freshmen and freshet les
wearing a frnsli biilton, and SI.51) a
couple for upperclassmen. Refreshments will he saia eil.
Girls   Eager:
WUS Aids Cupid;
Pairs Up Frosh
Sex is receiving a motherly
push on the campus.
Brainchild of WUS Prexy Helen
Lindsay, a date Bureau has been
operating in the Quad as a sidelight to tonight's gala social attraction, the annual Frosh Reception.
Elva Plant and Anne Peers, two
pert members of this year's Frosh
executive, confided Tuesday that
initial results had been disappointing, but "that business is
picking up."
Chief fly in the ointment seems
to be that the males about the
campus are shy when it comes to
their eligibility. The girls are always  eager.
BRING BUTTONS
Freshmen are urged t wear their
frosh buttons to the reception tonight. The buttons enable freshmen and freshettes to get into the
dance for a fifty cents dutch treat
price. Page 2
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Wednesday, September 29, 1948
The Baity Ubyssey
Member Canadian University Press
!»• mi u   ,Au1'horized as Second Class Mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa. Mail Subscriptions—$2.50 per year
published throughout the university year by the Student Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society of the
University of Br'tish Columbia.
Editorial opinions expressed herein are those of the editorial staff of Tlie Daily Ubyssey and not necessarily those
of the Alma Mater S>ciety nor of the University.
n*t . V V ¥
Offices in Brock Hall. Phone ALma 1624 For display advertising phone ALma 3253
raJITOR-IN-CHIEiP  -   -   -   -  RON haggart
„_„ MANAGING EDITOR   -   -   -   -   VAL SEARS
GENERAL STAFF: News Editor, Bob Cave, Chuck Marshall; Features Editor, Ray Baines; Photography Director,
Ellanor Hall;  Sports Editor, Jack Wasserman;   Womens'   Editor.   Loni    Francis/1
Editors This Issue - CHRIS CROMBIE, MICKEY FYNN
Associate Editor — LES ARMOUR
'N
ew
inances
The pillars of type facing, this page, today
tell a story of blind extravagance.
tn the palmy days of post war UBC, everyone felt the boom town philosophy that
gripped the campus. More money rolled, into
the coffers of student government than had
(&Vfcr been known and the men who signed the
cheques knew this was the time, as they said,
"to put UBG on the map."
Tne finger of blame for lack of economy
in thi past cannot rest on any one student,
on any one student council, or even on the
students of any bne year.
Name calling at those who have left will
neither patch the tattered ends «f the Alma
Mater Society nor provide a pattern for future leaders to follow.
When students of UBC examine the past
and present at a general meeting of the AMS
October 6 it will be their opportunity to lay
a firm foundation for future financing of
student activities on the campus.
Fundamental weaknesses mar the frame-
<^ork of student  government  ^nanteing  on
\me Catnpus, and there are minor defects in
the budget which Paul Plant has prepared
to see UBC through this difficult year.
Student Councillors were faced this year
with the immovable brick wall of fixed bud-
geting. Because of a constitutional clause
which they helfd as sacred, Councillors were
forced to give three dollars from every student to what i§ known as a pass fund, the
ftool from which yBC's symphony concerts,
sgkftts games and other activities are subsidized. Almost one-third of the $10 they had
to play with was gone before Plant even began to draw up his crimped budget.
Then with the seven dollars remaining, he
WM forced to give $1.75 to men's athletics,
0ne Quarter of his liquid funds. The $1.75
appropriation to athletics is called for in the
cpiistitution of the Men's Athletic Directorate,
a scrap of paper which any council could
easily toss in the wastebasket.
But Plant, a former treasurer of the Men's
Athletic Directorate, was unwilling to do
this, lie chopped only $1000 from the money
which ,MAD will receive so that students
may continue to languish in the luxury of
top notch basketball games for only 35 cents.
Actually, MAD will have some $5000 less
to spend this year, but only because enrollment is down and because they are at last
being billed for bleachers built at a cost of
$8000 a few years ago.
Whether or not MAD has accepted a budget cut comensurate with other groups on
the campus remains for students to decide
when they review the proposals of council
on October 6.
They should keep in mind that 20 clubs
on the campus will be without a nickel of
AMS subsidy while sports-minded students
still enjoy the most extensive intra-mural
athletic program in Canada.
Despite its hard-hearted dealing with
most clubs on the campus, council has reserved a cushy financial pillow for religious
clubs. Council's announced policy was to
cut all "special interest" clubs of the subsidy
religious clubs which serve, after all, the
list. Political clubs which serve the special
interests hi their party were left dry, but
religious clubs which serve, after all, the
narrow interests of their denomination, still
receive a generous handout.
If Plant can prove that AMS finances
can be propped up again, he will halt what
is sure to be a steam roller movement for
permanent supervision of student government either by a student appointed manager
or worse still, by the university itself.
Minor structural changes in Plant's otherwise masterful budget can be made easily
enough, but deeper, more fundamental alterations in the very foundation of student
financing need to come if the evils of spying
supervision are to be avoided.
Finger in the dyke methods are not good
enough for a $100,000 business.
letters to the editor
Dear Sir:
Both orchids and brickbats to
Miss Phyllis Webb's thoughtful
letter about the Daily Ubyssey's
brand  new  women's  page.
