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The Ubyssey Jan 19, 1965

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 BEWLEY BACKED: POT RAPS STIFFEN
An Appeal Court judge warned students Friday
the use of marijuana will bring greater penalties
in the future.
"This court will support the imposition of even
greater penalties in the future in an attempt to
stamp out this incipient social evil in our community," Mr. Justice Sullivan said.
•   •   •
He was speaking at an appeal by UBC student
Barbara Budd, 21, to have her six month sentence
for marijuana reduced.
Miss Budd was convicted last December by
Vancouver Magistrate Les'Bewley.
Magistrate Bewley said at the time the use of
marijuana apparently was becoming "fashionable" among certain UBC students.
In dismissing the appeal the Appeal Court an
nounced it was backing Magistrate Bewley to the
limit in the personal war he has declared against
the use of the drug.
•   •   •
"It may be that youthful students are particularly attracted to the use of drugs by reading biographies of some of the famous artists of the past
whose works have endured, but it is time to warn
such students that the law of Canada must be observed," said Mr. Justice Sullivan.
This warning applied to both university students and skid row riff raff, said the high court
judges.
•   •   •
Miss Budd appealed her sentence, but not her
conviction, claiming the sentence was too severe
in view of her clear record and her personal circumstances.
The court was told she was still recovering from
a serious auto accident, was still taking medication and her UBC scholastic standing was excellent.
Mr. Justice Sullivan, who handed down reasons
for the court's decision, said police reports indicated Miss Budd has resorted to smoking marijuana and "to taking the needle".
•   •   •
"A girl of her intelligence must have known
the risk she was taking in doing so, but it is probable she has not yet become an addict in the
accepted sense and she has it in her own hands
to break the habit," said Mr. Justice Sullivan.
Mr. Justice Sullivan's warning declaration was
supported by Mr. Justice Sheppard, the presiding
judge on the panel, and Mr. Justice Bull.
THE UBYSSEY
VOL. XLVII, No. 37
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1965
CA 4-3916
NEW CANADIAN flag flies in the breeze i n AMS president Roger McAfee's office.
Flag was presented to AMS by Liberal MP Grant Deachman and UBC Liberal club
president Peter Braund (centre and right) "to mark the mananimous spirit of the multiparty decisions in the House of Commons."   McAfee holds flag.
From Leon Ladner
&
Window
New   SUB   gets      ]   smashed
$5,000, books
By ROBBI WEST
The new Student Union Building has been offered $5,000
and a priceless collection of books for a Canadian library
section.
Leon J. Ladner, Q.C., and
seven-year member of UBC's
Board of Governors, announced
the offer Monday.
The collection consists of
original publications (some dating from 1862), original documents and various books concerning the history of B.C.
Also included will be books
on the social and political de
velopment of Canada, Hansard
and other Government publications.
Ladner is providing the
$5,000 to buy additional books
relating to Canadian politics.
On permanent loan from
Ladner's personal library the
collection will be placed in a
section of SUB's Library.
A liquor bottle smashed the second floor
lounge window of a
Totem Park women's
residence early Sunday
morning.
Housing director John
Haar said a dance sponsored by Haida House
men's residence was in
progress in the Common
Block when the bottle
went through the window
of Nootka House.
Two men, believed to
be attending the dance,
were seen running from
the residence but they
were not identified, he
said.
Illegal suites
face city
crackdown
City of Vancouver building department is clamping down
on off-campus illegal suites, many with UBC student
tenants.
City Housing co-ordinator
Ray Colburne said Monday
one of the city's six illegal
suite investigators has begun
working full-time in the university area.
He said a number of notices
have already been sent ordering operators of illegal suites
in the area to close down the
suites.
"Most homes in the university gates area are classed as
single family, which permits
only two boarders or lodgers,"
said city building department
general office manager Hugh
Green.
Colburne said owners told
to remove illegal accommodation can appeal to the city's
technical planning board. The
board can grant extensions on
good accommodation until the
en of 1966.
If this appeal fails, appeals
can be made to the zoning
board of appeal, Colburne said.
(Six of 23 appeals to a
board session last Wednesday
involved homes with UBC students as illegal tenants.)
"When a student is notified
he is living in an illegal suite,
he is given one month to move,
after which the building will
be rechecked," explained
Green.
"When these students go
before the appeal board, it
usually permits them to remain where they are until the
end of the Spring Term," he
said.
AMS president, Roger McAfee, said there were no illegal
suites listed on the AMS's
housing lists.
"A few of them might have
crept through," he admitted.
"The   listings   come   in   by
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE:   SUITES
Library
tightens
security
The Main Library has instigated new security precautions
following a rash of library
thefts which culminated in a
purse-burning last Wednesday.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Monday he could
not release details of the new
security program as this might
tip off thieves.
Stuart-Stubbs cautioned students against being optimistic
about the new precautions.
"The library is a very large
area to protect," he said.
He said there are always
people intent on stealing regardless of security precautions.
"I wish students would not
leave valuables such as purses,
watches, cameras, etc., in an
unprotected place," he said.
"Up to now we've had one
full time guard to protect student's property," he said.
Last Monday's theft of a
camera and $20 from the College Library is still unsolved.
RCMP Sergeant Dan Thompson was waiting for the serial
number of the. camera before
further investigation could be
made.
AMS Second Vice-President
Byron Hender said: "Students
appear to be too trusting.
"I cannot emphasize this too
much—take your books with
you, or leave them in a locker." Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1965
Confusion token of woe
to come on campus buses
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
Tokens and confusion filled
the UBC buses Monday.
Today was the first day the
10-for-a-dollar tokens were
used on University buses and
most students are still in the
dark as to how the 10-cent
token system works.
The token system was devised to let students who take
only the campus bus save 10
cents.
Students can transfer to a
city bus for another dime.
"Most of the students got
pretty snarly today when they
paid  out  a ten-cent  token on
this UBC bus and then found
they had to pay another 20
cents to ride the city bus because they forgot to get a
transfer," said UBC bus driver
Al Pinkerton, Monday.
"I can't figure out why they
need to use tokens anyway,"
he said.
"I don't see why they can't
get on for 10 cents when they
show their AMS card and forget the tokens altogether."
But this is not permitted by
the Public Utilities Committee, and students riding campus buses must either present
their AMS card and one token
Doctor studies
a Red  sickness'
By RON    RITER
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Dr. Fred Schwarz is an Australian medical doctor who
claims he's also a pathologist reporting on a disease called
communism.
The World Christian Anti-
Communist Crusade president
said Monday he can't offer a
cure for communism, but
claimed to be an expert on the
theories and philosophies behind the disease.
Schwarz and former Federal
Bureau of Investigation informer Herbert Philbrick speak
here today at a noon-hour anti-
communist rally.
Rally topic is Communism,
Fascism and Extremism.
Topic for tonight's rally  at
the Queen Elizabeth theatre is
* The, Communist Plot to Over-
.   throw Canada	
When asked about the plot,
Schwarz said he had no information on Canada's internal
situation.
"But   as- international  corn-
it munism  .grows   stronger,   the
threat   of   communism   within
each   country   becomes   more
dangerous," Schwarz said.
Schwarz said Philbrick is
not a CACC member, but is a
guest of the crusade.
Schwarz said the crusade has
more than 50,000 supporters
who donate about $700,000 a
year to the anti-communist
cause.
He called the crusade nonviolent and educational.
Communism is a greater
threat to America than fascism
only because there are more
communists than fascists,
Schwarz said.
Be dismissed U.S. nazi leader George Lincoln Rockwell as
an evil man and fascism as an
evil cause.
"Rockwell calls communism
a Jewish conspiracy," Schwarz
said, "and that's paranoid delusion. The man is evil."
