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The Ubyssey Oct 16, 1962

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 THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLV
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1962
No. 14
IFC promises crackdown
TRAFFIC IS STUMPED by roots of huge elm tree wrenched out of ground by Friday's windstorm
and blown onto middle of University Boulevard. Tree blocked traffic for 16 hours before
B&G trouble crews removed it.
—George Fielder photos
TOLL OF TREES was taken by Friday's windstorm. This huge tree near parking and traffic
"r   office on west mall was uprooted, barely missing nearby hut.
High winds buffet campus;
•4 injured, $5,000 damage
Four persons were injured
. and    damage    to    University
property      is     estimated      it
'$5,000     in     Friday     night's
storm.
Injuries occured when a
' car travelling on University
■ Blvd.    apparently    struck    a
fallen tree.
v    Occupants  of the  car,  two
boys and two girls, are in Van-
-couver   General   Hospital,   in
good condition. Their names
have not been released.
A second auto accident occurred across from Memorial
Gym, but no one was hurt,
police said.
Police said University Blvd.
was closed for nearly 16
hours while fallen trees were
cleared.
L. J. Bayly, of Buildings
and Grounds, said more than
Lady Chatterly's lawyer
urges rational criticism
There's more to life than morals, says Lady Chatterly's
lawyer.
Dr. Norman St. John Stevas, author of the 1959 British
Obscenity Act, which permitted the sale of Lady Chatterly's
Lover, called on critics to use rationality in judging works of
art.
His lecture on "Art, Morality and Censorship," was presented by the Newman Christian Culture series, Friday, in
Wesbrook Auditorium.
Dr. Stevas classed a good work of art as one which reflects society, and a bad one as one that fails to present a
true picture of humanity.
He noted that poor censorship laws can increase sale of
such works.
half    the    elms     along    the
boulevard were destroyed.
Less serious damage was
done to trees along Marine
Drive and in Totem Park at
Agronomy and Marine Drive.
"The value of the trees lost
is over and above the $5,000
it  will   cost us  to   make  repairs," said Bayly.
•       •       *
Girls barred their doors
against raids as power went
off   in  University   residences.
Acadia - camp remained in
the dark for nearly 12 hours
while Fort Camp and Lower
Mall residences had power
restored by early Saturday
morning.
Power flickers in the Common Block set off residence
fire alarms, and brought out
the campus fire brigade.
Most UBC power lines are
underground, resulting in
little stoppage of power for
the University, said Bayly.
Electrical crews and gardeners are still working to repair damages.
Dobell tells city
frats will be quiet
Inter-Fraternity Council will clamp down on its 15 member
fraternities, president Ken Dobell promised Monday.
Dobell     assured     Vancouver
alderman Orson Banfield the
city will hear no more complaints of rowdy fraternity
houses.
Banfield met with IFC mem-
bets, representatives of student
council and the Delta Upsilon
executive to inquire into the
problem of fraternity house
supervision.
•The alderman will present a
summary of the meeting at today's city council meeting.
SIX PROTEST
A delegation of six angry
Kerrisdale homeowners sparked
a city inquiry last1 week.
The delegation complained of
repeated, wild all-night parties
at the Delta Upsi^in Fraternity
house, 2867 West Thirty-seventh. \ ■
Only one homefciwner in the
2800 bloc|: West *fhirty-seventh
failed to sign a petition urging
city council to force the fraternity out of the district.
Dobell will present a letter
to    city   council   today   stating
SEE:   SURVEY   STORY
Page Three
that IFC will take action on all
future complaints against fraternities.
He said IFC didn't hear about
the DU fracas because there
were no IFC executives available when the residents contacted the University last summer.
He said if IFC had known of
the trouble it would have
handled it without a complaint
going to the city.
INDEFINITE  PROBATION
"They (the DUs) are currently on indefinite probation with
the IFC," Dobell said.
Residents complained of wild
beer bottle brawls, profanity
and all-night parties.
One woman told city council
her small son "smelled like a
brewery" after playing with
beer bottles thrown around the
district by the fraternity members.
There are eight fraternities
off campus. The other seven are
on "Frat Row"—Wesbrook Crescent.
Permission for Delta Upsilon
to continue using its Kerrisdale
property will be decided at a
future city council meeting,
said Banfield.
Meet chooses
peppy leader
Steve Hunter, Arts II, was
elected president of UBC's new
pep club at a general meeting
Thursday.
Students who want to help on
committees and fill executive
positions should come to Bu.
203 Monday noon.
to ponder
40 changes
Student council will try again
to ^ do its housecleaning at
Thursday's general meeting.
., A total of 40 constitutional
revisions will be placed before
the meeting.
The most controversial issues probably will come from
the floor.
The   engineers   have   already
posted notice that they will ask
that the Frosh president be taken
off student council.
NFCUS MOTION
And there is a possibility that
a motion will be put forth concerning the National Federation of Canadian University
Students.
Ten per cent of the student
body—or almost 1,400 students
—will have to attend the meeting for any business to be
passed.
The general meeting is being
held   this   month,   because   last
j spring's meeting failed for lack
| of a quorum.
Most important of the constitutional revisions is a proposal
for new eligibility rules.
Under the new scheme, each
student office is allotted a certain number of points. A student may hold offices that number up to 20 points.
The rules are designed to
prevent students from overloading themselves with extra
curricular activities.
Minimum academic standards for a student running for
student office will be changed
so that the students:
• must have a 60 per cent
average if he is taking 15 or
more units, or 65 per cent average if he is taking less than 15
units and enough units passed
for credit in his course in the
immediate previous Christmas
exams.
• must have a 65 per cent
average at Christmas if he
fails his previous year.
This means a student who
failed his year cannot become
eligible  until  after  Christmas.
Also a student elected or appointed during the spring must
pass his finals to remain in office the next year.
The rules are flexible enough
to allow for students who do not
write Christmas exams or who
have  unusual  courses.
After a student is electedr to
remain in office he must get
at least the minimum requirement for credit in his course.
Other constitutional revisions include:
(Continued on page 3)
SEE: "GENERAL MEETING Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 196|
EDITORIALS
Politics to figure in editorship?
A proposal will come before the general
meeting Thursday that could have the effect of
making the appointment of the Editor-in-Chief
of this paper a political issue.
At other universities in Canada, such action
has had disastrous results. Thus, it is important
that those voting at the meeting should be
aware of its implications.
The amendment would change the system
of appointment that has prevailed for many
years. The Ubyssey Editorial Board has interviewed candidates for Editor and recommended
the one it considered most qualified. The stu-
'-dent council then accepted or rejected the candidate.
No one knows what would happen if the
council rejected a recommended candidate. It
has never been done.
The system has produced few bad editors—
and most have done a good job for the Alma
Mater Society and have gone on to make their
mark in the professional newspaper field.
Tjhe new proposal would have all applications directed to the council and that body
'would choose the eventual editor.
This would put the appointment on the
same level as other committee appointments
hiade by the council.