1 agree with her in principle
that the university has something
to offer co-eds other than a social
fling. However, it is difficult to
see how the publication of about
four columns of type once a week
under the heading of "Women's
Page," will fatally cripple the
"brad, inclusive and varius bdy
of knowledge" she speaks of.
Again, Miss Webb complains of
the co-ed who "comprehends her
rocial role as a social whirl involving an avid interest in clothes
men and personal appearance."
To this I reply that the life of
every co-ed ought to contain some
semblance of a social whirl and
that, for humanity's sake, she
ought to exhibit an avid interest
in clothes, men, and personal appearance.
This "social whirl," however,
should be neither orb nor orbit
of a co-ed's life. Perhaps this is
thc thought that Miss Webb intended  to  convey,  and  through  a
loose  choice of  terminology,  misconstrued  herself,
Finally, on Miss Webb's argument against the Women's Page
on the grounds that it loads to
sexual inequality. Last year, there
was a great hubbub among women
athletes wh cmplained that they
were being squeezed off the Ubyssey's sports page by the weight of
men's sports write-ups. The Ubys-
'sey's defense, I believe, ran to the
effect that when the women made
"news" they would break into
prin;.
Laura Haahti, 4th year Arts
Want A Lift ?
DAILY UBYSSEY RIDE MART
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30 FROM
eivher 12th and Vine or 16th and Vine
every morning or Mon, ad Wed. oly.
Prefer to arrive by 8:10 or 8:15. CE.
1454.
RIDE WANTED FROM 3229 W 11th
Ave., for two every mormg. See Peter
Dyke at the barber shop.
RIDE HWANTED FROM NORTH
Vancouver Tues. Wed. and Fri. to
arrive at university by 10:00 a.m.
North 1907-R
RIDE WANTED VICINITY 23RB &
Lillooet to 10:30 lectures Monday,
Wed.,'and Fri., and 9:30 Tues. Thurs.
and Sat., or as many days as pos-
ible. Phone Dexter 3011. Rene.
CAR CHAIN-CAR AT DISPOSAL
any day of week—in or around 12th
and Oak, 8:30 CE 1484. Joe.
RIDE WANTED TO 8:30 LECTURES
every riiorning from 27th and Balaclava or vicinity, Urgent. Phone Kay
BA 2012-R
3rd YR. MECtt. NEE&S RIDE FROM
vicinity 28th and. Dunbar, all 8:30's.
Phone BA 4507-L or C. S. White
Group 24 Mech 50.
WANT TO FORM CAR CHAIN VI-
BX 9333-L
cinity 32n Ave. and Granville, Phow
ANYONE MOTOFUNG fO OKAN '
agan valley for Thanksgiving weekend with room for paying passenger
please phone H. Venables at BA
4932-M.
GEOLOGY GRAD WITH WORK TO
dc in vicinity of Whonnock would
like to contact UBC students from
that district with a view to swapping transportation home at weekends for a Saturday night's lodgings.
Sec LEE HM 15A.
RIDE FROM VICINITY OF 41st &
Ormville.   Call   Vicki,   Kerr.   6320-R
RIDE FROM 2nd AND TOLMIE
(or thereabouts) wanted by second
year engineer. Please phone Al 1227-
M.
RIDE FROM 25th AND CAMBIE ST
for 8:30's or 9:30's. Phone Helen. FA
3606.
RIDE FROM 33rd AND DUNBAR
for 8:30's every day. Phone Kerr.
1093-R. Joan.
RIDE FOR 8:30 LECTURES MON,
Wed., Fri., and Sat. from corner of
Haro and Denman. Phone John PA
7970.
RIDE WANTED FROM JOYCE RD.
ad  45th   Ave.  for  8:30's.   Phone  Bob.
Chambers.   Dexter   3158-L.
RIDE FROM NANTON AND MAR-
mieritc (3 blocks west of Granville
on 27th, 8:30's or 9:30's. DA G087. Ask
for Mary.
SIGNBOARD
Meetings
<$>
PIPE BAND FIRST PRACTICE TO
be held in Armouries 6:30 Friday,
Oct   i.   Bring   i:ii:oa,   chanters,   bucks.
ALL THOSE WISHING TO JOIN
brass band, please bring instrument;
to hut B-3 (behind Brock) noon
Friday. ,
UBC SYMPHONY ORCH REHEAR
A general rehearsal will be held
at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept 30
in Club Hut 3B behind the Brock.
All students who play insiVumentt
will be welcome. Bring your supper,
*-
Accommodation
ROOM AND BREAKFAST $35. Mrs.
Howard, 3813 West 15th.
ROOM AND BOARD FOR GIRL
student in return for light, services.
Kerr.  5891.  5989  Hudson.
TWO SINGLE ROOMS. WILL GIVE
breakfast and lunch. Rates by ar-
ranbement. Phone. Mrs. Gardner, BA
2291-R. 3991 Puget Drive.
TOP-NOTCH BACHELOR ACCOM-
modation, 2 vacancies. 100 percent
student house close to UBC. Private
study, 8:30 ride. 4000 W 10th. Phone
Alma 3459-L.
