UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 18, 1965

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0125664.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125664.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0125664-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0125664-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0125664-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0125664-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0125664-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0125664-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0125664-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0125664.ris

Full Text

 But we
don't drink
THS UBYSSEY
VOL. XLVII, No. 50
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY,  FEBRUARY 18,  1965
48
CA 4-3916
•WRV
SOOPPM
MftSO.
"Now, sit up and beg."
Activities frozen
Watchdogs close
AAC, comb files
Student council watchdogs have closed Academic Activities Committee offices and confiscated its files.
AMS   co-ordinator   Graeme
Bonner orders
Naegele inquest
Attorney general Robert
Bonner said Wednesday
night there will be a full inquest into the death of UBC
dean of Arts Kaspar Naegele.
"The usual policy in these
cases is to conduct a full inquest and the Vancouver
coroner has been so informed," he told The Ubyssey.
Peterson
hints cash
for faculty
Education minister Les Peterson hinted Wednesday
night there will be enough money in UBC's operating grant
to cover substantial wage increases for UBC faculty.
Peterson said UBC will get
a fair share of the $19.3 million allocation for Vic College,
Simon Fraser and UBC.
"I'm sure the universities, in
their budgets, will make provisions for increases in professors salaries," he said after
the Bennett testimonial dinner.
Earlier Wednesday he was
reported to have said "a substantial increase in salary is
probably in store for UBC's
teaching staff."
Peterson stressed the universities themselves decide
how to divide any funds the
government  allocates.
The Ubyssey learned Monday the Faculty Association
had asked for pay raises averaging $2,000 a professor, and
that the administration had
replied with offers of an $800
a professor raise.
Official administration reaction to slated Faculty salary
hikes and possible student fee
raises was a wordy "no comment" Wednesday.
"No official representation
for a pay increase has been
made by the Faculty Association to the Board of Governors," an edministration spokesman said. He said it was possible governors could have
been approached as individuals by the faculty.
"There are inaccuracies in
your story," said faculty association head Dr. John Norris.
"But I won't spell out which
ones since that would be giving you the information.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:   PROFS
Council,
Filmsoc
feuding
By COROL SMITH
Ubyssey Council Reporter
The AMS council and Film
Society are openly feuding
over a proposed projectionist
fee increase.
"When a club operates so it
infringes on the rights of other
clubs and organizations something has to be done," said
AMS president Roger McAfee.
Film society wants 50 percent of the gross profit for all
commercial showings. Commercial showings are showings
for profit which are not connected with the aims of the
organization producing them,
says Filmsoc.
Filmsoc spokesman Pete
Harrison said the figure is
reasonable because Filmsoc
has to raise $2,000 to cover an
AMS loan and operating expenses of both projectors and
booths.
AMS second vice-president
Byron Hender said it is incongruous to limit commercial
showings while trying to raise
money for operations.
Harrison said putting a restriction on commercial showings will prevent over-saturation of the film viewing public.
(Continued on  Page 2)
SEE:   FEUD
Vance said Wednesday: "The
room has been closed, activities of the committee have
been frozen, and we are going through their files."
Vance and Arts president
Chas Pentland were appointed
interim co-chairmen of AAC
by council after former chairman Mike Coleman resigned.
Coleman left after Council
censured his committee on its
handling of the joint AMS-
Victoria College symposium.
Vance said: "We feel that
unless we know what is going
on we don't want anything going on."
He said he and Pentland
want to find out exactly who
is on AAC and how they have
spent their $1,200 AMS grant.
Vance and Pentland will
look into the current operation of the committee and determine if the original aims
have been followed.
Sixteen tons
Two months extra
Ubyssey's ma milked for record
Ubyssey Magic Sovereign,
a UBC bull named after The
Ubyssey, has a real champion
milker for a mother.
She is Agnes Riverdene
Magic, eight year old Hol-
stein, B.C. born and bred.
•   •   •
She lives at the campus
aggie barns—and she is the
new Canadian milk producing champion.
She produced 32,764
pounds of milk, containing
939 pounds of butterfat, on
305 successive days of twice
daily milking.
Agnes   weighs   only  1,575
pounds.
Most cows quit at 30S days
AGNES RIVERDENE MAGIC
—Agnes is the only Canadian
cow to top 30,000 pounds in
305 days—but not our Agnes.
She continued to produce,
for a 365 day total of 37,402
pounds   of   milk   containing
1,085 pounds of butterfat.
•   •   •
This is an average of 102
pounds of milk daily, with a
one-day peak of 136.5 pounds.
In quarts, it's 44 a day, average.
Agnes is now dry and
awaiting the birth of her
sixth calf.
Hopefully, a brother for
Ubyssey Magic Sovereign. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February  18,  1965
Retorts
Boylan
blasts
slander'
Defeated first vice-presidential candidate Charlie Boylan
blasted as slanderous charges
he waged a garbage campaign
in the last election.
He said AMS president Roger McAfee's statements were
vague and unworthy 6f an
AMS president.
McAfee charged Boylan's
campaigners used "lying garbage tactics" in the last election.
He said the campaigners
spread rumors that he (McAfee) and incumbent Bob
Cruise bribed other potential
candidates to stop them contesting the first vice-presidency.
Boylan said: "As far as I'm
concerned the election for first
vice-president was a clean,
hard fought campaign built
around important student issues."
"The election is over," he
continued, "and any personal
comment is irrelevant."
Boylan called for unity in
order to advance student interests.
He said: "There are so many
important student issues that
we need unity not personal attacks.
"Disagreement and debate,
yes; slander and defamation,
no," he said.
Answering McAfee's challenge to a public debate Boylan said: "I accept the challenge, not in order to continue
the campaign but in order to
make my position clear."
