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The Ubyssey Feb 25, 1965

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 Lower Mall art show features collage of old paint, newspapers and lunch bags. (See story P. 2).
«.**. jfiE yyYSSEY c i9e
VOL. XLVII, No. 53
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1965
48
CA 4-3916
10 per cent
Budgets
slashed,
says ML A
Liberal MLA Pat McGeer
charged in the provincial legislature Tuesday that B.C. universities' budget requests have
been cut by about 10 per cent.
McGeer charged the Social
Credit government with bringing down a bush-league budget.
McGeer said he isn't sure
about the amount of the cut
but assumed it was about 10
per cent.
"Nobody will deny there's
been a cut but nobody will say
how much,". he said in an interview Wednesday.
In the legislature he said
government penny-pinching is
holding B.C. back in the
world's new technological age.
"We're cutting our own
throats in B.C. by allowing
this to happen," he said.
He said the universities
have been on a crash program
to catch up with standards in
the rest of Canada within
three years but that budget
cuts will prevent this.
Police raid
Alberta frats
EDMONTON (UNS) — Police Wednesday raided fraternity houses at the University of Alberta looking for
beer and liquor.
They seized beer from pop-
vending machines and a case
a liquor from one frat house.
Police said more seizures
would have been made if police had raided the fraternity
houses simultaneously.
No arrests were made.
ED LAVALIE
. . . hopped up
CUS now
twice as
hopping mad
By TOM WAYMAN
Ubyssey  City Editor
First it was the means sur-
vey, and now its the national
seminar — UBC students just
aren't co-operating with the
Canadian Union of Students.
Last Thursday UBC's chairman of the CUS National Student Means Survey Ray Larsen said he had received only
100 replies to the 1,163 students contacted for the Survey.
He said he was hopping
mad.
Ed Lavalle, the organizer
of the UBC delegation to the
CUS national seminar in Fred-
ericton, New Brunswick this
Steptember said he hadn't received enough applications to
go by the Wednesday deadline.
He said he was hopping
mad.
"There are  eight  free,  all-
inclusive    trips   right    across
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:  HOP
Residences urged
to join with AMS
Woods asks direct link;   j   yafjcan
grants, free services seen I $ees £Qj
The president of the Lower Mall Resident Association
has  advocated  affiliation  of
Mater Society.
John Woods outlined his
proposal Tuesday night in a
message to the residents of
Lower Mall.
"Personally, I feel affiliation
is an excellent idea," Woods
said.
"Previously it has been proposed that the residences affiliate as a body," he said.
But this idea has been rejected by the Inter-Residence
Council.
IRC, composed of the executives of the Lower Mall, Totem,
Acadia and Fort Camp residence associations, has express-
Lower  Mall with   the  Alma
ed fear of subjugation by the
AMS if they joined.
Under discussion with IRC is
a proposal to have one representative for all residences
hold a seat on the AMS Council.
"One representative from
the residences could hardly
give an accurate picture of the
different problems involving
different residences," Woods
said in his message.
Woods said he wants a direct
relationship.
He said a referendum will
be held in the next week for
the individual residences.
in others
'Need strong representation
Woods outlined the advantages and disadvantages of the
affiliation move.
He said Lower Mall would
receive free accounting and
auditing services, free use of
campus facilities, free legal
services and support plus possible grants.
Woods also said he would
lose his power as a direct signing officer if the affiliation
took place.
"But the more strongly we
are represented, the greater
are our chances of receiving
the things we need in this residence."
AMS   President  Roger   Mc
Afee said he was pleased with
Woods' proposal.
"It will be of benefit to the
Alma Mater Society because
we'll have a better liason between the Society and the residence.
"The AMS will be more effective in action with Lower
Mall, and the energies of the
residents of Lower Mall will
have a positive direction," McAfee said.
BIRDS BATTLE
FIREFIGHTERS
(See Page 2)
By STEVE  BROWN
Roman Catholic arch-
bis h o p of Vancouver
Martin Johnson told 150
UBC students Wednesday his church now realizes God's spirit also
works through non-Catholic churches.
And he said he expects
the Catholic Church will
make a definite pro-
nouncement on new
birth control methods
next fall.
"In the past we Catholics tried to restrict, in
our own minds, God's
work," Archbishop Johnson said in Bu. 205.
"We lived in a ghetto
of our own making."
He was speaking on
his own personal impressions of last fall's session of the Ecumenical
Council, Vatican II.
The local spiritual
leader, dressed as an ordinary priest except for
his ring of office, said he
felt the key statement in
the Council's Christian
unity decree is:
"There can be no true
ecumenism without a
change of heart within
us."
(Continued on Page  2)
SEE: YES OR NO Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 25, 1965
ASTRONOMER Dr. Jean Pet-
rie of the Dominion Astro-
physical Observatory i n
Victoria speaks on The
Realm of the Galaxies for
the Vancouver Institute in
Buchanan Saturday at 8:15
p.m.
HOP
(Continued from  Page  1)
Canada  waiting to be picked
up," Lavalle said.
"It's a golden opportunity
to meet students from everywhere in Canada and a chance
for a real intellectual exercise," he said.
"And students still don't
seem to want to respond."
Lavalle said the deadline
for applications has been extended to 4 p.m. next Monday.
The seminar will run Sept.
6-12, on Democracy in the University Community.
It is open to all graduates
and undergraduates returning
to UBC this fall, and applications should be submitted to
the AMS office.
On the Means Survey front,
Larsen said Wednesday only
15 per cent of the students
asked to complete it have done
so.
"We have to have about 90
per cent if the survey is to
mean anything," he said.
Sending out reminders to
students has boosted costs for
the survey about $75. "If response doesn't improve UBC
will not be represented in the
survey," Larsen said.
He said the CUS Brock Extension office, where the
means survey questionnaire?
must be filled out, is oper
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. today
and from 9 a.m. until noor
Saturday.