Miscellaneous
WOULD LIKE TO EXCHANGE 2
matinee tickets for "Hamlet", Monday, October 4th for similar tickets
Oct. 5 or Oct. 7. Leave message
Ubyssey office.
EXPERT TYPfNG-NOTES, ES-
says, etc, Quick service, 12 cent's per
page. Mrs. J. C. Davie, 4000 W vOth
Ave. Work can be left with J. C.
Davie,  1st year Law,
For Sale
LOST
IN THE BUS HUTS (I THINK) ON
Monday morning, Volghtlander camera. Phone N. Nixcn at CE 2361.
Reward.
WILL THE GIRL WHO PICKED UP
the black wallet in the Arts Common
Room Tuesday a.m., please return it
to the  AMS office.
WILL THE FROSH TO WHOM 1
loaned my grey eversharp on registration day please heturn same as it
is a keepsake. H. Perini at 2116 W
8th Ave,
'47 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION SE-
an, climatizer, radio. 1st class condition, $2600. 3130 East 23rd. Ave.
1929 MODEL "A" FORD. GOOD
cenditien throughout. Phone Alma
0295-L.
SLIDE RULE. K. E. POLYPHASE.
Phone 8:30-5:30 Ray. Marine 8930.
MATH REFERENCE BOOKS. MAR-
geneau and Murphy, Maths for Physics and Chem." Doetsch "Laplace
Transformation". Phone Bob at FA
7844-Y.
Wanted To Buy
SIZE 9 OR 9».'z TRACK SHOES.
Phone Gordon Kerr. 3055-R.
CASH FOR GOOD PORTABLE
typewriter. Write, giving price and
description to Alison Martin, 2386
Cornwall St.
Found
3MALL BROWN CHANGE PURSE.
May be picked up at Burser's office.
A WALLET CONTAINING A CON-
siderable sum of money outside the
Administration Building. Apply at
cashier's office.
•I™"1  Lost
GLASSES, BASEMENT CHEMICAL
Bldg., Sept. 23rd. Finder please return
to AMS.
BROWN LEATHER BRIEF CASE,
contained notes and economice text.
Bill Pratt, Hut 0-16 or Alma 3495-R.
WOULD THE STUDENT WHO
picked up in error Psychology and
Life book outside the barber shop
on Friday 24th, please turn in to the
AMS office.
NAVY BLUE LEATHER WALLET
lost Thursday Sept. 23rd. Please return to Betty Ridley. Kerr. 3245-L.
GREY PARKER 51 NEAR COM-
merce huts. Reward, eturn to AMS
Office.
£ALE BLUE HANDKERClliEF,
with large red flower in corner near
Quad. Reward. Return to AMS office.
MONDAY SEPT. 20. BROWN LfiATH
er purse. Urgently needed. Reward.
Please leave atAMSorphone Marion
Reid Kerr. 6083-L
SMALL LIGHT BROWN LEATHER
change purse Thursday containing
$10. Phcne Kerr. 1035-L.
FROM AGGIE COMMON ROOM
Tuesday, Sept. 21, Brown leather
brief case. Name inside flap. Return
to  Ian   Paton,   Dean's   Office,   Aggie
building.
IN ARTS BUILDING NEAR QUAO,
khaki colored cloth jacket containing scarf and fountain pen. Please.
return to AMS office.
BROWN LEAfrrfER WALLEf CO&-
taining money and papers. Return
to  AMS office.  Reward.
UBC May Adopt Germans;
Teach Them Democracy
A plan to adopt four or five German students and finance
them through one year at UBC has been proposed by two
students who attended an International Students' Service
seminar in Germany this summer.
The students, Cliff Greer and Grcg<5/
Balkov, brought forward tlie proposa
in line with a resolution adopted by
fifty Canadian students who attended
the ISS seminar at Plcen.
To "show German students the significant values of democracy", they
will ask the National Federation of
Canadian University Students to finance 35 German students during one
academic year at a Canadian university:.
Students also voted to ask the Fed-
era' Government to" adopt" two stu-
students, for everyone financed by
NFCUS.
Belkov and Greer are bringing thc
campus groups.
While in Germany, Greer and Belkov visited a university in Hamburg,
where they found ill-clad and badly
housed students, struggling with inadequate textbooks and lack of equipment.
Most of them lived on a daily ration
of soup provided by the Swedish government' for students 20 pounds underweight.
Maimed and crippled veterans tried
to cope with difficult laboratory problems.
Science professors demonstrated to
tho Canadians their experiments with
resolution to the attention of various  atomic fission.
Fledgling Reporter Dazed By Lightning Ubyssey Production
By  LLOYD  HALE
One day last week, prompted by what
appeared to be an desperate appeal for sucker, I turned up in the Brock Basement (Bastille (just right of the third rack to thc left
of the iron maiden—can't miss it) known in
happier days as the pub room.
Several of us had gathered, suddenly on
the stairway there sounded the hoofbeats of
hard-ridden horses. Before any of our group
could titer an exclamation of surprise or protest the her riders drove before us before
them into a cramped unlighted confinement.