No date has yet been set for
the debate.
JENNIFER RHODES, Arts III,
Gamma Phi Beta, has been
chosen Sweetheart of Sigma
Chi  fraternity.
Fed meet
finds home
in Acadia
The B.C. Student Federation
convention will be held Feb.
27 and 28 at the Youth Training Camp in Acadia Camp
Residences, chairman Hardial
Bains   announced   Wednesday.
"We have booked YTC recreation hall and six small
rooms from Housing," Bains
said.
BCSF's original booking of
Brock Hall fell through when
AMS co-ordinator of activities
told the non-AMS group they
would have to pay off-campus
rates of $80 a day.
Housing office said cost of
renting the recreation hall
and room is $38 for the two
days.
Bains said other particulars
of the convention will be as
outlined in the BCSF's full
page ad in last Thursday's
Ubyssey.
Dance doorprize
real Quebecer
A real date with Real is the doorprize at the Creditiste
Club's semi-formal ball.
The UBC Creditistes are
holding a dance Friday, February 19 from 9 to 12:30 in
Brock and the door prize is a
date with Real Cauoette February 27.
If a male wins the door
prize he gets a ticket to a $3 a
plate luncheon at the Hotel
Georgia February 27 with
Real Caouette.
"Caouette is impressed with
activities out here," Barry
Cooper, Creditiste Club president, said. "The UBC Creditistes are recognized by other
national Creditiste organizations as the remarkable West
Coast group," he said.
PROFS
(Continued  from  Page   1)
"I'll give you the full story
when the time comes," he said.
The Ubyssey also predicted
a possible* fee raise of $50 to
meet the 25 percent of costs
the Board of Governers announced last year it expects
students to pay.
"The 25 per cent figure was
not fixed," the administration
spokesman said.
"The president said at that
time if money could be obtained from other sources, the
student's share would not
necessarily have to be that
amount."
ARTS U.S. ELECTIONS
Nominations close 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 18th
for Next Year's Executive
■& President ■& Secretary
*fo Vice President •& Treasurer
-fr Executive Member
NOMINATE THE CANDIDATE OF YOUR CHOICE
Committee set up
to steer building
The AMS has set up a Client's Committee to deal with
furnishings, interior decoration and efficiency of the Student Union Building.
The 13 member committee
met with SUB architect Kenneth Snider to orient the committee with problems in planning SUB and to give the committee an insight into work to
be done.
The committee will be subdivided into groups to study
revenue areas, lounges and
food services.
• •   •
The chairman of the Clients
Committee and three members
will meet with the AMS president and a representative of
the university to form the executive of the committee.
The committee is subsidiary
to the AMS and is not a policy
making body.
In areas where policy is involved information will be
submitted to council and the
decision made by council will
then be carried out by the committee.
Snider won the national
competition to design the SUB
and was in Vancouver for the
SUB Competition award presentation Wednesday night in
the Faculty Club.
• •   •
The prize was $3,000 and
the contract to complete the
building design. The commission for the building is six percent of cost, an estimated
$120,000.
Snider also met with SUB
quantity surveyor George Parsons, the Board of Governors
and AMS council members.
'THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious  T-Bone
Steak $1.35
If s really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
FEUD
(Continued  from  Page   1)
Faculty films, club films,
Cinema 16 and one commercial
showing were the source of
last year's revenue for Filmsoc.
Technical manager of the
group Lome Massey said Filmsoc is responsible for the care,
maintenance and replacement
of $14,000 worth of equipment.
Massey said he personally
spent 100 hours doing maintenance work on the machinery this year.
No blood
squeezing us
The Red Cross is upset with
the UBC spring blood drive.
"Since 1954, there has never
been such a poor showing as
this spring drive," said Forestry Undergraduate Society
social chairman Bob Christie.
"Unless UBC fulfils their
quota of 3,000 they will have
to hold a special off-campus
drive."
Christie said 1,924 donors
have given so far.
Blood donor clinic is open
today and Friday from 9:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the Armoury.
l/oqusL
FLOWER SHOP
2180 West
Broadway
Moving   February  26 to:
2197   W.   BROADWAY
10%    Discount   to   Students
RE 3-3021 RE 3-7322
SPECIAL EVENTS
presents
New York Social Economist
ROBERT THEOBALD
The Problems of Automation"
Today - Aud - 25c - Today
B.C. Hydro & Power Authority
will be on campus
to interview
3rd Year Engineering Students
for
Summer Employment
Dates: February 23 & 24
Please arrange an appointment time  through
the Student Placement Office
Pont Be Disappointed
Totem's Grad Edition
will be available
early in March
•
Be Sure of Your Copy
Limited Number Available
PLAY IT SAFE-BUY NOW Thursday, February 18,  1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
SEEING THE LIGHT, Arts classes get first look at new
projectors for displaying profs' notes on screen or wall
at front of class.
Debate, fashions
for Frosh Week
Frosh are bringing culture to campus Monday.
It's Frosh Week  and  frosh
Fined for damages
Hut levies
$900 for
top
term
dence, when the sum due was
subtracted from a $25 dorm
deposit banked at the start of
their term in residence.
Housing is also insisting on
having the $25 kept up to date
from year-to-year, rather than
letting the dorm deposit
dwindle each year, as assessments are taken off.
"Audit-wise, letting the
money just diminish was an
incorrect procedure," R o h -
ringer said.
"The auditors asked us to
clear up the situation by
bringing the $25 up to full
strength.
The amount so far deducted
from dorm deposits of the
2,500 students in residence
was not released.
More than $900 in finds has been slapped on Fort Camp
huts for damages in the first term.
Hut hardest hit was Hut 7,
with a whopping $394 slice of
the sum. The money goes to
replace broken ceiling tiles
and windows, and for penalties for violations of fire
equipment regulations.