PLAYBOY
OF THE
WESTERN
WORLD
Directed by BRIAN D. HURST
with the
SIOBHAN McKENNA PLAYERS
Running Time: 110 minutes
Shows at 12:30, 3:30, 6:00 and 8:00 p.m.
Added Feature: One (1) Mister Magoo Cartoon
Thursday, January 21st
All for the ridiculously low price of 50 cents
or 20 cents cash, Pinkerton
said.
"Students riding campus
and city buses can save five
cents every two days by buying another kind of token, just
to make things more confusing," Pinkerton said.
"These tokens cost 75 cents
for four of them and are available to anyone anywhere, on
any city bus," he said.
"Now you understand why
all the bus drivers have gray
hair," he said.
"I have been driving a bus
for 17-and-a-half years and I
think the best bus fare is 10
cents flat rate for any adult,
student or child on every bus;
no transfers or anything."
Director decries
feet in football
SAN FRANCISCO (UNS) —
There is too much foot in American college football, according to San Jose State College's
athletic director.
Bob Bronzan has suggested
more rules are needed. Spectators have a choice as exciting as the intentional walk in
baseball, he said.
WE NEED
5 Girls Part-Time
for
Campus Work
as
Mary King Cosmetic Counsellors. 3-5 hours per week
minimum. Average $2.00 per
hour. Call Mrs. C u r r i e at
RE 3-8196.
Means director
Canadian Union of Students
is looking for a means director.
The job involves supervising
the National Student Means
Survey on campus in February. Application for the position can be made in AMS office, Box 56.
Sales Career Opportunity
National Company requires
a sales representative
for the Vancouver area.
Career position with definite
advancement possibilities.
No travelling.
Substantial salary and
Commission arrangements.
Excellent training program
with full security benefits.
Apply in writing to Mr.
Hirtle, at 1131 Melville St.,
Vancouver 5, B.C.
giving background and education   and  phone  number.
CANADIAN
PEACE CORPS
(C.U.S.O.)
Go to: Africa,   Caribbean
India, Asia
South America
Any graduating student can go and work for
two years at jobs such as:
TEACHING, NURSING,
MEDICINE, SOCIAL WORK,
RURAL DEVELOPMENT,
(ENGINEERING, etc.
Applications at AMS Office and
International House
Further Information Call International House
January 15-22
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes. Tuesday, January 19, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Birth information
Control
clause
deleted
By DON HULL
The Demographic Society
has deleted the clause in its
constitution stating it will disseminate birth control information.
The society took the action
at the request of the University Clubs  Committee.
UCC rejected the clause because it felt the AMS would
be breaking the law if it sponsored a society engaged in an
illegal action.
Under section 150-2c of the
Criminal Code of Canada, dissemination of birth control information is illegal.
The revised constitution will
go to student council for approval.
Deletion of the clause will
not prevent the society from
distributing birth-control information said S i e g 1 i n d e
Streda, a sponsor of the society.
The society's first presentation will be a film entitled
The Story of Human Fertility,
to be shown Thursday at a
general meeting of the society.
The film has been used in
nurses' training at Vancouver
General Hospital.
No one under 18 years of
age will be admitted to the
film showing.
The society met with lawyer
Gordon Dowding last Thursday  to discuss  their aims.
Dowding, who addressed a
society-sponsored meeting at
UBC last week, is supporting
the society's efforts for a more
enlightened approach to birth
control in  Canada.
Also involved is Burnaby
MP Robert Prittie who will
again present an amendment
to Section 150-2c when parliament resumes, Miss Streda
said. The amendment was
tabled last session.
SUITES
(Continued from  Page   1)
phone   and   we  have  to   take
their word for it."
"For the past five years inspections have been carried
out throughout the city to locate illegal suites, and serve
notice to their occupants,"
Green said.
"There are two kinds of
inspections: One is the block
survey in which an investigation of a given area is carried
out. It is hoped that the whole
city will be done in this manner within 10 years.
"The second type of investigation arises from complaint
from neighbours. This is especially true of fraternity
houses," he said.
McQuhae acclaimed
Grad class picks
three engineers
Engineer Ken McQuhae was re-elected grad class president by acclamation Monday.
McQuhae resigned after a
Jan. 11 meeting because it was
engineer   dominated.
Posters in Buchanan building this week asked grads to
elect a different president.
Monday 400 students attended, including 100 engineers.
(At the first meeting 250
grads and 100 engineers overruled then-chairman Byron
Hender,    forcing   nominations
to close with only McQuhae
standing.)
The grad class also approved
a constitution with little discussion of the other 1,100 graduating students not present.
Until now, the grad class
has not had a constitution,
and did not exist as such.
Engineer Kyle Gardiner
was elected vice-president, and
engineer Ray Doerges is treasurer.
COUNT 'EM—Two lovely girls-two! Five lovely legs—FIVE?
Mardi Gras floorshow cuties Mary Beth Steele, Rehab I,
and Susan Turnbull, Arts III (right), refused to say whether
fifth leg belonged to them or would appear in show
by itself.
New English mass
starts unity week
An English Catholic mass was introduced to UBC students Monday noon to kick off a campus Week of Prayer
for Christian Unity.
The new mass, with much
of the Latin replaced by English, was performed by Father
Neil Kelly at St. Mark's College.
The mass is being introduced at several city churches,
and will be compulsory in
March.
The mass was the first in a
series of noon-hour prayer
services to be held this week.
More than 200 students attended, including many non-
Catholics.
Father Kelly said the large
turnout was due to Catholics'
interest in liturgical changes
and non-Catholics' interest in
their faith's relation to Catholicism.
Chem. 101 & 102
HELP wanted?
Do you feel disappointed,
frustrated, confused, after
the shock of Xmas exams?
The answer . . "A Complete
Guide to Chem. 101 labs",
available at the College
Shop, Brock Extension —
The key to pass — clarity.
— TODAY
DR. FRED SCHWARZ
TODAY— and
HERBERT PHILBRICK
An Anti-Communist Bally
"Communism, Fascism and Extremism
rr
BROCK EXTENSION — 12:30 TODAY
A Special Events Presentation
25c
Menfs  Fraternity
Spring Rush
REGISTRATION
Sign up until January 22 in AMS office
N-oRth-mtE'ias'
ACTUALLY GUARANTEED FOR YOUR LIFE
With new "Miracle"
Stainless Steel
ball socket
The only ballpen
with a written
"Life Guarantee"
. . . Refill guaranteed to write &
full year or replaced free.
New Stainless steel
ball socket eliminates
ink stains on hands,
clothing and paper.
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 20, 1965
for the following positions:
Slate I
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Slate n
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Nominations for the First Slate must be posted on the
A.M.S. bulletin board no later than 4 p.m. Thursday-
January 28, 1965.
Nominations for the Second Slate must be posted no
later than 4 p.m. Thursday, February 4, 1965.
The open candidate's meeting will be held on Monday,
February 1, 1965 in Arts 100 for the First Slate and
on Monday, February 8, 1965 for the Second Slate.
ELECTION DATES ARE:     .
1st Slate Wednesday February 3, 1965
2nd Slate Wednesday, February 10,1965
Nomination forms, eligibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. secretary. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loo. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1965
Book push
Bed pushing, that crazy fad UBC spawned in 1961,
should happen again.
Not only for the dubious honor UBC gained but for
the boost World University Service of Canada received
for its part in the stunt.
Overnight bed pushing became fashionable in Canada
and the United States.
All over the world university students attempted to
beat a 42-mile push of a bed on wheels from Peace Arch
to the UBC campus.
In the fuss the real purpose of the bed push has been
covered up.
It was to get books for WUSC. A gang of students at
UBC who formed the Intellectual Stunt Committee
seized upon the bed push idea and WUSC got books.
WUSC collected 7,000 books that year and shipped
them off to Japan, Africa and Asia.
In addition to books WUSC collects funds for various
humanitarian projects—such as health clinics and pre*
vision of medical supplies.