Only gleam of hope for
gloomy CUS workers appears-
to be the planned visit Mar
12 of smiling CUS national
president Jean Bazin.
Plusersatz collage
Bit of everything
in residence show
Lower Mall's annual art show opened Wednesday with
paintings, prints, pottery, a sculpture and a phony collage
priced at $45.
Soccer clash
set for noon
The show, sponsored by the
Lower Mall Residence Association Cultural Committee, was
open to all UBC students. Majority of the works on display in the Lower Mall Common Block men's lounge are
paintings, but batiks, wood-
carving, woodcut prints, and a
thread-and-liquid solder sculpture are also exhibited.
The dubious collage is called
Mondo Conner, and is the
work of bearded John Carver,
Science II, and several members of the Folk Song Society
who threw it together for a
gag out of a junked door, old
newspapers, paint, lunches
and a fishnet.
The display is open today
and Friday, 4 to 6 p.m. and 8
to 10 p.m., and on Saturday
from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Admission is free.
UBC Thunderbirds and
Vancouver Firefighters clash
in the third annual muscular
dystrophy soccer game at noon
today in Varsity stadium.
Dr. W. C. Gibson of UBC's
Faculty of Medicine will
handle the pre-game kick-off
honours.
Admission will be toy silver donations with proceeds
going to the Firemen's muscular dystrophy fund.
UBC battled Firefighters to
a one-all draw two years ago
but lost 4-2 last year in the
first two annual charity games
between the two teams.
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(Continued from  Page  1)
Following the speech, the
archbishop said in an interview he hopes and expects
Pope Paul's committee on
birth control will report its
conclusions at next fall's
Council session.
"The Church appreciates
the fact the world is demanding a definite yes or no answer on recent developments
in birth control methods,". he
said.
"Paul's committee, formed
last year, is now hearing representations from experts in
the biological, medical and
other fields, as well as the
theologians," the prelate
added.
Archbishop Johnson told
students the next council may
ake the laity into the same
haring of responsibility with
he Pope that the bishops
rained last session.
He said the newly-declared
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Archbishop Johnson said he
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was somewhat shocked on
first hearing the blunt castiga-
tions flying between liberals
and conservatives at the council.
But the results of this head-
on meeting of minds dispelled
his concern, he said.
The prelate said the new
Catholic liturgy represents the
start of a whole reformation
and renewal of spiritual life
to make it relevant to modern
man.
(The ecumenical council
meets for its fourth and probably last session next fall.
(Observers feel the College
of Cardinals, greatly enlarged by Pope John and Pope
Paul, may carry on the Council's reforms, meeting regularly for the first time in history.)
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
HOT
Khoury
By JACK KHOURY
Take a frosh — any frosh.
Pull that stupid pipe out of
his mouth, shave off his
peach fuzz, strip him of his
sneakers and white jeans and
give him decent clothes, deprive him of his daily ration
of Brock coffee, forbid him
his regular gossip sessions in
the College Library, deny
him the privilege of reading
his favorite thrice-w e e k 1 y
school newspaper, and what
have you got left?
You guessed.
A frustrated upperclass-
man.
•   •   •
Frosh are the most infamous of all student groups.
To upperclassmen, they
offer an unfathomable well
of mysteries and occasional
chuckles.
To engineers, they are
3,100 fish out of water.
Consider the frosh's valorous attempt to be heard: The
Odyssey.
Released on Monday, The
Odyssey consists of a good
number  feelthy  frosh  jokes.
Because the AMS wouldn't
dare support this publication,
Frosh Council organized
Frosh Week to raise the $300
they invested in The Odyssey.
• *   •
Frosh Week started with a
debate Monday noon: Resolved that Frosh are Beneficial.
During the rebuttal AMS
President Roger McAfee and
McGoun Cup debater Wolfram Raymer for the negative
complained that their timer
wasn't doing his job correctly. They asked for an impartial timer, but didn't get one.
The judge, striving for fairness, decided to have a house
vote from the audience who
were practically all Frosh.
• •   •
It was finally decided
Frosh president Kim Campbell and AMS first vice-
president Bob Cruise for the
affirmative had given the
best presentation.
Wednesday's Frosh Week
event was a fashion show in
Brock lounge. Eleven lovely
freshettes modelled for an
enthusiastic audience of almost three hundred students.
For a fashion show, however, the number of boys
present was surprisingly
high  ...
• •    •
Now that many of the
events scheduled for Frosh
Week have already been presented, you get to wondering
whether it was worth it.
If you stop and think,
you'll find that both The
Odyssey and Frosh Week are
entirely unncessary, for each
one was made solely to support the other.
But you'll have to hand it
to the Frosh, because they've
got one thing that other
years don't have.
Freshettes.
ETHNIC BLUES come to campus at noon today with Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee,
guitar and  harmonica virutosos. They're   sponsored   by  Special Events.
Asia
Dull
pert asks neutrality
simplicity gone'
McCreary
lobbying
in Ottawa
UBC's dean of medicine flew
to Ottawa Tuesday to seek
early implementation of some
proposals of the Hall Royal
Commission on Medicare.
Dr. John McCreary will meet
with federal | health officials
and cabinet ministers to seek
speedy implementation of the
education section of the Commission's report, tabled last
Thursday in the House of Commons.
Dr. McCreary is president of
the Association of Canadian
Medical Colleges. He said the
Report's recommendation for a
school at UBC to train hearing
and speech therapists would be
a valuable addition to UBC.
Dr. McCreary is also seeking
early implementation of the
Commission's proposal that the
current research grant of $6.9
million a year be increased by
$3 million a year until 1971.
Dr. McCreary said the Hall
Royal Commission did an imaginative and courageous job.
By RICK BLAIR
An American expert on Asia
Tuesday called for a neutral
South East Asia.
Dr. Robert Scalapino, a political science professor at the
University of California, said
the U.S. must strive for a neutral, non-aligned South East
Asia, including North and
South Viet Nam.