"These assessments are levied when physical damages
are done within a unit, but
when actual names of the perpetrators are not known," said
Housing administrator Leslie
Rohringer.
• •   •
"If   the    guilty    person    is
known, individual assessments
can be made."
Except for damage to fire
equipment, fines cover damages only, Rohringer said.
"As far as I know, the law
of the country makes tampering with fire equipment a
criminal offense. But we at
Housing realize the students,
when they are joking, are not
criminals.
"And with our $100 penalty as a deterrent, we can keep
the authorities satisfied," he
said.
Only other penalty-type
assessment is a warning made
earlier to Hut 7 that their
fines for damages will now increase geometrically. "There
is a long history of rowdiness
there," Rohringer said.
• •   •
Unit 7 and area assessments,
where a whole camp or residence area pays for damages,
such as when the statue Pregnant Woman was taken from
the Frederic Lasserre building
and hoisted atop Fort Camp
meal hall roof, are paid for by
dividing up the money among
students  concerned.
A new procedure to be implemented by Housing this
year means immediate notification of students involved in
individual and unit assessments.
Formerly, students were not
notified of monies due until
the end of their stay in resi-
are sponsoring a cultural debate, a fashion show, cultural
dances and stunts.
Frosh President Kim Campbell said that the culture
theme would be enlightening
to students.
Monday noon in Brock,
frosh are sponsoring a debate
on Resolved: Are frosh beneficial? Between Law and frosh.
Debaters will be AMS first
vice-president Bob Cruise and
AMS president Roger McAfee
for Law versus Kim Campbell
and Wolf Raymer representing
frosh.
Tuesday noon there is a free
mixer in Brock Lounge with
the Shantelles. There will be
a donation for the Cup of Milk
Fund.
Wednesday noon freshettes
will model their own fasnions
in Brock.
Thursday, Shakey's Pizza
Parlour comes to North Brock
from 12:30-3:00. Students will
be able to buy a pizza and a
pepsi from freshette waitresses after the Folksong show
in Brock Lounge by Sonny
Terry and Brownie McGhee.
Patrol Sheriocks home in,
that's where stolen car was
A UBC coed who discovered her car missing from C-lot
last week immediately phoned the university patrol who
informed her they had no idea of where her car was.
Four hours later the patrol phoned Linda Murray,
Arts TV, to tell her that her car had been discovered parked beside the patrol's Wesbrook Crescent headquarters.
"Nothing was taken from the car," Miss Murray said,
"but there was a hole in the gas tank."
A Ubyssey story Tuesday told of an engineer who
found his car looted in C-lot.
Police said an average two cars a month are stripped
in the parking lots.
MjRth-RitE'/95'
ACTUALLY GUARANTEED FOR YOUR LIFE
With new "Miracle"
Stainless Steel
ball socket
The only ballpen
with a written
"Life Guarantee"
. . . Refill guaranteed to write a
full year or replaced free.
New Stainless steel
ball socket eliminates
ink stains on hands,
clothing and paper.
Engineers help
frosh for a day
UBC engineers will declare a truce with frosh this
Thursday.
The engineers will guide
all frosh interested in entering engineering next year
through all six Engineering
buildings.
The tour begins at 12:30
in Eng. 201. Later Thursday
afternoon, 500 to 600 high
school students from the
greater Vancouver area will
also tour.
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.  10th Ave.
24 Hr. Service      CA 4-0034
Alma Mater Sotiety
OFFICIAL NOTICES
1. ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
General meeting of all academic activities committee members in the council chambers, Friday noon.
2. GENERAL MEETING
IMPORTANT.
Any proposed amendments to the AMS Constitution
and By-laws must be received by the secretary no
later than Friday, March 5.
3. COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
APPOINTMENTS
• Anyone interested in being appointed chairman of any of the following committees must write
a letter of application to the secretary.
• Application letters and eligibility forms must be
received by the secretary no later than Friday noon
preceding the Monday on which the appointment
will be made.
• Eligibility forms available AMS office.
MARCH  1  (Application letter must be in by Friday
February 26.
— Special Events Chairman
— Homecoming Chairman
— College Shop Manager
— Frosh Orientation Chairman
— U.B.C.  Radio President
MARCH 8. (Application letters to be in by March 5)
— Canadian   Union   of  Students  Chairman
— Totem Editor
— Bird Calls 'Editor
-i    Tuum Est Editor
— Intramural Sports Chairman
— High School Conference Chairman *
MARCH 15. (Application letters to be in by March
12).
— Ubyssey Editor
— Academic  Activities   Chairman
— Canadian    University   Students   Overseas
Chairman
— World University Service Chairman
— Student Court
— Leadership  Conference  Chairman.
4. FINANCE COMMITTEE
Applications are now being accepted for positions
in the Finance Committee:
1) Three Assistant Treasurers
2) Secretary
3) Member at Large
Please apply in writing to Box 47 by Ferbruary 26,
1965. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage In cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY  18,  1965
Tsk, tsk, tsk
The seductive little wench
who accompanies us into
the editorial column today
is on the provincial government venereal disease
posters.
The posters warn:
"Four out of five pickups have VD — guard your
health."
One glance at our girl
and thoughts of guarding
our health begin to vanish.
If pickups look like this,
it's worth the chance to
find out if she's the one,
or just one of those.
And, rather than discourage loose moral conduct
among the people of British Columbia, the poster
will probably invite depravity.
If the above has your
blood pressure up for any
one of the following three
reasons (check): 1. poor
taste (), 2. unrequited
love (), 3. fear (), then
rush to the Armory.
There, until Friday, your
frantic heart can donate a
pint   of   blood   to   UBC's
annual blood drive.
