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The Ubyssey Feb 5, 1965

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 THE UBYSSEY
hos
four ears
VOL. XLVII, No. 45
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1965
CA 4-3916
su*m,*-*mnmmm^
—dave henderson photo
COOL WORK on a rainy day. Ice sculptors were part of demonstration of contemporary art techniques in Buchanan building Thursday. Ice proved adamant to small
butane torches but broke up easily when a ttacked with a hatchet.
Half of proceeds
Rower
Filmsoc fee hike     named
bucked by AMS
The AMS moved Thursday to thwart an attempt by Film
Services Society to charge 50 percent of the house for
certain film showings.
Film Services Society president Peter Harrison Wednesday announced the new policy.
"We raised the cost of hiring one of our projectionists
because we want to discourage campus groups from showing films not pertaining to
their constituted aims."
AMS president Roger McAfee held a meeting with Film
Services executives Thursday
to try to get the rates back to
normal.
"AMS subsidiary groups
have the right to raise funds
in any legal way," said McAfee.
Harrison explained by films
pertaining to group's constituted aims he meant such
things as Aqua Society showing films on skin diving or
Special Events  showing films
of interest to the campus at
large.
Sigma Chi Fraternity and
the Young Bourgeois Authors
and Artists Association asked
Film Service Society members
to project cartoons in the auditorium immediately prior to
the increase in price of the
projectionists.
"All duly-constituted groups
under the AMS, such as the
YBAAA, should be charged
the regular student rate," McAfee said.
"In my opinion, the 50 per
cent is unreasonable. Facilities
should be available to duly-
constituted groups as cheaply
as possible," said AMS Treasurer Kyle Mitchell said.
"There has to be some kind
of compromise. I don't want to
see students over-charged,"
Mitchell said.
city's best
UBC student George
Hungerford was named
Vancouver's athlete of
the year last night.
Hungerford and Roger
Jackson of Toronto won
Canada's only gold medal
in the '64 Tokyo Olympics by winning the pairs
without  coxswain  event.
Strictly darkhorses
Hungerford and Jackson,
who had only been practising together for a few
weeks before the Olympics, overcame seemingly
impossible odds to sweep
by (he world's best rowers and make-up somewhat for the poor showing of the UBC - VOC
eights.
The other four athletes
in contention for the
award were Terry Dool-
ey, track, Jane Hughes,
swimming, Bob Puddi-
combe, tennis and Jim
Sed.
Two more
candidates
acclaimed
By JOAN  GODSELL
Two more AMS executive members are in by acclamation—co-ordinator of activities Graeme Vance and treasurer
Mike Sommers.
Two candidates are running
for first vice-president in the
second-slate elections.
They are present AMS first
vice-president Bob Cruise and
former Communist club president Charles Boylan.
FROM THE ARMS
In a telephone interview
from the Fraser Arms Mike
Sommers said: "I have the
qualifications and interest for
the job  of treasurer."
"I also have a fair number
of new ideas and I'll do my
best."
During  his  managership   of
the    College    Shop   Sommers
doubled  sales   over  the  previous year.
DISAPPOINTED
Graeme Vance said, also
from the Arms: "I am disappointed there aren't more
qualified people around to
fill this position."
"I tried to get some fellows
interested but the position
seems to scare them off."
(Vance is the present AMS
co-ordinator   of activities.)
First vice-president nominee
Cruise said: "I have several
new ideas for this position
next year, aimed at creating
closer communication between
the AMS and the students."
NEEDS EXPERIENCE
"It's my feeling that a
three-quarter million dollar
operation such as the AMS
needs someone who has experience,"  he said.
"And I'm looking forward
to the campaign."
Boylan said: "The main
reason I am running is because
I think there should be a voice
on council in the tradition of
Jim Ward, (AMS first vice-
president in 1963-64), to stimulate debate and bring council
closer to the students."
Boyland was president of
UBC's Communist Club from
1962-64.
"However," he said,  "I am
running strictly as a non-partisan."
ONE INELIGIBLE
A third student, Mike
Castlemain, Science IV, was
also nominated for the position of first vice-president but
was ruled ineligible.
Castlemain placed his nomination forms in AMS secretary Marilyn McMeans' post
office box instead of posting
them on the AMS
board as demanded by election rules.
Nominations for second-
slate positions closed Thursday at 4 p.m.
Campaigning officially began Thursday, 6 p.m. The second slate election will be held
Wednesday.
PROF. DOUGLAS Kenny has
succeeded acting dean Edro
Signori as head of UBC's
psychology department.
Top AMS
politicos
honored
Honorary Activities Awards
Committee has selected seven
UBC students for this year's
awards.
The seven are: Rehabilitation
Medicine undergraduate society, president Judy Bain, ex-
Academic Activities chairman
Mike Coleman, Ubyssey art
director Don Hume, AMS
president Roger McAfee, Totem editor Scott Mclntyre,
Graduate Students president
James Slater and Homecoming
chairman Rick McGraw.
The awards are made on the
basis of excellence in student
government, said committee
chairman Gordon Galbraith.
"It's pure politics, the winners are the top politicians and
bureaucrats on campus," he
said.
"Seven is the largest number
of candidates ever to be given
the award. This reflects the
growing scope of the Alma
Mjater Society," Galbraith said.
The committee which selects
the award-winners consists of
all past winners who are still
bulletin  on campus:
Ubyssey associate editor
Mike Hunter, AMS treasurer
Kyle Mitchell, AMS activities
co-ordinator Graeme Vance,
CUS chairman Gordon Galbraith, Ubyssey Page Friday
Current Affairs editor Peter
Penz and Barry McDell, Arts
rv. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   5,   1965
1st vice
president
seconders
CHARLES BOYLAN
By  Everett  Northup
There is still a chance for
change on Council.
The vote I received for AMS
President indicates widespread
dissatisfaction with the present establishment and agreement with my programme.
For this reason I am seconding the nomination of Charles
Boylan for first vice-president.
Among his qualifications
are:
Academic record: graduated
in honors English with 79.5
per cent average; Member of
Arts Council; Member of AAC.
Three years member Parliamentary Executive Council;
UBC delegate to Commonwealth Conference; winner
UBC-U of A debating competition; active UN club member;
founding member of BC Students Federation.
Put a new voice on council.
Vote for Charles Boylan.
•    •    •
BOB  CRUISE
By Bill Harvey
I second Bob Cruise for the
position of first vice-president
because he has worked hard
the last four years in student
activities.
Turning the first vice-president into an event program
co-ordinator is just one of the
many positive suggestions in
Cruise's report Blueprint '66—
an analysis of the AMS.
The AMS must, next year
more than ever before, establish better lines of communication between student council
and students. |
Read Blueprint '66 to get
Cruise's ideas on this problem.
TIM HOLLICK-KENYON
. . . most yet
Alumni
score major
'breakthrough'
Alumni director Tim Hol-
lick-Kenyon said Wednesday
the 12.5 per cent increase in
alumni giving over last year's
total of about $85,000 represents a major breakthrough.
"The $100^000 mark was a
big barrier," he said.
Alumni have donated $100,-
576 for scholarships_and general campus improvements in
1965.
"This is entirely separate
from the Three Universities
Capital Fund," said Hollick-
Kenyon. "It is strictly for use
for the benefit of this campus."
Hollick-Kenyon said after
this year money donated by
alumni will be given to the
Three Universities Fund drive.
He said the $100,576 will be
divided into a $25,000 Sherwood Lett Memorial Scholarship Fund, grants to the library, athletic department, and
various campus activities, $350
scholarships to one student
from each B.C. electoral district, and a discretionary grant
of about $13,000 to UBC President John Macdonald for general campus expenses.
Mardi Gras money
Anti-hate rally cancelled
after only 10 students show
An anti-apartheid rally scheduled for the Hebb Theatre
Thursday, was cancelled when only 10 people showed up.
"The poor turnout does not make me pessimistic," chairman of the anti-apartheid committee, Dismas Adija, said.
"I am sure people are interested in what we are doing."
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OPEN   7:30 a.m. • 7:00 p.m. Monday - Friday
8:00 a.m. • 6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
Dystrophy gets
cheque at test
Profit made by UBC sororities and fraternites at their
annual Mardi Gras Festival last month will be presented
to muscular dystrophy research next Friday.
The money will be presented
Spot for mom
on campus
at the annual songfest in the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre at
8 p.m.
President of the Muscular
Dystrophy Association, Al
Simms and Dr. W. C. Gibson,
head of the Kinsmen lab
searching for a cure to muscular dystrophy, will accept a
cheque from Robin Lecky and
Cathy Broderick, Mardi Gras
co-ordinators.
The amount of the donation
will not be announced until
the presentation of the song
fest.
Ten fraternities and six sororities will compete in the annual singing competition.
Judges will he Dr. Lloyd
Slind of the Music department
and critic Karel Ten Hoope.
Songfest will feature an 18-
piece orchestra. It will play a
medley of old hits before sorority and fraternity singers
come on.
The M a r j o r i e Leeming
trophy and the Houser cup, activities awards for the top sorority and fraternity, will be
presented at Songfest.
Tickets are available at the
AMS or the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre: adults $1.50, students
$1.
If your mommy and daddy
want to come visit you at UBC,
now you can put them up right
here on campus.
Yorkeen House, at the north
edge of campus, is available
for short term residence at $4
to $5 per day.
"If students' parents are visiting and wish to stay on campus, this is the place for them,"
said Director of Housing John
Haar.
The house will also be used
for people on short courses and
visiting professors. Forty commercial fishermen on an 18-
day technical fisheries course
are currently using the residence.
Cruelty of youth
irks geology prof
A UBC geologist Thursday
proposed young people be
trained in the proper use of
wilderness areas.
"The attitude of young
people today seems to be if
you see something move,
kill it," said Dr. Wilbert
Danner.
Dr. Danner was speaking
at a Varsity Outdoor Club
talk on A Geologist's View
on Parks.
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Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes. Friday, February 5, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
On
Tap
By   DOUG   HALVERSON
The fellow down the hall
grabbed me and pulled me
into his room as I walked
by last night.
"Ssh," he whispered, "You
work for The Ubyssey —
right?"
"Yes," I answered defensively, "but if you don't hit
me I'll quit—honest, I will."
"You don't understand,
I've got a big story for you!"
he said.
• •    •
"Gee whiz," I said gratefully. Do you think it's big
enough that Editor Horsey
will give me my own press
card and copy pencil and
trenchcoat if I get it?"
"This story is so big your
editor will give you anything
you want for it," my assailant said.
"You mean it's a real
scoop," I cried, my mind
filled with visions of the
things every reporter longs
for — a genuine goose quill
pen and simulated tortoise
inkwell, a one-quarter size
working model of William
Randolph Hearst . . . even a
Reader's Digest condensed
volume of Addison and
Steele.
• •   •
"Fill me in! Fill me in!"
"Well, look," said my assailant. "This story is of international importance. It's
so great it's going to make
Russia, China and America
impotent as world forces."
"Gosh," I said. "That's almost stop-the-presses news.
Tell me the* rest."
"It's like this," he said,
trying to appear mysterious.
"Think of an island in the
Northern Atlantic that is
completely surrounded b y
water and has shores on all
sides and is considered completely harmless?"
"England!" I cried with an
air of sudden enlightment.
• •   •
"No, fool!" he said as he
thumped me on the head
with his bust of Kipling.