After the passage of two or three days a vitriolic stream of profanity ripped through
voice placating: "if we hafta, we hafta, run.
the walls of our stall, punctuated by another
'em in and let's get rid of 'em' Back in the
corner   one   of   the   smaller   ones   began   to
Burning Flesh, MSAhAhAhA
A small opening appeared and wo stamp-
whimper,
eded out through a narrow chute. The room
we entered was filled with screams and tho
nauseous acrid smell of burning flesh a:;
each of us was branded reporter on the left,
thigh with a white hot  iron.
A we sat nurdng our wounds; a lallWh
superior sort o gentleman s;.'ppod I aaeord
and snapped his garter lo bring, u ; X> attention.   Inoliced   the   hack  oi  In-;  coal   hail   Ihe
word editor in flashing neon on it while he
stood there regarding us from baleful eyes
surmounting large dark puffed pouches be-
lying a long carrer of dissapation, doubtless
from many sorties on the big comfortably
upholstered council grant. I put him immediately into a good humor by asking him for a
copy of the preceeding Tuesday's paper. He
stifled a tirade about did I expect that they
printed enough papers for every, idiot on
the campus to equip his privy with and turned on an ingratiating grimace.
"Now,' he said, returning his bull whip
to its stand, "I want you to realize you're going to have FUN around here."
partment is over in the corner,'' he stated,
Dust, Cobwebs and Sport
"Anyone wishing to write sports—that de-
pointing to a ck«'k l»arely visible beneath layers of dust and cobwebs. "Sorry I can't introduce' ihe sports ed but he's in Oregon,
has been for the last couple of weeks—covering the loot ball game of course. Anything of
special feminine interest should be turned
in to the women's eitor, I'd like to introduce
her but - ah - she's in Florida right now—
doing something  on  resort   fashions   I  think.
"However, most of yon will he writing
new: ami for your information this is where
you'll  all  work  al   one  lime or another,'   be
continued gesturing behind himself, 'It's
called the U desk and its just the place for
you ahahahahahahah—" He collapsed on thc
floor in a helpless paroxysm of laughter at
his revolting jest, revealing a terrifying
In back of him was a U shaped desk ar-
hight.
ound the outside cdge#of which were chained half a dozen emaciated miserable beings,
filth and blood stained tatters hanging from
their gaunt fleshless frames, their protruding haunted eyes staring sightlessly out of
cadaverous faces, their long white finger
bones from which the flesh had long since
withered and worn off typed out aimlessly
an endless amount of copy. Our speaker
quickly regained his feet and hid the horrible
sight from view.
T© The Aid Of The Party
"By Gar," quoth he, "the editor in chief
is in! I'll get him to come out and say a few
cubicle he ihrew it open and sprang quickly
words." Stepping to the door of a lair sized
back to avoid ''eirui engulfed hy a clinkling
cascade of empty twenty-six ounce containers. The chief htil'ed 1 •; b'earyoiyod way
;v.to ;s the room boas'.'.n.g enroute, "throw
h.  .'  dam   parties   whole   un'ves'ty. '
'. h.erlly alter Ihe o-i-c'sdenarl ure a mu ;-
lacked   individual   drifted    in   on   a   dreamv
cloud, languidly puffing an opium pipe handed a clipping to our keeper and faded away,
A hissing rose out o his collar., "Scooped",
he screamed. "Some dirty mercenary sold
out to a downtown daily! One of the first
commandments of the Ubyssey is that no
member of the staff be tainted by the acceptance of any other recompeense than moral
satisfaction. It deeply grieves me, "he wept
a sa riot truck of armed gurillas roared away,"
that we must discipline one of our' membefs
for smirching his amateur status.''
Greener Pastures
Some of the speaker's cohorts had started
to move ethrough our cringing group, clamping a small black box at the base of each
person's neck. The editor explained that this
was a precaution they took to make sure that
the assignments were turned in promptly at
three o'clock. Thosee little black boxds contain small powerful time bombs set fop 3:02
which will be rcmoveed when the assignments
are handed in.
It was just about then that I decided it
was time to throw my quota of engineers
in the lily pond. A.s I shot my way (out I
noticed they had already manacled one tyf the
stronyer specimens to a spare typewriter
and wore whipping htm about the head/ and
shoulders chanting "five quarto pages" With
each   bkiw. I Wednesday,' September 29, 1948
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
feni
Campus Gov't 'In Red'
i Grew
Mushroom increase in clubs and organizations during rosy
post#ar years on the campus, coupled with expanded expenditures oh student activities caused the disastrous overflow
budget of last year's Student Council.
This is the reason given by audi-<$ ;	
tors today for the  increase  in total   to tbeir increased tempo and, in par-
expenditures for last term which has
saddled the Alma Mater Society with
a  capital  deficiency  of $20,000.
Student government last year spent
$16,000 more than it received in revenues, the report to be presented to
a general student meeting October
6, shows.
Increase of expenditure by the
Men's Athletic Directorate is due
principally to an increase of $2897 in
administrative expenses, together
with a decrease in revenue from
booster passes of $1517, the auditors
say.
The increase in the net cost of
campus activities and events was due ' more.
AMS  $16,000. In   Red
The auditors statement of revenue and expenditure to the closet dollar for
the AMS in 1947-48 is as follows:
ticular the cost of such eventes as:
National Federation of Canadian University Students Conference, $1366,
School for Scandal $1183, and spring
production of Tovarich, $740.