Officials say this is the worst year since 1954 for
bleeders.
Sorry about the beginning, but so few people read our
usual bland pleas for blood.
Flag flap flop
Canada's new flag was raised on poles across the
country Monday with little emotion.
We were in Ottawa when Pearson's pennant tangled
itself atop the parliamentary pole.
Despite press reports, it was greeted with as much
emotion as was the flag at UBC raised early In the
morning by a lone traffic man. Elsewhere in Canada
emotion was zero.
There was a crowd of 10,000 in Ottawa, mostly civil
servants given time off, school children and press
people. A sickly cheer — all two seconds of it — was
raised when the flag reached the top.
We wonder if all the time spent haggling in the Commons is justified when it seems few people give a damn.
ppy
&4*nfaw2-J^
I WENT INTO
A -SERVICE
STANCH THE
OTHER GKf
ANDTHEY
"FUTATJSeR"
IN MY TANK-
40(UK£
AN IDIOT,
1£AII>
WHY,,     J
HOT?   J
—from the Manitoban
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Kim speaks
Editor, The Ubyssey:
To Miss Judy Lowe: After
reading your letter in Tuesday's Ubyssey which exposes how I spend my twenty
hours a week (minimum) on
Frosh Council activities, I
deduced that in order to have
gained such detailed information, you must be either an
English 100 rep or a janitor
in the Brock Extension.
On perusing my lists of
class reps, however, I failed
to notice your name. Not giving up hope, I looked over
my committee lists to see if
you were mentioned there.
Your name was conspicuously absent.
(Tell me, are you pushing
a broom?)
If, as your letter indicates,
you are interested in Frosh
Council and its activities, I
should like to extend to you
an invitation to join a newly-
formed committee of the
Council. It is called the Criticism Committee. Any freshman is eligible to join.
Those caught making any
constructive contribution to
the Frosh Undergraduate Society will, of course, forfeit
membership. Meetings are informal and continuous.
I trust you will find your
particular talents well suited
to this committee.
KIM   CAMPBELL
Frosh  President
TP       *F       *r
We're unreoliable
Editor, The Ubyssey:
From my experience with
The Ubyssey I can only con
clude that it is a biased and
unreliable  newspaper.   v
During the election campaign for first vice-president
the paper repeatedly made
Communism an election issue. The photograph and
story on the library debate
distorted both the focus of
discussion and what I said.
Following the election, a
story was given front page
coverage. I was not even contacted to present my views
regarding McAfee's vague
and slanderous charges.
Promised that I would be
given a chance to reply, I
submitted a statement which
included an acceptance of
McAfee's challenge to debate
for Tuesday's paper. It was
not printed.
One last example of distorted reporting was the
story on Mr. Buck's Monday
meeting. Completely ignoring
his whole speech on the need
for reform in an age of automation and the need to negotiate peace in S. Viet Nam,
the story quoted out of context a statement by Mr. Buck
in answer to a student's question.
To set his position straight,
Mr. Buck said the NDP was
a positive alternative to the
crisis-ridden Tory and Liberal Parties.
I can only hope that similar activities and events are
not misreported or ignored
in the same way.
CHARLES   BOYLAN
Graduate Studies I
V       Tr       V
Broadminded
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Unfortunately t| he Red-
shirts are unable to participate in artsy courses such as
Basket Weaving and Canoe
Rowing wherein one becomes
acquainted with the higher
forms of culture, however, we
are learned enough to accept
constructive criticism when
it is understandable, Mr. Wilson.
Although my pocket dictionary failed me, I gathered
from your letter that you disapprove of the "Cunning
Stunt".
Rather than conceal your
self in the darkness of the
Brock and criticize the Engineers for their form of campus
cheer, why not gather some
of your artsy friends together
and teach the EUS the correct
and proper methods of group
participation. The Engineers
are extremely broadminded.
Also, Mr. Wilson, I understand that the pond will soon
be full.
R.   WESCH
Eng.  I.
•fa fp af*
Yep. Mike's o winner
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re: This Week has 2 columns: under the name game
section . . .
Mike Coleman, Mike Coleman, Mike Coleman, Mike
Coleman, Mike Coleman,
Mike Coleman, Mike Coleman and etc.
There, that ought to make
me this week's winner.
MIKE    COLEMAN
winner
V        V        v
Name SUB Naegele
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Considering our loss
through sudden and tragic
demise of Dean Kaspar Naegele, we might pay no higher
tribute to his memory than
to name after him the student union building.
The contributions he made
and the attitudes he fostered
deserve   perpetuation.
WE REMEMBER
EDITOR:  Mike  Horsey
News     Tim Padmore
Managing   Janet Matheson
City   .  Tom Wayman
Art   Don   Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. City   Lorraine Shore
Asst.  News   Carole Munroe
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts
Associate    Mike Hunter
Associate    Ron  Rltar
Well, today it was Robbl West as
assistant city editor and those helping her through the day were Gordon McLaughlin, Carol-Anne (chasing Playboy) Baker, Art Casperson,
Sandra Stephenson, Bob Weiser.
Joan Godsell, Rick (James Bond)
Blair, Cassius Clark, Robin Russell,
Paul Terry, Elizabeth Field, Corol
(hungry) Smith, Sunfink Mike Grenby, Bob (fratrat) Burton, Massimo
Verdicchio and Al (Ethiopia) Birnie.
And guess what group—no party
this   weekend. Thursday,  February 18,  1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
ENS    ENTRANCE
»^^i^W**#
Familiar B.C. beering landmark. Not so in England.
BACKGROUND
English pubbing easy
LONDON — Last October,
a week before leaving Van-
c o u v e r , I was impolitely
ejected from the Fraser Arms
for the embarrassing sin of
being  nineteen.