Dr. Scalapino, sponsored by
the Special Events committee,
spoke to 700 students in the
Auditorium.
"A neutralized South East
Asia would be acceptable to
the U.S. which has moved
away from the Dulles smplicity
of 10 years ago in which a
country was either with you or
against you," he said.
Scalapino said he was oppos
ed to a U.S. withdrawal from
South Viet Nam now because
this would have a disastrous
effect on U.S. allies in Asia.
He also opposed total war
against North Viet Nam saying
this could lead to war with
Communist China.
"U.S. attacks on North Viet
Nam supply bases were completely justified," he said.
"We've got to prove this
kind of guerilla war has risks
for the Communists too before
the U.S. can bargain with
them.
"The Peking regime pays
great attention to Afro-Asian
and Latin American countries
which they see as the soft underbelly of capitalism," he
said.
The Chinese do not want the
U.S. to change its isolation policy towards China because the
U.S. provides a scapegoat for
Chinese foreign policy, he said.
"The Chinese are willing to
deal with countries like France
in an attempt to loosen these
countries' ties with the U.S.,"
Scalapino said.
"Peking believes it can isolate the U.S. before the U.S.
can isolate it," said Scalapino.
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THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1965
A sorry survey
The Canadian Union of Students should not be surprised that the UBC part of the national student means
survey has had such poor response.
The methodology is wrong, for a starter.
It is extremely naive to expect students to flock to
the CUS office in Brock to fill out a lengthy personal
questionnaire on the strength of one or two letters telling them to do so.
Surely this is the most difficult, and to the average
student most inconvenient, method of attracting students to fill out the questionnaire.
The student means survey conducted by the Alma
Mater Society last year consisted of a questionnaire
sent in the mail to students selected by random sample.
Students merely had to fill out the questionnaire and
either mail it back or drop it off at the AMS offices.
Even under these simple procedures AMS officials
spent many hours phoning and harrassing students who
could not be bothered to return the questionnaire.
The department of preventive medicine is also conducting a survey right now.
For this survey students must appear in Wesbrook
100 next Thursday and answer a detailed form.
But, for their inconvenience, the department is willing to pay each student who shows up $2.
The CUS questionnaire is a carefully prepared survey which will attempt to estimate student earnings,
expenses and living costs in an effort to see if further
student aid is necessary.
The data will be collected and processed by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics and submitted to the
Bladen Commission on higher education.
Its long-range findings could mean savings to students by supplying information to support the CUS
"freeze the fees" policy across Canada.
At present 100 UBC students have replied to the
questionnaire.
That's about 15 per cent of the required sample..
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the U.S. government consider 75 to 80 per cent return on a survey as
only workable.
Anything less is useless. It would also be ridiculous
to have a student survey across Canada, but missing
our largest daytime enrolment university.
It is too late for us to suggest CUS change its survey
method.
It is not too late to ask UBC students to fill out the
questionnaire if they have been notified.
Put up with the inconvenience, and perhaps the CUS
committee will give away free coffee, or something.
Ah, fame
Waterloo University proudly announced that it may
change its name to Winston Churchill University.
Just what the great Sir Winston and a muddy little
campus in eastern Canada have in common isn't really
too clear to us.
Unless, of course, Waterloo had a long, (and secret)
association with Sir Winston.
Bah. It's the case of a small university vainly reaching for fame and fortune it has despaired of ever gaining through its own efforts.
"Whitey, if s hard to believe that you've been a big league
catcher for twenty years new . . . ."
LETTERS
More frosh fuss
Editor, The Ubyssey:
With no malice intended
toward Miss Kim Campbell,
her criticisms of Miss Lowe
were unjust and undeserved.
I know Miss Lowe to be a
level - headed, serious - thinking student, who would not
offer criticism of any organization without just cause
and preliminary investigation.
Answer me three questions,
Miss  Campbell.
Can no one but a member
of the Frosh Council give
constructive criticism of this
group without being subject
to name-calling?
What IS the purpose of the
Council?
And finally, Miss Campbell, what in heaven's name
has this cute little social club
accomplished?
NICOLE   TERLINDEN
Frosh
V       •?•       *r
And more frosh
Editor, The Ubyssey:
This is my last letter about
the Frosh Council. There are
three reasons: I have no intention of becoming part of
a feud on The Ubyssey's Editorial page; my questions
won't be answered because
only those governing or garbage-collecting have the right
to ask questions; and, I wish
to save Miss Campbell from
embarrassing herself further.
My first letter was not intended as criticism of Miss
Campbell personally. All I
said was common knowledge;
what concerned all Frosh
was Snflormation about the
Frosh Council and its membership. Therefore when Miss
Campbell stooped to such
depths of abuse and evasion
in her letter, it was a slap
in the face to all Frosh.
Her letter merits no reply;
within it, she has sown the
seeds of her own destruction.
JUDY   LOWE
Education   I
*r        V        *r
Hitch-hiking violets
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It seems to me that some
time ago, I read a letter in
your paper on the too extrovert habits of UBC hitchhikers. Whether the letter
rendered all hitch-hikers silent, or it has been my luck
to pick up only retiring violets, I don't know.
Surely there must be a
compromise between the loud
radio - playing, chain - smoking hartebeest, and the mute-
perched - on - end - of - seat -
done - something - in - pants
type, who can barely squeak
thank-you as he hastily bails
out before the car has actually stopped?
While I am quite prepared,
and fully insured, to pick
up, welcome and ask destination, chauffeur and set down
safely, any UBC student free
of charge, I do not feel that
I should have to restrain, put
at ease, or entertain too.
I understand that in most
parts of the world, when two
or three are gathered to-
g e t h e r, moderate conversation (small talk, if you will)
is normal, natural or whatever word is in vogue currently, just to pass the time
of day or the time away.
If UBC hitch-hikers come
in two varieties only, either
loquacious parrots or monosyllabic bores, then I'd like
to know, so that I can pass
them all by in future. Otherwise for Pete's sake, let's
have some pleasant conversation — even about the
weather!