In these appointments a rule of thumb may
be applied: if a former student councillor applies, he will get the job, qualified or not.
An example of this occurred last year when
a student councillor who knew little about
NFCUS was appointed chairman of the local
committee over another student who had worked with NFCUS for some time. Fortunately
the s,tudent councillor left university and the
qualified person now has the job. In other cases
in recent years, the AMS has not been so
lucky.
Oh other campuses where, the editor is appointed in this way, bitter political battles
have been fought over the editorship which has
been considered, rightly or wrongly, as a position of great influence.
Councillors, angling for the presidency the
following year, have striven mightily and
schemed perfidiously to have their stooge appointed so he may attempt to sway the voters
in their favor.
This could easily happen here.
Furthermore, if a campus bureaucrat becomes editor of The Ubyssey, its editorial policy will inevitably reflect his views. And by
virtue of his interests these views are likely
to coincide with the views of the council. Thus
would vanish the watchdog function of the
paper. '    ' :*i
Or, he might be angling to be president himself.
It would be dangerous to make the editorship a political issue. Why change a system that
has worked successfully for almost 40 years?
Especially to implement one that has a doubtful history at other Canadian universities.
Frosh leader yes - - councillor no
The Engineers, and this is not really the
first time, have come up with an eminently
intelligent suggestion.
Remove the president of the Frosh from the
student council, they suggest. The Ubyssey
seconds the motion.
Experience has shown that freshmen, no
hiatter how intelligent they may be, are not
qualified to make decisions on the matters that
come before the council.
They lack something basic in this regard:
knowledge of the campus and its traditions.
And, because of the nature of Frosh elections, many presidents should be disqualified
on other grounds—lack of ability.
The election, held less than a month after
freshmen arrive on campus, is decided On frra-
tiohal grounds. The voters generally have no
personal knowledge of the candidates, no idea
of what abilities the office requires, and little
idea of what they want from their executive.
Thus, the winner is usually decided on the
basis of ingenuity of campaign gimmicks or,
more probably, through the loyalty of voters
to the candidate from their high school.
Last year's Frosh president showed ability
in creating spirit and put on an adequate program for his constituents. But his actions in the
Council chamber bespoke immaturity and an
abysmal ignorance of the issues.
As a Frosh president, he was successful. As
a student councillor, he failed.
It seems to us that it is expecting too much
of a freshman that he succeed in the mature
deliberations required of a student councillor.
It is our feeling that the Frosh do not need
representation on the council.
" We suggest that the Engineers make a serious proposal at the forthcoming general meeting that the Frosh president be removed from
council. And as we said before, we'll second the
motion.
THE UBYSSEY
Winner of the Southam Trophy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Published three times weekly throughout the University year in Vancouver by the Alma
Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the Editorial
Board of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the Alma Mater Society or the University
of B.C. Telephone CA 4-3242. Locals: Editor—25; News—23; Photography—24.
Member Canadian University Press
Editor-in-chief:   Keith   Bradbury
Managing Editor
Denis Stanley
Associate Editor  :  Fred Fletcher
News Editor   Mike Hunter
City Editor M. G. Valpy
Features Editor   Mike Grenby
CUP Editor Maureen Covell
Picture Editor  .... Don Hume
Layout Editor .  Bob McDonald
Sports Editor   Ron Kydd
Editorial Assistant Joyce Holding
Critics Editor     William  Littler
Layout: Bill Millerd
REPORTERS AND DESK: Catherine Janitch, Ann Burge,
Greydon Moore, Tim Padmore, Ron Riter, Mike Horsey,
Maureen Broadbent, Penny Tucker, Ian Sandulak, Rob
Watt, Lorraine Shore, Krishna Sahay, Al Harvey, Gail
Andersen, Karen McConnachie, Nicki Phillips, Shannon
Russell, Heatrer Virtue, Nonna Weaver,  Shannon Pigott.
SPORTS: Donna Morris, Collin Sabell, Danny Stoffman,
Glenn Schultz, Janet Currie.
TECHNICAL: Clint Pulley, Jo Britten, Gail Andersen.
Apology tor Pete
By DEREK ALLEN
Not that you're interested
because you weren't there, but
Pete was a flop.
I wrote that editorial in the
paper last week urging you to
go and listen to Kim discuss
"The Challenge of the Cold
War," so I feel a certain responsibility and if; anybody who
went did so in part because of
that editorial I sincerely apologize.
• • •
Pete (after hearing him speak
it is impossible to maintain a
facade of respect — I cannot
say Mr. Stursburg) gave us an
account of the life and times
of a foreign correspondent.
He told anecdotes about the
UN and joked about the wind
in Vancouver compared to that
around Parliament Hill, Ottawa.
Letters to the editor: Race history important
■*
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
The editorial on Ole Miss
in Thursday's Ubyssey is an
insult to the intelligence of its
readers. I personally despise
and loathe racial prejudice
particularly the deep-seated
emotional brand of the Southern USA. Yet I find the irrational babbling of an opinionated author equally revolting.
If the author were truly
"swayed by the search for
truth" himself, how could he
define truth, in the South to
be sure, as "what Southern
demagogues say about race relations." He does not take
into any account the history
behind the Southern race relations or the stubborness of
Southerners in holding onto a
way of life.
If we are to combat racial
prejudice, we must do so wfth
intelligence as well as understanding. A head-on clash of
opposing sets of ideals will
never solve anything.
The author has gathered his
material from a: few rahid
and recognizable newspaper
accounts. Even though these
stories do not even attempt to
explain what goes on in the
minds of the Southern whites,
he concludes that, for some
reason, what does go on is not
reason, and the latter is what
the "academic world is based
on," and they might secede
from it.
Such confused editorializing
can do great harm to the excellent reputation of The Ubyssey. I would rather see no
editorial at all, than be insulted by irresponsible drivel
on critical topics.
Yours truly,
CORNELIUS     Von
BAEYER,
Arts 2.
Frustration
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Terri Feming's generosity
toward David Nordstrom was
unnecessary. Mr. Fleming
states that Nordstrom "has
taken the weapon of destructive criticism and demolished
the framework of an idea
presented in an art display
called "Here Was Man."
On the contrary. Nordstrom
took the weapon of destructive
criticism,    combined    it    with
bigotry, logical incompetence,
and lack of Insight, and destroyed himself.
He states, for example, that
the artistic excellence of the
exhibit "does not exist." But
in the same paragraph he later
says that each painting is
"clearly illustrated," and that
the "technical facility is good."
This kind of ignorance, including a vague and incorrect
reference to 1984 is excusable.
But public and uninformed
slander of a man's character
is not.
Nordstrom stoops to this in
the concluding paragraph of
his review. Frustrated in his
attempts to criticize the display, he turns upon the artist
and accuses him of being motivated by basically mercenary
considerations.
John Poole-West spent nearly two years in seclusion while
creating his display.
It is depressing to think of
a sensitive man trying to reach
out to others through his
creativity, and being met only
by derision.