He was a foreign student.
"Iceland," he cried. "Iceland
is the threat."
"Little, quiet, respectable
Iceland?" I inquired.
He said: "But under that
quiet is a plot. A plot to overthrow the world!"
"I can see it now; 10,000
Viking longships sailing on
the harbors of the world.
New York, London, Murmansk, Prince RuDert . . . nations falling under the heavy
blow of Viking steel  .   .   ."
• •    •
I sneaked out of his room.
I might have believed his
fantastic tale but I caught
the one slip he made.
He said that those Icelanders were going to invade in
Viking longships and everyone knows longships are
made of wood.
His story was impossible
because Iceland has been defrosted for centuries.
It was more proof of the
journalist's superior  mind.
—sllpstick photo
OUT, OUT, damned cock.  Co-ed  tries to shoo  away chickens released   by engineers
in   College   Library  at  noon   Wednesday.    Fowl were  later taken away  by  Buildings
and Grounds workers.
High school conference
175 peek into
academic curtain
High   School   conference
Saturday.
Lens bugs
crawl out
By ED BLACK
Now is the time for all one-
eyed square-shooters to get
busy at the vats in their smelly
dark caves.
UBC photographers have
been given just three weeks to
produce.
Their art will be exposed in
the annual Hill-Tout Salon.
Deadline for the salon, held
in honor of University photographer Ben Hill-Tout, is
March 1. Application forms are
available from Lasserre 201 or
Hut Gl-Room 18.
comes   to   UBC   Friday   and
Under chairman Bob Holt-
by, the conference brings 75
high school students from all
over B.C. to the campus to
give them a look at university life.
"We want them to know
what to expect of lectures,
what the different faculties
offer — as many facets of university life as possible."
Object of the conference is
to have students return to
their schools and communities
and explain what goes on at
university and what the university is like, Holtby said.
Delegates are met when
they arrive and are driven to
their billets, (if they arrive
before the program starts Friday at 9 p.m.) or to the campus by members of the High
School Conference Committee.
Love cheap
in Ubyssey
True love gets a cut rate in
The Ubyssey for Valentine's
Day.
Manager of Student Publications Al Vince said that a
special rate of 50 cents will be
given for Valentine messages
in the Classified Ads next Friday. Regular rate is 75 cents.
"This is the first time we've
offered this," he said. "We
think it will brighten up the
section."
No money,
meeting
suggested
Men's and women's athletic
committees want more money
and AMS president Roger McAfee wants them to have a
meeting.
The men's athletic program
faces a $35,000 annual deficit
by 1966-7 if changes are not
made in the present system of
financing, AMS first vice president Bob Cruise told council
Monday.
• •    •
Women's   program   faces   a
$17,535 deficit, WAC president
Linda Williams said.
"MAC and WAC should get
together, have a joint philosophy meeting, and present an
overall plan to council," AMS
president Roger McAfee  said.
AMS European charter
flight director Ken Christenson
told Council Monday 65 students have signed up for the
trip.
• •    •
He said he expects no problem filling the flight which
leaves May 21 and returns
Aug. 5.
Grad student president
James Slater has been appointed chairman of the AMS Elections Eligibility committee.
Other members of the committee are Engineering president Steve Whitelaw, Arts
president Chas. Pentland, UCC
chairman Gordon Galbraith
and Lome Hudson.
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During this period, members of The Institute of Chartered
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to graduate in 1965. Arrangements for interviews may be made
through Mr. Hacking at the University Placement Office. Earlier
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MU 1-3264 THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1965
Govt by default
Government by acclamation is not as healthy as
government by election.
The three AMS positions that went by default this
year (treasurer, second vice-president and co-ordinator)
presumably were uncontested because student interest
in AMS politics is low.
The 33 per cent turnout in the first slate Wednesday
tends to re-enforce this.
It is unfortunate that some effort was not made to
contest the defaulted positions.
The AMS committee system, for example, should have
been able to produce at least two candidates for each
position.
An election campaign establishes a tension. Programs, policies and ideas tend to flow from this tension.
The   AMS   presidential   campaign   will   hardly   be
I
remembered   for   its   scintillating  clashes  of   wit   and
concept.
But it should indicate specific areas of concern for
president-elect Byron Hender.
He should analyze why Northup beat him soundly
in three residence areas.
Northup won Acadia 110-50, Fort 182-86 and Totem
Park 131-89.
The three areas are significantly removed from
the AMS geographically; perhaps there is an intellectual
isolation as well.
Or perhaps students were more impressed with
Northup's plans for student co-op housing than with
Hender's.
Hender is at least in the position of being able to
see areas of his own policy that need strengthening.
And the election has given president-elect Hender
a mandate of sorts.
It's a mandate from at least 2,482 students who think
Hender's program of increased aid to undergraduate
societies, prompt student union construction and
extensive study of our athletic program, is worthwhile.
As for the non-voters, the 10,000 or so who didn't
care, life will roll along.
And they may remain blissfully unaware that nearly
$1 million of their hard-earned money, or their parents',
is being handled by people they know nothing about.
Oh really dept.
Det. Sgt. John Gillies, head of the Vancouver City
Police Narcotics squad, told UBC students that marijuana is addictive.
Doctors tell us it is not, or no more so than cigaret
smoking and with about the same risk involved.
Which, for a starter, indicates some of the problems
faced by those who wish to legalize the sale and use
of marijuana.
"The fit isn't exactly right yet, sir . . . but your head ought
to get quite a bit larger in the near future."
Posterity watches
the quiet parade
By CAROLE MUNROE
A prediction: The 1960's
won't make a big splash, but
instead will quietly parade
across the pages of history
books complete with prepared
briefs and upheld banners.
Why? Because today the
best way to get what you
want—in    any    field—is    to
talk about it.
Forget the violence. Instead, use arbitration, conciliation, down-to-earth and factual DISCUSSION.
The best shot doesn't win
any more. What he really
needs is target practice in the
speech field.
•    •    •
This trend had its beginnings in the south when millions of Negroes realized that
force was getting them nowhere. Their change to peaceful tactics—in policy and in
practice—is gaining them
ground, even if slowly.
The general public doesn't
go for violent demonstrations.
And you can't offend their
cultured tastes if you want
their support.
Now university students
have joined the parade—and
organized a few of their own.
Two years ago UBC students rallied the Lower Mainland behind them with a Back
Mac campaign.
Just this week University
of Manitoba students boycotted classes and paraded to the
Legislative buildings armed
with a petition, a printed report, and scads of facts.
• •   •
Admittedly neither Minister of Education revolutionized
their budgets as a result. But
both these drives definitely
indicate the trend.
Berkeley students at the
University of California improved their demonstration
techniques and have had remarkable success.
There, the Free Speech
Movement reached the ultimate in sophistication of sit-
in technique last term.
Thousands of students took
part in a massive sit-in
around, on, in and over the
administration  building.
Parades, leaflets, speeches
and even an all-night rally
made the nation aware something was wrong at Berkeley.
Violence flared up infrequently as students and faculty supporters practiced the
finer points of non-violent
demonstration.
• •    •
And behind it all, a rational, thoroughly prepared case
that couldn't help but be a
winner.
This is it—how to succeed
in demonstrations without
really shooting.
Watch for more and more
of it. This is what history
will remember us for.
Mr. D. R.
McAfee
replies
Mr. Horsey, The Ubyssey's
erstwhile editor-in-chief pontificated (in an editorial
Thursday) that "the establishment" retracted with a rare
burst of energy" in enacting
legislation prohibiting advertising on behalf of a student
politician in The Ubyssey.
Mr. Horsey's council reporter, who doesn't seem to know
that the AMS first vice-president is Bob Cruise and not
Byron Hender, claims in her
column of garbage, that council enacted the legislation because "it would have disqualified AMS presidential
candidate Everett Northup
from running . . ."
This is utter nonsense.
Council's action was taken to
insure that no group, regardless of hwo much money it
had, could spend it on behalf
of a presidential candidate of
its choice.
In short the council was trying to keep elections on this
campus from becoming measured in dollars and cents.
And if you think that
couldn't possibly happen let
me inform you that in a recent by-election at the university of Manitoba one candidate spent $1,200. There are
no limiting rules there, Mr.
Horsey.
The Ubyssey urges Mr.
McAfee to re-read the editorial. Space once again, will
then be given to Mr. McAfee
in Tuesday's paper to answer
the editorial's criticisms.
Mr. Horsey rightfully
points out another possible
loophole in even the new regulation and I have only one
question of him? Where was
he Monday night when council was discussing the matter?
He is, after all, a member of
council and it would seem to
be one of his responsibilities
to point out this problem.
I would not like to give the
impression that Mr. Horsey is
not capable of accurately reporting what went on in
council.
I would merely like to point
out that he spends so little
time at the meetings that
whenever he does show up he
immediately becomes confused.
This I might add, is not a
reflection on council.
EDITOR:   Mike  Horsey
News   Tim  Padmore
City  — Tom Wayman
Managing  Editor .... Janet Matheson
Art    Don   Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. City    Lorraine Shore
Asst. News Editor   Carole Munroe
Associate   Mike Hunter
Associate  — Ron Riter
Asst.  Managing   Norm  Betts
Page Friday    Dave Ablett
Critics   John   Kelsey
Another swinging day in the perspiration factory granted a fourteenth of a laugh. What do you do
with old bowling balls, sez mooting
lawerlet Bert (ha) McKinnon: string
necklaces for elephants. Inane? Not
so, say: Jack Khoury, Joan Godsell,
Corol Smith, Carol Anne Baker, Sara
Simeon, Mona Helcermanas, Robbi
West, Bob Wieser, Art Casperson,
Brian Staples, Doug Halverson, Gord
MteLaughlin, Cassius Clark, Harold
McAllister, Bob Burton, Elizabeth
Field, Jack McQuarrie, Tim Roberts,
Dave Orchard. We're waiting to see
Art StevSfison Thursday next. And
we're waiting to see Al Birnie anytime, not to mention Lynn Curtis.
Inane. Inane. Inane. Inane. Inane.
(Everything seems inane today.) Connor missed a meal — see page 4
irt in action • the UBC week • squishy decline pi
FEBRUARY 5, 1965
ON THE COVER: The dancers
who were near one corner at
The Medium Is the Message—
the Fifth Festival of the Contemporary Arts armory show.
See Page 2. Photo by Dave Henderson, known to his friends as
Fred.
Editor: DAVE ABLETT
Criticism..
John Kelsey
Films, Books Graham Olney
Current Affairs Peter Peni
Artwork leff Wall, Al Hunter,
Gerry Ehman
A look at the festival
today   in  Page  Friday.
But back there, on
Pages 6 and 7, a series
of letters completely unrelated to the arts raises
a question of interest.
The letters deal with
Holger Herwig's reply to
German professor Ernst
Loeb.
Putting p e r s onalities
aside — and the interchange of articles and
letters over the past
three weeks on these
pages has certainly degenerated into a personality issue. Dr. Leslie
Miller raises the ques
tions of what is a scholar
and what is a scholar's
duties.
Assuming that most
people who live and
learn in a univensity
community, either aspire
to being scholarly or
come in contact with
those who are, it is a
question that cries for an
answer.
What is a scholar?
Page Friday's pages
are open to those who
would give some kind of
an answer — student or
faculty. And we would
hope that those in the
best position to give an
answer would be the
first to come forward.