A  GRADUATE   STUDENT
A system
of honor
and air
By LLOYD  GRAFF
(Reprinted from
The Michigan Daily)
"What is honor? A word.
What is in that word honor;
what is that honor? Air . . .
Honor is a mere scutcheon."
At the Air Force Academy
scores of cadets have been
sacrificed for that airy word
which Shakespeare's Sir John
Falstaff so thoughtfully ridiculed.
¥p *p *fr
From the information
which has been pried out of
the secretive academy, it
seems clear that many cadets were forced to resign because they had heard rumors
about exam stealing and had
not reported those rumors to
proper officials. They were
caught in the machinery of
honor.
The Air Force public relations men, who since the last
war have outdone those of
every rival service in grinding out rosy propaganda, are
faced with a mammoth whitewashing job, but they appear
to be equal to the task.
But the image of the academy is of far less concern
than the reputation of those
who were sacrificed to public opinion because they had.
an inkling but didn't "spill
it". They are not the ones
who rifled the exams and
then sold them. They are not
the ones who bought the stolen tests.
Honor keeps the system together but murders many inside it. The Air Force Acada-
my applied the knife to its
cancer and removed the
identifiable malignancy. How
much benign tissue went with
it for the sake of concept, a
concept which says a man
should turn in his friend —
and himself — for the sake
of the system?
flp*        •*•        *r
If there is a hero in the
sordid Air Force affair it is
the unknown cadet — who
must exist — who heard the
rumors and did not turn in
his fellow cadets on hearsay,
nor resign as a martyr later
for the sake of honor. He is
the person to have control
over dropping bombs that
might end civilization because he values human life
and sympathizes with human faults while the believer
in the honor system demands
perfection and forgets humanity.
EDITOR:  Mlk.  Horsey
News    Tim Padmor.
City Tom Wayman
Art Don Hum.
Managing Janet Matheson
Sports	
Asst. City	
Asst.  News 	
Asst. Managing
Page Friday	
Associate	
Associate   Mike Hunter
COME ALL YE: Tom Wayman
played city editor, and Granny Shore
played assistant. Others playing in
the office were Rick (Crash) Blair,
Tim Roberts, Lome Mallin, Robin
Russell, Anna Burger, Gordon (arty)
McLaughlin, Robbi West, Ethel
Bloomsbury, Sandra Stephenson,
Cheryl Mitchell, Art Casperson,
Carol-Anne (I'm wearing my contact lenses) Baker, Sara Simeon,
Massimo Verdicchio, Jack Khoury,
and Mike Bolton. And there really
will be a party next Wednesday.
Come down and do some work and
we'll tell you the details. Don Hull
showed on niteside while Padmore
got  booted  out  of  the  Cecil.
George Reamsbottom
  Lorraine Shore
 Carole Munroo
 Norm Betts
 Dave Ablett
 Ron Rltar Thursday, February 25,  1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
BACKGROUND
Brock art downtown
By GORDON McLAUGHLIN
Canada's second largest
student art collection moves
from here to the Vancouver
Art Gallery next week.
The Brock Art Collection
goes on display in the downtown gallery at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
The 34-painting collection
is second in size only to the
Hart House Collection at the
University of  Toronto.
• •    •
The exhibition will be opened Tuesday evening by
AMS president Roger McAfee, Totem editor Scott Mclntyre, and Fine Arts department head B. C. Binning.
The idea of UBC art collection originated early in the
1950s but the idea was forgotten for several years.
• •    •
In 1957, UBC student Ron
Longstaffe revived the idea.
His aim was to purchase
three or four representative
contemporary Ca n a d i a n
paintings a year for a permanent collection.
In 1958 Maclean's magazine commissioned Canadian
painters to paint for the B.C.
centennial.
Professor Bining heard of
this and persuaded the magazine  to  donate  seven  paint-
ROGER MeAFEE
. . . opens show
ings to  the foundling Brock
collection.
"We feel this is a worthwhile project for the university. It is a cultural expression
—truly Canadian," said Binning.
•    •    •
The AMS grants $1,500 a
year toward the purchase of
new paintings. This is about
10 cents per student.
Fine Arts gallery curator
Alvin Balkind and Binning
act as advisors to a six member   committee    responsible
for the selection and the purchase of paintings.
This year the committee
consists of Scott Mclntyre,
Hans Boehm, Roger Ford,
Jack Darcus, Rob Roy and
Alan Bell.
The Brock collection is valued at about $14,000, said
Balkind.
• •    •
"There is no doubt some
of the paintings are worth
more now," he said.
This year one new painting has been purchased. It is
by Donald Jarvis, and hangs
in the Brock Link.
Both Balkind and Binning
said they hoped to see the
Brock collection moved to
the Student Union Building.
But they don't want the
collection placed permanently in a gallery.
• • •
Binning said: "The collection should be part of the
decor of the building. It
should be placed in committee rooms and lounges, as it
is now, but under more favourable viewing conditions."
"Students should not go
hat in hand in awe to view
masterpieces; the collection
should just be there for students to absorb," Balkind
said.
Shortest meeting
rejects Morrocans
The AMS Council meeting
on record Monday night.
It lasted only 45 minutes.
Council extended its "heartfelt sympathy" to the National
Union of Morroccan Students
but turned down their appeal
for operating funds on the
grounds that Council cannot afford it.
The Moroccans had asked for
aid to bolster sagging finances
threatening the organization
with the prospect of sharply
curtailed activities.
AMS Treasurer Kyle Mitchell commended the sub-committee looking after the removal
may have been the shortest
of   the   gates   on   University
Boulevard.
Workmen began tearing
down the gates Monday following years of protest that they
constituted a serious traffic
hazard blocking the visibility
of drivers leaving the campus.