Ubyssey, apologize.
Yours truly,
Tony Buzan,
Arts 3.
Annoyed
Editor,
The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
On behalf of the executive
of International House 1
would like to sympathize with
the Chairman of I.P.A.C. who
had the story of the first Inter-
Provincial Agricultural Conference missed by your paper.
O'ur club had the same experience regarding the talk
given by the Public Relations
Officer for the Sons of Freedom Doukhobours. Written,
and verbal contact was made
with your paper on the day
prior to this event and this
was the last we heard of this
matter.
We should be pleased to receive your explanation regarding this matter at your
earliest convenience.
Yours truly,
C. N. BULL,
Publicity Chairman
•      •      *
Advance notice of this talk
was given in 'tween classes
and a reporter was sent io
cover   the  story.   Sorry   sir,
.  Joe   Podivinnikoff . said   nothing worth reporting—ED.
He mentioned that he had
been in Paris and Berlin and
London and Rome and Delhi,
and boasted that he had nev^r
seen the Tower of London or
the Taj Mahal.
It is his opinion, however,
that the coliseum — which he
saw by moonlight—is the greatest monument antiquity has
left to Europe. (How he can
say this after visiting Athens
I do not know, but I saw tJia
Parthenon by moonlight so Via
prejudiced. Hell, we all know
moonshine is great.)
• •      •
Pete eventually got  aroutfd
to mentioning the Cold War.
The challenge of it, no, but
certainly the Cold War.
The burden of his message
was that disarmament talks
have been going on forever, and
he had a cute little anecdote
about a League of Nations cor-
respondent who is still around
on the same assignment at the
UN, still covering disarmament
talks.
And Pete did  go out on a
limb and predict success for the
,   nuclear test ban talks, which
success, he says, will take the
bite out of Cold War tension.
But he was speaking under
false pretences, and the crowd
—he drew nearly 250 people-
was disappointed.
• •      •
Half an hour after he began
I saw six people dozing.  The
view from where I sat was, of
course,    limited.    There    may
' have been more.
The only reason I counted
was that I saw two people get
up and walk out.
This is hardly what you expect from a well-known speaker and writer that I was foolish
,'   enough to describe as eminent-
'   ly    qualified    to    discuss    the
Challenge of the Cold War.
But he did have a beautiful
speaking voice.
That he was so bad is a
shame because the Vancouver
- Institute does present good
speakers. It got off to a b a d
1 start, but that doesn't give the
entire program a black eye.
*       So  remember,   Saturday
',  nights, 8:15, Buchanan 106.
•4       You can always  go to thai
»  party afterwards. Tuesday, October 16, 1962
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
again
grab globulin cup
:     Mirror, mirror on the wall, who bled the mostest of us all?
The foresters, that's who—for the umpteenth straight year.
• The greenghirts gave 103
to
per
this
cent    of    their   quota
year's fall blood drive.
Nurses ran them a close second with 102- per cent but those
haughty aristocrats, the graduate students, gave only eight per
cent.
Blood drive co-chairman Jim
Winchell said the drive achieved
only SO pef cent of its 4,000
quota, based on 30 per cent of
UBC's  total enrolment.
Students donated 1,984 pints,
including 359 pints at Friday's
special bleeding session, said
W/inchell.
To.tals.-for residences, fraternities and sororities were not
tabulated because of the smallpox vaccination.
Faculty, totals are given below. Percentages for the 1961
iajll blood drive arc in parentheses.
Forestry . 103% (290%)
, Nurses,_____'__ 102%  (197%)
Architecture ._• 88% (6%)
Agriculture. 73% (268%)
Home Ec.  70% (176%)
Education 69%  (96%)
Commerce 51%   (105%)
Pharmacy 51%  (96%)
P. E.  44%   (100%)
Engineering ___ 39%   (235%)
Medicine    27%   (88%)
Law       26%   (64%)
Social Work 24% (not known)
Arts   __:    23%   (94%)
Science       19%   (160%)
Frosh 12%  (not known)
Grad Studies  8%  (32%)
DAVID PRIOR-PALMER
. . . prior experience
Debate takes adult view:
sex first, babies next
o ecortfest set
for  X-mas cards
Shutterbugs can win cash in
a, university-sponsored contest
t$r photographs suitable for use
on a UBC Christmas card.
First prize is $29 and second
if $J5. The contest is open to
ajll students, faculty and staff.
Entries are to be submitted to
the Fine Arts Gallery in the
naent of the' library by October
Black and white pictures must
be at least 4x5" on glossy paper.
Color slides may be any size,
mounted or unmounted. There
is\ no limit to the number of entries.
German exhibits art
Etchings and watercolors by
the German-bprn impressionist
Lyonel Feininger are currently
being featured in the UBC fine
.prts gallery.
Ignorance may be bliss but
UBC students like sex better.
A capacity crowd in Brock
Hall voted Friday against the
motion that infants enjoy infancy more than adults enjoy
adultery.
"Infants just don't know what
they're missing," said one of the
negative debaters, Chris Thomson, Arts IV. His partner was
Leeds University student Alan
Andrews
Supporting the motion was
anol^ier Briton, David Prior-
Palmer, and John Hutchinson,
a student ,at Trinity College, in
Toronto.
The winners said they unyeil-
ed a new debating technique in
the debate.
"Anti-argument," Andrews said.
"This means that the way to the
truth is to ignore the" facts."
He suggested the audience
should trust its subconscious
and let "adult" ideas come out.
Thompson said the only one
in the family who has any fun
is the father—through adultery.
"Babies have to bear hairy
hands tweaking their tender
cheeks and cavity-filled smiles,"
he said.
One of the losers, Hutchinson,
enumerated the joys of infancy.
"They don't have to eat spinach, turnips, or Brock coffee,"
he said.
"Man spends his life trying
to regain the warmth he enjoyed
in his first nine months (counting backward from zero),," he
said.
He claimed- statistics showed
that enjoyment of infancy is increasing at 14 per cent per annum.
His partner, Pri.or-Palmer, said
he had done personal research
on adultery.
'Not one Canadian I met admitted he enjoyed adultery,"
Prior-Palmer  claimed.
Wesbrook residents
attack frat parties
Wesbrook Camp residents
complained Monday that fraternities hold noisy parties all over
the street.
Married quarters across the
street from "Frat Row' on Wesbrook  Crescent were surveyed.
Reporters found widespread
complaints of noise aod wild
parties throughout the week.
Most of the Wesbrook residents have young families.Resi-
dents said their children were
kept from sleep by "wild parties
going far into the night.'
"There is an excess of noise
and rambunctiousness," said
Mrs, Nancy Seahorsman.
"It would be all right if they
(the fraternities) would hold
their three or four parties a week
in the houses but they don't.
"We have been here for three
years," she said, "and the noise
has never been this bad before."
Last week was the end of fall
rushing for fraternities.
Many residents said they feel
if the parties were restricted to
weekends no one would complain.