Also, in today's PF, a
new feature — a superficial, uninhibited, completely biased look at
UBC's week.
Notice, par ticularly,
the blatant theft of a
well - known television
show's format. It is compiled by the staff, friends
and enemies of PF and
The Ubyssey. Its twin
themes are irreverency
and  irrelevancy.
FESTIVAL
Medium's message stayed
behind those hanging screens
tor most of the audience—
it's that old bugaboo tor
UBC students—mental blocks
PF Two
By JOHN KELSEY
EVER tried to involve people in a production?
Take an armory.
Add hanging curtains, electronic music and noise, dancers, two dozen slide projectors with colored slides.
Supply all the light with
the slides.
Sprinkle well with thundering attacks on all senses
—touch, sound, sight, smell—
and with the urge to communicate
Add students.
This was the Armory show
of 1965, THE MEDIUM IS
THE MESSAGE.
•      •      •
The show, part of the Fifth
Festival ol the Contemporary
Arts, ran three times Wednesday, with a total attendance of about 500. It is one
hour long.
The Armory was hung with
colored plastic cut curtains,
dividing it into distinct areas
and providing a projection
space around the walls.
There were enclosures and
alleyways here, there and
everywhere, with a card
board - and - cloth building
thing in the middle.
The slide projectors
around the outside on scaffolds in the middle played
colored light, shapes and objects all over the curtains.
They continously moved
and changed, following people and playing on different
screens.
Performers with alpine-
horns, violins, tapes, sheets
of tinfoil and microphones
all hidden in the hangings
made noises.
Dancers filled the. center
house and one corner area;
they made textural movements on cloth screens between them and the people,
pushed arms and legs
through the holes, and danced in and with the crowd.
The basic idea was to create a world, putting people
from this world into it. Then
try to make people react,
make the presentation appealing enough for people
to take part, to try to communicate back.
Some did, most didn't.
The ones who did danced
with the dancers, pushed
back on the cloth screens,
shouted at the shouters. One
mooed back up the alpine-
horn—startling the player.
They made puppet shadows
on the screens, swung the
curtains, and tickled feet
sticking out of the center
house.
It was a good attempt,
showing a great deal of imagination by the designers.
The near darkness allowed
people to act as they do in
a dark theatre, picking noses
and grimacing faces.
The crowd was unguided;
they roamed as their fancy
dictated, as their attention
was caught by something.
And something invariably
caught one's attention. A
bright flash of light, a
scream, a loud moo, a bright
red projector beam shining
in one's face. Were there any
order of procession, as in
museum display, the effect
would have been lost.  Lost
Lindsay's an engineer and
architect who's got everything
beat in the space structure
game—except the weather
That towering (maybe),
flying (perhaps) rotating
(well . . . ) space structure that was supposed to
be erected Thursday
wasn't.
It will, perhaps, be
erected today at 3:30 p.m.
the weather willing.
Jeffrey Lindsay, architect and engineer, who
was supposed to erect the
structure as part of the
Festival of Contemporary
Arts, said it couldn't be
done  in  the  rain.
That means if it rains
today, the structure will
go up on Monday at 3:30.
If it rains then . . . and
so   on   until   the   festival
ends, in which case, if it
is still raining the structure stays in pre-fab
stage.
Lindsay isn't saying
what the structure will
be—it could be anything.
He was given $500 by
the festival committee
and 30 student assistants
to build it.
After it is up, it will
perform in  some way.
Lindsay is currently
working on the structural
system of the theme
building of Expo '67 in
Montreal and on a one-
acre skylight for Simon
Fraser Academy.
as surely as it would have
been if there were a broadcast program of instructions.
However, the action was
all simultaneous. Perhaps it
would have been better if
there was an intense concentration on in one place, and
then in another, keeping the
crowd at a constant high
level rather than at an all-
pervading medium level.
But that would have left less
freedom to wander. One
would have to attempt such
a production both ways,
and see which achieved the
best result.
•     •     •
But the main block was
the UBC student's natural
reserve. He's unwilling to
react, unwilling to show his
feelings.
On most of the people,
those who were bewildered
or merely bemused, it had
an effect and this- show did
communicate, if one was uninhibited   enough   to   let   it.
There's a re-run today.
Go take part, it's worth it.
ART
Dark Mirror
sheds some
light on the
dismal arts
By JACKIE FOORD
The Dark Mirror, currently showing at the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery, is crucial for
two reasons.
It has gone a long way in
correcting what I call the
fallacy of modernity and it
presages a new direction in
art.
By the fallacy of modernity, I am referring to the attitude that "pessimism, degradation and despair" are
somehow the exclusive
right of the post war painters. '
This exhibit is important
because it makes a statement not about the modern,
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE:  MORE ART MORE ART
(Continued from Page 2)
but about the human, condition.
True, the progenitors of
"The Dark Mirror" are
painters like Munch, Ernst
and Kokoshka, but these artists in turn have their historical counterparts in the
works of Bosen, Breughel
and Goya.
• •     •
If these painters are still
too modern to support my
thesis, observe Strombotne's
The Dangling Man. This
painting illustrates the fate
of the defector in the battle
of the hall portion of the
Odyssey.
Observe too, the Classical
theme of Nude on the Rocks,
the Gothic sentiment of The
Discontented, the Rennais-
sance concern with perspective in A Kind of Hell. What
this exhibit represents is the
eclipse of the existentialist,
anti-dialectic approach to
art. It seems that 20th century art is finally paying its
debt to history, acknowledging that we are human first,
modern second.
• •     •
As to the portentious nature of the show, I predict
that figurative art is coming
into ascendancy, that the age
of squishy, oblique abstracts
is in decline.
For these reasons, see The
Dark Mirror.
Don't despair, it is significant, honest art and it is
good.
POETRY
Welch made them
laugh — and
they forgot he
could be serious
By AL HORST
"I want to thank Lew
Welch for his delightful
reading," the girl said. I'm
sure the entire audience felt
that the reading was delightful. Few thought it was anything more than that.
Welch's effusive sense of humor prevented the reading
from being a complete success. He used humor very
effectively in many of his
poems but he used it so obviously that the audience
began to listen for nothing
else and missed much of the
impact of his "serious"
poetry. Unfortunately, many
of those who came for edification found merely entertainment.
•      •      •
Welch is an excellent reader; his voice is clear, his manner unpretentious. Most of
the poems were from a collection called On Out. They
ranged from recollections of
schoolday experiences in
which the "circular process"
of association first mentioned in Wobbly Rock (1960) is
still evident, to his Hermit
Songs, written while in a
self-imposed two-year hermitage in the wilderness. The
Hermit Songs best show the
This is a part of one work
in The Dark Mirror, currently
showing in UBC's Fine Arts
Gallery.
effect of Buddhism on his
poetry (American Buddhism,
not oriental. He looks to
haiku and oriental Buddhist
verse only for certain aspects
of form, not theme. "Man,
the world's blowing up! I
haven't got time to write
about dew drops on a rose
petal.")
• •      •
Those who attended the
reading will remember more
than anything else his
"scores" or jazz-poems.
These were funny, rollicking
things sung by Welch. (He's
got a great voice; used to be
a jazz musician) "I want to
get song and poetry back together."
His final poetic statement
was a simple, eloquent summary of a poet's life, a poet's
search: "Shrineless, I pilgrim through the world."
Jack Spicer's reading on
Tuesday was entirely different. He read quietly, intently; the audience listened
carefully. It was the first
public reading of Language,
his most recent book.
• •     •
As a listener, I found it difficult to connect Spicer's
countless metaphors, but
there was definitely a thread
of theme running through all
the poems: as the relation of
letters and syllables forms
languages, so the interaction
of the thoughts, objects, and
energies of the universe
form language, the language
heard and understood by the
poet, ("death is an image of
syllables").
Spicer calls the essential
unit of this language "grapheme".
Buchanan 106 was packed
for Spicer's reading. Perhaps
the spirit of the Festival is
catching on. I hope so. This
is one of the few times when
students at UBC are given
the opportunity to question,
to learn, to experience and,
above all, to think.
CINEMA
Conner's art:
a new quirk
tor every
occasion
By ED HUTCHINGS
Mr. Conner began his
show by improvising on the
mouth-organ against a sort
of cantus firmus of rhythms
on a film loop (the loop was
that 10-9-8 thing you see all
the time) He followed this
with A Movie, a film which
I enjoy and have seen several times. An untitled, (as
far as I know) rather slight
film followed. Then he ran
a Betty Boop cartoon( circa
193?) apparently because he
felt the situation required it.
Then came a film called,
I think, Report, which could
have been better. He ended
with something called Cosmic Ray or, sometimes The
Movie.
The Avant-Garde, or a
sizable fraction, claim that
their mission is to disturb
us. I certainly found myself
disturbed by the effect of
showing these films to a
Contemporary Arts Festival
audience, compared with
the effect of the same films
on an everyday audience.
You'd think that the CAF
audience would have by far
the better attitude, but my
impression is just the reverse. Cerainly A Movie,
which I found subtle and
thoughtful on a previous
viewing at Cinema 16, seemed flat and rather arbitrary
in Bu. 106 before an audience who had damn well
paid their money to be
astonished.
Only something like Cosmic Ray, which has a few
honestly nasty moments and
one good dirty joke, can
come across in this kind of
situation. I suspect that Conner thinks so too: hence the
antics . . . the mouth organ,
the letter in the last Artisan
and an impressive reversed
signature which must have
taken a while to work up.
I don't blame him; for this
kind of situation I think I'd
show Betty Boop, too.
In fact, I'm beginning to
wonder if Conner might not
be an example of a new
kind of Avant-Gardeist:
Quirks For Every Occasion.
Let no collegiate audience
depart unamazed. Let no
gaggle of jewelly patrons
escape without a delightful
hint of wickedness.
Yet with all this, a few
hours a day for honest effort, and, in Conner's case,
perhaps a solid corpus of
work, and an honestly won
reputation at the end of it.
Uncalled for, unwanted and mostly
unfair, the following
two columns contain
a whimsical review
of the past seven days
at  UBC.
PF  Three
COLUMNS
IN GENERAL: Beta
Byron Hender was elected president of the AMS
in one of the closest elections in years. So far his
frat brother George Lincoln Rockwell (who really is a Beta) has not commented on the victory.
Totem park residence
held a "suppressed desire" dance last Friday,
which officials say was a
significant comment on
the morality revolution
o n Canadian campuses.
No  one turned up  nude.
O n Wednesday, Dr.
John Barfoot Macdonald
announced that 12 new.
street lights will be installed on Marine Drive.
No wonder. He lives
there.
On Monday, which
was Chinese New Year,
several Totem Park Students dressed up in Chinese costumes and handed
out fortune cookies to
students as they went
through the food line. It
didn't surprise anyone.
They were probably hired
by food services which
employs coolie labor, according to student workers.
INSIGNIFICANT: More
than 180 future teachers
invaded the campus last
Friday and Saturday to
look over UBC's education faculty. It is expected about 175 of them will
decide to go into Arts.
AMS returning officer
Bob Peyton, who flew off
to Ottawa as first slate
elections got under way,
took the Bureaucrat of the
Week award. The week
was one of only two in
the year in which Peyton
has anything to do.
There's still second slate.
Dr.   John   Macdonald's
Guidepost to Innovation,
the blueprint for UBC's
academic future that was
expected to raise a controversy, didn't. Forty
students jammed a 450
seat theatre to hear a
panel of top speakers discuss it last week.
