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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 1965

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VOL. XLVII, No. 47
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11,  1965
CA 4-3916
Bonanza boosts grads
$7 million grant
'most generous'
—bert mackinnon photo
CAGED  AMS  president-elect  Byron   Hender and Roger MacAfee (behind Hender) were
paraded before the Library Wednesday noon. Earlier, 50 Engineers kidnapped Hender
and MacAfee from their offices in Brock Hall.  Later the  redshirts  carried  a  chopped
red Austin into Brock Hall. Engineering Week continues (See story page 2).
Tribute of silence
Quiet ceremony
salutes Naegele
A tribute of words and a tribute of silence was paid Monday to dean Kaspar Naegele,
President John Macdonald,
philosophy head Dr. Barnett
Savery, student Robert Anderson and acting dean Dr. Dennis Healy spoke of the Dean of
Arts who Saturday fell to his
death from the tenth floor of
the Vancouver General Hospital.
IMMEASURABLE LOSS
More than 1,000 hushed students and faculty members
listened to the simple, 20-
minute commemoration ceremony.
President Macdonald spoke
of the loss to the university
and the immeasurable personal loss.
"Not one of us can help but
feel that our aspirations will
be harder of attainment without him," he said.
"Why did he die?
"Not one of us can hope to
answer; yet not one of us can
help but torment himself with
the question," the university
president said.
MODEST AND HUMBLE
"Modest and humble in the
extreme, I know this man who
perceived others with clarity
and compassion, could not see
JELLYFISH
GOT AWAY
See page 3
in himself the greatness of
his gifts.
"That was his tragedy and
now it is ours," said Dr. Macdonald.
Dr. Barnett Savery spoke
of his closeness to the Dean.
"Only last Friday I took my
problems to Kaspar and everything was wonderful, everything was fine."
"Now these is no Kaspar to
take the problems to," Dr.
Savery said.
Fourth year arts student
Robert Anderson talked of Dr.
Naegele as a teacher and
friend.
"When a man comes to us
and suggests to us through his
own style of life a fresh
course we become really excited. And so we go to see him
often.
TEACHER AND FRIEND
"And he asked us to live to
the last minute, and then, at
that moment, we would see
our equations written out,"
said Anderson.
"We can say that for him all
actions were symbolic.
"They were statements. And
he has made a statement, discreet and final, and it is true."
Dr. Dennis Healy, who was
Monday appointed acting dean
of arts, spoke about Dr. Naegele's tireless work for the university.
"There was something about
Kaspar Naegele that made
people want to give the best
they had — and they did."
BOB CRUISE
. . . re-elected
Cruise in
with big
majority
By CAROL ANNE BAKER
Incumbent Bob Cruise was
returned as AMS first vice
president Monday by an overwhelming majority.
More than 4,300 students
cast 2,675 votes for Cruise and
1,698 votes for opponent
Charles Boylan. First slate elections last Wednesday saw
just under 5,000 students vote.
"I hope Cruise carries
through his election platform
in the coming year," Boylan
said after his defeat. "I'll be
here next year to watch him."
"I campaigned extremely
hard, as did Charlie," said
Cruise. "I wish to thank particularly my campaigners from
Fort Camp and Lower Mall."
"This election has done
much to dispel and destroy tne
old image of the Brock bureaucrat," Cruise said.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: ELECTION
By RICHARD BLAIR
Lumber magnate H. R. MacMillan's $7.2 million gift to
UBC will put the university on par with U.S. ivy league
colleges, president John Macdonald said Wednesday.
MacMillan announced Wednesday a $3 million grant to
the UBC Library which, with interest earnings over a 10-
year period, will total close to $4 million. The money will
come ffom MacMillan's personal resources.
Money for postgraduate fellowships totalling $3.2 million
over 20 years will come from the MacMillan Family Fund.
"These fellowships will put
us into competition ■with the
top U.S. colleges such as Yale,"
said Macdonald.
In addition, Union College
and the Anglican Theological
College each receive $1 million endowment funds from
MacMillan personally.
The $3 million gift to the
Library will provide $300,000
a year for 10 years to supplement the operating budget for
books  and  periodicals.
The fellowships for PhD students will provide $3,200 a
year for up to three years for
each student and will be renewable each year depending
on performance.
$500 FOR OVERHEAD
UBC will receive $500 a
year for each fellowship for
overhead and essential travel.
Macdonald said: "I believe
these are the most generous
gifts ever made to graduate
education in Canada.
"Our first priority is to increase the number of our
graduate and post-BA professional students from 2,099 at
present to 5,500 by 1973."
He said the 1,300 graduate
students at UBC receive an
average of about $1,000 each
and the U.S. average is about
$3,000 a graduate student.
"The library gift will provide tremendous impetus to
our graduate program by
strengthening our ability to
provide library resources essential for research work and
advanced study," he said.
TWO MILLION BOOKS
"The present 700,000 volumes will rise to two million
volumes by 1975 to make our
library the best in Canada.
These facilities are crucial for
attracting top-flight faculty
and graduate students," said
Macdonald.
The endowment funds for
the two protestant colleges
will be used for research,
scholarship  and  training.
Staff members will be given
opportunities for travel and
study, visiting lecturers will
be brought to campus and refresher courses will be offered to B.C. clergymen.
The first 15 H. R. MacMillan fellowships will be available in September. By September 1967, there will be 45 fel-
(Conlinued on Page S)
SEE:   GIFT
JOHN MACDONALD
. . . buy books
Gift made
dreams
reality
Wednesday's gifts to UBC
were president John Macdonald's dreams come true.
In his recently-issued 1963-64
annual report, Dr. Macdonald
asked: "Graduate work must
be heavily subsidized: the number of graduate students will
grow in direct ratio to money
poured into their support."
And Wednesday money for
$3.2 million worth of postgraduate fellowships over 20
years was authorized from the
H. R. MacMillan Family Fund.
"This money must be used to
establish fellowships and to
buy books and equipment,"
Macdonald said.
And a $3 million grant to
UBC library from the* lumber
magnate's personal resources
promises a total of nearly $4
million, when interest earnings
over a 10-year period are
added.
UBC head librarian Basil
Stuart-Stubbs said Wednesday
he will use his money to aid
the two main kinds of graduate
students on campus.
"This   means   many   more
periodicals   for   the   scientists
who want to keep, up on the
latest developments, and more
(Continued on Page 5)
SEE: DREAM Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  11,  1965
Caged
politicos
paraded
The redshirts were joined
Wednesday noon by a red
skirt.
AMS president-elect Byron
Hender wore the girlish attire.
He was joined in a steel
cage by Roger McAfee, present AMS president.
