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The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1965

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 —don hume photo
Here is winning design for new $3.9 million Student Union Building. Canada-wide competition decided winner.
Glug glug
THE UBYSSEY
SUB pub?
VOL. XLVII, No. 38
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1965
CA 4-3916
First time
AMS, IRC
together
on survey
Residence conditions survey
forms distributed Tuesday
night to all resident students
marked UBC's first AMS-
Inter-Residence Council cooperative effort.
IRC conceived the survey in
December. With AMS financing, it was administered by a
joint committee of two AMS
and three IRC members.
"It's a good step towards
improving relations between
IRC and AMS which have been
damaged by sheer ignorance
on both sides," said AMS coordinator Graeme Vance.
Residents were asked for
their opinions on the adequacy
of facilities, food and the cost
of living in residence, in a
questionnaire similar to the
student means survey conducted last year.
"The survey will be processed by computer and the results will be analyzed by a
joint committee of IRC and
AMS members,"  said Vance.
"The purpose of the survey
is to provide statistical backing for further negotiations
with Housing,"  he  explained.
"The Means Survey showed
us the value of this method,"
he said.
IRC president Derrill Thomas said:
"If Housing is to be self-
supporting, the University
should provide capital outlay
for new residences."
At present all UBC resident
students are paying for Lower
Mall and Totem Park residences in their residence fees,
Thomas said.
"Our aim is to keep the cost
of residence to the student at
the minimum, and the survey
will give us a way to do this."
■ fit
HARDIAL BAINS
... gone
Fed head
resigns
all posts
B.C. Student Federation
chairman Hardial Bains Wednesday announced his resignation from all campus positions.
Bains said he is also considering resigning as Federation
president.
In a letter to the editor of
The Ubyssey he blamed deterioration of health for the
resignations.
Until Wednesday Bains was
program co-ordinator for the
Academic Activities Committee, Chairman of the AAC lia-
son committee, chairman of
Fall Symposium and chairman
of last weekend's Victoria Col-
lege-UBC Symposium.
He said the question of
whether he will retain his
Federation post will wait until the Federation convention
in February.
(Last Thursday Bains announced his resignation as
program chairman of Academic Activities Committee. He
made no mention of withdrawing from any of his other cam-
SEE: FROZEN
(Continued on Page 2)
Full steam ahead
on $4 million SUB
By   CAROL-ANNE   BAKER
UBC's $4 million Student Union Building is off the drawing board after four years of haggling.
The AMS announced today
v^^A >''ftCV
Winnipeg architect Kenneth
Snider's plans have won the
10-month architectural compe-
tition for the SUB design.
Snider's design was chosen
from the 70 entries submitted.
It was one of the largest
architectural competitions in
Canada.
AMS PRO Byron Hender
said work on the $3.9 million
first-stage building is scheduled to begin in eight months
to one year. It should be completed by September 1967.
Snider's plans include second stage buildings to be completed at a later date. They
are a $1.5 million, 1,200-ca-
pacity theatre and a $250,000
non-denominational chapel.
SUB will be more than twice
the area of Memorial Gym
and about as high as the Las-
sere building. It will contain
two storeys and a full basement.
It will have:
9   two  cafeterias  with  room
for 600  people  and  space for
an additional 300 people when
necessary;
# snack bar for 420 with expansion   room   for   370   more;
# reading lounge and music
listening lounge;
# 500 seat auditorium;
9 400 - couple - capacity ballroom with stage and adjoining
dressing rooms;
# individual committe rooms
for meetings or dining.
Twice the size of Gym
"Snider's plan was easily
the best," said Hender. "It provides a large central core
building with lots of open
space inside."
SUB will occupy the area on
East Mall from south Brock
to University Boulevard where
the stadium, field house and
intervening huts now stand.
A 650-car parking lot 300
yards from the building will
cover part of the area now
occupied by the grass hockey
fields.
"We need a SUB to promote
greater cross-fertilization of
ideas," said AMS president
Roger McAfee.
"It will provide an area
where different groups and
faculties can mix," he said.
Models and architectural
plans of the building should
be on display in Brock link by
the weekend, McAfee said.
Warnett Kennedy, secretary
of the Architectural Institute
of B.C., is project advisor.
Runners-up for the best design were R. J. Thom and John
Andrews of Toronto; Tofin and
Baxter of Richmond, B.C.; and
P. M. Thornton, A. R. Gathe
and R. Garrett of Vancouver.
CALVIN'S
BACK
(See Page 2)
Beefs
freeze
money
By ROBBI WEST
A scathing letter has
resulted in Academic Activities Committee funds
being frozen.
In a letter Monday
Victoria College AMS
vice-president, Rolli Cac-
chioni, charged UBC's
Academic Activities
Committee with showing
"niggardly" hospitality
to visiting delegates at
the joint symposium held
here last weekend.
When the letter was
brought before Council
Monday night, they voted
unanimously to censure
the AAC by freezing
their funds.
A letter of apology has
since been sent to Vic
College  by  council.
Crowning touch of the
fouled-up weekend came
Saturday night when
Cuban committee chairman Brian Belfont and
AMS president Roger
McAfee broke into a
shouting match regarding
AMS bureaucracy.
AAC Chairman Mike
Coleman said Wednesday: "The tension arose
due to the basic personality clash between AMS
officials and a few people
SEE:    RESIGNS
(Continued on Page 2) Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 21, 1965
fkiw  Noqn.Vu&so
'WHAT KIND OF MAN
SHOULD BE
MARDI GRAS KING?
Wit
nam
WED.NooN BROCKI
KING CANDIDATE . . . nu delta pi?
Science biggest
problem-Douglas
Band sweatered
thanks to sex
Art movie maker Larry
Kent is outfitting the Pep
Band.