IN THE NAME GAME:
AMS president Roger
McAfee, who will comment on anything, got his
name in the paper 18
times this week, something close to an all time
record. He easily beat
out Mike Coleman (13),
Hardial Bains (6), and
Casey the Groundhog (2).
IN HONORARIUM:
Mike Coleman, who has
belonged   to   just   about
every committee on the
campus, was this week
awarded a n Honorary
Activities Award for his
work. Then student council, in a great burst of
consistency, turned
around and censured him
for the way he ran the
Academic Activities Committee. Committee - man
Coleman, HAA pocketed,
quit.
•      •      •
In other awards THE
BRIGHT IDEA OF THE
WEEK award goes to the
entire student council for
voting a supplementary
grant to the engineering
u n d e rgraduate society.
The vote was taken after
AMS treasurer Kyle Mitchell explained that the
society has no more
money and will be dangerously close to bankruptcy if further funds are
shelled out.
INCONSIDERATE: The
UBC accounting department, which announced
last week that income-
tax fee receipts will not
be ready for students
until mid-February. No
word has come from Ottawa as yet that income
tax forms will be accepted up to six weeks late.
Brock Management
Committee ordered the
Varsity Outdoors Club to
stop climbing walls in
practice climbs . . . Now
if the management committee has any good ideas
for getting rid of the pit-
ons on the library . . .
INADMISSIBLE: President Macdonald announced Monday that it
may be harder to get into
UBC in future. Students
were not surprised. Ever
tried to get in at 8:15
a.m.?
And in model parliament elections the Liberals won again. A prospective cabinet minister
was immediately accused
of ... oh never mind.
IN TROUBLE: University of Alaska's goal
keeper Dave Carter who
played against the Thunderbirds hockey team and
let 29 goals into the nets
in two games. "The second game score (13-2)
would have been higher
if we'd been using our
first team," said a modest
UBC player.
BIGGEST STORY OF
THE WEEK: The engineers cut down a tree on
the library lawn. It was
40-feet big.
night brad yeah, hosa PF's poet records for posterity
the contemporary arts bash—
poets in odd places, screaming
students, nude devil women and
all that was made respectable
campus contemporary art festival
What a weekl
A painter splashing lots of paint on gobs
canvas with good results.
A display of strange clocks
Wild sculpture
(every so often a student runs
screaming insane
out of the gallery)
and nude red warm woman devil painting
The odd poet
(are all poets odd?)
in a lecture hall
(odd place for a poet)
reading some good some bad some
poetry
And people jammed crammed slammed
in crowds droves herds
listening
no one dropping a pin
Modern painting poetry art
made respectable under the guise of
Contemporary
And of course campus election week
simultaneously.
—frank harxis
ART
Conner's—er—Mike's eat
turned out to be the biggest
fiasco of the year—ah, but
the rest of art in action was
fun—and a bloody good idea
By JOHN KELSEY
Art in Action, yesterday
afternoon, brought 21 local
and visiting artists to UBC,
to display and do their various works in the corridors
of Buchanan building.
The most crowd captivating features of the show
were Heinz Laffin's poetery,
Reg Holmes and Iain Baxter's ice sculpture, and
Bruce Connor's eating.
The Connor eat was certainly the fiasco of the year.
Connor, who last Monday
had agreed to eat, decided
not to when Vancouver
Times reporter Michael Val-
py reported the coming
event in the paper.
Connor developed a dis
like for Valpy, and so Valpy
decided to do the eat himself. He wasn't too entertaining, so the crowd stormed
his concealing screen to expose the crunchy reporter
and his chubby accomplice,
Murray Farr of Special
Events.
Laffin's pottery was (as
usual) extremely competent.
A potter with a wheel is always a crowd drawer, because of the starling metamorphosis occurring in his
lump of mud.
Ah, but the ice sculpture.
Six tons of ice on the quad
were attacked by a horde of
screaming fine arts students,
under Holmes and Baxter's
supervision.
They used blowtorches,
icepicks and axes, colored
inks, and one flame thrower.
Like many of the painters
inside, they didn't take the
project very seriously —
rather, it seemed to be a
lark. Which is as it should
be.
It was fun, it was made,
it was transient, it had no
plan or coherence. It was a
bloody good idea.
PF   Four
Art in action is always a
good idea. It gives the student a chahce to see what
artists are doing today, a
chance to ask them questions, a chance to form a
far more complete background than one would
otherwise have. With people
and canvases and color—and
a little madcap—it can only
be fun.
If it isn't taken too seriously.
This year's production
seemed to have just the right
amount of absurdity, levity,
and serious study into art
forms to come off properly;
a good noon's entertainment.
The frivolously funny was
balanced by the serious
study:—such as Wilkinson's
applause, Chow's woodcuts,
Graham's lithography, Laffin's pottery.
Except for the eating fiasco, which could have been
hilarious, and wasn't.
Poor Hernando
lust didn't
sense the
profundity
By   BEVERLY   BIE
Hernando: Jeez, Marianne, what a bunch of
crap.
Lookit this guy, p-f-f-i-f-
-e-r, pffiffer, I mean, Pffif-
fer. What's with the no capital letters bit? I guess that's
artsy-craftsy or something .  . .
Anyways, get the way
he's slopping the paint on
that thing. Reminds me of
the time I painted the kitchen and my mother changed her mind about the color
when I'd half-finished, after
the dog ran through.
Marianne: Shshsh! Hello,
Elfrida. Just love your - uh -
appliques!
Hernando, don't you see?
I mean, don't you just feel
it right here?
Hernando: Where's that?
Marianne: Your soul, your
Hernando. That black in the
centre is the depth of man's
unconscious, the head of
darkness, and the yellow
circle around the edge represents the conscious mind,
the self we manipulate to
pulse in tune with the universe around us. That magnificent vibrating daub of
red in the upper left corner
is The Apple, Hernando.
Don't you feel it?
Hernando: Barf.
Marianne: Shhh. Let's go
downstairs and see the pottery. I have two of Heinz
Laffin's pots in my bedroom, you know.
Hernando: One inner
tube, two coke ads, one beat-
up seven-up sign, a wheel
with spokes, three rusty tin
cans. I don't believe it. I
just don't believe it.
Marianne: But don't you
see how expressive it is of
the collective Twentieth
Century human consciousness? Why, it's the Great
Society in a nutshell . . .
Everyman lost, bewildered,
wandering in a billboard
jungle. It's the epic of modern man, it's today's Beowulf.
Hernando: Look, Marianne. I could do one of
those with my big toe and
my eyes shut.
Marianne: Oh, you Philistine. Come and see the pottery. Oh, wouldn't it be the
most sublime experience to
create a pot out of mud
with your own two hands—
so elemental—did you notice how cleverly they have
put Laffin right next to the
pop  art?
A visual poem, isn't it?
Natural man and civilized
man, really. Oh, let's follow
all those people, here's such
a crowd, it must be something good.
Hernando: Hey, this is
more my style. C'mon,
here's a couple of seats.
God, what's all the garbage
on the platform? Hey, let's
eat, huh?
Marianne: Hernando,
Shhhhh. You can't eat now.
That's Bruce Connor, the
artist, you know. We can
eat later, he's going to eat
now. Ooooh, he's so marvellous, and so terribly profound.
BISTROS
New partner,
newer ideas
sharpen up
the Flat Five
By  TAJA  BHAVAN
Much has been said about
the revitalization of the
Flat Five in the newspapers.
The new spark in the
field of jazz expression in
Vancouver is now present
only at the Five. Jazz has
never, at least in the past,
been a staple diet of coffeehouses that have managed
to survive bankruptcy.
The various jazz clubs
have gone broke or changed
policy to a folk or even
east-end entertainment.
Even Howie B a t e m a n
closed the Inquisition because he was losing too
much money trying to promote jazz in a coffeehouse.
His big money loser and
closing act was Miles Davis.
The Flat Five may become a winner now that
there is a new major partner, Robert Cardinal, who
has run a few small clubs in
Montreal. He is young and
has new and vibrant ideas
that are already present in
the renovation of the club's
interior.
The atmosphere is . excellent for  all-night  gigs.
When Stan Getz was in
town last week, he and his
side-men (mostly his side-
men as Getz always seemed
too tired) would go down
after their last shows and
either practice or just have
a session. The club is theoretically open just on the
weekends and on Wednesday nights for poetry readings but there is usually
someone drinking coffee,
(Continued on Page 5)
SEE:  MORE  BISTROS
Support K.K.K.
Feb. 1-5
• Eyes Examined
• Contact Lenses Fitted
Armstrong & Rea
OPTOMETRISTS
Uptown office:
1522 West Broadway
RE 3-1611
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2263 W. 41st Ave.
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WEST POINT GREY
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Eleventh Avenue at Sasamat
Rev. A. J. Hadley
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11:00 a.m. 'This We Believe'
7:30 p.m. 'Faith and Works'
8:45 p.m. Young People's
Fellowship
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GSH NEWS
Any graduate student interested in applying for
a University Fellowship is reminded that the
closing date is March 15, 1965. Awards are made
to students selected by the Scholarship Committee
from those recommended by departments. Students
who propose to proceed to a higher degree at the
University should get in touch with the department
concerned without delay.
Looking for a place to meet your friends
Try "THE BOOK BARREL"
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TEL: MU 5-5814
891  GRANVILLE ST. tandem painters at Art in Action
MORE BISTROS
(Continued from Page 4)
playing a guitar, or just
talking.
Peter's Ear is the restaurant in the front area of the
establishment that is now in
the process of being renovated and made into a distinct part where anyone desiring good food can go
without having to pay the
Five's admission price. This
was the idea of the other
partner, David Parkin.
The idea is to create a
new and different atmosphere than the club's inside
with good service and different foods. It will, I imagine, be open as soon as
the rebuilding is complete.
MUSIC
At last—
a pianist who
treats one note
like another
By BASIL RATZLAFF
Once in a while, people
have a chance to hear and
really enjoy a pianist's interpretation of music without
being dazzled by flashy technique and unnecessary pian-
istic mannerisms. I'm sure
this is the way the whole
audience felt about Boris
Roubakine last Tuesday.
I have not heard such fine
piano playing in a long time.
Technique became the vehicle of expression instead
of the controlling overbalance one so often hears. Mr.
Roubakine's performance
went beyond finger work,
musical dynamics and phras-
ings into the real understanding of the music.
The interpretations were
his own and he played with
unfailing assurance and conviction. He is one of the very
few artists who is able to
treat each note as if it were
just as important as the next
and not letting this aspect
overshadow the whole musical idea of any given composition.
The Beethoven Sonata,
Op. 110, which opened the
program, is a giant among
piano works. In 35 minutes
of music there is shown all
aspects of the composer's life
—the fierce, gnarled roots
of inner turmoil to the serenity and quietness of later
life.
With no fuss, Mr. Roubakine sailed through the technical hardships and showed
us all the aspects of the
music as clearly as if he had
painted them on a canvas.
His hands were steel or
silk as he chose; nothing was
omitted.
The Brahms—Handel Variations and Fugue were played with the same assurance
and thorough understanding
of the composer as well as
the composition.
The last work on the program the Davidsbundler
(League of David) dances of
Schumann were played exactly as Mr. Roubakine explained they would be — impromptu, fleeting glances of
real life. There is some comedy here since there was no
League of David, and these
pieces were not characteristic dances. Even this subtle
humor came through in the
performance.