The cage was paraded
around campus by a group of
engineers.
About 200 formed a parade
with a red car, a large red
cardboard beer mug and the
cage.
Earlier the two AMS executives were peacefully abducted from their Brock offices.
McAfee pleaded physical incapability but was escorted to
the Engineering building
where the parade began.
"This is goddam uncomfortable," McAfee protested as he
was led into the cage.
"Shut up or they'll split
you tongue," Hender suggested.
The cage was rolled along
on a dolly down the main
mall, past Brock and around
to the flag pole by the Faculty
Club.
At the flag pole the red ensign was lowered and the
giant red cardboard mug was
raised in its place.
The caged occupants were
later released.
CANADIAN      COMMUNIST
party chairman Tim Buck's
talk here has been rescheduled for Monday noon in
Hebb theatre.
ELECTION
(Continued from Page 1)
The heaviest poll was in
South Brock where there were
347 votes for Cruise and 150
for Boylan.
There were 22 spoils.
President-elect Byron Hender was elected last Wednesday with a 466-vote lead over
his nearest contender.
Also elected in the first slate
was AMS secretary-elect Joan
Curtis.
Treasurer-elect Mike Sommers and first vice-presidentelect Peter Braund were elected by acclamation.
AMS co-ordinator of activities Graham Vance was returned by acclamation.
Scienceman hits
towing red tape
A tow-away led to the run-
around Tuesday for a science
student.
Roger Magnall, Science IV,
told The Ubyssey he got the
runaround when he tried to
dollect $13 damages to his
car after it was towed away
from C-lot Tuesday:
"I noticed later the panel
under the back bumper of my
car was dented and scratched,"
said Magnall. "The Traffic
office people told me to take
my complaint to Fraserview
Towing."
(Fraserview Towing are
called in to help when UBC's
regular company, Ken's, cannot handle all the work, Traffic Director Sir Ouvry Roberts explained.)
The towing company refused to pay damages because
of the release I signed when
I paid $10 towing charges,"
Magnall said.
"The damage is small but
it is the principle of the thing
that worries me.  It was  ob-
viously done by the tow
truck," he said.
"Students should check
their cars carefully before
signing the release."
Sir Ouvry said students
should register a complaint
with his traffic office as well
as the towing company. If
they are not satisfied with the
towing company's settlement,
he said, they should register
another complaint to him.
Dean to head
hate probe
MONTREAL (CUP) —The
dean of the McGill University's law faculty has been appointed chairman of a special
committee to study hate literature.
Dr. Maxwell Cohen is one
of seven Canadians appointed
by Justice Minister Guy Fav-
reau to form the committee.
Canadian universities were
plagued with hate literature
last year.
Western Canada's Largest
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Tuxedos White 4. Blue Coats
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Directors' Coats 10%  UBC Discount
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ATTENTION!
Instructions in Modern Conversational Greek will be
offered at evening classes
through the Vancouver
Night School. Any one interested please write or
phone The Greek Canadian
Cultural Society, 304 - 718
Granville Street, Vancouver
2, B.C.
Phone: 681-6171
ANNUAL
SALE
of
DISCONTINUED TEXTS
ART PRINTS
and
STATIONERY ITEMS
•
Begins
Tuesday
Feb. 16
•
UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE Thursday, February 11, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Fiery
Caouette
coming
By DAVE ORCHARD
Fiery Creditiste leader Real
Caouette is coming to campus.
Secretary-treasurer of campus Creditistes Murray Farr,
Arts IV, said Wednesday
Caouette will speak here Feb.
25 or 26, probably in the
Armory.
Caouette is listed as one of
the patrons of the Creditiste's
Semi-Formal Protest Ball,
scheduled for Brock at 9 p.m.
Feb. 19.
Other patrons are Dr. and
Mrs. Bernard Lundahl, and
Premier and Mrs. W. A. C.
Bennett.
• •    •
"I don't know if the other
patrons will be there, but
Caouette will be in Edmonton
the night of the ball," Farr
said.
Club president Barry Cooper said: "It is clearly the Protest that is semi-formal, not
the ball."
"The ball itself," he said,
"is to be utterly unformed,
while the nature of the Protest is a more Complex phenomenon to describe."
Farr said the protest is being directed against the refusal of Model Parliament to
grant political party status to
the Creditiste Club.
• •    •
The ball will feature the
Chessmen, special Creditiste
records, and a French Canadian Creditiste organizer from
Montreal.
"A certain cultural dress is
usually worn, one intended to
reflect the modern dilemma of
alienation and despair bred in
the persona by a modern capitalist society," said Cooper.
"The transcendental state of
consciousness may be achieved
by a full participation in the
evening's ritual," said Cooper.
"Music and atmosphere is
designed to effect such a state
by an emphasis on patterns
of recurrence and movement.-'
—bert macklnnon photo
It doesn't hurt, realeeee ....
Steel men to drive
human wheelbarrows
A wheelbarrow race with human wheelbarrows will run
Friday noon from Main Mall to the Armory.
The race is to spotlight the
Motion deplored
Red Cross blood drive on
campus which started Monday
and runs to Feb. 26.
Each undergraduate society
is invited to send two representatives, said organizer
Wayne Green of Forestry Undergraduate Society, who are
sponsoring the blood drive.
Prize is a case of liquid refreshment, Green said.
More than 900 students had
donated by Wednesday, according to Red Cross officials.
This is about on a par with
last year, they said.
Plastic jellyfish
one that got away
You should have seen the jellyfish that got away Tuesday afternoon.
It was 50 feet in diameter,
full of helium, worth $500 and
had 30 handlers.
It was engineer - architect
Jeffrey Lindsay's polyethylene
maze — meant to be a "jelly-
fish". It was moored in front
of the Arts building as part
of the Contemporary Arts
Festival.
But it got away.
"It was an accident," said
associate professor of Architecture Abe Rogatnick.
"It was a free-floating structure display, not meant to be
released, but some people
started cutting the lines," he
said.
He said the Department of
Transport was notified of the
accidental release because the
balloon could have been dangerous to aircraft.
But a DOT spokesman at
Vancouver International Airport said the jellyfish probably burst in the upper atmosphere.
He said the balloon would
have been difficult to track
with radar as it contained no
reflecting  material.
Mike's odes
probed
Professor R. J. Clemens will
speak on Michaelangelo —
His Poetry as a Key to his
Art in La.  104 Friday noon.
Friday evening at 8:00 p.m.
in Bu. 106 he will speak on
Dante and the Western World.
Prof. Clemens is a professor
of Romance studies and head
of the department of Comparative Literature at New York
University Graduate school.
STYX
COFFEE HOUSE
48tb, and  Elliott St.