Kyle Mitchell, AMS treasurer, reported at council
Monday night 30 new navy
blue sweaters will march
thanks to Kent.
The $350 price of the new
sweaters was met by the 10
per cent profit realized from
Kent's movie, The Bitter
Ash.
"The Pep Band can now
hope to capture some of the
allure of Kent's artistry,"
Mitchell said.
FROZEN
(Continued from Page 1)
pus commitments at that time.)
thoroughly involved with academic life and thoroughly
against AMS per se.
"Obviously UBC politics has
no place at a joint symposium
and this clash turned a legitimate discussion topic into a
parochial verbal brawl," Coleman said.
; Regarding the S a t u r day
night fiasco ex-AAC program
chairman Hardial Bains said:
"McAfee started ridiculing my
manifesto and Belfont defended it—and you know how Bel-
font talks."
"I am not responsible for
the speakers," he added;
(Bains' manifesto called for
a 51-man student council.)
Bains, who resigned his
position the preceding Thursday said the frozen accounts
were immaterial.
Coleman, who will appear
before council next Monday
night in an attempt to defrost
his funds, had another view.
"I feel the AMS censure was
possibly   exaggerated,   but  it
'brought   about   the   attention
the   problem s of   inter-faction
fighting deserved."
The scientific revolution is
man's greatest problem, says
Tommy Douglas, national NDP
leader.
"Next to the bomb," Douglas
said.
"And you people in university today are the generation
faced with this problem," he
told an overflow crowd in
Brock Hall, Wednesday noon.
"With the advent of machines which can make value
judgments, we are moving into the era of the totally automated factory," Douglas said.
"Teach. a machine to play
chess, apd it will beat you with
about eight games practice."
Douglas said he had been
asked not to talk about political issues so he talked about
politics.
"Give my party 70 seats, and
we'll turn parliament upside
down. Give us 170, and we'll
set Canada right-side up," he
said.
"Canada must find 1.5 million jobs in the next five
years," Douglas said. "In the
next two years, we may have
to resort to deficit financing to
create these jobs."
He said shortening the work
week will not necessarily stimulate economic growth.
Disowned spy
New anti-Red
follows Fred
By  RON  RITER
Ubyssey  Associate Editor
Latest arrival on UBC's burgeoning anti-communist scene
is Calvin MacDonald, the man who claims to be a disowned
RCMP spy.
He showed up Tuesday to
hear Christian Anti-Communist Crusade leader Dr. Fred
Schwarz speak here.
MacDonald first came to
public attention last year
when Underdog leader David
Colishaw hurled a milk carton
of cow's blood on the House
of Commons floor to publicize
MacDonald's claims.
MacDonald charged the
RCMP disowned him after
promising him a pension for
spying on Canadian Communist activity.
The 42-year-old Vancouver
department store salesman is
heading up a fledgling anti-
Communist group called the
Canadian Activist Organization.
He said the organization has
seven members in Vancouver
and a branch in Toronto.
MacDonald said he thinks
universities are a major outlet for communist propaganda
and thought.
"University students are tomorrow's leaders," he said,
"Universities are natural
scenes of communist infiltration."
"You have communist cells
on campus but no anti-communist groups. This is very
bad," MacDonald said.
UBC's Communist Club
boasts roughly 20 members.
MacDonald claims his group
is also anti-fascist and non-
racist.
"Anybody except fascists
can belong, as long as they
are anti-communist,"   he  said.
While on campus, MacDonald met with the AMS Sjpecial
Events committee to ask permission to speak here.
Special Events sponsors such
speakers as crusader Schwarz
and attempted in December to
bring U.S. Nazi leader George
Lincoln Rockwell to campus.
But before Special Events
could decide whether to sponsor MacDonald, the Creditiste
Club offered its sponsorship.
Creditiste president Barry
Cooper said his club will sponsor MacDonald's speech Tuesday noon in Bu. 106.
Ofma,
'/ Wea, PI
en
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<tfa€c
'ccaitoni
GO FORMAL
TO THE MARDI GRAS BALL
Tuxedos - While Dinner Jackets
Tails - Morning Coats - Director Coats
Complete Size Range and Latest Style*
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PRESENT THIS COUPON
and receive from
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ICE CREAM STORE
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AT 1/2 PRICE
Good  until January 31,  1965
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RESIGNS
(Continued from Page 1)
In other B.C. Student Federation resignations, Ray Lar-
sen, Arts II, announced Wednesday he has stepped down
from the ad-hoc central council of nine which implements
action in the organization.
"This radical group has failed to maintain the respect of
the average university student
at UBC," Larsen said.
"Not that the AMS has the
respect of the average student
either," he added.
Lunch-time Meet
offers more food
UBC's Greek letter societies are offering a full meal
at their Mardi Gras Pep
Meet noon today in the Gym
—beef and cheescake.
B.C. Lion quarterback Joe
Kapp will act as master of
ceremonies — providing the
beef and nine lovely ladies
will compete for Mardi Gras
Queen — providing the
cheesecake.
Thirteen frat types running for king, and skits and
a general good time are
added attractions.
KisctirnoN i
EYE GLASSES
Atl Doctor's Eytglass  Prescriptions
filled. First  quality  materials  used.
Alt   work   performed   by   qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville      MU 3-8921
^H M*My«Bacfc Gtraranf** HiB
UBC RINGS
• ORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN
• HIGH QUALITY, SMART FASHION
• SILVER OR GOLD
• ORDER DATE CLOSES JAN. 22
• DELIVERY MARCH 15
THE COLLEGE SHOP
Brock Extension
Mon.-Fri., 11:30-2:30
Mens  Fraternity
Spring Rush
REGISTRATION
Sign up until January 22 in AMS office
PLAYBOY
OF THE
WESTERN
WORLD
Directed by BRIAN D. HURST
with the
SIOBHAN McKENNA PLAYERS
Running Time: 110 minutes
Shows at 12:30, 3:30, 6:00 and 8:00 p.m.