The encores, Schubert's
Moment Musical in F minor
and Brahms' Intermezzo in
E flat, Op. 117, No. 1, were
ideal finishing touches to a
perfect evening.
Lieder recital
beats technical
problems of
Mahler, Brahms
By GRAHAM CLINE
Clear presentation, full,
warm tone, exceptional musical understanding — these
are three of the many qualities which made last week's
Lieder recital of Maris Schil-
der and Phyllis Schuldt a
memorable  occasion.
Supported by a sensitive
and sure accompaniment,
Mrs. Schilder was able to
overcome the technical difficulties of the Mahler and
Brahms songs and give us
richly satisfying music.
(Continued  on Page  6)
SEE:   MORE MUSIC
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Vacancy 3945
Fisheries Research
Division Director
of Research
The Marine Department
requires a Director of Research for the Fisheries Research Division, Wellington.
The initial salary will be
£290O-£3100 per annum.
Fisheries research, carried
out by the New Zealand
Government, has been reorganized as a separate division of the Marine Department, with emphasis on basic
fisheries research and separate from the development,
extension, management and
technology functions, which
are the responsibility of an
associated division of the
Department.
An excellent opportunity
exists for a capable and experienced fishery biologist,
with a capacity for administration and leadership, to
develop a new unit under
very favourable circumstances, with Government priorities being given to research
expansion, provision of new
laboratories, research vessels and associated facilities.
There has been some basic
work carried out in New
Zealand on demersal species
and on invertebrates; however, the present and continuing need is for substantial expansion of the basic
biological studies on which
valid management practices
can be founded.
Priority is being given to
building up a fully qualified
graduate staff, and a technical staff to an initial total
of 30.
The Director's immediate
responsibilities will include
the recruitment of staff, formulation of a research programme, and the planning
of laboratory and ship facilities.
Salary £2900-£3100 with
prospects of higher remuneration in the expansion
scheme. Conditions of appointment include provision
for payment of fares and
other travelling and accommodation expenses. There is
opportunity to join an advantageous superannuation
scheme.
Further details are available from:
The Secretary,
Marine Department,
P.O. Box 2395,
Wellington, New eZaland.
(for attention Fisheries
Research Division)
or from:
The New Zealand High
Commission,
Ste. 804-77 Metcalfe St..
Ottawa, Ontario.
365 DAY
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Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product ol Coca-Cola Ltd.
Special Events of the Fine Arts Presents
CANADIAN OPERA COMPANY - ON TOUR
DIE FLEDERMAUS
Johann Strauss' Comic Opera (in English)
February 16, 8:30 p.m. — Auditorium
Tickets at A.M.S. - 75c and 1.25
Don't procrastinate!   We had to turn away over 200.
Late Ticket Buyers at Our Shankar and Montoya Concerts MORE MUStC
(Continued from Page 5)
The six songs of Gustav
Mahler which opened the
p re- g r a m are among the
most difficult in the repertoire. Both performers displayed vitality and control
in this group and although
Mrs. Schilder's pitch sometimes was not sure, this was
over-shadowed by artistic
and sincere interpretation.
The eight Gypsy songs of
Brahms were well done.
Here both soloist and pianist displayed the sensitivity
and co-ordination so necessary to make Lieder a success.
The last group on the program was a representative
selection of Brahms' romantic songs. Musically as well
as technically difficult,
these songs provided both
artists with the opportunity
to prove their musilal worth.
Each song in this group received its special musical
approach.
Toward the end, the pitch
of the soloist again tended
to be a little flat, but considering the difficuly of the
program and the vitality
needed to make it a success,
this was insignificant.
Both Mrs. Schilder and
Mrs. Schuld are to be congratulated.
DISSENT
A drenched
answer to
hitch-hiker
hater Hunter
By MOLLIE HZNNEY
Scene: Corner of Chancellor Boulevard, just down
from the flagpole. Time: Almost dark. Weather: Normal
(pouring rain).
Driver: Hop in! Sure, I'll
give you a lift. Always room
for one more! Miserable
night, eh?
Hiker: Boy, I'll say. It's
really pouring there. Good
of you to stop. I certainly
appreciate the lift.
Driver: Think nothing of
it. I'm always ready to lend
a helping hand to a fellow
traveller. Besides, you'd be
drenched through in no time
in that downpour. Do unto
others, I always say.
Don't suppose you've got
a cigaret? Thanks, forgot to
pick some up at the last
stop. Got a match? Hate to
use the lighter unless it's
necessary. A penny saved is
a penny earned, you know.
Ha! Ha!
Hiker: Hope I'm not dripping water all over. So kind
of you to stop.
Driver: A little water
never hurt anything, I always say.
LOUD BANG
Hiker: What was that?
Driver: Sounds like a
flat. Darn, and me with no
raincoat. Say, do you know
PF  Six
how to handle a jack? Good.
I'll take the umbrella and,
re-direct oncoming traffic
with this red light I brought
along. Always be prepared I
always say.
(Gets out and looks at
tire.)
Rotten luck, old boy, we
seem to be stopped in a
rather deep puddle. Makes it
a bit of a challenge for you!
Give me a call when you're
finished — with this umbrella to hold I won't be
able to help . . . Oh, well,
too many cooks, you know!
Driver: Hmm! Strange —
not one car for me to redirect. As I always say, better safe than sorry! Gee, you
look rather wet. Guess one
can only get so wet, eh? Ha!
ha!
Got a cigaret? Thanks.
Even the cigarets are a bit
wet; you should have left
them in the car. Your last
one, eh? Hate to take it, but
if you insist . . . Any dry
matches? Thanks.
Hiker: My God, I'm soalc-
ed to the skin!
Driver: How about a
quick cup of coffee? That'll
warm the cockles of your
heart!
Hiker: I could sure use
something hot after that ordeal.
Driver: We'll stop at the
White Spot just a little further on. I'd better pull in
here and get some gas first.
Say, don't suppose you've
a credit card I could use?
Hate to break a large bill
and I'll pay you at the next
town. I don't use one myself. Only buy what you can
pay cash for, I always say.
(To gas station attendant.)
Fill 'er up! Better check
the oil, too. Gee, didn't realize it was that low. Better
throw in a couple of quarts.
Oh, say, put some cigarets
on there, too, will you —
hate to keep borrowing from
my passenger here. Never a
borrower or a lender be, I
always say!
Hiker: Let's get that coffee, I'm freezing. Haven't
you got a heater in this
thing?
Driver: Never turn it on
while I'm driving, makes me
sleepy. If you're going to
drive, don't sleep, I always
say. Here's the drive-in.
Hiker: Thank heavens!
I'll get the coffee.
Driver: While you're in
there grab me a hamburger
and a side of chips! Don't
forget, lots of ketchup!
Hiker: Yeah.
Driver: That was refreshing—good of you to treat—
guess you really appreciate
this lift, eh? Yes sir, I'm always going out of my way to
help the other guy if I can.
People who know me well
all call me Generous George,
and the shoe fits, even if I
do say so myself.
Here we go again — too
bad that window won't close
on your side there. It's a bit
chilly. Oh well, blow the
cobwebs out of your head!
Darn, there's that blasted
windshield wiper stuck
again.
Say, seeing as you're already soaked, would you
mind riding out on the hood
and helping them out a bit?
Where are you going?
Hey, come back! We're in
the  middle  of nowhere!
Not even a thank you. Ungrateful vagrant. Oh well,
takes all kinds to make a
world, I always say.
Confidence
You, too, will hove Confidence in
Contact Lenses
jgm       by LAWRENCE
Calvert
"He specializes"
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mm
NTH
It has been brought to our attention that quite a few girls swim
during the winter—in gym pools,
in club pools, in the balmy south
and in (brrr!) the Polar Bear Club.
May we remind them what no
one should ever forget: you can
swim wearing Tampax internal
sanitary protection, Tampax can't
be seen or felt once it's in place,
yet it's just as protective as the
much larger pad. Unlike a pad,
it doesn't get wet from the water.
During the summer, we promise you coolness, cleanness, freshness. These are just as important
in the winter. Everyone
wants to feel fresh and
clean. And the problem of
odor (which Tampax prevents), the problem of feeling overheated, can certainly arise in winter's warm rooms.
Come to think of it, maybe
we'll stop saying anything different in the wintertime than we do
in the summertime. Swim any time
of the year! Canadian Tampax
Corporation Limited, Barrie,
Ontario.
NO BELTS
NO PINS
NO PADS i
NO ODOR
Invented by a doctor—
now used by millions of women
€SA NEWS
NOMINATIONS FOR G.SJL EXECUTIVE positions
opened Feb. 2. The following positions are open:
President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Secretary,
Social Officer, Cultural Officer, Public Relations
Officer, Sports Co-ordinator, Club Night Chairman and Special Services Officer.
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING—Tuesday, Feb. 9. A
bar will be open from 3.30 to 4.00 at which time
the meeting will begin.
SKIING TRIP—Would all those interested in a skiing
trip to Mount Baker on Sunday, Feb. 7 please
sign the list in the G.S.C. or contact Chuck Irwin
at Local 652 or 224-0644. Come and meet your
fellow students and enjoy the snow.
Low-cost permanent protection
for your books
Book-Ion Plastic Laminate
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Protect your investment in books with Book-Ion,
the modern washable plastic laminate. Book-Ion
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Larger rolls, size 400" long by various widths,
available on special request.
Distributed by Ben Sanders Company Limited, Toronto
Do the
Louie - Louie
with the
CHESSMEN
TONIGHT
Friday, February 5
Totem Park Lounge
9:00-1:00 a.m.
Admission Only 50c Warren rang
bells with
nine irate
musicians
(The following was signed
by nine students of the
music faculty.)
It is unfortunate that your
Page Friday critic Mr. Warren Bell failed to understand the purpose of the
Music Department's Collegium Musicum.
If Mr. Bell is looking for
an evening of musical entertainment, he would be
better advised to confine
himself  to   concert-going.
• • •
His criticism that Mr.
Piltz's remarks were of interest primarily to students
of musicology, is comparable to a crticism that a
meeting of L'Alliance Fran-
caise is incomprehensible to
an "outsider" because it is
conducted in French.
It is obvious that Mr.
Bell missed the whole point
of Collegium. Its purpose is
not to provide an evening
of relaxing entertainment
for the general public, but
to give an illustrated lect-
ture on lesser-known aspects of music, about which
one would not generally
hear.
There is no reason why
anyone should feel like an
intruder, if he is willing to
accept Collegium as it is
intended.
A second
professor
hits Holger's
scholarship
By LESLIE  MILLER
Ass't. Professor of German
Mr. Holger Herwig's second utterance in The Ubyssey (in response to Dr. E.
Loeb's letter calling attention to factual errors in Mr.
Herwig's report on Germany) raises a quesion of
serious concern to a university community.
The issue is not whether
the "enlightened views" of
Mr. Herwig are "shared" by
two noted British historians,
nor whether Dr. Loeb is
"getting paid" to be an expert on Thomas Mann — a
depressingly primitive conception of the role of a
scholar.
•      •      •
The question is whether,
when one is granted the
means to study in a foreign
country, one honors the responsibility to report on that
country with objecivity and
accuracy, and how one reacts when it is suggested that
one is guilty of factual inaccuracy.
In his latest article Mr.