Ladner
Fri. & Sat. Folk Singing
Sunday, Talent Night
BILL GRAHAM
From The Clansmen
February 12-13
also
THE TERRA-NOVAS
Whigs threaten
split with CULF
The UBC Liberal club is threatening to pull out of the
Canadian University Liberal Federation.
The UBC Liberals are pro
testing a resolution passed by
the National CULF convention
held in Ottawa last week.
"The resolution was passed
that with due respect to Her
Majesty the Queen, that she
be removed as head of state
of Canada and be replaced by
the Governor-General," said
Peter Braund, UBC Liberal
president.
"It was the last resolution
of the convention brought up
Sunday afternoon," Braund
said.
"Only half the delegates
were there. A lot of them had
already left for home," he
said.
"It was an individual vote
so the eastern clubs with more
delegates pulled the vote
through," he said.
"The Queen may not be a
unifying symbol in Canada
but removing her could have
a disunifying result," Braund
said.
"The vote was a flagrant
violation of democratic procedure.
"After the resolution was
passed we told the convention
we would seriously consider
revoking our charter from
CULF," Braund said.
"All the western clubs were
with us.
"Our club will spend the
next couple of days considering the move," Braund said.
The UBC club won the
Arthur Laing trophy for the
best Western club.
"All the talk was about the
Queen and the theme of the
convention was Canada and
the U.S. and Canada in international affairs," Braund said.
UBC delegates were Allan
Gould, treasurer, Liz MacKenzie, vice-president, Bob Peyton, past CULF president and
Braund.
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"A CURTAIN OF IGNORANCE"
Hear World-Famous Correspondent
FELIX GREENE
Author of "AWAKENED CHINA"
; Tell how tht American and Canadian Public /
havo been mis-informed about CHINA
The only American-based correspondent who has been to China I
more than once since the Revolution, Felix Greene returns from
his  third' trip In recent years to tell of the startling changes i
\ that are taking place.       ,
Travelling 12,000 mites* In three and one-half months, this
trained observer covered both urban and agricultural areas of
| the Chinese mainland, venturing far into the hinterlands. Granted
permission to travel freely In nomadic Inner Mongolia, he rode
. camels In cold blizzards and took jeeps through trackless wastes
I. to learn the true conditions there.
•    Is life behind the,Bamboo Curtain as grim as it is painted
I in the Canadian press? Felix Greene spoke with people in all
'walks   of  life  from  Prime  Minister Chou   En-lal  down  to the ,
smallest child in the most remote area of the country senior j
§tvil   servants,   commune   leaders,   Western   diplomats,   artists."
octors,  teachers,  religious leaders, and Just plain people.   He .
presents a vivid cross-section of an awakened and growing China i
| at this crucial moment In its history. '
SATURDAY, FEB. 13th, 8 p.m.
P.N.E GARDEN AUDITORIUM
Sponsored by the Canada-China Friendship Association
Admission $1, Students 50c
Jack of Hearts
The annual Jack of Hearts
Ball will be held Sat., Feb.
13th, in Brock Lounge, 9:00
p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 5-piece
orchestra and half time entertainment.
$2.50 Couple
Tickets  at AMS.  Office
Special Student Performance
Thursday, 12.30
75c
Auditorium
—^* nuuiiviium ^i
Bells Are Ringing
Adults: Wednesdoy thru Saturday Night
1.50 - 2.00 - 2.50
Tickets at CA 4-1111 or CA 4-3242 THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1965
Suee, i'll tell
VOU fRMKLY
WHY I c,N\0K£
MMiUMNA,	
LETTERS
Vulgarity
The President's Report on UBC's 1963-64 academic
year is recommended reading.
It's full of facts and figures.
It's a compact but comprehensive statement on the
activities and accomplishments of UBC's faculty and
staff — as seen from where Dr. John Macdonald sits.
Among a wealth of interesting data, we find in the
section on the Faculty of Arts two especially illuminating sentences:
There are (other faculty members) whose names
are not found in the University's Bibliography for
some years, for they are devoting themselves to the
kind of long-range scholarship that eventually finds
its fulfilment in books. Such men must not be subjected to the contemporary vulgar pressure to
publish.
We commend the president for his stand.
But why should the waiving of this admittedly vulgar
pressure apply only to those devoting themselves to a
"kind of long-range scholarship . . . ?"
The fact that 77 pages of the 144-page report
are devoted to the university bibliography—publications
of faculty and staff—would indicate that far too many
faculty members are "subjected to the contemporary
vulgar pressure to publish."
A man can be required to be teacher, administrator
and author to only a certain degree before one of his
jobs—not to mention the man himself—begins to suffer.
Unfortunately, from the student's point of view, the
first job to be neglected is too often that of teaching.
More unfortunately, from anyone's point of view,
the man himself begins to suffer under the pressure.
More than one prof will privately speak out against
the system.
But neither individual faculty members nor the
faculty association will publicly denounce this system
which demands that profs publish to gain professional,
academic and financial advancement.
The system is nothing new — it's been around for
years and some say it's endemic to any overcrowded
and under-financed university.
But this is no justification for maintaining the status
quo.
The President's Report has offered the hint of a lead.
That lead should be followed—the earlier and the
more vigorously the better—by the faculty association,
the Senate, and the president himself.
The vulgar pressure to publish should be given
intense scrutiny and met with honest, outright resistance.
Well-treated
Organizers of the high school conference are to be
congratulated for their efforts.
The conference, held at UBC for the last 18 years,
is designed to acquaint high school students with problems they might encounter here.
By all accounts the students were well treated and
suitably impressed by the efficiency of the conference.
And a conference such as this can present problems.
One year a young high school co-ed was sent home
pregnant.
It'll be a little while before we know for sure, but
our guess is that this year's batch of high schoolers were
too well looked after for any of that.
EDITOR:  Mike  Horsey Another  long,   long  trailer  as   the
News                                  -rjm  Padmore election results came in and report-
-...        __„ •«.„„,» ers  went out.  Those who did man-
c'*y   Tom wayman age   to  stagger around productively
Managing  Editor .... Janet Matheson Wednesday    were:    Dave    Orchard,
Art                                           Don   Hume Lynn   Curtis,   Ross   Acutt,   Richard
_      " '" '""        .   .. Blair,   Jack   Khoury,   Mona   Helcer-
sP°rts   George Reamsbottom manaS| Gord McLaughlin, Art Wat-
Asst. City  Lorraine Shore son, Bob Burton, Robbi Wsst, Steve
Asst. News Editor        Carole Munroe Brown,   Robin  Russell,   Bob  Burton,
.         .  4                               »«•■     u     » Carol   Anne   Baker,   Linda   Hawley,
Associate   Mike Hunter Lome  Mallin,   Elizabeth Field,  Jock
Associate  Ron  Riter McQuarrie. Hangers on included Don
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts Hul1.   sunfink,   timesfink.   Art   Cas-
_         _. . .                               _          ,. . .. person,    Al    Francis    and    news    of
Page Friday ....-  Dave Ablett Mike   Bolton.   Link  Ablett  stumbled
Critics   John   Kelsey through likewise, even.
rn esottim.