Added Feature: One (1) Mister Magoo Cartoon
Today, January 21st
AUDITORIUM
All for the ridiculously low price of 50 cents Thursday, January 21, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
HOT
Khoury
By JACK KHOURY
Nearly 1,000 students
crowded the upper lounge of
International House last Friday (not at the same time,
Mon Dieu!) marking a great
success for the second French-
Speaking day.
While such French favorites as "Mademoiselle de
Paris" were softly playing,
Dr. Healy Treil and other
members of the French Department mingled with students over coffee (supplied by
IH) and cookies, discussing
everything from Brigitte Bar-
dot to Moliere.
• •    •
Among the guests were the
Consuls-General from Switzerland, Belgium and France.
So delighted were the consuls by the avid interest students showed in the French
language, that they promised
to give full support for future
activities by donating films,
slides, pamphlets and books.
One French post-graduate
student acted as fortune-teller
by telling the visitors "la
bonne aventure".
She predicted that I'd meet
a gorgeous girl in Brock
lounge this week—and I did!
(Too bad she didn't like me,
though.)
• •    •
The main purpose of these
informal weekly get-togethers
is to create an "ambiance
francaise", encouraging students to practice speaking
in French with Frenchmen
and professors.
The results were fantastic.
Students who normally were
too shy to utter a single French
phrase were babbling away.
(It might have been something in the coffee they
drank).
One French-Canadian girl
who left Quebec several years
ago took such heart in meeting people who spoke French
she didn't stop talking until
closing time.
• •    •
Professors decided to take
a break by bringing their
whole classes to IH to have
them meet the French students, drink their coffee and
eat their cookies.
The whole affair was, using Voltaire's own words,
quite "ring-a-ding-ding".
Bien sur, the idea catches
on.
A Russian-speaking day has
already been organized for
this Thursday at IH.
Starting in February we'll
be having Spanish-, German-
and Italian-speaking days.
• •    •
Pretty soon, mes chers
amis, you'll be hearing nothing on campus but talk of
bambinos, el toros, zdrast-
vetche gospodin, wie geht's
and itsy-bitsy teeny-weeny
yellow polka  dot babushkas.
They'll be organizing an
English-speaking day at IH
yet.
Oh, well. C'est la vie! au
revoir, adios amigos, ciao, auf
wieder sehen, salaam aley-
kum and all that.
—don kydd photo
WIZENED POET Earle Birney, 62, will give special lecture
on Creativity in Poetry in a special lecture Jan. 29 in
Bu. 104; student admission is 50 cents. The noted Canadian
poet has taught at UBC for more than 15 years.
'World disarming
up to C wealth
By DOUG HARVERSON
The Commonwealth should form a committee on world
disarmament, a professor of International Law said Monday.
Harvard   University   profes
sor Louis Sohn said the Commonwealth would be a good
organization to start such a
movement because it contains
member nations of all beliefs
and races.
"If a plan would please Ceylon, Ghana and Canada it
would probably please everybody," he said.
Sohn spoke on World Peace
Through World Law to a capacity crowd in the downstairs
lounge of the Graduate Student Centre.
Sohn said only complete
general disarmament and a
peace keeping force can keep
world peace.
He said he, thought the United Nations would survive the
present Russian non-payment
of dues crisis.
Sexy survey
f u&son* fag Oil an* (Sets
(Sompanj fSmttefc
CALGARY
has
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
for
GRADUATES
and
UNDERGRADUATES
in the field of
GEOPHYSICS
Geophysical and Geological Engineering
Maths and Physics, Engineering Physics
Campus Interviews Will Be Held On
January 27, 28
Students wishing advance information may write the
Company Recruiting Coordinator at 320 - 7th Ave.
S.W., GALGARY, ALBERTA.
Appointments for interviews should be made through
the placement office.
Who was whose
wife what was?
Wednesday's computer processing of 1,000 questionnaires
from the Married Student Housing Survey revealed trouble
for someone—one form had no listing for sex.
discovery,"
"Despite this
Graduate Student president
Jim Slater said, "we still want
married students who have not
completed their questionnaires
to fill them in."
He said 2,300 survey forms
were mailed out early in December. The survey was compiled by an AMS committee
under Cliff Millward, Law II,
and will be used by an administration committee under
Graduate Studies Dean Ian
McTaggart-Cowan as a guide
in planning construction of future married residences.
The survey asks students for
details of their rent, living and
travelling expenses.
Wednesday's computer run
of the first 1,000 questionnaires returned was intended
as a preliminary glimpse at
the results, Slater said.
"But the results can't be
considered as too accurate,
weV'e not 6ure this sample
isn't biased."
The preliminary results will
be released Friday, Slater said,
when they are presented to
Dean McTaggart-Cowan.
bers of the University Student
Wives Association, Slater said.
"They have been working
nearly every night since the
middle of December so tabulation can be completed as
soon as possible," he said.
Computor time for processing the survey—one-half hour
—was donated by the administration.
One-half hour computor
time costs $300 commercially,
Slater said.
"Married students — even
if they own their own home
or feel the survey does not
apply to them — are urged to
complete and return them,"
Slater stressed.
"It is essential the administration be convinced the final
report on the survey accurately represents the actual situation with regard to present
married accommodation both
on and off campus.
Deadline for accepting returned questionnaires will be
Jan. 27, Slater said.