Stocks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
0KANAGAN SUNSHINE AND
3 to SKI
Penlicton't
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Kelowna's
BIG WHITE
Vernon's
SILVER STAR
* 6 lifts and over 6000 ft. of vertical drop
* Powder snow skiing at its best
* Reasonable lift rates ($3.50)
* Excellent ski schools ($2.00 per group lesson)
* Special skiers' rates at motels and hotels
(Many offer excellent accommodation at 2 for $5.00)
Why not ski in this unique area during your mid-term
break next week.
Okanogan Ski Report — 926-1313
♦•go to hell
» • #
NO
DAMMIT  This  isn't  the   final
answer  on   the   C.U.S.   Student  Means  Survey
Over 1,100 students have been selected to participate in the C.U.S. student
means survey on a nation-wide basis. The purpose of the survey is to
compile a set of statistically-correct figures on student finances. The results
of this survey will give us a tool for influencing decisions on the financing
of higher education.
Your participation matters to you and your fellow students.
ADMINISTRATION   DATES   ARE  AS
FOLLOWS:
Friday, February 26 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday, March 1 ..9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Tuesday, March 2 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, March 3.......9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
IN BROCK   EXTENSION  354 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 25, 1965
V !•
—norm betts photo
UBC SQUASH tournament will be held March 2 to 14 at
various city squash clubs. Tournament pits together students and profs. Co-ed Penny Dwyer, Ed III, models UBC
Squash Club sweatshirt.
Marrying younger
Women after Mrs.
rather than BA
ATLANTIC CITY (UNS) — Fewer women are earning
college degrees, according to reports given at the annual
convention of the American Association of School Adminis
trators last week.
Protest organized
against $50 tee hike
LONDON  (CUP)  — Organized opposition has greeted
the prospect of a fee hike at the University of Western
Ontario.
Western U
goes psycho
LONDON, Ont. (CUP)—Forty per cent of the male students and 54 per cent of the
female students at the University of. Western Ontario have
felt some need for counselling
on emotional or psychological
problems since entering the
university, according to a
health survey.
But only slightly more than
one-half this number of students actually sought help,
most often from a friend or a
member of their family.
The survey, prepared by the
mental health committee of
the students' council at Western, showed that most of the
students who did hot seek counselling—35 per cent of the
males and 38 per cent of the
females—did not know who
to see.
South Africa
on spot again
The lecture series on the
apartheid problem in South Africa will resume today.
Miss Margaret Nash, World
Mission Secretary of the SCM,
will speak under the joint
sponsorship of the SCM and the
UBC Anti-apartheid committee
in Bu. 102 at noon.
Thirty-nine per cent of 1963
college graduates were women.
This was a smaller ratio than
in either 1940 or 1930.
The decline is even sharper
in fields of graduate study, the
meeting was told. The proportion of women earning Master's degrees was only 31 per
cent in 1963, as compared to
38 per cent in 1940 and 40 per
cent in 1930.
The number of women earning doctorates today has more
than tripled since 1930, but the
number of men in doctoral
studies has increased more than
five-fold.
Mrs. Esther Peterson, assistant United States secretary of
labor and special assistant to
the President for consumer affairs, attributed the decline to
a trend towards early marriage.
"Today, people are marrying
younger than ever, without
waiting until the man is settled
in a career. Marriage can now
be managed on credit or the installment plan.
"As a result, education for
women is becoming a life-long
prospect.
"Most women can combine
home-making and education
more easily than homemaking
and a job," she said.
Canoists cross
floes to class
HAMILTON (C UP)— Four
McMaster University students
canoed to class last week when
they found their path to the
university's physical sciences
centre blocked by a forty-foot,
long pool of water.
The pond, created by a rapid
thaw following heavy mid-
February rains, was three feet
deep in the middle and filled
with ice floes.
OTTAWA (CUP) —Foreign
students numbered 9,490 in
Canadian universities and colleges in 1963-64. This is an 11.4
per cent- increase over the previous year.
Debaters
cop second
at McGill
A UBC debating team last
week placed second in a debating tournament at the McGill
Winter Carnival in Montreal.
The two UBC students, Graham Phillips and David Buchanan, both Law II, were second in the negative championship and placed fourth in overall points.
They had 76 points out of a
possible 100, second to Harvard's 86.
They debated the resolution
that The Enforcement of Morals is not the Concern of the
Law.
The McGill tournament is
the largest debating session in
the Commonwealth.
In March, a UBC team composed of Betty Hall, Arts II,
and Jim Taylor, Arts III, will
compete for the Canadian
Championship Macdonald-Lau-
rier Trophy in Victoria.
Argonauts back
after  control' tiff
SACKVILLE (CUP)—The Argosy Weekly, Mount Allison University's student newspaper, has resumed publication after a four-month silence.
Administration control over
The Argosy's editorial policy
PRESCRIPTION
EYEGLASSES
All Doctor's Eyeglass Pref-
scriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE  OPTICAL
861 Granville MU 3-8921
sjs»Money Back Guarantees
Watch them
live in East
You can find out how people
in Ontario and Quebec live.
World University Service of
Canada is sponsoring a travel
and educational seminar for
overseas and Canadian students, from May 19 to June 16.
All Canadian students at
UBC are invited to apply for
the seminar before March 4.
Campus groups are busy organizing to protest the proposed $50 a year raise, and one
has suggested boycotting classes.
University president Dr. H.
G. Hall told officials of the
Canadian Union of Students
that 75 per cent of the students
can well afford the increase.
He refused to disclose his
basis for determining tuition
costs and the amount students
could afford to pay.
resulted in a mass resignation
of the newspaper staff last September. Only one issue of The
Argosy was published last
term.
• •   •
A special committee composed of representatives of the
students' council, the university administration and The Argosy was formed to study the
causes of the resignations.
It announced in December
that it had reached an agreement, but there was no response to calls for new staff.
Editorial positions, however,
were filled in January.