\wm PACTB
\ 6010,... WW
My c«jd\kd.„,
tXl W G£T
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Yoo USE
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ALL US EDITORS
GOT TROUBLES
(Part of an editorial by
Thomas L. Beell excerpted
from the University of Washington Daily, Seattle.)
My 15-week tour as Daily
editor rumbles to a halt today   .   .  .
In a way, getting out has
all the joys of being discharged from the service. In
another, all the regrets of
being retired.
Being Daily editor, to begin with, is frustrating, annoying, disappointing, nagging, exhausting and never
what you expected.
. . . The cluttered desk and
overflowing in - box suggest
all the stories still unwritten
and plans still undone. Fif-
teen weeks just aren't
enough. There can be no "30"
to this job. So I'll just write
"29" and leave it at that.
AMS vs. profs
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
Last Saturday, an International Studies 100 class was
interrupted twice by an AMS
representative. Dr. Winter
was finally forced to leave in
order to let high school students hold a seminar. Thus,
one professor and 400 students were forced to conform
to the dictates of a body of
incompetent  AMS  officials.
Are we to tolerate the control of our professors by a
disunited and seemingly in-
effective bureaucracy at
Brock? I say no!
I would suggest that public apology by the responsible persons be made to Dr.
Winter. Following that; a
thorough examination of the
AMS planning committees
could be beneficial.
CYRIL   W.   HACK
Arts  I
*)• «t* «T*
Contemptuous staff
Editor,  The  Ubyssey:
On Tuesday morning at
8:35, a distinguished looking
gentleman was present in the
Fort Camp Dining Hall wishing to have breakfast. He
explained that he was a guest
"from Europe" and that he
had ordered breakfast the
previous evening.
The staff then cheerfully
took the full price for breakfast and handed him a continental breakfast. When he objected that he had ordered
eggs they peremptorily refused, making no attempt to
explain  the  situation.
While I realize that meal
hours must be relatively
rigid, I do not think it would
have been inconvenient for
them to have given him two
boiled eggs in view of the
fact that no one had informed
him of the meal hours. In
any case their miserable lack
of common courtesy was inexcusable.
I sincerely hope that he
will receive much greater
hospitality elsewhere, lest he
have only unpleasant memories of our university.
This incident illustrates
the absolute autocracy existing within the food services,
when kitchen staff can be
contemptuous of guest and
student alike.
Perhaps they have forgotten that the residences are
completely self - supporting,
that it is the residents who
supply their jobs. Perhaps it
is time things were changed.
BERK MADDAFORD
Pre-Med   II
V        V V
Pink panthers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Once again, through the
device of the famous "Cun-
ing Stunt", the Pink Panthers have treated the academic
community to a significant
form of socio-academic comment. They have drawn our
flagging, often misdirected
attention to some educational, political, or social inadequacy or injustice previously
unperceived by any but the
astute engineers.
The smearing of incendiary
material in the foyer and
lavatories of the college library, so too the liberation of
a number of chickens in the
study areas,  has  proven  the
depth   of   social  conscience
and conscious of the EUS.
—Hasn't it?
We personally cannot see
the point, merely the disruption of studies for the academic faculties. We can only
see the obvious danger of incendiaries. We do miss the
significance.
—Don't we?
Let's face it, only one girl
was burned, merely ruining
her blouse, and she was,
after all, only slightly injured. We must look deeper
than this for the hard core
of purpose inherent in Cunning Stunts.
For the information and
edification of us out-of-tune
academicians, we request a
rational explanation of this
latest engineering coup. It
must have a rational explanation.
BARRY  L. WILSON
Arts II
•JU *JU •£•
The TR4 Myth
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This is an open letter to
Mr. Michael Hunter (famed
TR4 driver) and to all those
other souls who might be
laboring under the misconception that the TR4 is the
"greatest car ever made".
(Ubyssey, Thurs. Feb. 4).
I would like to call Mr.
Hunter's attention to the fact
that at 6:30 Sunday evening
Jan. 31 — the final day of
the Thunderbird Rally — the
ONLY cars remaining on the
rally route (or off it as the
case was) were two of Mr.
Hunter's "greatest cars" and
two of its predecessor, the
TR3. (One of which was nose
down over a ten foot bank.)
Hallelujah — what an incongruous end for the greatest cars ever made.
R. XZ. COOK
Eng.  Ill
' ■*?!■' 'Jw>£-!,
^'■^^<**%V«%'iX -
fc5l*?~Ttlei35 bj, r«*Htn
ckan^e me.
mummuiMi Thursday, February 11, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Far-out festival brewed
6 months in modern minds
. . . pinned
Bi-loyal
frat rat
in at last
By BOB BURTON
Saturday 18 pledges
were initiated into Sigma
Chi Fraternity at UBC.
One of the new frat-
rats is a Ubyssey reporter—me.
Ubyssey reporters are
very anti-fraternity. I was
no exception.
I was reared in a very
Victorian home. I thought
sex and drinking were
dirty and evil, so, naturally, I thought fraternities were dirty and evil.
Since I was a typical
fraternity-hating Ubyssey
reporter, I was told to
rusrTtne trats and expose
them for the nasty, evil
things they are.
My chance for glory—
a spy for the Ubyssey.
So I rushed.
I received bids! They
wanted me! A Ubyssey
reporter, a social leper.
So I pledged.
And I went to the
drunken and debauched
frat parties. But they
weren't even as drunken
and debauched as Ubyssey parties.
My newspaper friends
would greet me in the
halls and Ubyssey office:
"Hey, Frat-rat; drunken
Frat-boy!"
And disbelievers in
other fraternities would
whisper: "You're a spy
for the Ubyssey . . when
are you going to depledge
and write your distorted
story for that Ubyssey
rag?"
I persisted and comments continued. I stopped trying to argue with
the Philistines; instead I
would simply break off
the conversation with a
chuckle.
I was playing neutral
—in the Ubyssey office I
would yell anti-fraternity
slogans and at the frat
house I would accuse The
Ubyssey of inaccurate reporting and mediocre
editorials.
But now I'm a real
frat-rat—gold pin and
striped shirt and all.