This unhappy memory is
ironical in retrospect, for I
am currently bolstering a
dwindling supply of traveller's cheques working as a
bartender in a London pub,
days of illegal imbibing in
such monstrosities as the
Arms and the Blue Boy safely far behind.
• •    *
Much nonsense has been
written about the "typical
English pub." Our place of
employment,   which   for   an-
L a s t fall, Ubyssey re-
porters Al Donald and
Danny Stoffman left for
Europe. Al Donald sent several stories from overseas
last term, until he ran out
of stamp money and The
Ubyssey lost his address >to
send him more. Here's
Danny Stoffman's first.
onymity's sake we will call
Pooh Inn, is not at all a
typical English pub. Which is
typical.
The character of Pooh Inn
is determined by its location
—in the Earls Court area of
western London which contains one of Britain's largest
collections of Aussies, homosexuals, Negroes (often sporting tribal scars, mod clothes,
and English girl friends),
Canadians and other oddballs.
The pub is run by a bearded ex-Navy officer, with the
help of his red-headed wife
and a huge Alsatian who is
at liberty to terrorize the
customers.
• •   •
Like all pubs, Pooh Inn is
divided into a saloon bar,
richly carpeted and plushly
upholstered, and a stark public bar, where floor and
chairs are bare. Here, ta replaces thank you, and a
bottle of Guinness costs a
penny less.
Pooh Inn has a third section, called the lounge bar
which is even posher than
the saloon. It is packed three
nights a week and Sunday
afternoons — when New Orleans jazz is played by seven
Londoners  from  Islington.
English pubs differ from
B.C. drinking dungeons in
one profound way: far fewer
customers come for the sole
purpose of getting bombed.
Most make a pint of beer
last for hours, although the
occasional   patron   who  does
seek oblivion proceeds with
a vengeance and imagination
rarely seen in Canada.
An elderly Irish gentleman who insists he was once
a well-known child-actor, arrives in the public bar every
night at about 7 p.m. and
downs two pints of draught
beer, each braced with a
double scotch, in hardly more
than a minute.
He then spends less than
five minutes over a concoction known as a Chelsea —
bitter Guinness stout mixed
with a sickly sweet but potent unprocessed apple cider
known as scrumpy.
Next he treats himself to
a large Jameson (Irish whiskey), with which he retires
to a corner to spend the rest
of the evening silent and
smiling.
•   •    •
There is no table service
at English pubs. Customers
must come to the bar for
drinks, of which there are a
bewildering variety for the
novice barman to master.
And if one doesn't buy a
drink, nobody pays any notice, least of all the management. Above all, Pooh Inn is
a human sort of place. One
can't say the same for the
Blue Boy.
Of more interest to the
young tourists are places like
the Prospect of Whitby overlooking the Thames in London's ancient east end (lately the in area for pub-crawling).
The Prospect, like so many
London pubs, is hundreds of
years old and has been altered little over the years. The
floor is stone and the oak
walls are festooned with
brass mugs and pots.
There is no room for chairs
or tables; every inch of floor
space is crammed seven
nights a week with standing,
singing students.
At the time of our visit,
however, the Prospect's very
olde English aura was seriously marred by The Sands,
consisting of three Hawaiians
in flowery red shirts, twanging electric ukeles and trying
to turn Beyond the Reef into
a beer-drinking song.
• •    •
Most guide books to European night life direct the
youthful London visitor to
the Lyceum, a famous dance
hall and pick-up spot just off
the Strand.
The Lyceum seems deadly
dull after one has discovered
the jazz clubs and coffee bars
of Chelsea and Soho but is an
eye-opener to the visitor
from puritan Canada.
Hundreds of dateless young
men and women flock on
Saturday nights to this gaudy
and audacious converted
theatre, where red carpets
surround one of the world's
largest dance floors, flashing
lights swirl overhead, and
two bands continuously hammer away from a revolving
stage. There is a long, fully-
stocked bar at one end of the
hall and a more intimate
drinking lounge in a separate room; facilities which
would no doubt shock the
LCB, for at least half the
Lyceum's patrons are under
21.
• •    •
But this is England, where
the 18-year-old can take a
drink like an adult rather
than a delinquent.
The result is a completely
un-danceland atmosphere No
police are in attendance and
only a handful of commis-
sionnaires. One sees no
drunkeness, no fighting, no
loud behavior. The atmosphere, in fact, is almost too
civilized.
Treated like adults, these
young people behave like
adults — which can be a bit
of a bore.
Shot down
Co-ed sex claims
PALO ALTO, Calif. (CUP)—Sexual permissiveness has
not swept the American college campus, a Stanford University researcher contends
This is contrary to recent
opinion.
Mervin Freedman, assistant
dean of undergraduate education bases his conclusion on a
detailed study of an Eastern
women's college where 49 students were interviewed for
four years and several thousand students were tested.
Among his findings:
• Three-f ourths of American college women are virgins;
• Premarital inter course
among college women is usually restricted to future husbands;
• Promiscuity i s probably
confined to a very small percentage of college women,
probably a lower proportion
than high school girls.
Broaden Your Horizons
only
EUROPE    $
on a Canadian Pacific
Airlines Tour.
only
6
a day
(plus air fare)
.*»»J
m
You can see Europe by motor coach for as
little as $6 a day on the "Club Special" -
one of 15 budget-priced tours offered
you by Canadian Pacific Airlines. Get
your FREE 24-page brochure from your
Travel Agent, any Canadian Pacific
office - or mail coupon below.
vfl^i
»  i '^AaVa
wgKSmKk             OMKNisai
Q+Mmttku/
w«»p sommimmA ulzwu^c
>nesu
I          ujcb«kO"K!/      Or
/                      nana   T
fOMNMH             resign       JL.
ucu
miotC
MSMIQ,
mt
Sample European Tours
• CLUB SPECIAL - 57 days $350. Belgium, Holland,
Germany, Denmark, Switzerland, Austria, Yugoslavia,
Trieste, Italy, France, Spain. (IT.FT.3)
• ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND SPECIAL - 6 days $75.