Because it works mainly in the international field
and has little to offer the pragmatic UBC student WUSC
is not on the lips of every UBC student. WUSC representatives have not reported turning away angry
thousands of UBC students wanting to join.
This is WUSC week and we feel WUSC fates one of
your old textbooks and perhaps a dime.
There's no rah, rah bed push this year, just the quiet
push for books in undeveloped nations.
Bus disgust
The last few days we've had to take the bus and
leave the driving to Gordon Shrum.
It has been a trying experience.
The drivers have been a singularly intolerant, ill-
tempered group who apparently believe that the customer is wrong—whatever he does.
To a man they resent telling patrons the fare—which
has been in effect only a week.
A small lecture invariably is given to those who seek
a transfer after forgetting to get one as they got on.
One rider who dared to ring the bell more than once
was called a wise-guy by the driver. As he alighted from
a rear door the driver suddenly jerked the bus forward
in an attempt to dump the wise guy into a snowbank
called a bus stop.
A couple of stops later, the same driver just never
bothered stopping for a rider who rang only once.
But the crowning touch came one morning when two
buses confronted each other on Broadway—one pulling
out of a bus stop, the other trying to pass.
• As all drivers know, bus drivers believe in giving no
other driver a chance and so these two played their own
peculiar game of chicken with loaded buses.
The driver attempting to pass, realizing at the last
moment the driver pulling out was not to be intimidated,
hit the brakes, nearly laying out everyone in the aisle.
We have only a couple  of suggestions for people
forced to use the public transit system.
Treat the drivers with the same contempt with which
they treat you.
And as soon as the snow is gone forget Hydro and
let it run the half-full buses it usually does.
"Cynthia . . . we can't go on like this.'
Lift£^S^Mf"t-b)tG:^
EDITOR:  Mike  Horsey s'no joke,  c'mon down an' read the
News        Tim  Padmore notices.   Come  to think  of  it,   there
City .. Tom Wayman !» something to do until we get the
Managing Editor .... Janet Matheson information     about     next     week's:
Rrt .... Don   Hume work—Tim Roberts, Rick Blair, Bob
Sports  George Reamsbottom Wieser, Art Casperson, Bill Willson,
Asst. City            Lorraine Shore Prian   Staples,   Steve   Brown,   Doug
Asst. News Editor       Carole Munroe Halverson,   Mona   Helcermanas,
Asst. Managing  _ Normie Betts Klizabeth   Field,    Ros    Acutt,    Jack
Associate   Mike Hunter ^"omT,   Rpbbl   West,   Corol  Smith,
Associate _ Ron  Riter A1 Birnie, Lome Mallin, Carol-Anne
Magazine   Dave Ablett faker,   Al   Francis,  Arthur Watson,
Gord    McLaughlin,   Robbin   Russell,
Well,   now   that   the   party's   over Jock  McQuarrie,   Harold  McAllister,
there's   nothing  to  do  until  we  get Cassius  Clark.  And thank  you.  Bill
the  information   about next week's. Rayner.
Painful hikers
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re:   Hitchhikers.
I had the habit of regularly
giving lifts to students on my
way out to campus; until today, when one of them tried
to wrench the door open on
the window-wind handle,
breaking the mechanism, and
finally stepping out through
the off-side door without
warning and without so
much as by your leave.
Z. ROTEM
Associate   Professor
V V V
Beeeeeep beep
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It was a serious letdown
to find that the Roadrunner
show was sold out. I left my
11:30 a.m. lecture with a
rhuwum rhuumm and beep
beep at twice the speed of the
famous Mexican mouse. (I
forget his name.) But alas, to
no avail. Might I suggest the
Armory   next   time.
BRUCE  ARBO
Arts III
•Jp fft *fr
Athletic bargains
Editor, The Ubyssey:
UBC Students Receive an
Athletic Bargain.
The students of UBC pay
less for their athletic program than almost every university in Canada. For the
price $4.20 per male student,
they are treated to 20 Inter-
Collegiate sports and many
inter-mural   activities.
At the University of Saskatchewan male students pay
a total of $10.75 towards
their athletic program. This
is broken up into $8.75 for
Inter-Collegiate sports, which
are all Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Association activities, and $2.00
for the inter-mural set up.
Out of the $8.75 it is possible
to  promote  only  eleven
sports.
In addition the athletic committee at. UBC receives a
grant from the university
while the Men's Athletic
Board at Saskatchewan receives no such monies.
It is obvious that even
with the $2.25 per student increase that will be necessary
at UBC if it wishes to reenter the WCIAA, students
are getting a bargain.
DOUG   BASSETT
President, MAS
U.  of  Sask.
n*      V'     •»•
Whoops, sorry Tony
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The article "Faced Centipedes" appearing in Friday's
paper contained several misleading  mistakes.
The sensational style of
writing which is characteristic of The Ubyssey is one
which is not objectionable
when the real issues are
placed in some reasonable
proportion to the sensationalism.
With reference to the
article in question, the reporter obviously missed the
real issue that Colin Johnstone (a returned CUSO volunteer, not a WUS volunteer
as headlined) was presenting.
The issue was that by participating in the Canadian
"Peace Corps" (CUSO) an individual faces a personal
challenge to himself to become part of the two way
sharing which is the unique
feature of such a venture
into the developing countries.
The last point is that al-
though some application
forms and some written information is available at the
AMS Brock Office, the CUSO
Office is in International
House.
TONY BEST
Student CUSO Chairman
WUS and the reds
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
Misrepresentation again ! !
"Sight of red scares WUS"
indeed. We don't discriminate
against engineers (a. they
have money; b. this is Self-
preservation Week)—it's just
that scholarships are for students and scholars. If any
engineer can attain this glorious status, he should come
to the WUS office and we will
tell him where to go (Spain,
Russia, Japan, or Germany).
As a matter of fact, we
have never seen a redshirt
in this part of Brock. Would
some of our exalted campus
leaders, members of the most
active faculty on campus
care to venture over here
some time? While you are at
it, how about bringing all
those expensive engineering
texts to the WUS Book Drive,
Jan. 18-22. We like cracking
the bindings on brand-new,
never-red books.
Engineers are kindly requested to leave their weapons outside Brock, announce
their presence by loud shouting, and come to the WUS
office alone.
A. L. PICKARD
WUS-UBC
•ft Jf*< iji
More beep
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I had as hard a time getting
in to see the Roadrunner as
the Coyote has had of catching him. Being desperate, I
watched a while standing behind the screen. (It can be
done and it's not too bad
either, except that the words
are all backwards.)
But after seeing only two
adventures, the janitor
kicked me out—stage right—
laughing all the way. How
about a re-run for us unfortunates? Besides, you said it
was for a worthy cause.
A. W. BURTON
English  II MARDI ERAS EDITION
Mardi Gras Edition
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 19, 1965
Page 1
Hit the High Spots!
25 years' fun
in one weekend
Mardi Gras Hits The Hgh Spots this year.
UBC's biggest social event of the year, Mardi Gras '65,
recreates the best themes of its 25-year history.
In the 25 years it has been
put on Mardi Gras has become
the largest costume ball in the
city.
MARDI GRAS hits the high spots of yesteryear; a cast of 40 presents a trip down
memory lane. Entertainers (top picture) Joanna Nerheim, Penny Dwyer and Marilyn
Kennedy will re-create last year's theme, Oliver Twist. Dick Surgeson and Morley Adel-
man direct the show, it includes a number from South Pacific (bottom picture). Singing "There is nothing like a Dame" are Collin McDougal, John Bowles and Derek
Cave.
,,&&*■'.* *s-   ->»# OC-*>~*
Mardi Gras money aids
UBC dystrophy research
Every year the student
committee which plans
Mardi Gras selects some
cause which it feels is deserving of the several thousand dollars donated.