Student Council expenses increased
by $884, attributable to several conferences of the Student Christian
Movement, the Pacific Northwest
College Conference, the National
Conference of Student Veterans and
the High School Students Conference. |
Increased expenditures on clubs included: Film Society, $1163 more
than the year before; Jokers Club
£567 more; and Musical Society $1593
Not  Our  Show
Red-Faced
Council   Says
Student's Council, faced with a
situation for which they take no responsibility, but which has been the
result of the last three years' increased activity and capital expenditure,
has taken resolute steps to improve
Ihe current finahcial picture of the
\ AMS.
An Age;
For
This was the official position of
Student Council laid down by AMS
President  t>ave  Brousson.
"We have made every erfort to prepare an equitable budget, but ive will
be only too pleased to" receive Mg-
gestions and critlcisrtis," he said.
j_____
Revenue:
Student fees
Miscellaneous
Total Revenue
Expenditure:
Cost of Activities
Administrative and general expenses
Total Expenditure
Excess of expenditure over revenue
Total student fees are determined as follows:
Total fees to AMS
Less Refunds
Year Ended June 30, 1948
$44,891
2,389
$47,280
$41,026
$22,992
*        *  $64,019
$16,739
$128,750
490
$128,260
Deduct:.
War  Memorial   Gymnasium
Pass System
MAR
$42,752
25,652
14,964
. .   . $83,369
Balance  of  student  fees   available  for   general   purposes   is   then   $44,891.
Student fees of $15 -are allocated as follows:
Yfar Memorial $5.00   33.33%
Pasi System 3.00   20    %
fialance:
f Quarter to MA& '    1.75   11.67%
ftre'e-Quarte'rs  to general  funds 5.2|  35   %
15.00   100 %
20
ing
One of the major chan|es made in
AMS financial policy by treasurer
Paul Plant in his proposed austerity
budget has been the elimination of
subsidies for 20 campus clubs.
Formerly financed by grants from
student funds they must now find
their own way. Thejie affected are:
Stamp Club, Aggie ferigineers, Music
Appreciation, American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, Progressive
Conservative, Psycholdfe' Club, C.C.
F., Civil Engineers, AriieHcan Institute of Chemical Engineers, fchjjln-
eering Institute of Canada, Labor
Progressive Party, American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Liberals,
Gccgraphy Club, Letters Club, G. M.
Dawson, Amateur Radio Society,
Symphony Society, El Circulo Latino
Americano.
PASS   tUHB   GRANT
PASS FUND	
MAD      $ 5,000
Symphony    •    2,500
SJpecial Events   ..••  500
payers   Club 740
Mussoc   800
Frosh   Orientation      830
J*ep Club  600
Mamooks   	
Varsity Band   • •	
Homecoming 	
Parliamentary Forum  •
Daily  Ubyssey   	
Photographs at registration
Glee Club	
USC Administration 	
800 ( Film Society
300  Women's Undergraduate Society
1,000
335
250  Law Undergraduate Society 200
530 , Commerce Undergraduate Society 4C0
1,500
1,000
350
25
Physical Ed. Undregraduate Soc.     80
Nurses Undergraduate Society 60
Engineer's Undergraduate Soc.     1,375
Surplus for operating margin     2,410
.. .OK
t&e
would like lb meet
YOU
MERLE C. KIRRY
Officcr-incharge
Now you can do your banking fight on
the Campus . . . save time and money,
cut down on trips to town. Centrally situated, in the Auditorium building, your Bank
on the Campus is as easy to reach as the
library, lab or gym.
*   - :
Why not drop in and see us? . . . talk
over your banking problems, real or academic, with any member of our staff. As
newcomers to the Campus we would like
to meet you soon ... a warm welcome
awaits you at all times.
HAVING TROUBLE FINDING
YOUR WAY 'ROUND THE CAMPUS?
You'll find our special map folder useful
in locating most of the important buildings at U.B.C. Help yourself to one.
Holders containing the maps are in our
office and in buildings around the Campus.
Bank of MontreAt
Canada's First Bank
lljoRKISG WITH CANADIANS IN EVERY WALK OF LIFE SINCE 1817
Yotfii   Hr.ik On The Campus — In The Auditorium Building
) Mo lie C. Kirby, Ofioer-in-charge
Dean   Of   Campus
Gagsters    Leaves
Jabez is leaving.
With a grin of expectation,
and clutching his battered portable typewriter, he is ready to
face "the Usual humiliating ex-
pieHerice in a new country"—
ft^tice.
Hie quote is his own.
ke leaves Thursday for Paris and
a s'chdlarsiirj) at tbe Sorbonne, •where
the congratulations of countless
readers follow him. *
For ten years "tabez" Eric Nicol
was the leading cambus funny man
writing feature columns for many
B.C. newspapers. Lost year, he abandoned the "fast-paced" life with the
Daily Ubyssey because of avowed
old a|e.
LEAVES MOMENTO
Grateful undergraduates lovingly
dedicated a plaque to his memory,
last Valentine's day, which now
hangs in Brock ttall. Funds were
raised by "nickel" contributions to
what was probably the most popular campus subscription of all time.
Evidence of. the regard with which
he is held by a generation of students
was the tumultuous applause accorded him when he received his
Master of Arts Degree at Spring convocation excercises.