"I hope this noise will not
continue," said Mrs. C. P. S.
Taylor.
"So far this year it has been
noisy; but last year it was all
right," she said.
Mrs. C. A. Swanson said; "I
nave no complaint right ijqw, but
if things continue as they are,
I will complain,"
Said Mrs. Lynn Wallace: "On
the whole, the fraternities are
reasonable, although weekends
are carried too far.
"I would appreciate things a'
little  quieter around 12  p.m.,"
she added.
General Meet
(From page 1)
• revision of the required
number of signatures needed to
call a general meeting. Where
five per cent of the student
body must now sign a petition,
to call a general meeting, the
amendment  requires   only  500.
• method   of  appointment  of
the editor-in-chief of The Ubys-,
sey.
Instead of the editorial board
interviewing applicants and
submitting its choice to student
council, the amendment calls
for all applicants to appear before council with The Ubyssey
editorial board submitting a
recommendation as to which/
candidate it considers most
qualified. ~~
• changing  • the   admihistra* *
tive  structure  of the  AMS to
provide    for    the    publications3
sjjstem now being  used.
• reduction of the per capita
grant to the Accident Benefit
Fund' from 40 cents to 20 cents.
• changes in procedure for
passing the AMS budget.
•increase in the number of
signatures needed to get a proposed constitutional amendment
voted upon by the student,
body. The constitution now requires 100 signatures. The
amendment requires 500 signa^
tures.
• a number of honoraria
changes.
SOON YOU WILL SEE
MAR1ENBAD
Ends  Sat.
La Dolce  Vita
Restricted.
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Irwin Hoffman, Conductor
Your Best Entertainment Buy
7 concerts from $8.80   •
in   Queen   Elizabeth   Theatre
featuring   world   renowned  artists
5 SHURA CHERKASSKY playing Prokoviev's "Piano
Concerto No. 2 in G Minor"
3 ERICA MORINr playing Brahm's "Violin Concerto
in D Major"
5   CLAUDIO    ARRAU   playing   Beethoven's   "Piano
Concerto No. 5 in E flat Major
21 SIR MALCOLM SARGENT, famous conductor from
London on first visit to Vancouver
18 fSSAC STERN playing Mozart's "Violin Concerto
No. 1  in  B Flat Major"       '
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Mar.
4   GINABACHAUER   playing   Prokoviev's ''Piano
Concerto No. 3 in C Major"
. 18 UBC CHOIR and VANCOUVER BACK CHOIR in
Beethoven's "Missa Solemnis"
SEASON TICKETS AT ALMA MATER OFFICE
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. — Students 20% Reduction
and
at Vancouver Symphony Box ©fffee, -570 Seymour.
t*» MILDEST BF7ST-TASTING c.oar.tt. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1962
Opposition tactics
blasted by Fulton
By GREYDON MOORE
Mini.s+<«~ of Public Works Davie Fulton scored opposition
parties Monday for "their scream and scare" atempts to ais-
solve the government.
"Their wishful and highly
imaginable lust for power leads
them to attack federal policies
they know to be right, and pro-
Frat pledges
are concluded
The following names were
omitted from a list of 1962 fraternity pledges published in Friday's Ubyssey due to lack of
space:
SIGMA CHI— Rod Stevenson, Sandy D'Aquino, Dave
Castell, Bob Leminski, John
Daybrugh, Rick Atkinson, Phil
Wilcox, Dave Turner, Jan Hooper, David Garling.     ,
ZETA B^TA TAU—Dave
Seagull, Bob Biely, Bob Simpson, Mark Waldman, Ron Gut-
kin, Al Roadburg, Leon Bogner,
Harvey Shapiro, Gord Robinson,
Phil Chernov, Arnie Abramson,
Paul Brownstein, Lome Bal-
shine, Ted Izen, Phil Yacht, Gary
Averbach, Harold Groberman,
Ivan Weiss, Ken Glassner, s^rt
Lipetz, Ernie Nagler, Pete Merger, Ruchard Uechter.
ZETA PSI—Tom Chambers
John Grant, George Hungerford,
Bill Campbell, Barry Cooper,
Dave Wilson, Lorrie Parr, Sandy
Argue, Colin Yorath, Chart Mc-
Culloch, Tak Ohtani, Bill Hall,
Fred Waters, Dave Phillips, John
Lang, Brian Rostill-H u n 11 e y,
John Kerr, Bob Henson, Peter
Roberts.
Byelection has
2,500 registered
Twenty-five hundred UBC students have registered to vote
in the Point Grey byelection,
registrar of voters Ken Morton
said Monday.
The byelection was called after the death of former Social
Credit government minister
without portfolio, Mrs. Buda
Brown. No date has been set.
pose policies they know to be
wrong," he said.
"To put it mildly," the cabinet minister told a near capacity noon audience at Brock
Hall, "the balance of power in
Parliament is a little precarious."
He said the Liberals were determined to gain power at any
price and were supported by
the NDP, and at times by the
Socreds too.
The meeting was well-attended by Liberal and NDP party
supporters, who tried to throw
the Minister of Public Works
with loaded questions. Socred
supporters could not be seen.
But Fulton had a ready store
of facts and figures with which
to refute their attacks.
He said, "There are some in
the audience who refuse to bt
convinced by logic and fact."
"More Canadians than ever
before are living better than
ever before," said Fulton in defence   of   Conservative   policies.
He twice quoted the Liberal
MP Lionel Chevrier as stating
immediately after the election:
"Don't give them Follow-John-
ites • a chance. Don't look at
their program. Defeat them at
the opportune time."
"We have devised a program
that represents a conscious effort to deal with problems of
today and to lay foundations for
progress tomorrow," stated Fulton.
"It represents no compromise or deals with any other
party."
DAVIE FULTON
. . scream tactics
Matz & Wozny
548 Howe St.        MU 3-4715
Custom Tailored Suits
for Ladies and Gentlemen.
Gowns and Hoods
Special Student Rates
We  specialize
in
Ivy League
Clothes
Uniforms
UNDERGRADS
Have you considered
combining your B.COM./C.A. training?
A special programme has been arranged between the Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration and the Institute
of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia to enable
students to obtain the dual qualification of B. Com. and CA.
within six years after obtaining University Entrance standing.
Students taking the B. Com./CA. programme
receive a salary from the CA. firm employing
them, and also have their instruction fees paid _
for them.
The combined B. Com./C.A. course should prove of particular interest to undergrads in the First or Second Year Arts
and Science or Commerce; but all undergrads wishing further details of the course are cordially invited to attend a
meeting on
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 18 - 12:30 P.M.
Room   2239,   Buchanan   Extension   Bldg.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
530 Burrard Street MU 1-3262
Stiff parking fee
may hit Carleton
OTTAWA (CUP) — Multistorey parkades and a $100 parking fee may hit Carleton University within five years if a
parking committee report is implemented.
The report states there will
not be enough space at the campus for surface parking, and
parkades cost about $1,200 per
car.