Herwig alludes to the reaction of an audience at the
University of Munich to a
speech by Professor Golo
Mann on the question of
Germany's frontiers: it is
puzzling to me that a stu-
d e n t of German history
should make no allowance
for the political climate of
that particular geographical
area before citing events in
Munich as an indication of
the political thinking in Germany as a whole.
Would a foreign student
in the U.S.A. be as naive as
to draw conclusions about
the attitudes of most Americans, from the reception
which one can predict would
be accorded the Reverend
King, were he to speak before an audience at an institution such as the University of Mississippi?
e     •     •
It is, moreover, an overstatement to say that Professor Mann's views were
attacked by the "entire"
German press; it should also
be pointed out that a considerable body of informed
opinion in Germany subscribes to the views of historians such as Professor
Mann (even if there are
those who read with satisfaction the theories of scholars such as Professor Hog-
gan) and that the majority
of West German high
schools do not stop short in
their history classes at the
year 1871.
•     •      •
Part of Mr. Herwig's response is to identify Dr.
Loeb with the forces in Germany which provoke Mr.
Herwig's fears: (e.g. ". . . Mr.
Loeb's comments do throw
some rather interesting light
on the habit of Germans to
take any criticism of their
nation as a personal insult . . . ").
The gentleman cast by
Mr. Herwig as such an ardent and sensitive German
nationalist was, however,
forced to flee from Germany
because after 1933 he was
considered by those in power
to be "un-German".
Mr. Herwig's thesis would
thus be merely amusingly
inaccurate were it no in such
painfully poor taste.
May I conclude with the
earnest suggestion that Mr.
Herwig re-read Thomas
Mann's works, in particular
the letters and the "Betrach-
tungen eines Unpolitischen".
- • • •
He may not emerge an
"expert" but he will discover what Mann wrote in
that long work, when he
wrote it and whether
Thomas Mann did reject an
opportunity to lead the Germans in 1945, as Mr. Herwig
appears to believe.
"• . • and he
isn't much
of a gentleman
either . . ."
By GEORGE WEISSENBORN
Judging by your first
article on Germany (PF Jan.
15), Mr. Herwig, I had to
come to the conclusion that
you do not favor the scholarly approach to a subject.
Having read your second
article on Professor Dr.
Loeb's reply of (Jan. 29), I
regret to find that yours is
not the attitude of a genle-
man, either!
How many more revelations may we look forward
to, Landsmann?
Sine studio et ira.
OVERSEAS
Lumumba, man
and ghost,
stalk Congo
together
By SUSAN   ADAMS
Lumumba comes back to
The Congo — this time as a
ghost.
Over Congolese fields of
blood Lumumba's image is
being rebuilt—the image of
a martyred hero.
Before his death in February 1961, Patrice Lumumba
was prime minister of the
Central Congolese government. Before premiership,
he was one of the many nationalists fighting to gain
independence from Belgium,
and before that, he was a
minor clerk.
Lumumba's end is shrouded in myth and mystery,
and perhaps this is why he
is making such an excellent
ghost.
Soon after the arrival of
United Nations troops in The
Congo, Kasavubu ordered
Lumumba to be seized. Kasavubu was then commander-
in-chief of the Army and
president of The Congo. Formerly he was the political
rival of Lumumba.
The former prime minister was then soon freed, and
he worked hard gathering a
good deal of support in several provinces.
In December, 1960, he was
abruptly arrested and sent
to prison without trial.
Legend tells us that while
President Tshombe of the
seceded Katanga province
was seated in a theatre in
his capital, he received a
telephone call from Presi-
d e n t Kasavubu. Kasavubu
said that he was sending
Tshombe "a precious gift".
According to Tshombe a
'plane arrived next day containing Lumumba accompanied by two of his deposed
cabinet ministers. The three
men's hands were tied
stretched behind their backs.
They had been beaten and
bruised, and were vomiting
blood. Some claim that one
man was already dead.
Their last 'plane flight
must have been a hideous
one. Evidently, a few hours
later, Lumumba died from
his wounds.
But there are other accounts of the death; either
Tshombe had the three prisoners shot, or Lumumba escaped from jail and was
murdered while  fleeing.
Who is to blame? Kasavubu could have ordered his
pilots to beat the passengers and Tshombe might have
handled his 'gift' more carefully.
President Tshombe is now
prime minister of the reunited Congo. Pro-Lumumba
rebels are gaining strength
and civil war continues.
The ghost Lumumba is
projected as the saviour of
his people, but what was the
man  Lumumba?
PF Seven
English 100- English 200
"Course Summaries"
1. Short Statement of Themes.
2. Analysis and Explanations of Poems.
3. Biographical Sketches of Authors.
4. Old Exams.
5. Compiled according to  1964-1965 Course Outlines
Free Inspection at: THE COLLEGE SHOP
or
BETTER BUY BOOK STORE
4393 West 10th Ave.
THE BAVARIAN ROOM
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NAME	
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MY TRAVEL AGENT IS	 FESTIVAL
TODAY.
12 noon. Repeat performance of The Medium is the
Message, repeating every
half hour or so until 3:30.
At the Armory. Admission 25 cents.
3:30 p.m. "The Dumb
Waiter" again in the Audi-
t o r i u m . Admission 25
cents. Performance will
be followed by a discussion on the Theatre of the
Absurd.
Abo at 3:30. Free Jazz in
Buchanan 106. No admission price listed.
MONDAY
12:30 in New Education
100. Improvisation, against
the spoken word and
against pre-recorded tape.
3:30. A program of experi-
mental films including
Scorpio Rising by Kenneth Anger. Auditorium,
for 25 cents.
TUESDAY
12:30. Chance Music by
faculty and students of the
Department of Music, New
Education 100.
Also   at   12:30,   Dr.  D.   J.
Watterson conducts a tour
of "Dark Mirror" in Fine
Arts Gallery.
3:30  p.m. Poetry  reading
by   Dave   Dawson,   Grey-
don   Moore,   Wayne   Ny-
berg and others. Bu. 100.
WEDNESDAY
Feb. 10. 12:30. "Contracting   Evolution",   an   illustrated lecture by  Jeffrey
Lindsay. Freddy Wood.
3:30 p.m. Programe of experimental films. Auditorium. 25 cents.
7:30 p.m. "Instant Politics
in an Electronic Age". A
talk by Dr. Ed Black of
Political Science department. New Education 100.
Festival ends.
CALENDAR
Jose Greco, Spanish gypsy
Lecture  series  at the  Vancouver Art Gallery, 1145
West Georgia.
Tuesday, Feb. 9 — "Tutan-
khamun".
Feb. 16—"Thebes". (The
rich and glorious past of
Thebes in Ancient Egyptian history).
Feb. 23 — "Nubia". (The
attempts to save the Bub-
ian monuments, particularly Abu Simbell).
Dr. Henry Riad, Director
of the Greco-Roman Museum Alexandra Egypt will
give all three lectures. All
for absolutely nothing.
Lectures start at 8 p.m.
Arms and the Man. Play presented by Emerald Players. Metro Theatre, 1370
SW Marine Dr., Feb. 5-13.
Tickets $1.50 to $3.00.
Doors 7:30 and curtain
8:30. "Latecomers will not
be seated until after the
first act." Growf.
Jose Greco and his company
of Spanish Gypsy Dancers. QET Sunday Feb. 28
at 8:30.
Yacov Zak. "The Great Sov-
viet Chopinist". QET Feb.
11 at 8:30. Famous Artists.
Tickets $4.00 to $1.75.
Happy David
Support K.K.K.
Feb. 1-5
Something Really New
CON-GAR DROPS
A Concentrated
Mouth Wash and Gargle
Two drops to a glass of
water makes a truly
effective mouth tingling
antiseptic - deodorant
TRY IT TODAY
from your nearby Drug Store
Good Opportunity For
One or More Students to
Purchase
Young Men's
Clothing Store
Price: Approx. $20,000
Good U.B.C. and Local
Trade
For further information
write:
1313 Malibu Place
R.R. 2, Ladner, B.C.
Starting February 8—13 Auditorium
U.B.C. Musical Society's Production
of Broadway's Hit Musical Comedy
BELLS ABE RINGING
starring
PAT   ROSE
LOYOLA  BUNZ
Student Performances - Wed. - Thurs. 75c
General Public Wed-Sat. $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT A.M.S. or AUDITORIUM Friday, February 5, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
BACKGROUND
Tree dean still green
By LORNE MALLIN
Here's how it feels to be a
dean.
"I feel like a freshman,"
says Dr. J. A. F. Gardner,
new dean of Forestry.
Dr. Gardner took office
Monday.
He has worked in the Federal Forest Products Lab on
campus for the last 17 years.
• •    •
"I used to look out over
water, and now I look out
over green-roofed, tar-paper
shacks," he said in an interview in his comfortable office
in the Forestry and Geology
building.
Dr. Gardner graduated
from UBC in 1940.
He grew up in Nakusp, B.C.
"I love to fish and camp.
In Nakusp the water was too
cold for swimming, and
crawling around the hills
didn't interest me as a youngster," Dr. Gardner recalled.
• *    *
"I haven't had much of a
chance to do any skiing this
season. I'd go anywhere to
ski," Dr. Gardner said.
"I don't like to hunt, be
cause I like the animals too
much. But when I was a
youngster I hunted for food,"
he said.
Dr. Gardner was called Mr.
Cedar by members of the forest industry because of his research on cedar trees.
DR. J. A. GARDNER
. . . feels like frosh
"All my adult life I've been
working on wood," he said.
"This deanship is an interesting and exciting new experience. A lot of the faculty
are old friends and everybody
has been very helpful.
•    •    •
"My objective as Dean is to
strengthen the faculty and
improve Forestry education."
Dr. Gardner was asked
about the Forestry undergraduate society and their
newspaper, the Plank.
"They have a great deal of
spirit. I haven't seen the
Plank yet,    but I remember
that faculty editions used to
be a competition to get away
with as many off-colour stories as possible," Dr. Gardner
said.
"UBC students are the same
as students anywhere. They're
interesting because they're
young people and always
have a new way of looking at
things that older people like
me can benefit from," he said.
• • •
"Seems to me there is a lot
to be gained from increased
student- faculty contact.
There's always room for
more.
"I'd like to meet as many
students as possible.
"But if I stretched it too
much I wouldn't have time
for my duties as Dean."
CUS means to
survey us again
Look out, here comes another means survey.
The Canadian Union of Students, with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the Canadian
Association of University
Teachers and the Canadian
University Federation, will
conduct a means survey on 10
per cent of all Canadian university students, including
some from UBC.
Last year the AMS here conducted a means survey for UBC
students only.
Results will be tabulated by
the CUS national office and
made available to interested
persons.
All UBC students involved in
the survey will be notified by
Feb. 14.
UBC survey director Ray
Larsen urged students chosen
to co-operate.
Students interested in assisting the survey are asked to
leave a note forlLarsen in AMS
box 153.
I
I
I
FREE
to U.B.C. students only
Tyrolia Safety Harness
With the purchase of any model of
YAMAHA EXPOXI SKIS I
at
THE NIMROD SHOP
(At the Corner of 16th Ave.)
3206 Dunbar Vancouver 8, B.C. RE 3-6514
THIS   OFFER  EXPIRES   FEBRUARY   15TH,
Greased pig tilt rained out
as clean-up campaign end
Katie and the Kampus Klean-up Kampaign got washed
out Thursday.