The questionnaire  was  also
_  „      ... .   .      ,     ,     sent out to a few single stu-
Bulk of the work in check-
ing   returned   questionnaires   dents in error. They have been
and punching IBM cards with
the data is being done by mem-
requested  to return them  unanswered.
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 20, 1965
for the following positions:
Slate I
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Slate n
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Nominations for the First Slate must be posted on the
A.M.S. bulletin board no later than noon Thursday,
January 28, 1965.
Nominations for the Second Slate must be posted no
later than noon Thursday, February 4, 1965.
The open candidate's meeting will be held on Monday,
February 1, 1965 in Arts 100 for the First Skte and
on Monday, February 8, 1965 for the Second Slate.
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate Wednesday February 3, 1965
2nd Slate Wednesday, February 10,1965
Nomination forms, eligibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. secretary. ■WIKB-
"Well, Mr. Burton, did we have a little too much to drink?"
Oh
really
dept.
Reprinted from:
The  Vancouver  Times,
Tuesday, Jan. 20. 1965
NASHVILLE, T e n n.
(AP)—Tragedy, a recurring theme of country
and western music, seems
to haunt the singers of
the songs.
Eight have died violent
deaths in the last year
and a half.
Shortly after singer
Jim Reeves was killed in
a plane crash July 31,
he told an interviewer
that he would prefer to
stay home but booked
100 personal appearances
a year because "I like to
perform before people."
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays ami Kridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Maler Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of (he editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 21, 1965
Let's go
As UBC grows larger and becomes more and more
segmented there must at least be one central meeting
house.
The new Student Union Building, as yet unnamed
and still waiting for student suggestions, should fill the
bill with its student lounges, library and catering
facilities.
It should not, and must not, become a miniature
Brock, dominated by the bureaucracy, clubsters, pub-
sters, stray artsmen and Greeks.
We can hardly wait. In September we'll swim in the
excavation. December we'll skate around the forms.
March we'll steal brick to make bookcases and sometime in a year or two we'll sit around bitching about
the food served in the cafeterias.
With a little Shrumese UBC's new student union
will be a partial reality by this September.
Dr. Gordon Shrum's Burnaby Mountain mausoleum,
a year ago no more than a clump of bush on an ugly
pimple laughingly referred to as a mountain, is fast
becoming an institution.
And because Dr. Shrum backs his big words and
grandiose plans with action, excavations and concrete,
Simon Fraser may yet grow out of the academy stage.
Last February—a year ago—UBC students voted to
increase their AMS dole from $24 to $29 so our big
student playpen could get underway.
Today—a year later—the architect has just been
chosen.
In the same length of time Shrum's built half a
university.
SUB hasn't got the blooming plans yet. Let's go.
EDITOR:  Mike  Horsey Well fans, as the day draws to an
News        Tim  Padmore end at the end of another day—that
City                                    Tom Wavman may be redundant,  but its apt—It's
rly  —       "? wayman only fair to  warn  you  we  had  an-
/,rt  -   Oo"   Hume other day. Working, working, sweat-
Sports   George Reamsbottom ins   today  were:   Tim   (that's   Tim)
Asst   Citv Lorraina Shore    Roberts,   Jack   Khoury,   Robin   Rus-
Asst. City   Lorraine snore   se,   paul Terry   Doug. Halversonj A1
Asst.  News Editor .... Carole Munroe Francis,     Lome     Mallin,     Elizabeth
Associate  Mike Hunter Field,     John     Kelsey,     Carol-Anne
Associate    Ron  Riter Baker,    Robbi   West,    Linda   Holly,
Managing Editor .... Janet Matheson Rjck  Blair,   Corol Smith,  Al  Birnie,
Asst. Managing   Norm Betts Paul   Wood,   tip   from   Frank   Lee,
Page Friday ._ ~  Dave Ablett Gord   McLaughlin,    Art    Casperson,
Critics _  John   Kelsey Sara Simeon. Over and out, George.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Mass personalism
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Today I have received by
mail, addressed personally to
me, a "Courtesy Card" accompanied by an advertisement letter from the B.C.
Budget Rent-A-Car company,
offering me special student
rates.
I would be interested to
know how anyone outside
university and student officials could obtain names and
addresses of UBC students
and use these for business
solicitation.
I would like to voice my
strong objection against this
flagrant misuse of one of the
official student name and address files which I consider to
be confidential and to be used
for internal university purposes,
JINDRA   KULICH
Graduate   student.
Ed. Note: Birdcalls strikes
again.
•j» *p 9p
Faithless employers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am a part time employee
of the campus food services.
This is a job in which the
novice is likely to be unaware
of the correct procedures.
Outlined below are a few tips
I thought would be helpful to
other students.
First: the matter of minimum working hours. I have
been assured by the Department of Labor that a student
is entitled by law to receive
a minimum of two hours pay
when he works on a school
day. At the UBC employees
are required to report how
long they have worked.
If they report less than two
hours, they are paid for less
than two hours. The onus is
on the student to know his
rights. Either personnel and
food services are uninformed
or they are taking advantage
of the student.
Second: the matter of good
faith. It would be silly to expect the employee to be bound
to keep faith with the employer if the employer doesn't
keep faith with the employee.
The employer in this case will
lay off its student employees
with little and often no warning should the work load decrease.
This, regardless of the student's economic circumstances or past record. The
novice feels compelled to
work when he is scheduled
and even works through exam time when he could more
profitably be studying.
Finally the student must
realize that if he lives on
campus he is at a disadvantage. If he works he receives
part of his wages in the form
of a meal. Of course, he has
paid for a meal any way. He
can't give or sell the extra
meal, nor can he get a refund.
The person who lives off campus gets a meal by working
and the resident loses one. It
is true that the resident receives an extra nine cents an
hour but any way you add it
up the resident still loses out.