Last year $10,700 was
raised by the Greek Letter
Societies of UBC and given
to the Muscular Dystrophy
Association of Canada.
This money was used for
grants to aid workers, who
are now working on muscular  dystrophy  in  the   Kins
men Laboratory on the UBC
Campus, in scientific research.
Again this  year the  proceeds will be donated to the
MDAC   with   the   same   ar-;
rangement.
This donation will enable
the research to identify carriers of this fatal disease,
which, if discovered, could
lead to the elimination of 1
muscular dystrophy once!
and for all. «,)
Kapp q backs
noon Pep Rally
B.C. Lions Joe Kapp quarterbacks the grand gala
Mardi Gras Pep Rally, Thursday noon.
Come see Mardi Gras king
and queen candidates, vote
for your choice. Laugh while
your fraternity brothers
make fools of themselves and
their kings in uproarious
skits. Scream while your sorority sisters compete for the
best skits presenting the most
georgeous queens.
Come help Joe Kapp throw
Mardi Gras to the high spots
Growing along with the
social aspect has been the con-
t r i b u t i o n Mardi Gras has
made to worthwhile charities
in the province.
Last year the donation to
Muscular Dystrophy Research
totalled $10,400 and represented the largest single donation received by that  charity.
Muscular Dystrophy will
again this year be the recipient of the Mardi Gras proceeds.
Featured attractions coming
up this week are:
• Mardi Gras Pep Rally,
Thursday noon in the
Gym.
• Bazaar Time, 6:30 p.m. in
the Commodore.
• Showtime, 8 p.m. Thursday with the premiere of
the fabulous Mardi Gras
floor show.
• Dances Friday and Saturday night starting at 9
p.m. with the floorshow.
The Pep Rally Thursday
will be guided by B.C. Lion
quarterback Joe Kapp and
highlights the presentation of
the king and queen candidates
and an exciting new folk
group, the Green Street Four.
Thursday night at 6:30 p.m.
is Bazaar time at the Commodore. Here a wide assortment
of chance games and bakery
goods as well as the king and
queen fashion shows, the king
cake auction and, of course,
the premiere of the fabulous
Mardi Gras floor show.
Both Friday and Saturday
nights at 9 p.m. at the Commodore are the big Mardi Gras
dances. Each of these will feature the presentation of the
king and queen, the floorshow,
and lots of fun.
The floorshow, "Mardi Gras
Hits the High Spots", is a silver anniversary tribute to
Mardi Gras of the past. It is
designed to recreate some of
the test and most colorful
themes of the past years. The
show -is excellent and is indeed a tribute to Mardi Gras
past, present,  and future.
The dances will signal the
end of five months of arduous
work by the Mardi Gras committee, and fifty hours of
strenuous rehearsal by the
floorshow cast.
It is difficult to imagine
just how much is required of
these people to make Mardi
Gras a success.
But each year, with the
traditional Mardi Gras spirit
and drive, the show, the dance,
the donation, and the enjoyment all seem to get better.
40 members,
40 minutes
4 top show
Forty minutes of fast-moving song and dance combine
to make this year's floorshow
tops.
Musical director Dick Surgeson and co-choreographers
Lynne Grimwood and Morely
Adelman have put 40 members of the cast through four-
hour - workouts for the past
three weeks to bring the show
to perfection.
As a Silver Anniversary tribute to Mardi Gras of the past,
seven numbers have been produced in order to give as much
diversification to the show as
possible.
The opening number sets
the mood as the cast sings,
"Another Opening, Another
Show". The show then moves
on to various scenes depicting
the different themes of past
productions.
Included will be a Charleston number from the Roaring
Twenties. This is followed by
a motley crew of frustrated
sailors singing an old favorite
from the musical, "South Pacific".
Then from the South Seas
the show heads to the Deep
South for a number which
should appeal especially to the
male  audience.
And not forgetting last
year's theme, a scene from
"Oliver Twist" will bring back
fond memories of old London
Streets.
No show would be complete
without going to the show cap-
itol of the world—BROADWAY—where high society is
entertained. Finally, nearing
the end of the program, the
entire cast assembles on stage
to give forth with a stirring
rendition of "There's No Business Like Show Business".
The floorshow will be presented on Thursday, Jan. 21
at the Bazaar and at the
dances Jan. 22 and 23, at the
Commodore. It is the wish of
all those who made Mardi
Gras possible that you take
part in the excitement and
attend.
13 KINGS
9 QUEENS
SEE PAGES 2 8c 3 Page 2
MARDI    * GRAS      EDITION
Tuesday, January 19, 1965,
WINSOME NINESOME VIE FOR  CROWN
}-■**
LYNNE IWASAKI
. Gamma Phi Beta
KATHY CLEVELAND
. . . Delta Gamma
HEIDI SHEPHARD
. Alpha Gamma Delta
\
CHARLOTTE BERMAN
. . . Delta Phi Epsilon
MAUREEN FARR
. Alpha Omicron Pi
MAUREEN O'LEARY
. Kappa Kappa Gamma
BETTY IRWIN
. Alpha Delta Pi
BILLIE COHEN
. . . Alpha Phi
JUDI SHEPHERD
. Kappa Alpha Theta Tuesday, January 19,  1965
MARDI       GRAS      EDITION
Page 3
MARDI GRAS 65
WHERE THE FUN IS
THURSDAY, JANUARY 21
12:30 noon-Pep Meet in Memorial Gym
PRESENTATION OF QUEEN CANDIDATES
KING CANDIDATES' SKITS
VOTING FOR KING AND QUEEN
FEATURING JOE KAPP AS MASTER OF
CEREMONIES
THE GREEN STREET FOUR, FOLKSINGERS
13 who would be King ...
PETE McCULLOUGH
. . . Zeta Psi
DAVE JOHNSON
. . . Kappa Sigma
DON GORIING
. Alpha Tau Omega
6:30 p.m.-Charity Bazaar at the
Commodore
KING AND QUEEN'S FASHION SHOW
CAKE AUCTION
CONTEST DRAW
MARDI GRAS FLOORSHOW
PRESENTATION OF KING AND QUEEN
CANDIDATES
VOTING FOR KING AND QUEEN
GAME BOOTHS
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, JANUARY 22f 23
9:00 p.m.-Dances at the Commodore
Tickets at A.M.S.
$5.00 A COUPLE
THE BIG COSTUME CHARITY BALL
CROWNING OF THE KING AND QUEEN FOR
MARDI GRAS '65
MARDI GRAS FLOORSHOW
WHITE DOVE
CLEANERS
Complete
Deluxe
SHIRT
SERVICE
THE ONLY  DRY   CLEANING  PLANT
IN WEST POINT GREY
5467 West 10th Ave.
Phone: 224-4377
Student Discount On Dry Cleaning
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at the
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Students Meal Tickets
Available
For Your
lV dresses
i^ coats
l^ suits
visit
THE
Petite Dress Shop
LTD.
732 GRANVILLE
Specializing in sizes 3-22 Vi
JACK LITTLEHALES
. . . Delta Upsilon
•■» -,• »t
JOHN ROGERS
. Alpha Delta Phi
JIM 6AUDIN
. Phi Delta Theta
GERRY NAKATSUKA
. . . Beta Theta Pi
PETE McWILLIAMS
... Psi Upsilon
LORNE BALSHINE
. . . Zeta Beta Tau
MOHNEY SINGH
. Phi Kappa Sigma
SAM McMASTER
. . . Sigma Chi
DEREK CAVE
Phi Gamma Delta
MISSING
RON PLUMSTELL
Phi Kappa Pi Page 4
MARDI       GRAS      EDITION
Tuesday, January 19, 1965
Pearkes
patron of
25th Ball
Many well-known names
make up the long list of patrons and special guests attending the 25th Anniversary
of the Mardi Gras Charity
Ball.