(IT.FT.l)
• SCANDINAVIAN SPECIAL - 15 days $186. Holland.
Germany, Denmark, Norway, Sweden. (IT.FT.ll)
• MOSCOW SPECIAL- 15 days $240. Holland.Germany,
Poland, U.S.S.R. (IT.FT.8)
• ADRIATIC SPECIAL - 15 days $175. Belgium, Germany, Austria, Italy, Yugoslavia, Greece. (IT.FT.10)
Tour cost includes your transportation in Europe, accommodation,
sightseeing, some meals, all service charges and taxes.
Canadian Qticfoc
TRAINS / TRUCKS /   SHIPS / PLANES / HOTELS / TELECOMMUNICATIONS
WORLD'S   MOST COMPLETE   TRANSPORTATION   SYSTEM
MAIL COUPON FOR FREE BROCHURE
Canadian Pacific Airlines, 1004 West Georgia, Vancouver, B.C.
Please send me 24-page Motor Coach Tour brochure with
complete itineraries and costs.
NAME.
ADDRESS.
I
I
j     CITY PROV..
I
L.
MY TRAVEL AGENT IS.
COSTUMES
For All Occasions
DELUXE COSTUMES
1292  Kingsway at Clark
Phone:  874-6116
MtsctiraoN i
EYE GLASSES
<r5^S~169s
All Doctor's EyooJast Prcscripttont
fitted. First quality motor iots vMd.
All work p*rfornMd by apalifiad
Opticians.
GftANVILLE OPTICAL
Ml Granville     MU3-S921
■^■1 MMST*4s*ai AoawSMtM "W
w
FRIDAY NIGHT FEB. 19, 9-12:30
IN   BROCK   HALL
An Uninhibited Shaker With
THE CHESSMEN"
AND BONNIE THE YOUNG ONE
Tickets on sale now at AMS and at the door $1.00 each
But Don't Delay! 1200 people attended the last one at Totem Park
A CREDITISTE PRESENTATION Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  18,  1965
UBC HELPED FIELD HOCKEY TO MILESTONE
Wright, who was a member
of the '64 Canadian Olympic
field hockey team, m this the
concluding article on field
hockey, writes on the future
of this  sport  at  UBC.
By LEE WRIGHT
In 1964, a milestone in
the development of field
hockey in Canada was
reached, when, for the first
time a Canadian field hockey team had the honour of
representing Canada in the
Olympic games.
Although the team did not
win a medal in the Tokyo
Olympics, their participation
in the Games was an unqualified success. The team played
a   vigorous   and   demanding
schedule, 15 games in 16
days, of which seven were official Olympic matches.
Canada enhanced its world
rating to fourteenth place
and won one Olympic match.
(There are well over 50 members in the International
Hockey Federation). The best
and most satisfying game
played by C|a n a d a was
against India, the Olympic
champions, whom they held
three goals to nil.
The University of British
Columbia was well represented with four players—Victor
Warren, Peter Buckland,
John Young and myself—on
the Olympic team. In 1968
UBC will probably have an
even greater representation
on the Olympic team.
SPORTS
EDITOR:
GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
The facilities for field
hockey in Tokyo were the
best in the world. The fields
which we played on were
better than the golf greens in
Vancouver.
Canada,  which  is  a  new
comer to Olympic hockey, can
be greatly encouraged by the
example set by the Australian
team. The situation in Australia in many ways parallels
that in Canada.
Unlike other teams which
were in training camps or on
world tours for months prior
to the Olympics, neither the
Australian nor the Canadian
teams were able to train together as a team because of
the great distances separating
the players, and because of
the lack of necessary finances.
Australia first competed in
field hockey in the Olympic
Games in 1956. However, by
1964 they had improved to
such a great extent that they
won a bronze medal. I hope
that field hockey can undergo a similar development in
Canada.
Because some of the members of the potential 1968
Olympic hockey team are
now undergoing intensive
training and conditioning
under UBC and National
Coach Eric Broom, three and
a half years prior to the next
Olympics, the team should
greatly improve on their performance in the 1964 Olympic Games.
IN INTRAMURALS everything goes, even the ball, which we couldn't find in this
picture. However, we found out after careful inquiry, they were playing without
one. The final score in the game was 11-7 for the whites.
FROM THE PRESS BOX
Women in sports — baaah!
These pages lately have
been attracting garbage-
hurling fanatics in all
shapes and sizes.
McAfee led off the parade
by tearing bloody strips off
Reamsbottom for daring to
suggest that common sense
and a guy called McAfee
were a little less than synonymous.
Of another shape and size
though equally and adamantly incensed was Elizabeth
Field who took advantage of
our sports editor's fantastic
streak of toleration to again
submit our pages to another
onslaught of sophistry intermingled with the occasional
sharp piece of downright invective. This time it was my
tender hide posing as a target
for a razor sharp knife.
"How can you condemn
women's sports?" she cried.
"You're a nut," she wailed.
Such ramblings detract
greatly from the modest yet
saintly aura of class which
people like myself lend to
this section.
As well as insinuating that
yours truly has a screw loose
Miss Field claims that women's sports have a place in
the university because "They
provide an opportunity for
developing above the normal
level and for participation in
the university community."
Never, but never, has
yours truly even contemplated harboring a grudge against
"women developing above
normal level". Just recently
in fact I renewed my membership in Lechers Anonymous.