FROSH FAVORITE
He is specially dear to Freshmen
!o whom he has extended sympathy
at a questionable quality.
tiasi year, as an instructor in the
Department of English, Jabez managed to painlessly pump the dangers
of the comma-fault into inumerable
Engineers,
TEN YEARS 0> HlSTbitY
Jabez began bis column of humor
stories while a Sophomore in 1938,
with the "Chang Suey" series. Since
then he has knocked out an immense
plk'o'f copy containing hints to freshmen about conduct, orientaion and
Sciencemen.
QUINCEY LIVES ON
Two years ago, he created the
Freshman of them all, blunder-
struck Homer Quincey, who couldn't
fight his way through a book of
nursery  rhymes.
Jabez became a nationally famous
author and a candidate fpr the Stephen Leacock award for humor with
publication of his "Sense and Nonsense." The book received a rousing
welcome bo|h in Canada and England.
While soaking up some Parisian
atmosphere and earning his Doctorate of Letters, Jabez has promised to
turn out more of his inimicable brand
of humor. That city, he feels, will
provide  him  with  lots  of material.
MUST WORK AT GAGS
His parting fatherly advice i'o
would-be-humorists:
"You on't step in and start knocking off howlers," he says, "You
learn. And, by the way, tell them
I'll be back!"
SORBONNE BOUND is UBC's favorite columnist, Eric "Jabe*"
Nicol. Jabez has rollicked UBC students'with his gentle mirth
since first "Chang Suey'' column appeared in Ubyssey of 193$.
His later Mummery column mixed belly-laughs with cdmhiori
sense.
—Photo  by  Danny Wallace
Council OK
Handed Down
For Clubrooms
l
Accomodations for 22 UBC
clubs was assigned definitely
for the year Monday night by
Students Council.
The following are the club room
allocations recommended by the
Krock  Extension  Committee.
Al •■ Varsity    Outdoor    Club
A2 Film   Society
A? Photo    Studio
A4 Varsity   Christian   Fellowship
A3 Camera     Club
A7. .Publications   Board   Dark   Room
Afi     Mamooks
Bl SW Commerce Undergrad Society
Bl SE International Fraternity Coun-
NE. .Christian    Science    Organization
cil
Lutheran Students Association
NW International    Relations    Club
Parliamentary Forum
CCF  Club
f.12 SW...,Physical   Eucation   Undergrad  Society
Fencing  and  Archery
SE Pre-Med    Undergrad    Society
.V'l United   Nations;   Club
NW. ... International Student Service1
Ij.'i, .University   Symphony   Orchestra
Ja.".'   Society
\ arsity   Band
Varsii'y    Pipe    Band
'Finger-Tip* Control Over
All Money Spent By Clubs
Treasurer Paul Plant will keep personal, finger-tip control
over almost every penny spent by various clubs and organizations on the campus this year.
This is Plant's answer to the heritage of headache handed him by
previous councils.
In his "austerity" program which will go beeforo students for approval
October 6, Plant hopes to pay back half of the $20,000 capital deficiency with
which the AMS is saddled.
Here a,re his proposals for this year.
1. Anyone wishing to obtain a pur-<§-
chase  order  for a  subsidiary  organ
ization of the AMS is requireed to
have the approval of the Treasurer, effective October 4. The Treasurer will
post special daily office hours for
this  purpose.
2, Organizations planning dances or
other functions must present estimated budgets first, and detailed accounts afterwards.
3. Individuals requiring Petty .Cash
must secure thc Treasurer's approval
first.
4, Clubs and organizations must take
inventory of equipment in their possession, and Presidents and Treasurers will bc required to sign for it
and  be  responsible  for  it.
5. Budgets not yet in rnusst be submitted by October 5th.
G. Mailing expenses will be handled
directly  through  the  AMS  Office.
His budget follows:
Estimated Revenue from fees at $10,60
per   student       $75,000
Revenue from Saturday Night
Dances    • •       1.QO0
Administration       13,000
Pass Fund  22,QQ.O
Activities    • •  2,000
MAD    11,125
WAD      i#5
Publications Board        9,9j)|)
Misc.  Expenses    ■•     2,500
Operating Margin  4,000
Surplus    ••  ip.pjo
$76,000
Note: surplus of $10,000 is to go towards removing deficiency in the
ivorkiiie   capital)
AdminisSrc*!
©n
Salaries  5,900
Audit  and Legal  850
NFCUS  loot
Stationer}'  and  Office  Expense 1,900
Postage 	
Students   O until   	
Telephone  and Teclcgraph
Misc.   (Honorariums  etc.)
, 850
1,100 '
,      750
,     030
$13,000
LSE Administration  3jf)
Newman   Club     95
URS (University Radio Society'* H70
Varsity   Christian   Fellowship 12'!
Can.   Civil   Liberties  ;;n
Fort   Camp      140
Film   Society  150
Eng. Christian Fellowship     40
International Relations Club  ,. TO
Hillel Foundation    20
Christian   Science   A{)
Social  Problems  Club     40
Student Chritian Movement  .. 1.00
Acadia Camp   •■.... .'!20
Glider Club	
Fnemu'er's   ?.be :c   Club     . ."
vifrses
PUuLiCATIONS  BOARD
Grant from Pass Fund  	
Publications   Board   	
13«i: Iy  Ubyssey   	
Daily Ubyssey Engraving  .