The new editor of The Argosy, Alan Swan, said in his
first paper:
• •   •
"The Argosy Weekly will be
an independent paper, free
from control by the administration, the Argosy Advisory Committee, the student government
and interests outside of the editorial staff."
A Trip To Europe
For Less Than $100
Switzerland — The International Travel Establishment will locate job
opportunities in Europe for anyone who likes the idea of a fun-filled,
low cost trip to Europe. Jobs are available in all fields throughout
Europe. Interested students should send $2 to Search Dept„ ITE, 68
Herrengasse, Vaduz, Liechtenstein (Switzerland) for a complete, do-it-
yourself prospectus which includes the key to getting a job in Europe,
the largest European job selection available, instructions, money saving
tips and conclusive information making a trip to Europe (including
transportation)  possible for less than $100.
3rd ANNUAL
HSC Often £<?uaA
Tournament
MARCH 2 -14 — $1.00 PER PERSON
Entry forms at A.MJ5. Three big classes.
One for every type of player. Racquets
supplied. Sign up now even if you've never
played before. Thursday, February 25,  1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
JOHN TURNER
... at banquet
Whig MP
to speak
at banquet
Lberal    MP    John    Turner
will  be  the  guest  speaker  at
the  Student-Alumni  Banquet
Thursday.
Turner,   son   of   Chancellor
Phyllis Ross, will speak on an
unspecified    current    political
topic at the Brock Hall banquet.
Only 200 of the 700 invited
alumni are expected to come.
All 300 students invited are
expected.
Student leaders coming to
the banquet include AMS
councillors and all club and
residence executives.
Turner, a former graduate
of UBC and a Rhodes scholar,
is presently assistant to the
Minister of Northern Affairs
Art Laing.
McAfee waffling
on Boylan debate
AMS president Roger McAfee is waffling on his public
debate challenge.
Caouette gets
familiar fare
French Canadian split-pea
soup will be the first course
served at a luncheon for
Quebec's Real Caouette Saturday noon at the Georgia.
Caouette, being sponsored
in Vancouver toy the UBC
Creditistes, will speak over
prime ribs at $3.50 for students and $5 for ordinary
people.
Tickets may be obtained
from the Special Events office in Brock Extension.
Runner
beeps last
his
Roadrunner has beeped
last in the Auditorium.
This Friday, Filmsoc brings
in a Congo Bill serial hot on
the tail of Roadrunner. The
club hopes to continue the serial if there is sufficient response to the movie.
Besides the Congo Bill thing
there will be a Laurel and
Hardy comedy.
Film Soc president Peter
Harrison said about Filmsoc's
showing: "We want to make a
fast buck too!"
Bears mangle 'Birds,
mount lead in series
University of California Bears gave a repeat performance
Monday and handily disposed of UBC's rugger 'Birds by a
13-3 count.
McAfee challenged defeated
first vice-presidential candidate
Charlie Boylan to a public debate after charging Boylan
supporters with employing lying garbage tactics in the election campaign.
McAfee claimed Boylan's
ibackers were spreading rumors
of bribes by Bob Cruise and
himself of other potential candidates to persuade them not
to run in the election.
Boylan accepted the challenge for the public debate two
weeks ago.
"I will be glad to discuss the
campaign problems in a public
debate as soon as I can spare
the time from present AMS
business," McAfee said.
No date has yet been set for
the debate.
CALYPSO  -  UMBO
By the
Trinidad Moonlighters Steel
Band   at   the   "Carnival  in
Trinidad" Dance
MANHATTAN BALLROOM
1727 W. Broadway
Fri. Feb. 26 - 8:30 p.m.
Tickets $1.50 at the Door
areallybig'night
Vancouver spring carnival
masquerade
ball
at the bayshore inn on
march 6, 1965
lance harrison orchestra
costume and door prizes
refreshments from 7:30 p.m.,
dinner  at  8:00 p.m.,
tickets $7.50 each at the
georgia hotel.
bayshore inn, and
Vancouver visitors bureau,
650 burrard.
For further information
call Mrs. A. Dawson,
MU 2-4445 or MU 3-5048
(evenings)
The bigger and more rugged
Bears were given no trouble
by the 'Birds who cannot seem
to cope with Cal's rough style
of play.
•   •   •
Saturday the Bears had beaten UBC 18-3.
This victory gives Cal an almost insurmountable lead in
the World Cup series.
In order to regain the cup,
the UBC margin of victory in
the two return matches would
have to be a total of 25 points.
*   •   •
The return games will be
played March 18 and 20 at
UBC.
T-Birds stop at Corvallis,
Oregon today, on their way
back from California, to play
Oregon State University in an
exhibition game.
Graduation — Then What?
A challenging profession?
A role in rehabilitation?
For full information (including bursaries) about enrollment in an eighteen-month
course in Occupational
Therapy
Enquire:
The Executive Secretary
Canadian Association of
Occupational Therapists,
331 Bloor Street West,
Toronto 5, Ontario.
A
NEW ARRIVALS . . .
IN SKIING and MOUNTAINEERING
EQUIPMENT:
Touring Boots - Packs - Sleeping
Bags - Climbing Skins
It
SALE
ON
L
SUN GLASSES & GOGGLES
98c to $5.50
SKI JACKETS
All  sizes and   all
colours . . .
20% to 50% off
II
FANNY PACKS
& CARRYALLS .
$3.50 to $5.95
MEN'S NYLON SHELL
JACKETS
Now only $9.95 to $12.95
[
SUN CREAMS
98c to $1.49
also
Many
Other
Items
Arriving daily . . .
Tyrol, Krista, Parsen and Champion Ski Boots
I!
SKI SLACKS for LADIES by "PANT-
MAN"      $29.95
816 W. Pender St.   - MU 2-4288
Vancouver's Largest and Most
Complete Ski Store
G
"CHINA   TODAY"
First Canadian showing of this 35 mm Documentary
Film Produced in Peking.
Sunday, February 28
Hours: 1.00, 3.00, 7.00 and 9.00 p.m.