Patrons include: Major-Gen-
eral the Hon. George R.
Pearkes and Mrs. Pearkes, the
Hon. R. W. Bonner, and Mrs.
Bonner, UBC Chancellor Mrs.
Phyllis Ross and the Hon.
Frank Ross, President John B.
Macdonald and Mrs. Macdonald, former President Dr. Norman A. M. MacKenzie and
Mrs. MacKenzie, and Mayor
William A. Rathie and Mrs.
Rathie.
Among the special guests
are: Dean Blythe A. Eagles
and Mrs. Eagles, Dean Ian
McTaggart-Cowan and Mrs.
McTaggart-Cowan, Dean V. J.
Okulitch and Mrs. Okulitch,
Dean G. Neil Perry and Mrs.
Perry, Dean N. V. Scarfe and
Mrs. Scarfe, Dean A. W.
Matthews and Mrs. Matthews,
Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Lusztig,
Mr. and Mrs. George T. Cun-
ingham, Mr. and Mrs. J. A.
Simms, Mr. and Mrs. Hector
Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph
R. Jacks, Mr. and Mrs. R. J.
Pop, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon R.
Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. Bryan
Williams, Mr. and Mrs. H.
Lowe, Mr. and Mrs. A. R.
Keller, Miss Alison Green, Mr.
Barry McDell, Mr. Roger McAfee, Miss Norma Scott, Mr.
Dean Paravantes, Mr. Michael
Horsey, and Miss Lynda
Chalklin.
The Mardi Gras Committee
is looking forward to meeting
these patrons and guests at a
dinner party preceeding the
dance on Jan. 22.
Mardi Gras
sets vignettes
The sets for this year's
Mardi Gras promise to be
the most exciting and unique yet. The backdrops,
painted in the form of
"floating vignettes" on
hanging carboard panels,
give an impressionistic effect.
In keeping with the great
diversity of songs and
dances, the sets offer an
equally varied range of
scenes and activities. Joan
McKenzie and Art School
student, Bob York, hope you
will find these sets as exciting as they did in creating
them.
Best Wishes For A
Successful Mardi Gras
from
MOLLIE'S
Card & Gift Shop
4479 W. 10th
Mardi Gras '65:
Costume Ball
UBC's largest
GEORGE PEARKES
. . . attends dance
Noon Rally:
skits, skirts,
Kapp, Kings
B.C. Lions' quarterback Joe
Kapp will call the signals for
the Mardi Gras Pep Rally on
Thursday, Jan. 21 at 12:30
p.m. in the Gym.
Featured along with Joe
will be the Mardi Gras King
and Queen Candidates and the
Green Street Four, a folk
singing group appearing at
UBC for the first time.
There will be thirteen hilarious King skits; ranging from
James Bond to Snow White'
\nd The Seven Dwarfs. Nine
Queen contestants will also
present their skits.
Thursday night at the Charity Bazaar at the Commodore
the King and Queen Candidates will model in a Fashion
Show commentated by
Blanche MacDonald.
Friday night will climax the
weeks of preparation and anticipation with the Crowning
of the Mardi Gras King and
Queen for 1965. The winners
will be presented again on
Saturday night at the dance.
No one can afford to miss
feature: Mardi Gras '65.
Mardi Gras is the oldest traditional dance on campus.
Since 1940 it has become the
largest  costume ball  at  UBC.
However, Mardi Gras has
become less elaborate in that
most merry makers choose to
prepare their own costumes
rather than adding to expenses
by renting an outfit.
This year's theme, Mardi
Gras "Hits The High Spots"
should prove no difficulty for
costume hunters as it offers
an unlimited choice of what to
wear.
As a salute to Mardi Gras'
Silver Anniversary the theme
has been based on the top hits
from previous years. From
London to the South Seas,
from Disneyland to Broadway,
or from the Charleston of the
Roaring Twenties to the swinging jazz of the Deep South—
there's your choice.
•    •    •
One of these moods surely
appeals, so get your costume
and prepare for the time of
your life.
The serious side of Mardi
Gras is support of a worthy
charity.
The target is $15,000 which
will go to aid the fight against
muscular  dystrophy.
Co-chairmen of ticket sales
Steve Hunter and Freda Ber-
man think the target will be
reached.
The Greek Letter societies
at UBC have 2,000 books of
tickets which they are selling
throughout the city. They compete among themselves for the
highest per capita sales.
Something new this year
was the Blitz, which helped to
increase sales. This involved
all Greeks going out to differ-
the year's best entertainment
• •    •
*
• •    •
Best Wishes on:
the SILVER
ANNIVERSARY
OF
MARDI GRAS
from
of Vancouver
2774 W.  Broadway
RE 8-9610
ent areas in the city on Tuesday, Jan. 12 to sell tickets.
One book sold per person
entitled him or her admission
to the Big Dance at Brock
Hall that night, with music
supplied by Derek Cave's
"Vancouver Accents".
Also selling books are the
Firemen throughout B.C., who
have over five hunedred books
and are doing a tremendous
job. Varsity Christian Fellowship and the nurses of the Vancouver General and St. Paul's
have also undertaken to help
sell tickets, adding to a great
all around effort.
•    •    •
Finally, on Thursday, Jan.
21st, during the Bazaar at the
Commodore, the drawing of
the lucky prize winners will
take place.
First prize will be a return
trip to Hawaii compliments of
Canadian Pacific Airlines, second prize, a Fur Stole, compliments of R. J. Pop, third prize,
a man's Wrist Watch, compliments of Henry Birks and
Sons, plus thirty other great
prizes.
Tickets are still on sale, so
get yours — You may be a
lucky prize winner.
We Have Costumes
For Your
MARDI GRAS
Deluxe Costumes
1292   Kingsway   at  Clark
Phone: 874-6116
Duffle Coats
from Sweden
with: Real Horn Toggles
Leather Thongs
Black, Beige, Tan
price $45-00
rir Edward
Chapman
777 W. GEORGIA
Oakridge  and   Brentwood
Committees
Heading the Mardi
Gras '65 committe are
co-o rdinators, Robin
Lecky and Catherine
Broderick.
Committee members
are: Rick McGraw, treasurer; Freda Berman and
Steve Hunter, raffle tickets; Trudy Hanson and
Keith Henderson, publicity; Joan Johnston and
Dave Graham, activities;
Barb McGraw and Ken
Burnett, Commodore arrangements; Judy Gau-
din and Steve Merritt,
Bazaar; Gail Flitton and
Derek Cave, programs;
Barb Edwards and Anne
Griffiths, secretaries;
John Bowles, dance tickets; Colin McDougall,
sponsors and donations;
George Peter, I.F.C. Rep.;
Sandra Sutherland, Pan-
hellenic Rep.
Cathy Cleveland,
make-up; Joan Pountney,
rehearsal pianist.
DUTHIE BOOKS LTD.
901 Robson, Vancouver 1
MU 4-4496
4560 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver 8
CA 4-7012 Tuesday, January 19, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
WUS sweats
Here's how week
becomes a Week
By JIM ROBERTS
Picture Granville and Georgia at 5 p.m. and you have
a graphic idea of the World University Service office during
the last two weeks.
Organizing publicity for
WUS week (this week), and
the annual WUS book drive
has produced a continual rush
hour in Brock Extension 257.
An appeal to the faculty for
the book drive, for example,
meant 1,000 letters had to be
mimeographed  and addressed.
Then after a frantic weekend of addressing the letters,
the committee was notified
Monday the letters would have
to be sorted into departments.
Three members rushed
down to the post office and
spent two hours sorting the
mail.
Scholarship committees
were organizing information
to be issued this week on the
four exchange scholarships
sponsored by WUS.
WUS Week is being held in
conjunction with International
Co-operation Year, designated
such by the General Assembly
of the United Nations in November, 1963.