Working for food services
is all a matter of adjustment.
If we of the food services
keep our heads down and
stick to the tried and true we
won't lose a thing—or will
we?
TUUM EST.
•f* fp fp
Student manners
Editor, The Ubyssey:
After hearing the Special
Events presentation of Dr.
Fred Schwarz the other day,
I felt more than just a little
ashamed to be a member of
the UBC student body.
What promised to be a lively debate on forms of extremism, fascism and communism,
degenerated instead into a
one hour session during
which Dr. Schwarz was forced to meet an incessant barrage of unintelligent "catcalls".
Even during the question
period this same pattern continued, only three students
having taken the time to listen to what was said and arguing on the basis of this.
Other questions were either
irrelevant or were intended
as forms of sarcastic persona
"wit".
It was a pity that more
people did not take the time
to listen seriously and either
question or heckle intelligently because, although the man
had grossly oversimplified
history and the communist
ideology, he did present a rational and extremely thought-
provoking lecture.
"I heard ten thousand whisp-
erin'
An' nobody listenin'."
REX   EATON
Science III
V       v        *P
Radsoc...
Editor, The Ubyssey:
As complaint committee of
the UBCLSIB, (UBC Lounging Society in Brock) we wish
to register a complaint about
UBC Radio. Through the long
months which we have been
sitting in Brock extension,
we have notice that the music
is almost the same every
morning.
Sometimes, the news is the
same. If this practice continues, we could be forced to
attend lectures. This is un-
forgiveable!
Please make use of your
supposed 50,000-record library. Have a heart!
LEO KRON, Science III
BRIAN BURRILL
P.E. II
ERIG BRYNSOLFSSON
Science II Thursday, January 21, 1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Aerial view of
campus shows
proposed site
of new SUB
As you cross the stadium
watch for the ghost of the
Student Union Building.
And it's a live ghost now.
By NORM BETTS
Ass't Managing Editor
Don't cut across the stadium on your way home
tonight.
According to last year's AMS president Malcolm Scott's press release of Nov. 25, 1063, Student Union Building construction has been underway for two months.
The SUB concept began in October, 1960 as a
gleam in the eye of delegates at the annual
Leadership Conference.
The idea went through many phases, has been
modified, added to, chopped down, accepted, rejected and accepted again.
By March 1961 council had an architect's floor
plan for the SUB and an ice arena.
Council also had a commitment for $250,000
from UBC's administration for the food service
facilities.
The SUB at that time was going to cost
$800,000.
Council decided to hire a professional SUB
planner from the U.S. after planning bogged
down over what facilities were needed. Porter
Butts, SUB director at University of Wisconsin,
was hired as a consultant.
Butts has been a consultant on more than 80
SUB's in the U.S. and Europe.
The building is now going to cost $3.9 million.
More time was spent hassling when UBC's new
president, Dr. John Macdonald, presented his
plan for future campus development.
The planned site at the corner of University
Boulevard and Main Mall, where the ten-story
Commerce and Social Sciences complex is now
rising, was ruled as a "prime academic area" and
the more remote site where the stadium stands
was offered to students.
In March, 1962, the AMS sponsored a 2,500-
copy survey to determine facilities needed for
the SUB.
Planner Butts, and council under Butts' advisement, accepted the site dictated to them by the
administration in the fall of 1963 but never questioned the administration about location or completion of a new stadium.
UBC will be without a stadium at least two
years after Thunderbird Stadium is razed to make
way for the SUB.
Preparations came to a high point two years
ago in an AMS campaign promoting the SUB
referendum which split students' choice between
being a) pro-SUB and b) pro-$5 fee hike.
Both  questions  needed  a  two-thirds  majority
but the voting was tragically interrupted by
president Kennedy's death Nov. 22, 1963.
The SUB itself was passed while the other half
of the ticket was defeated.
It later developed that the only method of SUB
financing which the Board of Governors would
permit was a 15-year plan involving the $5 AMS
fee increase turned down by the students in
November.
After a strenuous campaign spearheaded by
AMS president Scott and the then-chairman of
SUB planning committee, Dean Feltham, students
duly approved the fee increase.
The SUB-design competition was then speedily
drawn up with the aid of Vancouver architect
Warnett Kennedy and Porter Butts.
So after a four-year voyage the UBC SUB is
about to surface.
-don hume photos
Here are the losers.
These three designs, and the
winning model on page one
are the best four out of dozens
submitted to the Student Union Building planning committee last year.
The models depict both the
first and second stages of the
buildings.
"They had to design the
complex as an integrated
whole," said AMS president
Roger McAfee.
Winning design was by Kenneth Snider of Winnipeg. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 21, 1965
IDEAS
at
LARGE
By
Gordon Mclaughlin
Lost weekend?
Oh, I went to a joint symposium.
Yeah, University of Victoria
and UBC.
It was sort of interesting,
what I could understand of it.
Didn't go according to plan,
though. You know, fog and all.
But it was interesting. We
listened to a bunch of Profs
talking about creativity and
academics, and what they
were, and what their importance is and all.
Somehow, though, something happened. Saturday
night, these two guys started
talking, well, not talking, but
they had this big thing going
about bureaucracy and its
place on campus.
Don't know what it had to
do with creativity and academics. One guy had all these
statistics about how students
were getting taken by the government and how students had
to unite against this, and try
to get a fair deal.
He said that the AMS wasn't
doing half enough to get what
was right for students.
This other guy went on
about how students had to see
that the AMS was there to
try to do things in the best
manner for students, and for
the people students had to
live with, so to speak.
Sunday, be damned if we
didn't hear the same thing all
over again.