Katie a $12 piglet belonging to the Aggies, was supposed to be chased around the stadium by undergraduate
presidents. But the rain brought cancellation of the pig
chase.
"Katie is living in the Aggies' bull-barn until the event
is rescheduled," said Blake Dunlop of Circle K which is
sponsoring the campaign.
The Friday debate on liquor ads in The Ubyssey between AMS president, Roger McAfee, and an engineer will
go on as scheduled, at noon today in the Library pool.
Students are urged to attend the debate, and to throw
garbage at debaters.
GO FORMAL
TO THE LIMELIGHT BALL
Tuxedo* • White Dinner Jackets
Tails • Morning Coals • Director Coats
Complete Sis* Range and Latest Styles Page 6
r
i
THE     UBYSSEY
THE
t   Sm£m
I BUM |
By TIM ROBERTS
The Thunderbird ski team
had its moment of glory, and
is now looking for another
one.
There's little chance of the
team's ever beating the University of Washington squad,
but last weekend's second
place finish at Banff was a
coup d'etat of sorts in the skiing world.
U. of Washington, Montana
State College and, to a lesser
degree, U. of Idaho are sports-
scholarship-stocked teams with
financial support considerably
greater than that of UBC's.
• •    •
Their Nordic teams are almost wholly comprised of Norwegian imports on scholarship
in the United States.
The Montana State College
team drives about in impressive' 1964 Pontiac Station Wagons with "MSC" on the side
and two rows of Head Vectors
on top of the cars.
The Montana skiiers often
have afternoons off from classes to practice on the slopes.
The UBC team has made up
much of the difference through
steady training, and is likely
the best conditioned team on
the circuit.
Coach Allan Fisher has been
a steady inspiration to the team
both on and off the slopes.
The weather last term also
helped since the team was able
to run outdoors continuously,
enabling it to build up endurance in long runs over varying
terrain.
Due to the snow, sessions
have now been forced indoors,
and stress has been laid on running the bleacher stairs and on
exercises.
• •    •
On weekends the alpine
team either practices slalom
or enters local races, as it will
do this Sunday in the Tyrol
Giant Slalom on Mt. Seymour.
The cross- country team
works out on the "misery
sticks"—coach Fisher's appropriate term for cross-country
skiis—or enters in local competition.
The jumping team is a nonentity until each meet, when
regular alpine racers Leigh
Brousson, Tom Jenkin, Eugene
Ruelle and Dave Turner submit themselves to airy flights
for the sake of team points.
In Banff they were jumping
up to 150 feet, saving the team
from falling behind Montana
State College in the overall
standings.
• •    •
Elsewhere on the UBC scene,
VOC is planning two skiing
tours this Sunday.
The first, comprising some
20 people, will be in the Diamond Head region and the
other, led by Rick Moodey,
will find itself on Mt. Sedge-
wick near Woodfibre.
Upon returning to Vancouver, the two groups will meet
for a sing-song and "feast" in
"Kakademon Kloset" at the
foot of the Squamish Chief.
HEAVEN FORBID, exclaims Carroll College "Fighting Saint"
Bill Albright (14) as T'Bird Gene Rizak scores a lay-up
helping his teammates chalk up a 61-58 victory Thursday
afternoon in Memorial gym.
Rugger Champions
meet favorites
The UBC Thunderbirds run up against their most challenging opposition of the Pacific Coast Intercollegiate
Conference when they encounter Oregon State University's
rugby squad Saturday at Varsity Stadium.
The game goes at 2:30 and will be switched to Wolfson
Field if the Stadium field is in unplayable condition.
In other action at Wolfson Field Saturday the Braves
take on Georgians and Tomahawks meet Oregon State
Jayvees, both games commencing at 1:00.
UBC enters
Regatta
The UBC Sailing team will
compete in the Northwest
Inter-Collegiate Yacht Racing
Regatta in Seattle, Feb. 6 and
7.
The combined men and women's team has won the North
American Collegiate Sailing
Championship and the P.N.W.
Team Racing Championships,
three times in the last five
years. Perennial Thunderbird
rival is U. of Washington who
will be at a slight advantage
on their home ground^.
Support K.K.K.
Feb. 1-5
VOLKSWAGEN
Repairs • Inspections
B A Service Stn.
Dunbar and 30th Avenue
CA 4-7644
In basketball
Friday,   February  5,   1965
'Fighting Saints'
fall out of step
By JACK McQUARRIE
Thursday's noon-hour basketball game had everything—
cheerleaders doing the twist, an opposition forward who
yelped like one of President Johnson's beagles, half-time
ballet, crazed basketball coaches, and ... oh yes, best of
all a win for the homeside.
The T-Birds defeated the
Carroll College "Fighting
Saints" from Montana 61-58
in a display that rivalled the
victory earlier in the year
over Seattle Pacific as an upset and for thrills.
The Birds were led to victory by Bob Barazzuol who
staged a tremendous show
scoring 21 points, 14 in a hectic second half. Most of Bar-
azzuol's efforts were of the
driving, twisting variety. Alex
Brayden earned second star
honours, scoring 6 of his 11
points in the decisive final
quarter.
UBC faced a 31-27 deficit
at the half.
T'Bird basketball mentor
Peter Mullins, although allowing that "our shooting
was not up to par in the first half" was happy with his team's
performance. This will probably be news to anyone watching
Mullins perform under game conditions. During the warm-up
he sits very relaxed and perfectly under control, the picture
of composure so to speak.
Then the whistle blows; he squirms as one of his boys commits a needless foul, groans as another fails to execute a play
in the accepted manner, shrieks when another throws the ball
away, then fully out of control spends the rest of the game
jumping out of his chair ranting and raving at officials and
players alike. Finally, haggard and dishevelled, he pulls himself back into something resembling order and limps exhausted
back to his seat, only to leap up again seconds later, victim
of yet another misdeed.
Not for nothing did a local scribe label Mullins "The Yo-yo".
In summary it was great.
Next exhibition goes tonight
at 8:30 p.m. See you there.
PETER MULLINS
. . like a yo-yo?
SPORTS
EDITOR:
GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
WISailPTION i
EYE GLASSES
<o^ss:169S
.   All Doctor'! Eyeglass   Prescriptions   ,
EEirst  quality  materials  used,
rk  performed  by  qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville     M U 3-8921
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSN.
Annual General Meeting
and Elections
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1965
Nominations open for the following positions:
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Treasurer
Cultural Officer
Public Relations Officer
Social Officer
Special Services Officer
Sports Co-ordinator
Club Night Chairman
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1965
Annual General Meeting at 4:00 p.m. Nominees for
office will be present. Sherry will be served at 3:30
p.m. Nominations close at adjournment.
MONDAY, FEB. 15 and TUESDAY, FEB. 16 polls
open 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. in the office at the Centre.
Obtain further details at Graduate  Student  Centre. Friday, February 5, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
K-.T"* *.*«..
.vkMimm,
UBC GYMNASTS have been preparing this week for meet
with Eastern Washington Saturday in the Memorial gym
at 2 p.m. Working out on the parallel bars is an unidentified member of the Thunderbird squad.
UBC faces Denver
on road trip
Provincial title
next for curlers
UBC's Pacific Coast curling champions will be out for
the Provincial title this wee
Jack Arnet takes his rink
(Terry Miller, Glen Walker,
Soren Jensen) to Kamloops to
challenge the Interior representative who will be declared
late Saturday night.
Arnet will play a best of
three series Sunday. The winner goes to the Canadian
Championships in Saskatoon
March 1 - 5.
Since starting the Consol
playdowns in January, Arnet
and his curling cohorts have
won 12 games without defeat.
Two victories have been over
the 1964 World Championship
rink skipped by Lyall Dagg.
(Roy Vinthers skipped the
Championship rink in Arnet's
second meeting.)
OTHERWISE: The Thunderette girls curling rink left for
Saskatoon Wednesday to compete in their~ Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Association  spiel February 4-6.
Members of the UBC rink
are Dolores Doige, skip; Linda
Barber, third; Faye Thompson,
second and lead Carolyn
Swart. UBC last won the
trophy in 1961.
rend.
The Thunderbird hockey
team left last night on a four
game road trip. The Birds play
the University of Denver Friday and Saturday. They then
move to Provo, Utah where
they will meet the Brigham
Young Cougars for games Monday and Tuesday.
• •    •
Birds Olympic stars Gary
Dineen, Barry McKenzie, Ken
Broderick and Al McLean will
make the Denver trip. They
will return home Sunday as
they leave later this month to
join the National team overseas and do not want to miss
too much of their studies.
The wrestling team, recent
winners of the B.C. open
Championships, hosts Central
Washington tonight in the
Women's Gym. The meet goes
at 7:00 p.m.
• •    •
In Memorial Gym at 2 p.m.
Saturday, the Gymnastics
team, after a strenuous week's
practice, meet Eastern Washington.
The Men's Volleyball team
travels to Seattle, Saturday to
meet a sharp U. of Washington
squad.
Thunderettes
in Saskatoon
Thunderette teams travel to
Saskatoon this weekend for
WCIAA competition in basketball and curling.
Participating in the round
robin tournaments will be: U.
of Alberta (Edmonton), U. of
Alberta (Calgary), U. of Saskatchewan, Regina College,
Brandon College and U. of
Manitoba.
UBC last won the basketball
trophy in 1963, when they
shared it with Calgary and Saskatchewan.
Support K.K.K.
Feb. 1-5
Volleyball
Longview, Wash., is the destination of both the Women's
Volleyball teams this weekend.
The senior team, coached by
Miss Marilyn Russell, is composed of Jacquie Bell, Maureen
Fishleigh, Diane Kirby, Diane
Godfrey, Sylvia Mclntyre, Jenny Johnston and Lauretta
Teschke.
ATTENTION! Imported Car Owners!
We Can Supply All Popular Parts For Your Car
Plus a big range of accessories. These include driving
lamps, racing mirrors, wood rimmed steering wheels,
air horns, racing stripes, adjustable shocks, rally equipment, etc.
Drop Into
OVERSEAS AUTO  PARTS
12th & Alma Phone: 736-9804
10% DISCOUNT BY SHOWING A.M.S. CARD
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets at Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205
Be Sure of Your Copy
Buy
TOTEM
TODAY
..^
Pimm's No.1 has a Gin base
3 v^f'T?'^^^^^^^™
** ' ,-*■
<r*f"mr<t
Pimm's No. 5 has a Canadian Whisky base
(both are absolutely delicious!)
Two things about Pimm's: easy to
serve, and a taste you'll enjoy.
Just pour into a tall glass and add
ice and fill up with your favourite light
mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to
make the traditional Pimm's, famous
throughout the world. But don't bother
unless you're in the mood.
A new generation is rediscovering
Pimm's.. .and enjoying every moment
of it.
DRINK
PIMM'S
simply because you'll enjoy
the taste of it.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board
or by the Government of British Columbia. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   5,   1965
'tween classes
Cuban justice
on trial today
Vancouver lawyer John Macy looks at Cuban justice noon
today in Bu. 100. Films and slides will be shown at the
lecture which is sponsored by the Student Committee on
Cuban affairs.
• •   •
GRAD CLASS
Grad Class Council Faculty
reps meet in Bu. 227 Monday
noon.
• •    •
VCF
Communion with God, Rev.
Bob Birch, Hebb Theatre, noon
today.