The aims of WUS have always been of a nature similar
to those of ICY, being a student organization which supports developing nations with
material aid in the form of
buildings, printing presses and
of course literature.
Founded in Europe in 1920,
it was initially called European Student Relief.
Its aims at this time were to
publicize the urgent needs of
students    and    professors    in
were suffering as a result of
the First World War.
In 1926 its name changed to
International Student Service,
and in 1950 it adopted the
name of World University Service.
WUS became a student organization in UBC in 1949, and
since that year, UBC students
have contributed $1 per head
to WUS through the AMS fees.
The local committee, under
chairman Andrew Pickard is
concerned primarily with two
programs. One is the International Program of Action,
the primary WUS program for
distributing student aid. This
week's book drive is a contribution in kind. The other is
the scholarship exchange program.
The UBC WUS committee is
also active in the annual
WUSC national assembly, in
regional conferences, and international summer seminars
as will be held in Chile this
summer.
During WUS Week it is
hoped students will get better
acquainted with WUS generally.
The week is also encouraging support for the book drive.
"The work and frantic energy which has gone into WUS
Week has been an effort to
make two deceptively simple
slogans strike home to UBC
students this week: "Donate a
book and a dime', and 'Help
students to help themselves',"
Beeper re-run
maybe possibility
Last Friday's Roadrunner
cartoon showing was probably an unqualified success.
Mike Horsey, National
President of the Non-Conforming C a 1 a thumpiums,
said, "We may show Roadrunner again, occasionally,
sponsored by The Ubyssey,
but if we don't (and we probably might) we will perhaps
show something else.
"Maybe," he added.
BEER BOTTLE DRIVE-IN
We Pay 25c Per Dozen
Rear:  3207 West Broadway
KLASSEN'S
Used Furniture Mart
Zeta Beta Tau Hits
The High Spot at U.B.C.
THE BUS STOP
Wed.  Noon, Jan.  20
Buzzer
louder
The buzzer in Bu. 106 is a
little louder these days.
Two large horns have been
placed in the room and connected to the lights which
blink at the beginning and end
of each period.
The horns, guaranteed to
wake up the sleepiest student,
have been in operation since
noon Thursday.
It is not known who installed them.
many European countries who | said one WUS volunteer.
WUS will unbook you
to aid new countries
Are you booked up this week? World University Service
will unbook you
WUS will take the load off
your hands Jan. 19-22 during
its annual book drive.
The appeal is to both students and faculty to donate a-
book-and-a-dime to students in
developing countries in Asia
and Africa.
Books are sent to add to or
begin libraries in new universities.
The request for a dime with
each book is to pay for a bookplate to be glued in the book,
identifying the donor, and cover shipping costs.
Required are standard or
classical books, and reference
books of all types, text-books
or journals revised after 1950,
novels, anthologies, documentaries and books about Canada.
Booths will be set up in
Buchanan plaza outside the
amphitheatres and in the main
entrance of the library.
Collection bins will also be
located at main entrances of all
major buildings on campus.
The record collection for the
book drive is 7,000, made in
1961.
Wednesday, January 20, 12:30  -  Bu. 104
The Student Zionist Organization
is proud to present
ROBERT KELLER
West Coast Director of The Jewish Agency for Israel
THE CANADIAN ISRAELI'
A phenomenon in idealistic immigration!
EVERYONE WELCOME
Wednesday, January 20,  12:30   -   Bu.  104
man
has
CONFIDENCE
You, too will have confidence in
CONTACT LENSES
Cby LAWRENCE
ALVERT
"He specializes"
705 Birks  Bldg.    MU 3-1816
9:30.3:30 (Sat. Noon)
UBC RINGS
• ORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN
• HIGH QUALITY, SMART FASHION
• SILVER OR GOLD
• ORDER DATE CLOSES JAN. 22
• DELIVERY MARCH 15
THE COLLEGE SHOP
Brock Extension
Mon.-Fri.,  11:30-2:30
Low-cost permanent protection
for your books
Book-Ion Plastic Laminate
Easy to use
Self-adhesive
Crystal clear
Protect your investment in books with Book-Ion,
the modern washable plastic laminate. Book-Ion
keeps books, documents, drawings, etc., like
new, or can be used to repair damaged articles.
Available at your favourite book, stationery or
department store in rolls 40" x 9" and 40" x 13".
Larger rolls, size 400" long by various widths,
available on special request.
Distributed by Ben Sanders Company Limited, Toronto
(km Wis tan,h^%MwAAluti/q,
To^aJktofe soonnMi&i w/tw me,
1 ckrtfc miul tTtirfcfj pm%,
Of bodks,$uftofc offl&wm,
alk^ to trying
Penny-wise and dollar-wise,
The student who would like to rise,
' use this saving stratagem—
A bit each week in the B of Ml
to 3 muioh amoim
Gjnj
Bank of Montreal5
(gtuuuCeu. "pinoC &<ut& fan Student*
The Bank where Students'accounts are warmly welcomed
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building: MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1965
Puck wheelers
stuck with losses
UBC's hockey Thunderbirds went visiting over the weekend but their hosts weren't very hospitable.
The University of Notre
Dame in Nelson scored three
goals in the opening period
and then staved off a Bird
rally to defeat the visitors 5-3
Friday night before 400 fans.
Winger Ron Morris scored
all UBC's goals to pick up his
first hat trick of the season.
Saturday, the Rossland Warriors of the Western International Hockey League grabbed
a 5-0 first period lead and
went on to defeat the short-
handed Thunderbirds 9-5. The
Warriors led 7-2 after two
periods.
The Birds played without
seven regulars for both games.
Defenceman Dave Leishman
and Al Merlo along with
Olympic stars Gary Dineen,
Barry MacKenzie, Ken Broderick, Bob Forhan and Al McLean were unable to make the
trip.
The UBC Braves who tied
the New Westminster Royals
4-4 Saturday were shellacked
by the Royal City squad Sunday 13-2.
RON MORRIS
. . not all bad
Judo squad
busts sashes
in BC open
The Thunderbird Judo team
are bursting their sashes.
UBC arrived home from
Kamloops and the B.C. Open
Judo Championships this
weekend, swelling with pride.
The team threw its way to the
semi-finals before bowing
gracefully to the Vancouver
club 30-20.
Team members are now
looking to the B.C. Championships in Vancouver, January
30, as a chance for more
honour.
*    •    •
The Thunderbird swim team
was washed out over the
weekend.
The Birds were defeated by
Oregon State University in
Corvallis Friday night 60-34.
Saturday, the powerful University of Oregon swimmers
defeated the Thunderbirds 72-
23. Bob Walker set a new
Varsity record of 2:09.5 in
Winning the 200 yard Butterfly event for the second time
in as many days.
Gillespie, although placing
second in the Medley relay,
broke the Varsity record with
a time of 3:59.4.
Totems fogged
UBC brought some late
action and fourth quarter
fog to staid and sunny Victoria.
Saturday, the Women's
basketball team travelled
to play Victoria College Totems.
UBC then picked up speed
and flew away taking the
match   51-39.
PRESENT THIS COUPON
AND RECEIVE FROM
PETERS
ICE CREAM STORE
Broadway Location Only
ONE    SUNDAE
of Your Choice
AT 1/2 PRICE
PETERS - 3204 Broadway Ave.
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All Doctor'i Eyeglost Prescriptions
filled. First quality materials used.
Al)  work  performed   by  qualified
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GRANVILLE OPTICAL
861 Granville      MU 3-8921
BM MoiMy-Bflcfc Gworant** ■■
You are invited to hear-
Philbrick
Former Counterspy
for the F.B.I.