By
JACK McQUARRIE
However, not once have I
heard a campus female lay
credit for her superior development on the fact she participated in athletics (organized). In fact the more developed her assets the less
likely it is she will have the
time or the inclination to
bounce basketballs, throw
footballs, box, etc. Campus
males appear to be overly
sympathetic towards any
femmes with a hankering for
participation.
Anyone who took in the
Totemette basketball tournament will know what I'm
getting at. It's a brute fact
that the best were often the
bestial. In frequent display
were knees, arms and elbows.
In other words signs of the
aggressiveness that usually
prove a man to be a man.
Apply these features to a
woman playing sports and
what do you get?
Elizabethan history bespeaks chivalry in the court.
But it isn't a basketball court
being referred to.
Trivial example? Ok.
Carry it over to the business
world where men are currently besieged and knifed in
the back by aggressive career
women. But when the poor,
bloodied male turns to defend himself he's greeted
with a demure smile and
a charming female giggle.
Miss Field would seem to
accuse people like myself of
idealism for she scornfully
refers to "the protectors of
the great American Dream."
To which I say take in one
of the girls' athletic events
and enjoy a nightmare.
Why the hysterical attempt
of women to compete with
men? Is being feminine and
acting like it really that dif-
f i c u 11 and unsatisfactory,
girls?
From where I sit it looks
sort of natural . . . and nice.
Restless Birdies
aim for playoffs
UBC's Thunderbird soccer team kicked off the second
half of its Pacific Coast Soccer League schedule with a
well-deserved, one-point tie against Columbus Cartings
last Saturday.
It was the first point the
Birds had earned in seven
games. But instead of taking
it easy now that they've hit
their stride, UBC's restless
soccer Birdies are aiming for
even greater feats.
They intend to make a
PCSL playoff position which
is only eight points away. And
they can take a lengthy stride
in that direction t>y defeating
Victoria United Saturday in
Varsity Stadium.
Victoria is currently in third
place only nine points in front
of UBC.
Game time is 1 p.m.
Varsity
Sporting   Goods
Present Stock at
25%
DISCOUNT
We're moving to larger
premises at
4510 W. 10th Ave.
on MARCH 1st
Drop in now at
4564 W. 10th Ave.
Wanted - 3 Girls
Horse-loving and horse-experienced to ride and to guide
on our scenic trailrides and packtrips and to participate
in all our dude ranch activities on
Weekends and During the Summer Holiday.
Room and board is provided. Please write in detail to
Box   188,   Squamish   B.C.   (40   miles   from   Vancouver).
PARADISE VALLEY HORSE RANCH
Squamish, B.C. Box 188
GSM NEWS
Election Results
Weisbart   42
Wootton   73
There were 14 spoiled ballots. From the above figures
it is apparent that only 10% of eligible voters bothered
to vote. A bloody poor show indeedl The other executive
positions have gone by acclamation except for that of
PRO and Special Services Officer which are still open.
Letters of application for these two remaining positions
must be handed in by 5 o'clock Monday, February 22.
Applicants will be interviewed by the executive at 7:00
p.m. on Monday.
The 1965-66 G.S.A. Executive includes the following
people.
George   Wootton   — President
Ernie   Whelan        — Vice President
John Wiginton
Trudy Pentland
Bob Browne
Dick Holt
Peter Johansen
Arvid Hardin
— Treasurer
— Secretary
— Social Officer
— Sports Officer
— Cultural Officer
— Club Night Chairman Thursday, February 18,  1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC MEN!
JUST NOT
WITH IT!
THEY WANT A REWARD-SUPPORT!
Miss Charlesworth, who is
head cheerleader, writes this
article as spokesman for UBC's
enthusiastic cheerleaders who
are becoming increasingly exasperated with UBC's un-
enthuslastic   males.
By DIANA CHARLESWORTH
Why are there cheerleaders?
Our main purpose is to
support and inspire Thunderbird teams, but we can't
do it alone.
Teams want our support.
The football team paid half
our fares out of their own
funds so we could go to
cheer for them at a game in
San Francisco last fall. We
paid the other half. Each
girl pays up to $60 a year
to travel with the teams,
whereas many universities
pay their cheerleaders' way
to all out-of-town games.
• •   •
We receive no financial
aid — and no reward. We
feel we deserve a reward—
a peppy response to our
cheerleading efforts! When
there is little response from
the "fans" we feel discouraged.
We are called unenthus-
iastic even though we spend
a great deal of time and
effort each week practising
for the many games, pep
meets and other functions
we are asked to attend. If
this isn't interest and enthusiasm in UBC sports,
what is?
We turn out for a game,
go out on the floor and lead
a cheer for our team, and
what happens? Silence—no
response! Do the fans feel
they can leave cheering to
the cheerleaders?
* •   •
Do they feel it is beneath
their dignity to cheer with
us, or do they think we are
there just to entertain
them?
The fans must let our
teams know that they do
support them. A small group
of girls cannot create a gym
full of cheering fans.
When we cheer — you
cheer! This will be our reward.
Here're two
sports shorts
Thunderette Volleyball
team placed fourth in the
Longview Invitational Tournament last weekend at Long-
view, Washington. The Jay-
vees took ninth place. The
championship was won by the
Doorclosers from Portland.
• • •
UBC's swimming team hosts
two meets this weekend. First
meet is against U. of Wash,
tonight. Saturday's affair is a
triangular meet between UBC,
Western Washington and U. of
Alberta (Edmonton). Starting
time both nights is 6 p.m. at
the Percy Norman Pool.
We want a cartwheel! Flying high is head cheerleader Diana Charlesworth,
responsible for all leaping, soaring and dancing.