The report indicated the committee also ^considered banning
freshmen's cars from the parking lots and making students
living near the campus leave
their cars at home.
The committee said car pools
may well be at least a partial
answer to Carleton's coming
problems.
iw elected
frosh president
Frosh turned out in  smaller numbers than ever before
Friday to elect President Paul Danyliw as their leader.
Only 417 Frosh—or 7.7 per cent of the 3,200 total—cast their
ballots, said returning officer Peter Leask.
This  is  very  apathetic,"  he
is  very
said   Monday.    "It   gets   worse
every year."
- Three   hundred   more   Frosh
voted in the 1961 elections.
"And we called that (the 1961
vote) the smallest in UBC's history," he said.
Other officers elected were:
Vincent Kong, vice-president;
Sharon Skupa, treasurer; Trish
Philibert, secretary; and executive member, Deborah Clark.
Three Frosh council members
won their seats by acclamation.
They were: Pat Rose, special
events chairman; Maria Van
Drimmilen, women's athletic
representative; and Ken Pearce,
men's athletic representative.
First Canadian
Dr. E. W. Steacie, president of
the National Research Council
of Canada, has been elected for
a three-year term as president of
the International Council of Scientific Unions, a UNESCO-
related agency. He is the first
Canadian to hold this office.
Reckless recluse
OTTAWA  (duP) — Student
police   here   Friday
hermit  driving   a
recluse driving.
arrested   a
Corvette for
Dramatic Reading
CRUCIBLE
BY  ARTHUR   MILLER
Directed  by Caroline Friedson
Auditorium, noon, Tues., Oct. 16; Wed., Oct. 17; Fri., Oct. 19;
and Tues., Oct. 23
"PERFECT MILDNESS
IN YOUR PIPE"
0raha&t:s
. . . Brahadi's smoking
tobacco is a special
"Cavendish" blend of
Mild tobaccos. Comfortably satisfying... a mild
smoking tobacco with a
delightful aroma.
50v for 2 ounces
Suggested Prloe
Also available in
vacuum packed halfpovndH*
SPECIAL STUDENT RATES
to see Vancouver Opera Association's
TOSCA
Opening Night - This Thursday, October 18th and
Sat., Oct. 20-Tues., Oct. 23-Thurs., Oct. 25-Sat., Oct. 27
THE QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
ONLY IF THERE ARE UNSOLD SEATS
On each  performance  night after 8:15  available tickets
will be sold at the Queen Elizabeth  Box Office
at $1.00 each
regardless of location
TO BONA FIDE U.B.C. STUDENTS
On presentation of official student card for identification
FIRST COME- FIRST SERVED - NO CHOICE OF SEATS
ONLY ONE TICKET PER STUDENT
Ait tickets issued at the discretion of the V.O.A.
and not before 8:15 p.m. on any night
REGULAR TICKET SALE - DAILY - EATON'S  BOX OFFICE - TEL.  684-4464
IF YOU WANT TO BE SURE OF A TICKET ! Tuesday, October 16, 1962
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
—All photos by Don Hume
DISCUSSION ON THE DOCKS is familiar scene at annual
leadership conference. Bill MacDonald, coordinator of publications, discusses Totem with some of the 120 delegates who
attended conference on weekend.
Leadership conference
ACADEMIC APATHY is displayed by Dr. Malcolm McGregor,
caught reading Greece-y book during debate Saturday. McGregor and partner Nigel Chippendale, centre, fought to a
verbal tie with Dr. C. S. Belshaw (left) and Peter Hebb on topic
"Resolved that the extracurricular student is of more value
to the university than the academic student."
Student police force
rejected at conference
CAMP ELPHINSTONE—Student leaders don't want a campus police force, secret or otherwise.
A resolution that would have
seen the establishment of a student police force at UBC was
soundly defeated here Saturday.
A student proctor would be
appointed to head a body of
student policemen- These policemen would be in attendance at
AMS functions and be responsible for order on the campus,
said the resolution.
The idea that the student
policemen wear armbands was
rejected by a majority of the
delegates.
It was feared that student reaction would be one of derision
if the proctors did wear a r m-
bands.
And if they did not, the delegates said, the proctors would
be too much like secret police.
Earlier, the conference defeated the resolution that student
court be dissolved and its fuhc-.
tions be handed over to the faculty council and the RCMP.
Jr. colleges won't halt
UBC's soaring enrolment'
Red tape
blackens
AMS scene
By MIKE HORSEY
CAMP ELPHINSTONE —
The Alma Mater Society is buried under too much red tape,
leadership conference decided.
The majority of the 120
delegates to last weekend's conference here voted for the affirmative in a debate resolved:
"The present AMS overly concern itself with the administrative  function."
"BUREAUCRACY"
Ed Lavalle, 2nd vice-president, said student council is a
"bureaucracy attempting to
perpetuate a bureaucracy."
But Bernie Papke, co-ordinator of activities, argued that
council was not inefficient.
We are students first and
councillors second, he said.
Delegate Brian Belfont, arguing in favor of the motion, said
council should be "the labor
union of the students."
CIVIL  SERVICE
Belfont pointed to areas
where he felt the AMS should
have  initiated action.
"What about the discrimination issue, the NFCUS difficulties, and the frat houses'
question?" he asked.
"The AMS is a type of Civil,
Service but it also should make
policy," he said.
Totem split
suggested
CAMP ELPHINSTONE—
Totem, the fast-fajling yearbook, may be revitalized.
The leadership conference
here supported a three-fold
proposal which would see:
• Totem divided into two
sections, an activity and graduate section.
• the cost of the activity
section incorporated into the
AMS fee at $3 or less.
• the proposal go to the
students in the form of a referendum.
The Totem activity section
will cost $1 less than the
present publication, which has
the graduate section included.
No price on the graduate section was set.
Bjll MacDonald, co-ordinator of Publications, said Totem
sales have decreased from
5,000 copies four years ago to
only 1,400 this year.
"Content is the major cause
of our lack of sales," he said.
"The size of the University
makes it impossible to include
pictures of everyone who
should be in it."
- ■ Earlier the conference de*
feated a resolution that the
Totem cease publication.
TOM HUGHES
. enrolment boom
BRYAN  BELFONT
. . AMS labor union
Hughes warns
20,000 by 1966
By MIKE HORSEY
CAMP ELPHINSTONE —
UBC's enrollment will continue
to spiral upwards despite relief
from proposed junior colleges,
a university official said Saturday.
Tom Hughes, superintendent
of buildings and grounds, toid
the Leadership Conference here
that the system of junior and
state colleges in California had
failed to take pressure off the
universities.
"Instead of cutting enrolment:
(these colleges) increased -thfif
interest of students and (there-:
fore) enrolment increased," he
said.
BOOST ENROLMENT
"I submit that before 1970
we will have 20,000 students
regardless   of   junior   colleges."
Hughes said that by 1966,
UBC would need nearly $50
million for academic buildings
by that time.