Photo   Department   .......
Student   Directo-v   	
Misc.
Ml.
EXPENSES
insurance
$ 1,300
853
,    C.800
.    1,600
1,000
SO
100
9c
$10,500
1,500
ii-fl
I
1
■•••»»>
« Si
,     'Wil
• > 1. * 1
■.'.'.> t\
,; tti.il
•.111 J J
i
Oil A
,.rt,
..fit
■ ,-i
■ 111 w
,1 'di
u >.;
a'.4'i
1        ^  ;
,.   -*X_;i
-. Oj
fteg
)'■
.. ■ .■Mr
«
300
% 2; n*ti
THE DAILY UBYSSEY
Wednesday, September 29, 1948
JACK WASSERMAN, Sports Editor
GIL GRAY, Editorial Assistant
Bird Gridmen To Battle
WWC Vikings Saturday
Smarting severely from a resounding defeat at the hands
of Pacific University, UBC's Thuftderbirds will try to regain
a little prestige this weekend when they tangle with the
Western Washington Vikings in their first home game of the
season, this Saturday at Varsity Stadium.
Don Wilson, though disappointed
with the club's inability to come up
with clean tackles, is not too downhearted regarding the 'Birds showing.
The players, too, feel that with a
little more practice, they will be able
to come up with a winner.
As far as injuries are concerned,
the campus men came through without
too many serious mishaps. Dick Mitchell, first striking fullback, wrenched his knee and will be out of the
line-up for a short while. He probably won't miss more 'than one game,
however.
Old injuries still plague former McMaster player, Don West, who broke
three ribs in training, and will be
out of action' for two and possibly
three weeks.
Hopes are high, too, that Doug
Ried, 1947's Sportsman of the Year,
a running and passing threat, will
be 'out this weekend, provided his
eligibility difficulties are cleared
away.
With a week's drill on pass defence
and fundamentals, the 'Birds should
put on a good display Saturday
against theeir powerful opponents.
<8>-
ONLY   ONE   WEEK
LEFT  TO   BUY
BOOSTER   PASSES
Do you want to be popular with
Ihe girls??? Do you waot to have
lots of spare money to throw around??
Well here Is your big chance.
There Is only one week left ln
which to get the full benefit out of
buying a booster pass to grid games
si UBC.
The set-up this year permits a purchaser to see all of the six home
games of the Thunderbird American
football   team.   Individual   price   of
UBC Track Club
Outlines Future
Training Plans
Track and cross-country programs for the fall season were
outlined at the organizational
meeting of the Track, Field
and Cross-Country Club, last
Friday.
Cross-country competition, non-existent last year, will be resumed if
present plans for a race with Idaho
materialize. Track and field candidates will commence working out immediately on a fall training program
in preparation for an indoor meet in
Victoria in November.
Bob Osborne introduced the members of last year's Northwest Conference championship team to the
freshmen and acted as chairman for
the club's elections, Distance ace
Bob Piercy was elected president;
Olympian Ez. Henniger, secretary;
and Fred Rowell, manager.
The training program was discussed
and it was decided to form several
groups in order to fit in with the
athlete's time tables. Twenty-three
members attended and it was deecided
to conduct a membership drive for
new recruits.
Daily workouts for those who can
attend will be held from 11:30 to 1:30
daily. Special arrangements will be
made for athletes unable to turn out
at this time.
SWIMMING CLUB
All men and women interested in
recreational swimming and stroke
improvement are encouraged to join
swimming at  Crystal  Pool.  Fees  are
the games Is fifty cents. Six games,: $2.00   and   are   now   payable   at   the
at fifty cents a game is three dollars. AMS  Office.
Now these little old passes are selling
at the tremendous reduction of one
dollar to students.
Think of it, you save onne whole
dollar, what a set-up! Passes will bc
on sale all this week in the offices of
the graduate Manager of Athletics,
Ole Bakken, beside theAMS   Offices.
MINOR SPORTS
Minor sports executive announces
that all budgets for the coming year
must be in their hands by October
second. Will all club executives please
see to this immediately.
MINOR SPORTS MANAGERS
SPORT   ' MANAGER PHONE
Archery  Don Chant AL. 1379M
Badminton Ian Sprinkling AL. 0535M
Boxing Jim Grove Stadium at noon
Cricket  Pete Hobson AL. 1358M
Fencing Dan Lambert  BA. 1965
Golf Dave Dale W. 531R
Grass Hockey Bob Ross   AL. 1466L
Gymnasium Dave Roxburough  HA. 0601L
Ice Hockey Mac Porteous GL. 0351M
Outdoor Club Harry Smith AL. 0355R
Swimming Bob Stangroom  AL. 063811
Tennis Jack Volkovitch FA. 7174R
Track  Al Baine   AL. 2551L
Thunderbir Ski Club ...Syd Young  KE. 0614R
American Football
Oct. 2 Western Washington College of
Education at UBC*
-WWC 35 — UBC 0)
Oct. 9 Open Date
Oct. 16 Willamette University at UBC
(Willamette 33 — UBC 0)
Oct. 23 Whitman College at UBC
(Whitman 7 — UBC 6)
Oct. 30 College of Idaho (Homecoming)
at UBC
(Idaho 33 — UBC 13)
Nov. 6 Lewis and Clarke College at UBC
(Lewis and Clarke 7 — UBC 26)
Nov. 13 Linfield College at UBC
(Linfieeld 21 — UBC 0)
Nov. 25 Western Washington College of
Education at Bellingham*
♦Denotes non - conference games
Scores are from last year's games
Bajus To Defend Title
In UBC Golf Tournament
By MILES HEYWORTH
Members of UBC's conference champion golf team will be.
heavily favored in the forthcoming University Golf Club
championships which are scheduled to be run off within the
next two weeks.