Adults $1.00   —   Students 50c
COLONIAL THEATRE
603 GRANVILLE STREET (at Dunsmuir)
Sponsored by The Canada-China Friendship Association
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
1. GENERAL MEETING
IMPORTANT.
Any proposed amendments to the AMS Constitution
and By-laws must be received by the secretary no
later than Friday, March 5.
2. COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
APPOINTMENTS
• Anyone interested in being appointed chairman of any of the following committees must write
a letter of application to the secretary.
• Application letters and eligibility forms must be
received by the secretary no later than Friday noon
preceding the Monday on which the appointment
will be made.
• Eligibility forms available AMS office.
MARCH 1  (Application letter must be in by Friday,
February 26)
— Special Events Chairman
— Homecoming Chairman
— College Shop Manager
— Frosh Orientation Chairman
— U.B.C. Radio President
MARCH 8. (Application letters to be in by March 5)
— Canadian   Union   of   Students  Chairman
— Totem Editor
— Bird Calls 'Editor
— Tuum Est Editor
— Intramural Sports Chairman
— High School  Conference Chairman
MARCH 15. (Application letters to be in by March
12).
— Ubyssey Editor
— Academic  Activities   Chairman
— Canadian    University   Students   Overseas
Chairman
— World University Service Chairman
— Student Court
— Leadership   Conference   Chairman.
3. FINANCE COMMITTEE
Applications are now being accepted for positions
in the Finance Committee:
1) Three Assistant Treasurers
2) Secretary
3) Member at Large
Please apply in writing to Box 47 by Ferbruary 26,
1965.
4. ELIGIBILTY
Candidates for positions on Students Council are
asked to have the Registrar's Office complete
an "Eligibility" form on his or her behalf as soon
as possible.
Forms are available in the A.M.S. Office and when
completed should be forwarded to the Secretary
of the A.M.S.
5. WUSC TRAVEL AND EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR OF ONTARIO
AND QUEBEC
Canadian students at U.B.C. are invited to apply for
participation in a travel and educational Seminar
for overseas and Canadian students that will take
place from May 19 to June 6, 1965. The Seminar,
sponsored by World University Service of Canada
in co-operation with the Canadian Centennial Commission and the External Aid Office of the Government of Canada, will travel throughout and study
Ontario and Quebec during the three-week period
for the purpose of providing the participants with
the opportunity to travel in a region which they
have not previously visited or whose visits in these
provinces have been extremely brief and localized.
Cost to the participant will be minimal. Further
information can be obtained from Brock Extension
257.    Applications due March 4. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 25, 1965
'tween classes
Panel to discuss grads
Panel discussion and question period on graduate and
professional education in Bu.
102 noon today. Panel includes
Board of Governors members
Arthur Fouks and John Liersch
and grad studies dean Ian Mc-
Taggart Cowan.
• •   •
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Ralph Cessna of Evanston,
111. will speak on Christian
Science and Reality noon today in Bu. 104.
• •    •
DEBATING UNION
ZBT and Zeta Psi fraternities argue Better Red than
Dead, noon today in Bu. 216.
• •   •
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Secretary treasurer of the
B.C. Federation of Fish and
Game Clubs Howard Paish will
speak on Development of Outdoor Recreation in B.C. noon
today in Bu. 205.
• •   •
AQUA SOCIETY
The Silent World by Jacques
Costeau Thursday 12:30-2:30
in Wes. 100. Free admission.
• •   •
PRE-MED SOC
Tickets for Friday's Sawbones Shuffle still available at
AMS or BE 361.
McMaster uses
bundles after all
HAMILTON (CUP) —McMaster University will get a
new medical school they
were given $50 million to
ibuild.
In spite of the large gove-
ernment grant, there was
some doubt McMaster could
find a site.
However university officials decided to close a campus through street to make
way for the building.
Pre-med
students
worth $2
The UBC department of
Preventive Medicine is paying
$2 a head to find out the fate
of students taking pre-med
courses.
In co-operation with the
Pre-Med Society and the
Science Undergraduate Society, it is conducting a study
of career choices of students
"•> who registered at UBC in
1962 or 63.
The department hopes to determine how many students
taking pre-med courses actually go into medicine, and how
much use these courses are to
students who change their
minds and go into other fields.
Students selected have received a letter asking them to
meet for one hour March 4 in
Wes. 100 to complete a ques-
„   tionnaire.
To   encourage   co-operation
each   student   completing   the
'.  questionnaire will be paid $2.
RALPH CESSNA
. . . faces reality
NATIVE CANADIANS
Meeting of Publicity Committee Thursday noon in Bu.
218.
• *   •
BIG BLOCK
Big Block meeting today at
noon in Bu. 225. Important; all
members attend.
• •   •
JUDO CLUB
Spring general meeting Monday, March 1 in Apparatus
Gym at 6:30. Practice follows.
• •    •
LOWER MALL
Special Mid-term dance Friday, 9:00 -1:00. Everyone 'welcome.
• •    •
DEMOGRAPHIC   SOCIETY
Film,   Challenge   to   Mankind
Thursday   noon   in   Bu.   100.
Free.
• •   •
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Field trip to Woodlands
Thursday noon. Meet by Stadium on East Mall.
• •    •
STUDENT ZIONISTS
Israeli Night Friday evening
at 9 at IH. Israeli food, music
and dancing; free. Everyone invited.
• •    •
SALISH HOUSE
Dance with the Lancers at
Totem Park, Friday, 9 to 1.
Admission 50 cents.
• •   •
SZO
Emergency meeting to discuss Should SZO Die, noon today. Come and bring a suggestion to Hillel House.
• •   •
UNIVERSITY LECTURES
Raga Dunayevskaya, former
secretary to Leon Trotsky,
speaks on Marxism and Freedom noon today, Bu. 106.
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Anthropology professor Cyril Belshaw speaks on Rural
Fiji with colour slides noon today in F and G 100.