They can't expel me and
The Ubyssey won't fire
me because I am a conversation piece . . . the
Ubyssey frat-rat reporter
. . . chuckle.
By   CAROL-ANNE   BAKER
This year's Festival of the
Contemporary Arts, which
ended last night, was six
months in the making.
"We have ideas about certain things we wanted at our
Festival and we had to arrange
what was available at the
time," said B.C. Binning,
chairman of the Fine Arts
committee.
The Special Events Committee in conjunction with the
Fine Arts Committee have
been bringing Festival events
to the campus for more than
10 years.
• •   •
But it was not until five
years ago that all the events
were concentrated into a ten-
day event.
"A contemporary theme was
decided on for the festival for
many  reasons,"  Binning  said.
"We are a young university
and the phenomena of our time
and place should be of interest
to the young people attending
the university.
"It is easier to obtain exhibits for contemporary shows
too," he added.
• •   •
"Also Vancouver is often
considered the end of the line
culturally, and we often don't
hear about contemporary
works until a year later. So
the Festival was sort of a pioneer venture," he said.
The whole committee works
together on Festival ideas.
"There are many ideas and
possibilities for future Festivals and improvements of past
Festivals," Binning said.
10 show
blind able
White Cane Week this week
hopes to show Canada what 10
blind UBC students have already proved.
The ten blind students on
campus, one of whom works
for UBC Radio, have made the
first step in proving to the public that they are not helpless,
and White Cane Week hopes to
make this acknowledgement
universal, a White Cane
spokesman said.
White Cane week, observed
across Canada until Saturday,
is designed to make the public
more aware of blindness and
the blind.
Lindsey speaks
on Great Wall
Dr. C. C. Lindsey, of the
UBC Institute of Fisheries will
lecture on the Great Wall of
China Monday at 8 p.m. in Bi.
Sci.  2O00.
Dr. Lindsey recently returned from an eight-day visit to
Communist China.
Anglican chaplaincy
Dean J. Richardson speaks
on Christians in India" at 7
p.m., 4660 West Ninth.
This year's festival brought
3an Francisco artist Bruce
Connor to the Fine Arts Gallery, with The Dark Mirror, a
jhow of contemporary cool art.
Designer Jeff Lindsay built
a jelly-fish structure out of
of plastic bags; the Medium is
is the Message confounded and
amused in the Armory for several days.
Art in Action covered Buchanan building with paint
and ice. Musicians made
chance noises and film-makers
showed far-out films.
And there were poets, sculptors, lectures, plays and tours.
Dear Abby-style program
on co-ed sex life planned
Radsoc has come to the rescue of co-eds with sex
problems.
Every Thursday Radsoc will present a new program
Sex and the Co-ed.
Students can write in with their problems and master
of ceremonies Marg Perry will answer them over the air
during the day.
Problems should be addressed to Radsoc, Brock Hall.
GIFT
(Continued  from  Page   1)
lowships   available,   including
renewals, and the same number including renewals for the
next 17 years.
Applicants can come from
any university, but must be
Canadian citizens. The fellowships can be used only at UBC
and each applicant must undertake to remain in Canada
for a reasonable time after
completing a PhD program,
provided he is offered a satisfactory position.
DREAM
(Continued from Page 1)
books for the arts students,"
he said.
UBC dean of graduate studies Ian McTaggart-Cowan said
he is excited about the grants.
"We can now go ahead with
our Ph.D. program," he said.
"We need more Ph.D.s in
humanities and especially in
the  social   sciences.
"And a good library will attract better profs and better
graduate students."
PMsctimoN i
EYE GLASSES
MdUnlU
All Doctor*! Eyoflou Proscriptions
fillod. first  quality  materials usod.
All  work  performed  by  quolrfitd
Opticians.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville     M (J 3-8921
Poetry   Reading
Al Purdy
Milton Acorn
Fri., Feb. 12, 8 p.m.
1208 Granville St.
Sponsored by
Vanguard Books
Proceeds go to the
Alexander Defence Fund
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try  Our  Delicious  T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
Special Events of the Arts
presents .
CANADIAN OPERA COMPANY - ON TOUR
DIE FLEDEBMAUS
Johann Strauss' Comic Opera (in English)
TUESDAY, FEB. 16 - 8.30 p.m.
Auditorium
Tickets: Students 75c; $1.25 at AMS and
Vancouver Ticket Centre
•     •     •
FEBRUARY 18 - BROCK • 12:30
Economist Robert Theobald
Panel Discussion
Sunday, February  14th
Eight o'Clock
Jewish Community Centre
41st Avenue, at Cambie
— THE B.C. INDIAN —
A Second Class Citizen?
The Panel Will Consist of:
Pat  Burnt — Radio Commentator
Profeasor  R.  W.  Dunning—Dept.
of Anthropology,  U.B.C.
Gloria    Webster — Social   Worker
From. Indian Centre.
Alfred Scow—Lawyer.
Dunstan Campbell—Youth Representative.
Glen   McDonald, — Moderator —
Lawyer.
TUXEDO RENTALS
for Fraternity Formats
Special Rate . . . $6.00 includes
Tuxedo, cummerbund, shirt, tie, studs, links, suspenders
TUXEDO JUNCTION FORMAL WEAR
2   Locations:   4683 Kingsway,  Bby by Sears  HE 1-1160
2608 Granville at 10th Ave  RE 3-6727
Applications Wanted for the Position of
AAANAGER-Fort Camp Canteen
Position to be available July 1st, 1965, and
includes apartment plus salary.
RESTRICTION: Manager must be a married student in
full-time attendance at U.B.C.
REQUIREMENTS:
—Knowledge of double entry bookkeeping
—Knowledge of wholesale buying
—Ability to handle staff
PREFERANCES:
—given to former Fort Camp residents
—given to students able to continue for two or
more years.
Written applications, stating age, qualifications, etc.,
must be submitted to:
PRESIDENT,
FORT CAMP MEN'S COUNCIL,
FORT CAMP, U.B.C.
by 5:00 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 13, 1965
All   applications   will  be   answered   and   interviews
may be requested. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 11, 1965
B. C. S. F. CONFERENCE ON
CONCERNS & CONFLICTS
OF CONTEMPORARY  STUDENTS
FEBRUARY 27-28
Students are part of a surrounding political world; whatever unique qualities they may have are
set within a context of attitudes
and ideas deriving from political
relations and social institutions.
They are moving into the world of
power relationships, in a state of
transition between the world of the
child who sees problems as personal
and familistic, and the world of the
adult who, hopefully, sees problems in their deeper social setting.
The apathy of the campus, the silence of students is not a unique
quality of the young, nor is it a
mystery; student indifference to
life is part of a general indifference
in mass society.