"We will have to build the
equivalent of four Buchanan
buildings to handle the rush,"
he said.
He said the University development fund had only about
$15 million left.
"But somehow or other,
we'll muddle through," Hughes
said.
Mistakes have been made in
•the past that have limited the
expansion of the university, he
said.,
* "Where the present stadium
is there should be an extension
of the physics building."
Outlining future development,
Hughes pointed to the lack of
funds   for   building   residences.
"The sad fact is we have no
surplus to apply to future residences,"  he   lamented.
PARKING PROBLEMS
He said the automobile has
affected the plans of the campus of the near future.
, "The parking lots have to be
on the perimeter of the campus
but perhaps covered walks and
shuttle buses are the answer to
the long walks in," he said.
Grad photos to be taken
Campbell's Mobile Unit
ARTS
SCIENCE
EDUCATION
GRADUATE STUDIES
By Engineer's Bldg.
OCTOBER 17th -    9:30 TO 12:30
OCTOBER 18th -    2:30 TO    4:30
OCTOBER 19th - 11:30 TO    3:30
By Stadium
OCTOBER 22nd - 10:00 TO 12:30
OCTOBER 23rd - 10:00 TO    3:30
OCTOBER 24th - 10:00 TO 12:30
OCTOBER 29 - NOVEMBER 1st - 10:00 TO 4:00
MEN: PLEASE WEAR COLLAR AND TIE Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1962
BIRD IN GRACEFUL ELIGHT is Rogec SoUy, a second year man,
with the UBC Gymnastics team. The 20-year-pld trarapolin®
—i)cm Hume photo
expert is also a second year physical education student. Solly
is shown descending from exercise on his trampoline.
"WWWWmWP*"1Sff
J]/fs houneedt
in Ic&thvlt
The Jayvees played great
football in the first half of their
game Saturday against Edmonds
Washington—in the second halt
they looked like the B.C. Lions
in  action against Edmonton.
In the first half Steve Verlak,
Joe Redmond, and Henry Johns
all scored unconverted touchdowns to give the UBC a half-
time lead o;f 18^6.
In, the. second, half Edmonds
surged ^ ahead with an unchallenged 13: poiat: burst that
Jefti the Jayvees bewildered.
UBC had a chance, to pull out
a victory, in the last few
minutes, but. their attempted
field goal was blocked by the
Edmonds team.
er team
SSQEWrV
UBfi^s irug^r Tteundjerteds created, a storm of their own
Saturday knocking over Trojans 14-3 in a wet, muddy game at
IpouygtogPark.
Th^ Birds had a Uttle.tarouble
Birds best alone;
Birds best single'
Despite brilliant individual
performances by Gayle Hitch-
ens and Gordie Robinson the
UBC golf teams went down to
defeat in the Western Canadian
golf championships in Calgary,
this weekend.
The men's team, who last
year took the title, finished second to Saskatchewan. Robin-
spn, however, led the field with
a 151 total for 36 holes to capture the  individual crown.
Gayle Hitchens, Canadian
Women's Open Golf Champion,
took the women's crown with a
J67 total, as the women also:
finished second behind the Saskatchewan trio.      -        ..    .    .
getti»# used to the slippery.lield
a»4: as .-.a. result «wej?e<heltirto a
3-3i draw at haJ$tlm& Hoover,
the second half was a different
story. Birds exploded for 11 unanswered points to wrap up the
gasae.
FORWARD- LINE LEADS.
Bird».<were-led by theiap for*
wajrd line but the backs; were
hampered by the soft ;• field-
Scorers for the Birds were Maa?k
OsbuifBTT-Tra rookie with the team
—with two tries, Ron Samel and
Mike Cartmel with on© each.
Mike Judd kicked a convert.
Outstanding players on the
forward line were Jim Beck and
John Grange.
Coach Albert Laithwaite, on
the whole, was pleased with the
team's efforts.. He felt that the
backs didn't play as well as the
forwards but that they will come
into their own..
In. other. games, Braves out-
hustled ExsBriits 11-6 behind the
scoring of ,6has, Pentland, Bob
May and Brian,Usher. Pentland
picked tip five points while May
and Usher picked up three each.
In th^ second-division^ P.E, bow-
ep to Kats 9-8, Trojaas squeezed
past f rosh I 17-16 and Frosh II
upset Tomahawks (score: unavailable).
SHORTS
IN BADMINTON? Practice days
for both men's and women's
teams are now held Tuesday
and Wednesday from 5:30 to
7;30.
* . *     *
MAJ^: -There will be a meeting
at noon today in Bu. 225 for a
discussion on minor sports.
* *    *
IN WOMEN'S SPORTS: Practices for the Girls' Rules Basketball team are being held every
Monday and Thursday at 4:30 in
the Women's Gym.
•      *      *
JUDO CLUB
Judo Club members—Emergency general meeting Wednesday, Oct. 17, 6:30 p.m. in
Apparatus Gymnasium.
WANTED
Student to do housekeeping services
in  exchange  for  board  and  room.
CA. 4-6738
ARTIST MATERIALS
Please note that I have re-opened
my business again for Gernaan Poster, artist, Retouch colors and
brushes,  etc.
C.  OPPERMANN
3513 West 19th Avenue
#.■ wy ji,f 4,1,'y
TYP4m% *
May I be Qf :.helR in- th}s typing.mt
your essay or thesis? Experienced
in   University, .requir^mienta. ..
Mrs. L. Rapeer AM. 6-4912
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GLASSES 43S<-
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Ptesaibtion Optical
We  use GENUINE. CORECTAL  lenses
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"Ask Your Doctor"
Contact Lenses — Zenith Hearing Aids
Special Discount to-Undergraduates
Established 1924- r
•IH'HHWIP^'WW^I'^P^
UBC crossed out
, The. UBC Cross Country
team bowed to the Vancouver
Olympic Club by a narrow 2
point margin.last weekend at
'UB<Sfr,:
• In -the reverse- sowing UBC
came ©ut.wi*h >2Qt points to
VOC's 18 points. UBC's top
runner was Peter Horn who
came, in third, followed closer
ly by Ron Constable .who
placed fourth and Geoff Bales
who placed sixth.
The winner of the face, was
VOC's   Ray    Hampton    who
placed first over the 5x/i mile
course.
Birds take
first place
in soccer
By DANNY STOFFMAN
UBC's soccer Thunderbirds
Saturday stumbled their way
into first place in the Mainland
League first division with a 2-1
victory over Canadians at Nor-
quay Park.
Birds did manage two goals—
by John Harr and Ron Cross-—
but should have had more in the
game which, coach Joe Johnson
said, he'd "rather forget."
"It was our poorest effort
and yet we won, said Johnson.
"The team just couldn't seem to!
click near the goals. We just
fooled around."
Three players coach Johnson::
did praise were team captain,
and right half Keith Watson,.
right fullback Joe Alexis, and.
Noel Cummings, left half.
Bird's next game is .this Saturday against Labatt's -at Mc-
Inhes Field.