This time we listened to a
student panel, well, two students, resolve that bureaucracy hasn't got a place on
campus, and that students had
to unite, and that there is a
B.C. Student Federation everyone should join, so that we can
get behind students convicted
on drug charges and help the
negroes and old-age pensioners and everybody like that.
I don't know. I'm still confused about what it was all
about.
MAURICE SAUVE
. . . very minor
'Quebec
revolt
transient'
Federal forestry minister
Maurice Sauve said the current Quebec Tory revolt is
very minor and temporary.
Sauve said Friday it is almost tradition for Quebec Conservatives to temporarily quit
the national party when it is
in difficulty, in order to preserve their seats in the next
election.
The boisterous Liberal
frankly declared that in Quebec the so-called Balcer revolt
is not regarded a serious Tory
problem.
Asked to comment on press
interpretation of the Rivard
scandal as indicative of an inherent French-Canadian lack
of political morality, Sauve
said: "There have been scandals all over Canada — John
A. Macdonald, Mackenzie
King.
"The Rivard affair indicates
the difficulties of politics today."
Sauve further said, "These
things happen when you have
minority government — the
opposition is always trying to
get us down.
"But people vote on a government's program, not its
scandals."
GRADUATES
Interested in a
Financial Career
should have an interview with
The Royal Trust
representative on campus
January 27th and 28th
Appointments made at Student Services Office
50
The Royal Trust Company
Canada's Leading Trust Company
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Academically
Safari explores
extremism jungle
The jungle of information and misinformation surrounding extremism will be explored at the ninth Academic Symposium Feb. 5-7.
The annual safari to Parks-
ville's Island Hall kicks off on
the Friday night with Dr. William Gibson of UBC's faculty
of medicine speaking on Extremism and Destiny.
Saturday morning, Political
Science Professor Walter Young
and Geophysics grad student
Gary Boyd will debate whether
extremism in the pursuit of
social goals is a virtue.
Saturday afternoon a panel
will inquire into the relationship of creativity to pain.
Sociologist Werner Cohn will
discuss Equality and Other
Forms of Extremism before
the Symposium retires into the
Saturday night search for truth.
Well-known Vancouver labor
organizer Syd Thompson will
argue the topic Strike Action
as a Form of Brinksmanship,
Sunday morning. He will be
followed by David Drake who
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.   10th Ave.
24 Hr. Service       CA 4-0034
will make a case for The Logic
of Indifference.
Before Dr. Nathan Divinsky
sums up the consensus of the
weekend, students Robert Orth,
Kirsten O'Brien, Dick Wordsworth and Gerry Skinner will
debate the merits or demerits
of Students and Social Action.
UBC president John Macdonald will attend the symposium and take the administration's defence in what is billed
as a three-ring circus Saturday
night.
Deadline for appliactions is
Friday. Forms are available in
the AMS and EUS offices, Inter-
national House and the Grad
Centre. They should be returned to AMS box 1.
Bloody Boris
2nd place prize
Bloody Boris, a 50-year-old
mascot of McGill University,
will be awarded to the faculty
placing second in UBC's spring
blood drive.
Boris was donated to the
blood drive by The Ubyssey's
Editor-in-chief Mike Horsey at
Monday's AMS meeting.
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try  Our  Delicious  T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets at Reduced Rates Available
.For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205
You can't beat
the taste oS
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes. Thursday, January 21, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
Red or Fred?
Crusader
extremely
semantic
By RICHARD BLAIR
A lesson in semantics was
given at UBC Tuesday.
Dr. Fred Schwarz, president
of the Christian Anti-Communist Crusade, spoke to a packed
house in Brock Lounge on the
meaning of Communism, Fascism and Extremism.
Greeted with jeers and a
large sign reading Better Red
Than Fred, Schwarz said: "I
feel right at home.
"I have spoken to many hostile audiences in the U.S., but
I have never been denied a
hearing."
Schwarz spent 15 minutes of
his 35 minute address on the
use of the word extremism.
"It is the fashion of the day
in the U.S. if you don't like
someone you call him an extremist," he said.
"Extremism means something different to everyone
and cannot be correctly defined. Using it is a sign of intellectual deficiency," said
Schwarz.
He defined fascism as the
term used by Mussolini to describe the party by which he
gained power. The Fascists
aims were the creation of a
party of the elite and its seizure of the government.
"The communist party fits
this description and must be
considered as a species of fascism," he said.
They don't
like Fred
Some student reaction to
Dr. Fred Schwarz's talk Tuesday:
pn his arrival Schwarz. was
greeted by a banner reading:
"Better Red Than Fred*'.
After hearing Schwarz
speak, John Hay, Arts II, said
he supported the slogan.
"They have broken the basic
concept of Christianity! Love
thy neighbour," he said.
"I think there is more danger from Schwarz's organization than there is from the
Communists."
BEER BOTTLE DRIVE-IN
We Pay 25c Per Dozen
Rear: 3207 West Broadway
KLASSEN'S
Used Furniture Mart
NURSING
First Year Arts or Science
students. interested in entering First Year Nursing
in September are invited to
a meeting (for information
concerning the program) in
WESBROOK 201,
on
MONDAY,
Jan. 25th, at 7:30 p.m.
VERSATILE C-LOT isn't sinking today-but it's still 20 per
cent snowed in. Snowpiles create interesting problems
such  as  parallel   parking  which  takes   up twice   regular
space and clogs roads. Traffic office says problem will
be alleviated when snow melts.
Honorary award
forms available
Nomination forms will be
available Friday for the
Honorary Activities Award.
The awards are given annually to three or four students for outstanding service to the student body.
The forms must be returned to the AMS by Jan.
29.
Pub hosts
photo tilt
Campus photo nuts have a
chance to gain a niche in immortality as well as win
prizes.