Social and political life demands
three convictions of its votaries:
(1) that it is important for the individual to have a relationship to
and a concern for the world; (2)
that it is possible to understand the
political world; and (3) that individual or organizational actions can
be effective in the actual world or
that more is to be gained by social
involvement than is to be lost.
Most people will concede that
political and social action is important. Far fewer, however, can
perceive the political dimension of
their everyday problems and tensions. What is not clear to most is
what it takes, and how much it
takes to change things, and to what
degree these things should be
changed. Fewer still believe in
their capacity to understand society. Ours is a world of increasing
political complexity, in which one
must have expertise to understand
any part, but in which a specialist
cannot understand the whole. The
turbulent social world is full of
buzzing confusion from which the
pillars of conviction and certainty
have been removed. It is almost impossible for the individual to believe in his own importance in the
political world. In a world of billions of men and of massive material and technical power, the individual seems infinitely small.
The two worlds of men, the
world of events in which men live,
and the world of values and visions
which give structure and meaning
to events, seem hopelessly separated. There is a perennial tension
between the best and the possible,
but today the two seem utterly incompatible.
There is little in the actions and
attitudes of contemporary students
in Canada which would tend to
suggest a unique contribution to
Canadian life. The stamp of mass
society is found in almost every
facet of student life, whether or not
the activities are termed 'political'.
That quality may be observed
clearly in three elements of current student life: (1) the personnal-
ist fixation; <2) student demands for
immediate satisfactions or solutions; and (3) the poverty of vision.
Nonetheless, it is difficult to
blame the contemporary student.
The Canadian education system
does not conceive its task to be one
of equipping the student with the
tools of analysis by which society
can be understood with a view to
advancing it. Rather, it sees itself
obliged to provide the necessary
number of trained personnel to
operate the industrial society more
or less as it is; its concern for the
student centers on providing him
with the tools which will guarantee
employment and high salary. Passivity has become the logic of the
secondary school: discipline is becoming tighter, the 'fluff' subjects
are being eliminated, the student is
being encouraged to assimilate and
reproduce and command masses of
information. "Adaptive man" is
becoming the ideal for the student.
In order to realize the nature of
the problems and the path to their
solution students must use their
facilities for researeh and understanding and apply them directly
to the problems which face both
themselves and the world around
them. It is only through the struggle to solve these problems that the
students can become aware of their
nature and dimension. Only
through active participation in our
society can we become aware of
ourselves and of our significance
in terms of other men.
B
C
s
T
U
D
E
N
T
F
E
D
E
R
A
T
I
O
N
S*
FEBRUARY  27 — 28
BROCK HALL, UBC, VANCOUVER
Apply  before  Feb.  22  -  See  delegate  form  below
B.C. Students' Federation has provided an           1. rallying on issues of education  (cost          Program of the Conference shall include
opportunity for students to get involved in of text books,  fees,  residences,  food comprehensive seminar groups on
their society on issues that are pertinent to^ and standards, etc.;                                             ,      ,_ ,    .       ,        . ,               ......
their socio-political situation. The students          0 ±     .      . ,                            _   .               L  student and social responsibility;
2. jg-=i^i=-iSA «-           2.   student needs;
1. cost,   standards and   nature   of  their ^„„„,,«,   ™~<~«„„  „t m„+,„ai   .,„,w 3.   role and purpose of educational insti-
•*—-= lKKEK!S£"L3£ tutionsin^h CoW.1*. and
2. their relation towards faculty, teachers sessions,   conferences,   seminars   and 4.   structure, objectives and program of
and administration;                                                symposia. B.C.S.F.
3. their responsibility towards the better- These and other issues require serious SOCIETY IS EVERYONE'S
ment of less priviledged in B.C., Can-       discussion and thinking in order to direct CONCERN
ada and other parts of the world; and       ^ ^^ change desirable for ^ better.        ^J  US  MAKE   IT   RELEVENT
4. their national and international obli-        ment of all. This  conference provides an       _^   />|ii>    KIEEf>C
gations to problems of freedom and        excellent opportunity for the students to        »U   OUR   NCCDd.
Peace- get together and evolve a meaningful com-        Join  B.C.S.F. now.   (You can  become  a
The students can best confront these situ-       munication amongst themselves and their        delegate to the conference by paying 25c
ations through: respective educational institutions. for membership and $2.00 for delegate fee).
■ THIS IS YOUR DELEGATE FORM J
-       Name *  Phone        |
Mail this I     JM^ _ _  I
Delegate Form '           _  |
WJiL   Kee L "• Name of educational institution you are presently attending. I
Before February 22nd ^^^   ■ I
Wj^m       I The delegate fee is $2.00 minimum for members. ■
tO f I The delegate fee is $2.25 minimum for non-members.
_■_«   «A.     m*% »                                           m Any bonifide student at any educational institution in British Columbia is eligible       I
4373    TT.   13th                                             I to attend. Members of faculty and administration (teachers in high schools and
I members of the School Board) are welcome to attend all the sessions except the       ■
B business session. Accommodation and transportation for out-of-city delegates is       |
Vancouver,   B.C.                                        | arranged.
iMail Delegate Form With Fee Before February 22nd To: |
4373 WEST 13th AVEL, VANCOUVER 8, B.C. ■
B.C.S.F. IS A UNIFIED NON-PARTISAN STUDENT MOVEMENT Thursday, February 11, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
AROUND THE CAMPUS
By ELIZABETH FIELD
"Women's sports!" said McQuarrie with sarcasm.
"What are women's sports?" He didn't like my answers,
so I put this question and others to some people in a
position to know.
For some unknown reason, men often value another man's
opinion above a woman's, so I went to see Bus Philips who
is the Director of Me's Athletics.
"Women's athletics have a very definite place in the university," he said. "They provide an opportunity for developing above the normal ability and for participation in the community at the university level."
'While men's sports are more intensified, the women are
just as keen although not so aggressive." And, get this please,
McQuarrie, he stated definitely that women's athletics "don't
detract from feminine appeal".
He told me that the Senate Report of 1958 lent support
to women's athletics by including them in a general policy
holding that "athletics are an integral part of campus education." Who are you to fight the Senate, McQuarrie? Don't
answer.
Then I went to see Marilyn Russell, Co-ordinator of
Women's Athletics who said of the purpose of female sports:
"Basically we believe university life is more than just the
academic. Opportunity is provided for developing other
skills—music, art, drama—and this should carry over into
sports. There should be an opportunity for both recreation
and competition."
She pointed out that women's sports emphasize an interest
in the individual and that girls are just as intent on improving their skills as are men.
Women's athletics at UBC were first officially recognized
in 1913.