*.'*-•
"California,  here  we  come,"
is' the  latest battle  cry of  the
UBC Thunderbirds soccer team.
Bus Phillips, UBC's Athletic
Director^    said    Monday , that
funds  wiM. be  available  for  a
November trip to California, ;
i The> Birds will play Stanford
on November 22, the University
of San Francisco on the 23f<$,
and-the University of California
on -November 24.
For Your HIPSTERS in the UNIVERSITY AREA
Shop at
FIN N■;' S
1   3031 West Broadway
I ,2159 West 41st Ave,
Regent 8-6656
AM herst 1-4420
—■■*■-
'"'■> l.H"J| Tuesday, October 16, 1962
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
BIRDS DEALT OUT
Smith's the man
with golden arm
The UBC Thunderbirds were beaten 30-0 by a tough, hardhitting University of Alberta team in Edmonton Saturday.
The win moved Edmonton in
to sole possession of first place in
the' four-team football league.
The Golden Bears have a perfect 3-0 woii-lost tecord, the
Thunderbirds are 2-1, Manitoba
is 1-2, and Saskatchewan trails
with no victories in three starts.
"The sooner we forget that
game the better," said Bird
coach Frank Gnup Monday. "We
didn't play as well as we can.
We had the wrong mental attitude. For some reason we went
in there thinking we would have
an easy time."
PASSING ATTACK
The Birds didn't have an easy
tiime. Alberta quarterback Garry Smith threw up an aerial attack that the Birds' ailing deep
defence could not halt.
The Golden Bear's defence, led
by all-star linebacker Jim Chris-
toff, stopped the Thunderbirds
cold whenever UBC got the ball.
Only twice did UBC get inside
the Alberta 25 yard line, and
each time a pass interception
killed the drive.
"Qur deep defence was a little
weak," Gnup said. "Any time
the other team -can score that
many touchdowns on passes y<rar
defence has to be weak."
FOUft TOUCHDOWNS
The Alberta squad got three
.of their four touchdowns on
passes. End Rod Esper and halfbacks George Severin and Ren-
nie Bradley each took passes
from quarterback Smith, and
high-scoring fullback Bert Car-
ron plunged seven yards for the
other major.
The   Thunderbirds   lost   one
^player    in    Saturday's    game.
Dick   Gibbons,   one   of  Gnup's
-Jr-T- "—~      -    ■- ,      i    ■ --
ROY SHATZKO
... 15 stitches
quarterbacks, required 15 stitches to close a mouth injury, and
will be out for an indefinite
time.
The Thunderbirds will get a
chance to redeem themselves
this Saturday as they meet the
Golden Bears again here at UBCj
GNUP SAYS
"We're going to be right in
the game this time," Cfftup said.
"The boys are good and mad at
Edmonton, and we should eome
out fighting.
"Roy Shatzko and Bob McGavin will- be back and that will
help our defence."
Saturday's game will be a big
one for the Birds. On perforriiT
ances so far this year, the Thunderbirds and the Golden Bears
should win all their remaining
games against Saskatchewan and
Manitoba. If the Birds want to
hold the WCIAA champioriship
they won last year, they will
have to beat Alberta by 31
points.
Women smash to
Claycourt win
The UBC Women's Tennis
Team successfully defended
their Western Canadian Intercollegiate championship in
Calgary this weekend.
Judy Cornwall, Diana Lawrence and Monicka Ahlen
finished with a fifteen point
total, one ahead of second
place finishers, Manitoba and
Edmonton.
The men's team lost their
championship to the University of Alberta at Edmonton
and ended up with a fourth
place finish.
Date set for
Broder Battle
The UBC Thtinderbirds basketball team, perennial Western
Canadian Intercollegiate basketball champions, will meet the
defending Canadian champion
Lethbridge Broders Thursday,
Nov. 22 at noon-hour.
Financial arrangements are
now being completed.
The game will be part of a
warm-up tour for the Broders,
who will represent Canada in
the World Championships in
Manilla this December.
tmC basketball coach IPeter
Mullins, said "It will be our
*Mrst igame of the season, but
we'll give Itoeni a good game."
The ^Broders recruited Dave
Way, UBC's all star Centre
last year, and two other players—Bill McDonald and Lance
Stephens-—itfho figured strongly in Mullin's plans this year.
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ENGINEERING
The engineering officer in the RCAF is offered unth "
Hial opportunities to exercise his initiative and in-
genuity. From the very beginning he is more than a :,
technical specialist. He deals on a management level
not only with professional problems but with people
and human relations.
The opportunity to become one of this select group — j
lo Share the challenge, satisfaction and prestige of an
air force career Is offered to graduates in the follow*
lag university courses: J
Engineering
Pure and Applied Scientt
Honours Mathematics
Physics-Chemistry
'General Science ^
For full particulars about the epporlunifies for engineers, eorltacf your
Resident Staff Officer located -on your campus..He will alio provide
details of financial assistance pitas available to university students.
Your Local Service Representative its
F/L R. B. Robinson, The Armouries,
CA 4-T910.
ROYAL CANADIAN AIR FORCE
COLLEGE
BROCK EXTENSION -  11:30 a.m. - 2:30  p.m.
This week introduces our fine new line of:
SPORT COATS - from 39.50
BLAZERS - 39:50
SLACKS- from 10.95
ASCOTS - Assorted
OVERCOATS - Assorted
SWEATERS - Assorted
In many assorted sizes, colours and price
ranges.
REMEMBER - WE ALSO GARRY YOUR COMPLETE
FACULTY EQUIPMENT AND WILL BE EAGER TO
SERVE Y6U.
m^*m*miJlm
Schuss Down To
NtW SKI AND OUTDOOR STORE
GRAND
OPENING
and
4TH BIRTHDAY SALE
OCTOBER 17 and 18
6 TO 9 P.M.
DOOR PRIZES       •       FREE GIFTS
SKIWEAR IS NOW LEISURE WEAR FOR ON OR OFF THE CAMPUS
816 WEST PENDER - ONE SHORT BLOCK WEST OF GRANVILLE
Free Parking at D.P.C. Lots or at rear of store
PHONE MUTUAL 2-4288
LA YA WAY, CHARGE OR BUDGET ACCOUNTS AVAItABtE Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 16, 1962
Tween classes
film on
Film: "Breakdown"—a typical psychiatric case history.
Members free; others 25c. Wed.
12:30 Wesbrook 100.
* *     x
HIGH SCHOOL
CONFERENCE
Organizational    meeting    for
all interested in committee, noon
today Bu. 322.
UN  CLUB
* *     *
Mohiuddin    Ahmed,     second
secretary to Pakistan high commission, on "Pakistan Today"
in   upper   lounge   International
House noon tod^y.
* ,'■'*    * '
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Conversation Group B meet
Bu. 2224 noon today.
* *     *
HAM SOC
^irst theory -lecture noon
today Bu. 227. Everyone interested please attend.