Janet  Greene
T.V.  Cinderella
Dr.   Fred   Schwarz
President of the
Christian Anti-
Communism Crusade
Herb Philbrick will discuss
COMMUNIST DECEPTION
¥     ■¥■     *
Dr. Fred Schwarz will discuss
The Communist Plan for the Conquest of Canada
Plus Janet Greene Singing Patriotic Songs including Original Compositions
■TUESDAY, JANUARY 19 - 8:00 P.M.-
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
249 W. GEORGIA, VANCOUVER
ATOMIC ENERGY
OF CANADA LTD.
will conduct
Campus Interviews
on
January 21 and 22
for
ENGINEERS
PHYSICISTS
CHEMIST
MATHEMATICIANS
METALLURGISTS
BIOLOGISTS
COMMERCE
CONTINUING
EMPLOYMENT
Arrangements for interviews
should be made  through.
your university placement
office.
A
Career
in
Iron
Ore!
IRON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA
QUEBEC NORTH SHORE & LABRADOR
RAILWAY COMPANY
SEPT-ILES. P. Q. • SCHEFFERVILLE. P. Q. • LABRADOR CITY. NFIO.
Career opportunities are offered in
GEOLOGY
ENGINEERING: Civil-
Electrical- Mechanical-
Mining- Metal lurgical-
Chemical
For a satisfying career in the Iron Ore
Industry, address all inquiries to:
PERSONNEL. DEPARTMENT,
IRON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA,
SEPT-ILES,  P. O.
Our representatives will be pleased to meet
with you when they visit your campus on
January 20, 21 Tuesday, January 19, 1965
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
REAMSBOTTOM
... a lack of
FOB THE BIRDS
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Sports Editor
There is this guy named Roger McAfee.
Then there is what is known as common sense.
It is my profound belief that any time the actions of the
first can be described as being synonymous with the second
it is strictly accidental.
Especially when it comes to UBC's extramural athletic
program to which UBC students contribute a mere $65,000
out of their already unreasonably high fees.
A year ago UBC athletic
officials sensibly decided to
withdraw from the WCIAA
for three basic reasons; excessive traveling costs (the
Canadian conference
stretches from Vancouver to
Winnipeg), the lack of balanced competitions and the
refusal of WCIAA directors
to allow UBC to stay in the
conference on the basis of a
reduced schedule.
These reasons are even
more valid now than they
were a year ago.
Yet McAfee now stands
ready to make good his
threat to have UBC re-enter
the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association.
I   question   his   reasoning
and wonder how many other
students would also if they knew the facts.
If we re-enter the WCIAA it will cost UBC—according
to a carefully calculated estimate by UBC Athletic Director
Bus Phillips—at least $30,000 more per year in traveling
costs alone.
One school, the University of Alberta in Edmonton, still
dominates the major sports. Alberta won the football schedule with an undefeated record and is currently undefeated
(in league play) in both basketball and hockey.
In the past this has meant UBC officials could expect good
crowds whenever the Alberta powerhouse visited our campus and poor crowds for games against the other three
WCIAA schools.
A year ago WCIAA officials refused to allow UBC to
remain a full member with limited schedule so we withdrew
(retaining an associate membership which means participating in six minor sports). UBC officials wanted to -split our
home and away series with each prairie school over a two-
year period instead of having a complete series every year.
SFU shows Shrumsense
UBC has now been given an ultimatum: either reenter the WCIAA on its terms or get out altogether.
The answer to this blunt declaration is both simple and
logical. Withdraw completely and remain independent.
The $$0;OO0 a year UBC will save on traveling expenses
can be used to buy much needed equipment and improve
our strained, athletic facilities. Competition against carefully
chosen American schools is much more balanced and appealing to UBC sports, fans.
And UBC can still have a
Canadian flavor in its schedule .sjnce several prairie
schools are willing to schedule non-conference games
with us (one example is the
traditional Hamber Cup Series our Thunderbird hockey
team continues to play
against Alberta).
Dr. Gordon Shrum, chancellor of Simon Fraser University,, has taken a realistic
and imaginative approach to
intercollegiate athletics, saying SFU will either join an
American conference or play
an independent schedule
against U.S. schools and do
things as the Americans do.
To do this Simon Fraser
plans a three point program.
• Athletic s c h o 1 a rships,
provided by outside or private sources and possibly by SFU itself.
• Superior coaching staffs, including the importation of
U.S. talent where necessary until Simon Fraser develops its
own coaching talent.
• A sincere interest in athletics by the university in providing tutorial encouragement, but not at the expense of the
academic program.
If student Czar McAfee has his way it will be a grievous
blow to UBC athletics.
UBC must retain its independent status and, while still
retaining a Canadian flavour in our schedule, work towards
the same realistic goals advocated for SFU by Shrum.
ROGER McAFEE
, . common sense?
5#*fc**>>1
MIKE CARTMEl
. . . big win
Brain Birds
blitz by
Washington
The rugby 'Birds from UBC
outplayed a brawny Western
Washington University squad
Saturday and came away with
an impressive 28-0 victory.
The heavier WWU team,
composed primarily of footballers playing rugger in the offseason, hit very hard and often, and had the T-Birds off
balance for the first part of the
game.
However, the 'Birds adjusted their style, and at half time
came off the field with a 9-0
lead, on tries by Dean McKin-
non, Dick Hayes and "T.K."
Kariya.
The second half was all
UBC's, as they ran the score
up to 28-0, getting a try^from
Andy Spray; two from Chuck
Plester, a drop-goal by Dave
Murphy, and converts by Keith
Watson   and   Mike   Cartmel.
Meanwhile, the UBC Braves
blanked the Western Washington seconds by an 8-0 score,
completing UBC's sweep
against Western Washington.
In basketball
UBC cage artists
can't cage Giants
"We were out of our class. They were just too big and
too good."
Thus spoke basketball coach Peter Mullins concerning an
80-63 loss at the hands of the University of Portland, a school
in possession of two forwards over six feet six.
One of the Bird's key per
formers was again Steve Spencer, who Mullins lauded for "a
good job in both games, scoring and rebounding."
The other game was against
Cascade College, which lost to
the T'Birds 76-62, with Spencer scoring 25 points and Doug
Latta netting 12.
Spencer scored 11 in the
Portland game while Bob Bar-
razuol, who was also credited
by Mullins for a fine series,
notched 17.
The Birds prep the rest of
the week for a game against
Western Washington, a team
that Peter Mullins says "the
Birds are capable of beating."
UBC Braves assured themselves of a fourth and last playoff berth in Inter-City Junior
League action over the weekend, sweeping a doubleheader
against Vancouver Island
squads.
Friday night at Victoria,
BC upset first-place Victoria
Chinooks 63-56.
"I thought we played very
well," said Braves' coach Norm
Watt, "I think we're finally
jelled as a team."
Vic Rahn led Braves scorers
with 14 points, while Allen
Quinn and John Klassen added 12 points each.
In the Saturday contest,
Rahn once again led the
Braves, sparking them to a
narrow 58-57 decision over Al-
berni Junior Athletics.
"Dave Rice played a good
game too," added coach Watt.
"He snared 19 rebounds .and
held (Marv) Johnson to four
points."
Rasslers
twist to win
in BC open
The UBC rasslers are the
best twisters in B.C.
They proved it this Saturday
afternoon at the Vancouver
YMCA when they won the B.C.
open wrestling championships
by virtue of victories over
members of the Central YMCA
and the Seattle YMCA.
Cann Christensen placed
first in the heavyweight division by virtue'of a win over
Ernie Fulton of the Central Y
who is nationally ranked.
Ron Frederick, Bruce Green
and Gunnar Gansen also scored victories for UBC with Parker Okano, David Holmes and
Ted Emerson of UBC placing
second in their events.
^ v your pirn u patter
X
Now Offering
Jet Fast
Delivery   Service
plus
10% Discount
on orders over $10.00
2676 W. Bdwy. - RE 6-9019
'■•%*•*>*!