The first sports we played were basketball, grass hockey,
and ice hockey, all originating before 1915. At this time, when
female enrolment was between 150-200, the budget was
$182.10.
The shining light in WAA history, came in 1930 when a
UBC team won the World Basketball Championship at the
Prague Olympics. Have your men done that, McQuarrie?
Women's athletics have expanded until they include, at
present, 18 sports, several having more than one team, and
more than 500 participants at the extramural level and 800
at the intramural level.
There is a notion, which is becoming increasingly passe,
that sports on a diversified scale are undesirable for girls,
would detract from their feminity and turn them into muscle
bound females. The protectors of the great American Dream
were naturally against this. So UBC finds its only worthwhile competition in the WCIAA. We're better than the
Americans, McQuarrie, are you?
At present Thunderette teams hold western champion-
shipsships in speed swimming, synchronized swimming and
badminton doubles. In the past they have held basketball,
volleyball, figure skating and golf trophies.
The original budget for 1964-65 was $16,400 but this was
later cut by AMS to $15,700 and recent requests for more
money have been refused. As an example of just how tight
funds are, consider that on trips a girl is allotted $1.25 for
each meal. Surely this is carrying an AMS interest in keeping
the students in shape, too far. McQuarrie drinks more than
that.
So mat's it, McQuarrie, that's what women's athletics are,
their purpose, and what they include. What do youlhink now?
—don hume photos
ALTHOUGH one year of PE classes are no longer compulsory, many are taking
advantage of voluntary classes which are open to all students. Shown here peering
through hair screen as she swats badminton bird is Marilyn Rice, PE II.
Columbus here Saturday
Soccer Birds must win
UBC's Thunderbird soccer
team has been doing some
heavy thinking this week.
In the Pacific Coast Soccer
League only the top four
teams in the standings advance into the playoffs.
Playing their first game in
the second half of the PCSL
schedule, UBC is eight points
out of a playoff position.
But this Saturday the Birds
have an opportunity to charge
back into contention.
Their opponents Saturday in
what Bird's coach Joe Johnson calls a "four point must"
game are Columbus Italians
who currently have possession
of the all important fourth
and last playoff position.
"Our last game out was
more than a moral victory,"
said soccer coach Joe Johnson
referring to the T'Birds' last
trip   out   against   the   PCSL
Sports at UBC
Hockey goes international
The following is the second in
a series of articles on men's field
hockey at UBC. Broome is head
coach of all teams at UBC.
By ERIC BROOME
The majority of Canadians, if they have heard of
field hockey at all, think
of it as a girls' game, and
girls do play it very well.
But it is also a men's
game and because they bring
to it a greater degree of
speed and strength, it is extremely strenuous and demanding. If the game did
not offer this challenge to
men it is hardly likely that
it would command the wide
international interest it does
today, with over 50 countries as members of the
International Field Hockey
Federation.
As mentioned in a previous
article, Canada is a newcomer
in the international scene, but
in the last few years her colours have been seen with distinction on foreign fields, and
interest and standards have
risen sharply. B.C., and
U.B.C. in part, have been
prominent in this growth.
By beating the U.S.A. at
the International Tournament
at Lyon, France in 1963 Canada won the right to represent
the American Continent in
the Olympic Games Hockey
Tournament at Tokyo.
This was a meeting of the
world's top field hockey nations, and our concluding article will be by one of the
four U.B.C. players who were
in the Canadian team.
What of the future? The
Vancouver based executive of
the C.F.H.A. is not content to
rest on its hard won laurels,
and it is already actively
planning and working towards the next Olympic
Tournament in Mexico City
in 1968.
To qualify for the honour
of once again tilting at the
world's   top   teams,   Canada
must win the Pan American
Games Tournament in Winnipeg—1967, in which six to
eight teams are expected to
compete.
Before that, Canada has
been invited to take part in a
Commonwealth Tournament
in England in the spring of
1966, and it is hoped that we
can test our strength against
American and European
teams at Rye, New York in
May of this year.
U.B.C. is a cornerstone in
these ambitious plans, and her
players are once more likely
to form the backbone of Canadian teams.
Varsity runs three teams,
and, in the pre-Christmas
games the undefeated 1st
team headed the B.C. 1st Division. New players, both beginners and experienced, are
always welcome, and coaching is available. Details from
me at the Men's Gym. Why
not join in the fun?
leaders   Vancouver   Canadians
which the latter won 3-2.
"This good display against
the league leaders has shown
we will be a force to reckon
with from now on. We intend
to prove this Saturday."
The Birds will host Columbus Saturday afternoon at one
p.m. in Varsity Stadium.
Prices have been cut and students without 'A' cards will
be able to enter for 50 cents.
Big Valentine Dance
and Miss Valentine Contest
(Open to any Young Lady)
Saturday, Feb. 13
Orchestra - Refreshments - Door Prizes
Fun For All   -  Everyone Welcome
Pedersen's Ballroom, 4336 Dunbar
Telephone: BE 8-2308
Low-cost permanent protection
for your books
Book-Ion Plastic Laminate
• Easy to use      • Self-adhesive      • Crvstal clear
Protect your investment in books with Book-Ion,
the modern washable plastic laminate. Book-Ion
keeps books, documents, drawings, etc., like
new, or can be used to repair damaged articles.
Available at your favourite book, stationery or
department store in rolls 40" x 9" and 40" x 13".
Larger rolls, size 400" long by various widths,
available on special request.
Distributed by Ben Sanders Company Limited, Toronto Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 11,  1965
'tween classes
Viet Nam battle at noon
Academic    Activities    Committee presents a rally on Viet
Nam in Bu. 104 at noon today.
Speakers include anthropology
lecturer Dr. William Willmott.
•   •   •
RAMBLERS
Soccer players go to Ramblers at noon today.
fell
• *   *
UN CLUB
William   Barlett,   secretary-
general of Canadian Commission  for  UNESCO  speaks  on
Canada's Role in UNESCO Friday noon in Bu. 220.
• •   •
LMT
LMTs available for Oh Dad,
Poor   Dad,   Vancouver   Symphony, Ballet Bihari, Cave and
Isy's from Special Events office.
• •   •
DR. WILLIAM WILLMOTT
... on Viet Nam
*
ACADEMIC GOALS
Panel Discussion on Student
Life with Rev. Richardson, Dr.
Mann,   Education   president
Dave Lynn, Clay Perry and Ed
Hutchings in Brock at noon today.
PHYS ED
Come to the P.E. Valentine
Dance,   the    Cardiac    Thump
Saturday. $3.50 per couple at
Canadian Legion at Fourth and
Trafalgar 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Visiting profs to examine
population, foreign policy
A series of public lectures by visiting professors will
take place in February.