* *    *        ;fij-
PLAYERS CLUB
Dramatic reading of Arthur
Miller's "The Crucible," noon
today in Auditorium.
* *    *
UNITARIAN CLUB
Special meeting noon today,
Bu. 225.
* *     *
BAPTIST STUDENTS
Henry Rempel on "The Psychological Aspects of Religion.''
Wed. 12:30 in Bu. 2202.
• *     *     *
LAST MINUTE CLUB
Tickets available for Foo
Hsing Theatre ( from Republic
Of China) for Wed. and Thurs.
Tickets in AMS  office.
* *     *
SPECIAL EVENTS
Ronald Turni, pianist, will
play in Brock Lounge, 8 p.m.
Wednesday. Reserved free tickets at AMS office.
UBC LIBERALS
; Speaker, Ron Basford—"Can
Canada. Survive?" Noon today
Bu,   102.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Lester D. Longman, U. of
California, on "The Causes oi
Recent Trends in Art." Lassere
102  noon today. Free.
* *     *
COMMUNIST   CLUB
Nigel Morgan, provincial
leader of Communist Party, on
"Prosperity, Not Austerity" Bu.
104 noon today.
* *     *
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Full facilities of IH now
available to students from 5
p.m.-10 p.m. Mon. to Fri. and
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sa-t.
and Sun.
Grads offer
intellectual
stimulation
A special type of off-beat intellectual stimulation is being
offered these days in the upper lounge of the Graduate
Students'  Centre.
Any and all opinpns are subject to critical attack.when the
Graduate English Students'
Association gets together to
delve into the hidden meaning
of words. -
Now going into its second
year the group opens this
term's sessions at 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday with a talk by Dr.
Elliott Gose on Pure -Exercise
of the Imagination: an arcehty-
pal analysis of "Lord Jim."
All graduate and graduating
students are invited to attend
and take part in the ensuing
discussion.
Three further evenings have
already been scheduled for
later in the term.
Suggestions for spring term
topics should be sent to Temple
Maynard, Room 6, Hut B-5  .
TODAY
LESTER D. LONGMAN
U.   of   California
"The Causes of Recent Trends in Art"
F. Lassere Bldg., 102 —
12:30- 1:30
FREE
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17TH
RONALD TURINI
INTERNATIONAL PIANIST
Brock Lounge 8:00-10:30 p.m.
Free Reserved Tickets at A.M.S. Office
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19th
His Excellency
ABDEL HAM1D SEOUD
AMBASSADOR TO CANADA FROM U.A.R.
Brock Lounge 12:30-1:30
FREE
FIGURE  SKATING   CLUB
Important meeting 12:30 Wed-,
in Bu. 204. All figure skaters
welcome.
*     *     *
GRADUATE  ENGLISH
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
First meeting Wednesday
8:15 p.m. in upper lounge oi
Graduate Students' Centre.
■_■*■*     *
NDC & SCM
"The Threat of the Modern
World" by Rev. John Heid-
brink—American Church Secretary for Fellowship of Recon-
eilation. Wed. noon Bu. 104.
■7  -    - * "  *•>" j*
NATIVE   CAN Ala AN
FELLOWSHIP
"How to Study."—a lecture by.
Dr. MaeKay of the Psychology
dept. Wed. noon in Bu. 216.
Eskimo committee
EDMONTON (CUP)—A committee to examine instances of
discrimination against Canadian
Indians and Eskimos has been set
up at the Edmonton campus of
the University of Alberta.
The move came In the wake
of discussion of the Janies Meredith case by the UAE student
council.
FOUND: A slide rule in Bu. 106 at
2:3fr on Friday, Oct. 12. Phone John
at  HE  3-6613.
UBC CLASSIFIED
MUST SELL: New woman's rain
boots, sue 8%-9. illusion heel, black
waterproof nylon, nylon fur cuff,
fleece lining. Were $15, now $9. CA
4-5834.
LOST: Thursday. Alaska Black diamond ring. Vicinity of lib. or ed.
building.  Reward.  Call CA 4-7759.
POOR STUDENT lost a short story
brook with names in it. Karen Mac-
Waters. Teacher: Miss Jane Rule.
Please   phone   Eva,   TR   2-5598.
FOR SALE: 3 brand new women's
lab coats. Size 36. Value $5, what
offers?   Phone   RE   8-1657.
FOR SALE: 5-string banjo, Orpheum,
top condition, $95 or closest offer.
Terms   if   needed.   Call   private   YU
7-3388.
WANTED:   Math   30   geometry   tutor.
.   Phone  Rose,   FA  5-4417.
WANTED: A girl in her 20's to share
a  large  furn.  flat with  two  others.
, Reasonable   rent,    convenient   location.  Phone RE  1-7842. '':..' 7
FOR SALE: (1) Goya classical guitar,
$80. (2) Mossberg .22 repeater rifle
With 4-povv-er scope,  $35.  RE 8-4419,
FOR RENT: Nice Clean, room. $35.
Male student, breakfast if desired.;
2338 Dunbar   St.   RE  3-5357.
FOR SALE: Used English 100 corre-.
spondence lesson section. Phone WE
9-7678.
FOR  RENT:  Room  for  men,   $55  per
. month.  Contact university  student*
. cotop" assoc.,   40S2   W.Sth.-Phoh&
CA   4-3631.
RIDE WANTED: 2 girls for 8:30 lectures. Vicinity of 1st and Arbutus.
Phone CA  4-3996 for Joan  or Barb.
LOST: Would the person seen fur-
lively removing my turquoise and
white coat from the Biological Sci-'
ence Bldg. on Wednesday afternoon
please return it to the same hook
at the same time next Wed. afternoon and no questions will be asked.
EYEGLASSES
'    ' UP
H495,
I H ^^mT Complete!
j includes Frame of Your Choice
| and Single Vision,.Prescription 1
Lenses.
Bifocals Additional.
.Alj-L  EYE  DOCTORS'
{OPTOMETRISTS' & OCULISTSl
T EYEGLASS  PRESCRIPTIONS!
1 •-'      FILLED '
0iANVtLLE
'     OPTICAL LTD.
MU 3-2828 -        MU 3-8921
861  Granville, Vancouver
"Repairs While You Wait"
EYE EXAMINATIONS
ARRANGED
'■/Mjoet,
If your North-Rite "98**
doesn't write as long as you
think it should, we will send
you a new refill — FREE!
ONJtY
MmtkRitEW   98c
ST.   LAMBERT,   QUEBEC
Philips New Battery Tape Recorder
with Honors in Versatility and Portability
Take your Philips Continental '100
along to lecture or recreation rooms.
Preserve sage words, mad moments
or music. Perfect for parties or dances,
it plays up to two hours of music on
a single tape. Records and plays back
anywhere because it's transistorized
and powered by ordinary flashlight
batteries. Have a listen to this eight
pound, Small Wonder with a Big
Voice at your Philips Key dealer. It's
all yours to enjoy for only $149.00.

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