A Challenging
Career
Opportunity
Representatives of
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROBATION SERVICE
will interview
candidates for
PROBATION
OFFICER
POSITIONS
Enquire now at the University Office of Student Placements for an appointment
January 26th & 27th, 1965.
L
4
1^
ROYAL   CANADIAN  AIR  FORCE
THE RCAF HAS ENGINEERING,
AIRCREW, MEDICAL and SOCIAL
WELFARE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR UNIVERSITY GRADUATES
... AN RCAF PERSONNEL OFFICER
WILL VISIT YOUR CAMPUS TO . . .
INTERVIEW
All Final Year Undergraduates
Interested in Permanent
Employment in the Air  Force
January 21 - 22, Thursday, Friday
APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE THROUGH
YOUR    UNIVERSITY    PLACEMENT    OFFICE
Local 620
ROYAL  CANADIAN AIR  FORCE Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 19, 1965
TOMMY DOUGLAS
. . . speaks Wednesday
Fulton
calls for
integrity
B.C. Progressive Conservative leader Davie Fulton Monday called for the re-establishment of integrity in politics.
While blasting the present
federal government, Fulton
said the Conservatives would
give government based on integrity if they were in power.
"We accept our responsibility to organize ourselves . . .
to give Canada a government
based on good principle and
integrity again," he said.
"Liberal charges of obstructionism are to divert attention
from the real issue," he said.
When asked if he will contest the leadership of the Conservative party at a convention, Fulton replied: "That is
not the kind of question to
which one can expect an answer."
Fulton said his party will
build national strength by reestablishing contact with the
young people of Canada.
He said this can be accomplished under the leadership
of John Diefenbaker.
'tween classes
Anti-everything
rally in Brock
Special Events sponsors The Visit, an anti-everything rally
featuring World Christian Anti-Communist Crusade president Dr. Fred Schwarz and former FBI counterspy Herb
Philbrick.
They will be speaking on
Communism, Fascism and Extremism in Brock at noon today; admission 25 cents.
• •    •
NDP
New Democratic Party leader Tommy Douglas speaks
noon Wednesday in Brock
Lounge.
• •   •
LAST  MINUTE  TICKETS
LMT's available for Cave, The
Seagull and Vancouver Symphony from Special Events office.
• •   •
CHORAL SOC
Rehearsals Tuesday and
Wednesday at 6:00 p.m. in Bu.
104. Full attendance required.
• •   •
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Second talk in series Sex,
The Creative Urge. Speaker
this week, Richard Thompson.
Wednesday noon in Bu. 221.
• •   •
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Show, Three Cures for a
Sick City, Wednesday noon in
La. 102. CBC Metropolis
series.
• •   •
PRE MED SOC
Faculty pediatrician speaks
on The Future of Pediatrics
As a Specialty Wednesday
noon in Wes. 100.
• •    •
NOON  HOUR CONCERTS
Wednesday noon in Bu. 106
the cello sonatas of Brahms
played by the Friedlanders.
• •    •
COMMON BLOCK
The Don French New Dimension Jazz Trio, tonight at
6:30 p.m. Free.
Artist pushes
perception
Artist Roy Kiyooka will emphasize perception in his Extension department drawing
workshop starting Tuesday.
Some of Kiyooka's work
hangs in the National Gallery
of Canada.
The course is one of seven
non-credit courses in art for
the 1965 spring program.
Featured in the series is a
12-week survey of Oriental
architecture, sculpture, painting and ceramics.
Another series examines
masterpieces of Greek art and
architecture. Ten sessions on
archaic sculpture, the temple
of Zeus, the Parthenon, and
the Hermes of Draxiteles will
be held Wednesdays at the
Kitsilano Library, from January 22.
The art, music, architecture
and cultures of Rome, Florence and Venice will be reviewed over 12 weeks starting
January 21.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
Lost & Found
11
HELP! I lost my black umbrella in
Hut L-4. Call 224-7859.      	
FOUND — Gold & agate drop earring in front of Brock Friday, Jan.
15.   Apply  Publications  Office.	
LOST — Necklace, brown & gold.
7viulti-strand beads. Near Brock
Friday, Jan.  15. Phone CA 4-0308.
WHOEVER FOUND BRIEFCASE
with Chem. 205 notes and glasses
phone   327-7518.
LOST — Man's silver Timex watch
in W.M« Gym. $5 reward offered.
Phone CA 4-3375.
LOST — One briefcase in main library Friday afternoon. Phone Ted
736-0634.
WOULD the person who accidently
took the grey corduroy topcoat from
the Fort Camp Mixer please call
224-1832 and ask for Bob Dugas.
Reward offered.
LOST — at Farmers' Frolic. Gold
Ronson butane lighter, "Wally -
Love Carol" engraved. Reward.
299-3063,  Wally.
FOUND  — A  telephone.   By  Jackie
Foord and Donna Firrie.  733-3982.
LOST — One    navy    blue    Bio.    105
note  book. Reward.  YU 8-5689.
Special  Nolices-
13
Transportation
14
HIGHLANDS AREA, North Van.
carpool needs person able to drive
1 or 2 times weekly. Walt, 988-7459.
WEST VAN. carpool requires drivers
urgent.  Phone  Bob  922-2984.
RIDE wanted for 2 students from
Richmond. 8:30 classes. Sandy
277-7928.
Transportation—conl.
14
RIDERS wanted. Start 41st & Main.
Phone   327-7518.
TO HELL with your car pool! Buy
your own 1948 Studebaker. Runs
good, looks good.  CY 8-9848 .
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
'53 CHEVROLET sedan in good condition $250. Dr. J. Fries, U.B.C.
Forestry, Loc. 869 or 738-0188 after
5:00 p.m.
Motorcycles  &  Scooters        27
HONDA "90", new condition, 3,000
miles. Can be seen at ATC. $300.00
or   offer.   224-9869—ask   for   Hank.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS   &   REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOM available within walking distance of classes. Private entrance
& bath. Phone & laundry facilities.
Call  224-7965.
Room  & Board
82
VACANCY in Psi Upsilon Fraternity
House. Room & board. 2260 Wes-
brook Crescent. CA 4-9052 any
time.
EXCELLENT room & board for two
girls,  $65 each.  4168 W.  11th.  CA 4-
5543.
PRIVATE room & board with all
amenities. Own washroom, $65.00.
Phone  261-6863.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
3   ROOM   bsmt.   suite,   near   gates.
Utility rm. Private entrance. Share
bathroom.  Phone  MU 2-4245.
IT'S
YOUR
MOVE
CHEMISTRY
& ENGINEERING
CANADA PACKERS INVITE GRADUATING STUDENTS
in Arts, Commerce, Business, Engineering, Chemistry
and Agriculture to discuss plans for an interesting career in a leading Canadian industry.
STUDENT INTERVIEWS
with Canada Packers' Representatives will be held on
January 20th
at times arranged by the University Placement Office.
For further information, Canada Packers' Annual Report
and brochure are available at the Placement Office.
CANADA
e
PACKERS
CANADA'S LARGEST FOOD PROCESSOR
Voluntary
Recreation Programme
New Senate Regulations Bring Changes
FREE TIME - FREE INSTRUCTION
FREE EQUIPMENT
You are invited to participate in
BOWLING
BADMINTON
TENNIS
GOLF
WEIGHT TRAINING
CURLING
SKATING
HOCKEY
BALL ROOM DANCING
MODERN DANCE
KEEP FIT
CIRCUIT TRAINING      JUDO
WRESTLING TEAM GAMES
If you don't see it — ask for it.
For exact time tables and advice enquire at:
ROOM 202, MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
ROOM A, WOMEN'S GYMNASIUM
12:30 -1:30 Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, January 20, 21, 22
or consult the bulletin boards.
Beginners or Skilled - Any Year - Grads, Too!
Come And Bring A Friend

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