The Ubyssey, along with
your friendly campus yearbook, Totem, is sponsoring a
series of photo contests.
Winning pictures will be
published in The Ubyssey and
added to a permanent collection for display in the new
Student Union Building.
Pictures should deal with
contemporary campus architecture, scenes and activities.
First contest will be run the
week of Feb. 1.
'Shun pediatrics'
If you like money
People who want money should shun pediatrics as a
career, pediatrician Dr. John Dean told a pre-medical audience of 80 Wednesday.
Biber recital
The faculty- student ensembles of the music department will give a Collegium
Musicum Friday at 12:30 and
8:00 p.m. entitled H e i n r i c h
Biber—-Composer and Violinist in Music 104.
"Intelligent and sensible
people can find a pretty rewarding future somewhere in
pediatrics," he said, "but it is
not a place for people -who
want money in large quantities."
Speaking at noon in Wes-
brook 100, Dr. Dean outlined
the future of pediatrics.
Pediatrics has progressed
from a simple practice by doctors who liked children to a
vast branch of internal medicine, he said.
It deals with high-power
antibiotics for diphtheria,
whooping cough, polio and
measles as well as chemical
studies into child food requirements, he said.
Teaching, research into
drugs, child psychiatry, cardiology and genetics were just
a few areas of lifetime work
he mentioned.
"Unfit for pediatrics," Dr.
Dean said, "are people who
blandly say: I love kids! Also,
lone wolf types have no place
here, for it is a profession
needing great cooperation with
other  specialists."
GO TO THE
MARDI GRAS
IN STYLE
IfiUDGfT]
Type of Car
Overnight
24 Hour Day
Weekends
Vauxhall
Volkswagen
$1.95+5c
$3.95+5c
$10.00+5c
Acadian
Chevy II
Valiant
Falcon
$3.00+5c
$5.00+5c
$12.00+5c
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
$5.00+5c
$8.00+5c
$16.00+5c
BUDGET RENT - A - CAR
1021 W. Georgia Phone 685-0536
OPEN   7i30 a.m. • 7:00 pjn. Monday - Friday
8:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday
Remember . . .
Totem's Selling Price
Goes Up Next Month
BUY NOW
CANADIAN
PEACE CORPS
(C.U.S.O.)
Africa,  Caribbean
fia, Asia
Go to:
South America
Any graduating student can go and work for
two years at jobs such as:
TEACHING, NURSING,
MEDICINE, SOCIAL WORK,
•    RURAL DEVELOPMENT,
ENGINEERING, etc.
Applications at AMS Office and
International House
Further Information Call International House
January 15-22 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, January 21, 1965
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY graduate Horst Witzke has been
awarded a World University Service exchange scholarship to study chemistry at
the University of Frankfurt.
Booking
check
started
AMS student activities coordinator Graeme Vance has
been asked to sit in on pre-
council meetings of undergraduate  society presidents.
The double booking last
week of Science week and
Aggie week prompted the invitation.
Vance said that he has been
preparing a new booking system and it will be ready soon.
"It's too big a problem for
the present system. The mechanics are good but a better
system of checks is necessary."
The proper procedure for
booking is to check with the
booking clerk in the AMS office to see if the facilities and
time wanted are clear, and
then to fill out a requisition
form.
The booking has to be confirmed by Buildings and
Grounds and is not official
until they have returned the
confirmed requisition.
"Our system is sound because all bookings have to go
through Buildings and
Grounds," said Vance.
A monthly and weekly calendar of events will be published
next year.
* Eye Glasses
* Contact Lenses
* Prescriptions Filled
* Immediate Optical
Services
- Student Rates -
PITMAN OPTICAL
Vancouver Block
734 Granville       MU 5-0928
Sales Career Opportunity
National Company requires
a sales representative
for the Vancouver area.
Career position with definite
advancement possibilities.
No travelling.
Substantial salary and
Commission  arrangements.
Excellent training program
with full security benefits.
Apply in writing to Mr.
Hirtle, at 1131 Melville St.,
Vancouver 5, B.C.
giving background and education  and  phone  number.
'tween classes
Playboy plays
our world today
Filmsoc presents Playboy of the Western World at noon,
3:30 and 6:30, today in the Auditorium. 	
Admission to the color show  ~~™™™""^^^^^^^~""^™,"'"^^~
Red shirts shock
stocked jock
starring   Siobhan  McKenna  is
50 cents.
• •    •
CUSO
Students interested in applying for CUSO attend social
evening and discussion with
volunteers returned from Africa and Asia Friday 7:30 to
10 p.m. Mildred Brock.
• •    •
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Folk-singing Malka and Joso
in Brock noon Monday.
• •    •
MUSICAL SOC
General meeting in Bu. 202
at noon today.
• •    •
LIBERAL CLUB
Important policy decision
meeting noon today in Student
Council Chambers.
• •    •
SQUASH CLUB
Meeting Friday noon in Bu.
202.
• •    •
ANGLICAN   CHAPLAINCY
Dr. Keith Clifford, General
Secretary of the SCM, speaks
on A United Church Minister
Looks at the Anglican Church
at 7:30 tonight 4660 West 9th.
• •    •
NATIVE  CANADIANS
Meeting today cancelled.
• •    •
IH FRENCH DAY
Lecture on Jean-Paul Sartre
and the Nobel Prize by Pro-
f e s s o r Dominique Baudouin
will be a part of the French
Day program at noon IH Friday.
• •    •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
New Haven field trip leaves
stadium at  12:30 today.
• •    •
CARIBBEAN   STUDENTS
Dr. Earle Birney of the Creative Writing department will
show slides and read poetry
on the West Indies in Bu. 204
at noon today.