—photos dave freeman
Here's the bouquet of beauty which brightens the athletic season. Rain, mud,
nothing daunts their spirit. Why aren't you turned on? Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February  18,1965
'tween classes
Automated talk at noon
Controversial U.S. economist Robert Theobald will
speak on Automation and Society in Brock at noon today.
• •   •
EUS
Tour for all those interested
in entering Engineering next
year at noon today in Eng. 201.
• •    •
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Architecture professor, Abraham Rogatnick, speaks on
The Art Nouveau Phenomenon at noon today in La. 104.
• •   •
LIBERALS
Policy-discussion: To Be Or
Not To Be, That is The Queen.
Noon today in Bu. 100.
• •   •
LAST MINUTE TICKETS
Tickets for Oh Dad, Poor
Dad, the Ballet Bihari, the
Vancouver Symphony, the
Cave and Isy's available from
Special Events Office.
• •   •
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
Film, Carnival in Trinidad,
at noon today in Bu. 100. Preview of Carnival Dance Feb.
26 at the Embassy Ballroom.
• •   •
NEW DEMOCRATS
Banned war propaganda
film Battle of Russia at noon
today in Bu. 202; 25 cents.
• •   •
PHARMACOLOGY DEPT.
Special heart tests will be
conducted on campus this
month. See article How's your
Heart?
• •    •
AQUA  SOC
The Silent World by Jacques
Costeau, free, Wes. 100 at noon
Feb. 25.
CHORAL SOC
Concert date changed. Now
Friday, Feb. 26 in Auditorium.
• •   •
JAPAN STUDENT
EXCHANGE
Applications for Japan Student Exchange due Fri. noon,
Bu. 4262.
• •    •
UBC PHYSICS SOC
Dr. F. L. Curzon on Physics
Today at noon today in Henn.
204.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Field trip to Willingdon
School for Girls, noon today.
Meet by Stadium.
• •    •
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting in Chem. 250 today
noon. Election nominations,
party location and film.
• •   •
BADMINTON  CLUB
Important general meeting
tonight.
• •   •
SCM
Meeting for students interested in summer work projects
today noon, Bu. 225.
• •   •
HILLEL FOUNDATION
Free films on prejudice at
noon today in Bu. 106.
• •   •
PRE-MED SOC
Who is Miss Sawbones
Shuffle? Find out at the dance.
Tickets at AMS, $3.75 a
couple.
• •   •
IH
Support the dance Friday
night at IH. Fifty cents per
person.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
WHOEVER TOOK my grey tweed
topcoat from the Freddy Wood,
Feb. 9, please return to Main Lost
& Found or call  CA 4-0158.	
LOST — Man's wrist watch, on 3rd
Floor Stacks in Library. Would
finder please call, AM 1-9719,
Stan.
LOST — On campus two weeks ago.
Leather key case with keys. Don,
266-2920.
FOUND — Liberty silk scarf found
Feb. 8 on Library lawn. See Mrs.
Hoeg,   College   Library.
WOULD the person who took my
Milton text from the Level 3
shelves please return it there as
I desperately need the notes or
call WA  2-0348.
FOUND triangular gold pin almost
equilateral of side 5 mm, found on
University Blvd. near Wesbrook
Crescent. Please phone Stu 224-
6868.	
LOST — A blue loose leaf holder
while travelling from U.B.C. along
10th last Sat. morning in a '64 red
Chev. Impala. Would finder please
phone 733-4496.	
FOUND — driver's licence, car keys
& case. Apply AMS Office.	
FOUND—Biege raincoat, Bayshore
brand. Library science. Tuesday.
You took mine by mistake. Will
exchange.   Phone  224-0065.
LOST — Late Tues. Girl's gold
watch, inscription on back. Reward. YU 7-7883.  Marg.
Special Notices-
13
COMING Friday. Feb. 26, noon, Aud.
Laurel and Hardy in "GREAT
GUNS". Also First part of exciting serial.
THE MEN of gold will be out today? Who are the men of gold?
Find out today in front of Brock
Library. Girls with the golden
men too.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED from West End.
Mon.-Fri. Phone John, MU 1-2094
after 6.
Wanted
15
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'56 M.G.A. Immaculate body, new
top, good rubber, best offer over
$600.   224-9885,   ask  for  Greig.
FOR  SALE  '47  DeSoto  Sedan,   $60.
Phone AM 3-3992, evenings.
Scandals
39A
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ART BUSINESS, ideal as side line,
for male or female. 1065 E. 17th
Ave. TR 6-6362.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms 81
ROOM available for male student.
Close to University Gates. Phone
224-3128.
$18.00 PER MONTH EACH—Warm
room for two — single beds —
desks — Available now. 4290 W.
11th.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
2 MALE students to share large
room of 2-room furnished apartment with one other, Broadway
&  Granville,   call  Bob,   738-4972.
Apartments
83
MOVING to Simon Fraser? 2-year-
old custom built 3 bedroom ranch
type home, colonial kitchen, F to
C fireplace, coloured plumbing,
large lot landscaped, fully fenced
within 15' min. University. Clear
title,  owner. WH 2-4871.
NATIVE  CANADIANS
General meeting today noon,
in Bu. 218.
• •    •
RAMBLERS
Hockey game, team 1 vs.
team 2 tonite at 10:15.
• •   •
SUS
General meeting today noon,
Henn. 200. Support your candidate for SUS elections.
Library offers self-copying
for schizophrenic students
The Main Library has started self-service copying.
Instant photo-copies from book pages, magazines and
newspapers can now be made in 30 seconds for only 15
cents.
Head Librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said he hopes the
availibility of the copying machine will eliminate damage
to books and periodicals. He said pages are often torn out
of books.
The copy machine is located in the southwest corner
of the main concourse.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0125664/manifest

Comment

Related Items