• •   •
ED US
Harold Huggins speaks on
alcoholism as a growing problem in schools today.
• •    •
IRC
IRC Formal Feb. 6, 8:30 to
1:00 a.m. at Flame Supper
Club. Tickets $3.00 a couple.
• •   •
NDC and NDP
Peter Light speaks on Nonviolent Direct Action, Albany,
Georgia to Lamacaza, Quebec
noon today in Bu. 224.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Paul Winn, talk and slides on
Neighborhood Houses Monday
noon in Bu. 202.
• •    •
TATE ENTERPRISES
Cartoon show presented by
Tate Enterprises. Speedy Gonzales and a host of other characters.  Aud.  noon Wed.,   25c.
• •    •
JAPAN EXCHANGE
See Japan this summer. Apply in Bu. 42i62 by Monday.
Women urged
to forget Mrs.
MONTREAL (CUP) —
Women at McGill University have been urged to
postpone marriage and continue their education.
Mrs. M. J. Sabia, president of the Canadian Federation of University Women, told women they should
go on to graduate studies in
the sciences, professions and
engineering.
A Winter
Compus Special
Finest Quality
Raincoats
by
CROYDON
Regularly $29.95
Being cleared   at
$19.95
Laminates Included
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville    MU 1-4649
Open Friday 'til 9
ALLIANCE   FRANCAISE
Color films Metropolitan and
Thaumetopoetia by Robert Enrico, noon today, Bu. 205.
• •    •
iH. GERMAN CLUB
German Day every Tuesday
10 a.m. to 5 p.m. in IH upper
lounge. Everyone welcome.
Slavonic Circle presents cultural evening tonight at 9 in
IH. Dance to follow.
French Speaking Day in the
upper lounge 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
• •    •
EL CIRCULO
Guitar recital noon today in
Bu. 204.
• •    •
FACULTY DEBATING
Resolved that Red is Better
than Blue. Affirmative,
Science; negative, Frosh. Today noon in Bu. 217.
Coffee machines
seen for library
VICTORIA (CUP) — Coffee vending machines may
be installed in the library
at Victoria College.
AMS vice-president Rolli
Cacchioni suggested the machines be put in the basement lounge of the library.
However library staff object on grounds they do not
have the money or janitor
staff necessary for such a
project.
Bikes left
after snow
B.C.'s snowy winter has
struck again.
Sgt. Thompson of the University RCMP detachment said
Wednesday that six bicycles
have been found apparently
abandoned on campus. He said
they were probably abandoned
because of the snow.
A student can come down
to the station at 2137 Allison
Road and claim his bicycle by
correctly identifying it at the
campus station.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
LOST — Brown wallet Monday 4.30.
PHone Mike at CA 4-9856. Reward
offered.
LOST — on campus! A ladies' red
birthstone ring with white gold at
both sides. Would finder please
phone TR 4-2065. Reward.
LOST — Pearl & diamond ring in
Bio Science Bldg. Call Barbara
WA 2-1483. 	
FOUND — Ladies' wedding ring.
Initials C. M. C. Near Gym. Apply
Publications office, AMS, Brock
Hall.
LOST — Light blue ladies' sweater,
checker board knitting pattern,
lapels & pockets. Commodore, Jan.
22. Please call Ella-May RE 3-8900.
Valentine Greetings
12
TELL HER she's the sweetest—or
him—in the "classified" way. Special rate of 50c for Friday, Feb. 12.
Special Notices.
13
THERE'S no insulation against the
SHOCKERS! In one week the
SHOCKERS will strike.
PART-TIME rock n' roll drummer
wants band to play with. Phone
Casey,   261-2167.	
WANTED—Escorts for Lower Mall
Dorm Formal. Apply Phyllis Ross
lounge—Sunday 2 - 3:00. Must be
neat!
HILLEL Foundation. Skating party,
I'.N.E. Forum, Sat. Feb. 6th. 9:30-
11:30 p.m. Info-Hillel House, CA
4-4748.
Transportation
14
RIDE wanted from 49th & Arbutus
area for 8:30's, back at 5:30. Phone
Marg.,  AM 6-0468,  after 6:00 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'53 AUSTIN Sommerset on warranty
service. Record available. Phone
John, HE 5-9603 after 6:00 p.m.
'57 BUICK Standard 8; floor shift.
What offers? BR. 7-9508 after 4
p.m. Brian.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
DRUMMER for small R & R group.
Phone John after 6 p.m. AM 1-
7510.
INSTRUCTION  —  SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ART BUSINESS, ideal as side line,
for male or female. 1065 E. 17th
Ave.  TR 6-6362.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING room for rent. Bedding
included. Ride for 8:30's. Fraser &
Marine.  325-0824.
1 FURNISHED room. Use of kitchen facilities, phone & fridge.
Preferably male student. Phone
RE 3-3678.
Room  & Board
82
VACANCY EXISTS in PSI Upsilon
Fraternity House, 2260 Wesbrook
Crescent. Phone CA 4-0952, ask
for Mike Pearson. 	
ON CAMPUS — Room and board
Zeta Psi Fraternity, excellent food,
good atmosphere. Call 224-9885.
WUS Exchange Scholarships
Applications for the following exchange scholarships
will be accepted until Feb. 10, 1965:
1. SPAIN  (University of Madrid).
2. U.S.S.R. (University of Moscow or Leningrad).
3. JAPAN (University of Keio).
4. GERMANY (University of Hamburg).
Application forms and additional information are available in the WUS office, B.E. 257. Deadline for applications, transcripts, and references is February 10.
SALE
RUSHANT CAMERAS
4538 W. 10th Ave.
224-5858 : 224-9112
Annual Sale Feb. 6th -20th
On All Equipment and Supplies!
NOTE: Space limits listing all items. Come early to avoid
disappointment. Sale definitely ends Feb. 20.
Open Fridays till 9 p.m.
NEW 35mm CAMERAS
NEW SLIDE PROJECTORS
Reg.
Sal*
Reg.
Sale
Fujica Auto M Kit        $128.00 $99.00
Sawyers R.
84.50
Exakta VX11AF/1.9
195.00
Airequipt
124.50
69.50
Taron C.D.S. W/C           79.00
49.95
Brumberger 2V4
89.95
69.95
Kowa H. S.L.R. Auto
89.95
Pradolux
109.00
89.00
Konica EE Auto. W/C
49.95
Sawyers S
54.50
Fujica Auto. Magic W^C
39.95
Fujica Drive % Frame     79.95
59.95
USED   SLIDE   PROJECTORS
Topcon RE.S.l.R.
299.00
Bell & Howell
42.50
Konica F.P. S.L.R.
129.50
Prado W/C
165.00
USED 35mm CAMERAS
NEW   MOVIE   PROJECTORS
Konica                               35.00
19.95
Bolex 18/5
199.95
159.95
Paxette                             38.50
19.95
Elmo (Demo) Zoom
159.00
89.00
Agfa Silette                      29.50
17.95
Sekonic (Demo) Zoom 129.00
69.00
Retina f3.5                         35.00
22.50
Eumig Mark S
349.95
289.95
Argus C3                           15.00
9.50
Analyst 16mm Kodak 585.00 250.00
Argus C4                            29.50
19.95
Kalimar                               19.50
10.95
EDITORS       from
17.95
Argus Auto                        39.00
29.95
Retina 1A                          39.50
29.95
SCREENS
Walz 35-S                       39.95
27.95
30x40 beaded Tripod
6.95
Regula 35                           29.95
17.95
50x50 Beaded  Tripod
14.95
Contaflex 1                       79.95
59.95
40x40 Lenticular from
14.95
Zeiss Colora F
33.95
50x50 Lenticular from
19.50
40x40 Beaded on Pole
MISCELLANEOUS
with Planter
14.95
Linhof 214x3l/4 Roll Back
35.00
for 2V4x31/4 Linhof Camera
SLIDE  FILING  EQUIPMENT
Bolex H16 Body only    255.00
165.00
Carousel Trays
3.95
2.95
Airequipt Trays
3.29
2.29
NEW LENSES
Sawyers  Roto
Metal Slide Files
3.75
3.98
2.95
Biotar f2.58mm
Slide  Sorters
5.95
4.75
(Exakta)                          80.00
37.50
Symmar f5.6 210mm
MOVIE LIGHTS from
16.95
12.50
(Linhof)                       240.00
180.00
Tessar f2.8 50mm
ELECTRONIC  FLASH
(Exacta)                          60.00
39.95
New Braun
74.50
59.95
Polaris Zoom 90—190
Metz III
29.95
22.50
Screw Mt.
89.50
Metz 116
44.50
35.95
135mm F^3.5 Screw Mt.
39.50
Used Pic
14.95
9.50
35mm F/2.8 Screw Mt.
39.50
Metz 109
29.50
19.50
Higon Zoom 100—200mm
(Pentax)                          139.95
59.95
FLASHBULBS
AG 1  Sleeves of 12
1.10
USED  LEICA STEREO  OUTFIT $30.00
AG   IB
1.25
Leica 200mm f .4.5 Teleyt
85.00
M2
1.10
Soligar f2.8 35mm
M2B
1.25
(Pentax)                  69.95
45.50
No. 5
1.49
Soligar f2.8 135mm
No. 5B
(Pentax)                 69.95
45.50
Philips Bulbs   25%  off
300mm Kilfit w/c
126.00
Petri Tele &W.A.F/1.9 set
10.00
REELS AND CANS
135mm F/4 Tele Agfa reflex
75.00
New  Reel & Can 8 mm
100mm F/3.5 Tele
200 ft.
.75
.49
(Minolta A5)
29.50
400 ft.
1.10
.79
101mm F/4.5 Raptar
in shutter
28.00
VIEWERS
90mm Elmar F/4.5 Leica
69.00
New  Sawyers
50mm F/2 Summitar Leica
12.50
Pan-Vue 1
7.45
5.45
Pan-Vue  II
3.45
2/45
4 x 5 & 5 x 7 FILM
Pan-Vue IV
6.50
4.50
Colour  &  B/W  25%   OFF
Pan-Vue V
1.49
.99
Transformer
3.75
2.95
NEW MOVIE CAMERAS
ABC 2!/4 sq.
8.50
6.25
Kodak Auto 8                  64.50
34.50
Kodak Auto 8 Electric 99.95
59.95
•RECORDING TAPE ..
25%
>ff
Konica 8 Zoom
129.95
Bolex P3 Meter &
ENLARGERS NEW AND USED
Zoom                           399.00 299.00
Royal  35mm  w.  lens
Sankyo 8 CM Zoom
89.00
& easel
Axomat 11A 2V4 w.
39.95
USED   MOVIE   CAMERAS
lens
99.95
79.95
Crown Meter & Case
69.50
Axomat  1A 35mm
Yashica M
15.00
w. lens
79.95
64.95
Bolex B8 2 lenses
60.00
Paxota 35mm
35.00
Keystone K28
20.00
TRIPODS
BINOCULARS
Tudor
17.95
12.50
Glanz 7 x 50                 39.50
32.50
Rondo
17.95
12.95
Kingsway 8 x 30           29.95
17.50
Anglo
24.95
17.95
Telitar 7 x 35                 31.50
17.50
Pocket
10.95
7.95
Trade-ins Accepted!
ALL  SALES  FINAL
FREE PARKING AT REAR
Everything Greatly Reduced
SALE

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