• •    •
NDP CLUB
Important general meeting
today at noon in Bu. 216.
• •   •
PRE ARCH SOC
Special meeting today at
7:30 p.m. in La. 204. Bring
drawing and painting materials. Tony Onley and Ian Baxter will be present.
• •   •
G. M. DAWSON CLUB
Mr. J. R. Pow of the Oil and
Gas Board of Alberta speaks
at noon today in F and G 102
on the mapping of resources,
and again at 8 p.m. on estimates of the oil sands of Northern Alberta.
• •   •
SPECIAL EVENTS
Noon today in Brock, Sonny
Terry and Browney McChee,
the most ethnic blues concert
to come to Vancouver.
Last minute tickets available for Vancouver Symphony,
Cave, Isy's and "Stop the
World: I Want to Get Off.
• •   •
PHOTO SOC
The Birth of a Camera, a color film by Asahi Pentax. The
Pentax Spotmatic will be introduced, in Bu. 204 at noon
today.
• •   •
IH
German Language Day today from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is al the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak $1.35
Ifs really Good!
Full course Meals
, within your income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
NEW YORK
FORMAL  WEAR
TUXEDO'S
TAILS
WHITE DINNER
JACKETS
SPECIAL RATES
FOR STUDENTS
4397 W.  10th Ave.
24 Hr. Service      CA 4-0034
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
LOST—Beige rain coat,  name  is In
pocket. Phone Don, CA 4-5758.
FOUND—Pen  &  pencil  set   (a  few
weeks ago). AMS office.
Special Notices-
13
TRAVEL PAMPHLETS & C.U.S.
Travel Plan information is available in the C.U.S. office. Brock
Extension 258.
WILL the University student who
hitch-hiked Thursday afternoon,
Feb. 18 in green 1955 Ford involved in accident on Chancellor Blvd.,
please call R. Adler, CA 4-1111
ext.  862.
MOURNED on his untimely passing,
the friend whose cheerfulness and
comfort supported us all, on February 20th, of natural causes in his
home, the Hennings 203 Turtle
Tank.
GIRL — wants ride to Calgary on
spring break. Will share expenses
& driving (if you dare). Call Tish,
733-5617.
ONLY 25c to see Laurel and Hardy,
noon Friday, Feb. 26. Aud. First
episode of serial "Congo Bill" also.
THE VICEROYS are coming, Granny's pad, March 13, 9-2. The Armouries. '
MOODY HIGH SCHOOL Home Coming. Friday, February 26th at 8
p.m. All grads invited.
COMMERCEMEN!!—Executive elections on Friday, Feb. 26. Vote Ray
Richards,   Commerce   Treasurer.
COMMERCEMEN!!—Executive elections on Friday, Feb. 26. Vote
Keith Vickers, Commerce Treasurer.
AUTOMOTIVE   8c   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'56   RAMBLER  4-door,  good   condition, snow tires. Phone 228-8620.
FOR SALE—'56 TR-3, damaged, not
in running condition. Call between
6 - 9 p.m. 434-9766.	
Automobiles Wanted
25
WANTED—50 - 54 Morris Minor in
good condition. Have cash. Phone
Mick, CA 4-6385 after 6 p.m.
Motorcycles
27
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
42
THESES TYPED by qualified typists,
30c per sheet including one carbon
copy and Standard Thesis Binder.
50c per typed Numerical Table.
263-4530 after 5 p.m.	
I HAVE TYPED many thesis pap-
era—can I type yours? Phone
226-6590. 	
EXPERT TYPING — Fast service,
reasonable rates. Mrs. Poison,
266-9042 (Kerrlsdale).	
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION  —  SCHOOLS
Tutoring 64
Special Classes
65
FREE—In the art of Squash; for
those who are artless and are Interested in playing in open tournament—apply AMS.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
Transportation
14
CARPOOL wanted for 8:30 lectures,
vie. 12th & Macdonald. Phone
Elaine at RE 8-1607 between 6 &
8 o'clock.
RIDE WANTED to Los Angeles
about March 4th. Can drive and
will share expenses. Phone CA
4-9510.
Wanted
15
WOMEN, any size or shape, for
dates to the Totem Park Dance
with the Lancers (sponsored by
Salish House) on Fri., 26th. Apply
3rd floor Haida (the Rabbit
Hutch).
ART BUSINESS, ideal as side line,
for male or female. 1065 E. 17th
Ave. TR 6-6362.	
FOR SALE—Fender bassman amp.
and jazz  bass guitar.  736-9633.
E. E. SLIDE RULE—Hughes & Owens. -24 Scales. Call Barry,
224-4213.	
FOR SALE—210 cm. Khelsel White
Star RS Marker Bindings. Used
two months. Good saving. Phone
FA 1-9376.
Room & Board
82
ON CAMPUS ROOM and board—
Zeta Psi Fraternity, 2250 West-
brook. Good food. Phone CA 4-5006.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
HOUSE WANTED — for summer-
school Prof, and family. July. Near
Campus. Furnished. Write Hutching, 5498 Commercial.
EL CIRCULO presents ...
(Dona oHaAiia la Solt&ux
by FEDERICO GARCIA LORCA (1898-1936)
under the direction of Dr. Francisco Marques. Department
of Romance Studies, on Friday, February 26, and Saturday,
February 27, at 8:30 p.m. in the OLD Frederic Wood
Theatre (at the foot of University Boulevard). Admission
$1.25. Tickets for both performances may be obtained at
our noon-hour meeting on Friday in Buchanan 204; at
the door on SATURDAY ONLY.
Special Events of the Arts "
presents
SONNY TERRY
and BROWNIE McGEE
Today
BROCK      —      NOON     —      25c
The most exciting ethnic blues in concert
to hit Vancouver ...
•     •     •
Tuesday, March 2
MEREDITH DAVIES, leading the
Exciting - Revitalized
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
Auditorium    -    12:30    -    25c

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