• •    •
LAST   MINUTE  TICKETS
LMTs available for the
Cave, The Seagull, Spring
Thaw, and the Vancouver
Symphony.
Vancouver disc jockey
Rolf Johannson faced his
music Wednesday noon.
Johannson, who is a first-
year Arts student, was locked in stocks by the Engineers in front of their building. The Engineers then
turned on the rock and roll
music he dishes out nightly.
An Engineering Undergraduate Society spokesman
said: "We thought it was
time he was forced to hear
the rubbish he pedals. Maybe now he will think more
of our ears and less of his
wallet."
Symposium
in clanger
from apathy
Academic Symposium is in
danger of being cancelled because of a lack of applications, chairman Bob Anderson
said Wednesday.
Anderson said only 40 applications had been received.
He said the symposium is usually attended by about 125
students.
"I think the lack of interest
is due to the number of symposiums already held this
year," he said.
Anderson said complaints
about last weekend's UBC-
Victoria College symposium
did not seriously influence the
turn-out.
Deadline for registration for
the symposium to be held Feb.
5 to 7 on Vancouver Island
is 4 p.m. Friday. Application
can be made at the AMS office in south Brock.
ATTENTION! FOREIGN STUDENTS
Q/axiity Chxlitian ^dCounlilfi
coidiauu invites, uou to
_/Ae DntExnationaL cStu.ds.nts.' <Suttfis.%
on  tDhuxiday, Q.anuaxu zStfi, 1965
at i.Lx-thittu h.m.
at tnc fiomi of <zM.%. and <s^xi. C. Q. OUvcx
6170 BCenncim £t\ttt
731-4561
731-6QQS
Speaker:
Mr. Christie Wilson.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
LOST—Black kangaroo wallet, initials D.P.D. Phone AL 4-1065.
Doug.   Drummond.	
FOUND—Black rimmed glasses mid
December — Jade ring (man's)
found in ladies' washroom—Drop
earring,   Circulation   Div,  Library.
FOUND — Beige dufflecoat, Fort
Camp dance Friday. You probably
have mine, call Bob, AM 6-4419.
WHOEVER took grey telescopic
umbrella from Bu. 216 last Thursday please call Leah,  CA  8-8588.
LOST — Ladies' gold wrist watch,
black band. Phone RE 8-9259. Reward.
LOST—Brown Mexican wallet, possibly in car of lady from British
Properties Tues. a.m. Please phone
738-4079.
FOUND — Brown wallet in Buch.
11:30 Wednesday. Phone Gordon
522-6966.
Special Notices-
13
Transportation
14
CAR POOL WANTED desperately
vicinity of 6th Ave. & Alder for
8:30's Monday to Friday. Phone
736-9574.
ROOM FOR 3 riders in car pool from
15th & Granville. Phone eve's
Glenna,   RE  8-7076.
WEST VAN CARPOOL requires a
person to drive once a "week. Phone
922-5504 after 7 p.m.
RIDE NEEDED from Central West
Van, can drive 1 day if necessary.
Phone Carolyn,  922-1058.
RIDE WANTED week days, 8:30
classes. 8th St., 4th Ave., N.W.
Can share driving. Phone 522-6966.
RIDE wanted for 2 students from
Richmond. 8:30 classes. Sandy
277-7928.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
'53 CHEVROLET sedan in good condition $250. Dr. J. Fries, U.B.C.
Forestry, Loc. 869 or 738-0188 after
5:00 p.m.	
FOR SALE—1955 Vauxhall, snow
tires, new battery, $175. Call CA
4-9062, Room 314 or leave message.
Motorcycles  &  Scooters
27
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART TIME WORK available now
& full time during summer for
male students—Light construction
& maintenance work. $2.00 per
hour. Must be presentable, trustworthy and capable. Call Mr.
Alexander, MU 1-4964.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
STEP  UP  to  a  good  folk  Guitar-
only $55.00.  261-6408 after 6.
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
ROOM & BOARD—Zeta Psi Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Crescent.
Call CA 4-5006 or CA 4-9885.
EXCELLENT room & board for two
girls,  $65 each.  4168 W.  11th.  CA 4-
5543.
PRIVATE room & board with all
amenities. Own washroom, $65.00.
Phone  261-6863.
Furn. Houses & Apis.
83
3   ROOM   bsmt.   suite,   near   gates.
Utility rm. Private entrance. Share
bathroom.  Phone MU  2-4245.
A.M.S. ELECTIONS
Nominations Open
THURSDAY, JANUARY, 21, 1965
For FIRST Slate.
1. Three Universities Fund Drive
A committee has been struck under the chairmanship of the 1st vice-president, Mr. Cruise to
deal with the question of how students can best
contribute to the three U's fund drive. This
committee will also aid the administration of
the fund in any way it can. Anyone interested
in working on this committee, or who has
suggestions please write to or see Bob Cruise.
2. National Student Means
Survey Coordinator
Applications are now being received for the position of a coordinator to administer the C.U.S.
National Student Means Survey on the U.B.C.
campus.
3. Eligibility Committee
Anyone wishing to find out information with regards to their eligibility for council positions or
wishing to appeal their eligibility is invited to
meet with the committee at 12:30 in the secretary's office on Monday, Jan. 25 and Feb. 1.
4. Academic Symposium
Deadline for applications is Friday. Forms at AMS,
EUS offices, Grad Centre, International House
for ninth annual Symposium in Parksville
Feb. 5-7.
5. C.U.S. Inter-Regional Scholarships
Are available to U.B.C. students. Tuition plus travel
grant. Applications available at Registrar's
Office. Closing date for applications:
JANUARY 25, 1965
6. Honourary Activities Awards
For outstanding service to the student body. Nomination forms available in A.M.S. Office. January
22-29.

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