Next Friday Dr. John Borchert from the University of
Minnesota will speak on urban population shifts in the
American Midwest in F and G 100 at 2:30 p.m. The lecture
is sponsored by the Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation.
Feb.  19 John McDiarmid, University of Washington,
will lecture on Oresteia of Aeschylus at noon in Bu. 102.
Alfred Grosser, from the University of Paris, will discuss DeGaulle's foreign policy Feb. 22 at 1:30 p.m. in Bu.
2239.
GRAD CLASS COUNCIL
Faculty grad class reps meet
in Bu. 227 Monday noon.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Award-winning feature film
on Algeria Les Oliviers de la
Justice at noon today in Bu.
102; 25 cents.
• •   •
NDP CLUB
MP Bob Prittie speaks on
his House of Commons bill to
legalize contraceptives noon
today in Bu. 212.
• •   •
POETRY READING
Dan McLeod reads in Bu.
100 noon today.
• •   •
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
General meeting noon today
on Carnival dance.
• •   •
THE ODYSSEY
The editor speaks on The
Importance of Deadlines. Noon
today in Frosh office.
• •   •
NISEI VARSITY
Valentine's Dance Saturday
at Airport Inn 8:30 to 1:00 with
L a v e r n e Gerard and The
Shades; $3.00 a couple.
• •    •
NATIVE CANADIANS
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 218.
• •    •
DEMOGRAPHIC SOCIETY
Dr. Poland speaks on the
Planned Parenthood clinic in
Bu. 202, today noon.
• •    •
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Russian Day in upper lounge
today and every Thursday.
CAMP COUNSELLORS
Summer Positions Open With Pay
Skills and experience desirable in:
WATERFRONT ACTIVITIES - CANOEING - RIDING
CAMPCRAFT - WILDLIFE
Also experience in working with young people.
Meeting in Room 211 - Memorial Gymnasium
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12 - 12:30 Noon
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
LOST—Ring. Gold set, tourquoise
stone. Missing since February 1st.
Phone 224-9098, Rm. 677 after five
p.m.	
PLEASE RETURN RECORDS left
in your car Friday to Record Library in Extension Department.
Sorry.   	
REWARD waiting for the person
who returns my red keycase and
turquoise green coat which disappeared from the Library Shelf
Monday. Call Bernice Gerrard, AM
6-9275 or report at Grad Centre.
LADY'S WATCH found in vicinity
of Buch. 3239. Phone Ray CA
4-9493  after  6  p.m.
LOST—Lady's gold wrist watch. Reward offered. Phone Pat Mullln,
CA 4-9970, Room 112.
LOST—Unusual silver wedding ring
in College Library, women's washroom.  Reward.  Call CA 4-3357.
DICTIONARY—Phone Bob: 298-7438
if found.  (Lost Old Arts Tuesday).
WOULD THE PERSON who took
black ski jacket from LA 104 on
Tues. morn please return to ATC
or phone 224-9846—Ask for Keith.
It's all I had.
LOST—Lady's black frame glasses.
Reward offered. Phone Diana, CR
8-6950.  Desperate.
Valentine Greetings
12
LAST CHANCE For Romance. Do
it soon—Today by noon. Special
rate of 50c for tomorrow only.
Soecial Nolices-
13
The BIG sound of the "Hornful
Souls". Totem Park—Friday night.
Don't  miss  it!
THE SHOCKERS are coming to electrocute the PSIV House Feb. 12!
The   SHOCKERS!
SPECIAL college rate subscription
for Playboy Magazine. 1 year, $6.50,
2 years, $12.00; 3 years, $16.50.
Call Fred,  RE 8-4504.
Transportation
14
Wanted
15
WANTED—One motorcycle crash
helmet.  Phone  Dave,  RE 1-2808.
AUTOMOTIVE   8t   MAHINE
Automobiles For Sale SI
1961 FIAT 600, white, 34,000 miles,
radio, good condition, city tested,
Mr. Johnson, "Physical Education,
Miem'orial Gym.	
1961 AUSTIN Cambridge. Excellent
condition, low mileage, new snow-
tires, good student transportation.
AM  1-2122  evenings.	
'52 CHEV 4-door, 2nd engine, '65
plates.   Offers.   Gary,   CA  4-6401.
27
Motorcycles
WILL the PSIV House withstand the
sonic assault of the SHOCKERS?
Tomorrow night—the SHOCKERS!
Scandals
39A
WHAT has  12  legs and fluorescent
hair? The  Shockers!  Coming Feb.
12th.  The Shockers.	
HEAR  The   Shockers  pound  It  out!
Sneak   preview   at   224-3520.    The
Shockers.
EMPLOYMENT
WeJp Wanted
51
SOMEONE to teach me to play blues
mouth organ. Suzanne, RE 8-4511
after 6 p.m.	
INSTRUCTION  —  SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ART BUSINESS, ideal as side line,
for male or female. 1065 E. 17th
Ave. TR 6-6362.	
RENTALS   &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
1 FURNISHED room. Use of kitchen facilities, phone & fridge.
Preferably male student. Phone
RE 3-3678.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
THIRD ANNUAL
CHARTER FLIGHT TO EUROPE
MAY 21-AUGUST 5
$360
WHEN
—Leave Vancouver May 2L
—Arrive London May 22.
—Leave London August 5.
—Arrive Vancouver August 5.
COST
$360.00 which includes:
—Return flight by C.P.A. jet prop Britannia.
—First class meals with complimentary dinner wines during flight
—44 lb. baggage allowance.
—Transportation from London Airport to London City centre.
—London Airport Taxis.
WHO IS ELIGIBLE
—All members of Alma Mater Society.
—UBC Faculty.
—Members of immediate family of above two categories which includes:
—father and mother if living in same household.
—husbands, wives and children.
—Members of immediate family must be accompanied by member of
A.M.S. or Faculty.
APPLICATIONS
—Applications may be picked up at Travel Directors Office — BROCK
HALL, or write to TRAVEL DIRECTOR. AMS CHARTER FLIGHT,
BOX 140. BROCK HALL. U.B.C. Further information available from
Travel Director.
TRAVEL IN EUROPE
—In co-operation with World Wide International Travel information
on travel in Europe will be available through the Travel Directors
Office.
COMPARABLE FAKES
—A person travelling by commercial airliner Vancouver to London
and return would pay:
—First class—in excess of $1,000.00;
—Thrift Class—in excess of $600.00;
—21 Day Excursion—in excess of $550.00.
AS THERE ARE ONLY 30 SEATS REMAINING THOSE
INTERESTED ARE URGED TO APPLY AS SOON AS
POSSIBLE.

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