DRIVING a long one down the fairway, alumni Ormie Hall
gets in a little practice time. Ormie was an active member of
the UBC Golf Club on the campus before he graduated.
SIGNBOARD
GYM CLUB
All students Interested in active
membership in the UBC gym club an
asked to be on hand at the meeting
in the UBC gym at 4:30 this Friday.
New club periods are to be announced.
BIG BLOCK
An urgen meeting of the Big Block
Club will be held Friday, October 1
at 12:30 in Brock Hall's north stage
room. All members are requested to
be on hand.
SWIMMING
Swimming classes at Crystal Pool
will commence Monday, September
27 while classes at Canadian Memorial do not start until Tuesday,
Ocjobeer 5. No classes will be held
at Memorial September 28 as previously announced.
MAD
Men's Athletic Directorate will meet
regularly every Wednesday evening
at 6:30 p.m. in the Brock Board Room.
Last year's winning combination
consisted of Bob Plommer, Doug Bajus, Davie Dale and Peter Bentley.
This  year's  club will  have  to  get
along without the services of four of
its   most   capable   mefbers—Plommer,
Dale, Ormy Hall and Hans Swinton.
BAJUS RETURNS
However, the loss will be covered
by the return of several of last year's
outstanding players: Doug Bajus, Dick
Hanley, Bob Esplin, Don Bodie and
Peter Bentley.
RUMOUR FALSE
About two months ago golf writers
of downtown dailies noted in their
columns that Gordon Wilks, Northern
California Junior Champ would be
attending UBC this fall. As it turned
out, however, Wilks never had any
intention of registering here. All he
did was take two weeks holidays in
Vancouver, as he does every year, and
then headed home to enrol in the
University of California at Berkley.
This year the conference tourney
will be held on one of North America's
toughest and yet most fieautiful layouts, Indian Canyon, Idaho.
BIG PLANS
It is also hoped that the club will
again be able to hold a wield day at
Peace Portal Golf Club next spring.
The first meeting of the club will
be within the next week. Watch The
Dally Ubyssey for further announcements regarding the .meetings and
tlie dates for the qualifying round of
the club championship.
MANAGERS
Managers are urgently needed for
positions on all UBC teams this year.
All those interested are asked to contact the athletic office in the Brock
Hall.
Shuttle Action  -4
Gets Under Way
Thursday Night
Shuttle enthusiasts will swing
into action Thursday night with
the opening of the University
Badminton Club, acting-president Ian Sprinkling announced
Tuesday.
The club plans to enter teams in
both the Class B and Class D city
leagues, which leaves numerous op*
enings for interested players,
LIMITED TIME
At present the club has been able
to secure the use of the gym tot
Thursday nights only, and as this
night is taken up with general play
it has been extremely difficult to fincl
time for team practices. However,
officials are still hoping to find play*
ing space for another night
The club enjoyed a highly success!
ful season last year, with several
individual players entering the pro*
vincial championships. Bruce Benham
was a runner-up in the handicap
singles and Maureen Bray was run,
ner-up in the junior ladle's single**
Play in the city leagues begins In
mid-October and continues until the;
provincial tournafent starts. As the
club is hard pressed for equlpmeent,
all players are urged to pay their
fees before Thursday, if possible. Fee
for the year is $4.00, payable at the,
AMS Officel
Calling All Coeds
To The BAY'S
COLLEGE FASHIONS CONTEST
Co-eds interested in fashion, this is for you! The BAY's
College Shop wants to know your preferences in 'round-
the-clock college fashions. What kind of coats and suits
do you like? How about day and date-time dresses- What
do you want in a formal? How do you feel about costume
separates . . . mix-'n-match skirts, jackets, blouses and
sweaters? In other words, what is your definition of a coordinated campus wardrobe, in terms of style, fabric,
color combinations, price? The BAY wants to know, and
makes it worth your while to let us in on your opinions!
Here's what you do: Write an essay of approximately
500 words on the subject of co-ordinated college clothes,
telling us what you want and would like to find at The
BAY for lectures, f ootba 11 games, tea dances at the Brock,
Big Evenings, and just lounging. Your essay may win
the wonderful prize: your choice of any suit, coat, dress,
formal or sports ensemble from The BAY's College Shop.
Send your essay, together with your name, address,
phone number, and a brief resume of your curricular
and campus activities and college affiliations, to THE
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY, c'o Ubyssey. The contest
closes October 23. So let's hear from you . . . and we do
hope that YOU win! '
Jn^otty'Bag €ompari£.
INCORPORArSD    »■?•   MAY  l«70

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