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The Ubyssey Feb 20, 1919

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 Issued Weekly by the Publications Board of the University of British Columbia
Volume I.
VANCOUVER, B.C., FEBRUARY 20, 1919
Number 12
Undergrad. Wants
"Dean of Women"
DECREES WOMEN STUDENTS
SHALL DRESS AS BEFITS
•VARSITY STUDENTS
The petition for the appointment of a
Dean of Women was approved by the
Women's Undergraduate Society at a
meeting held on Monday, at noon, in
the Physics building, and a committee
was appointed to obtain the permission
of the Students' Council to lay it before
Dean Klinck.
In order to correct the impression
that the University is a "glorified form
of high school," steps have been taken
by the Society to regulate the dress of
women students and insure that it
should be in keeping with academic
dignity. A permanent committee is to
be elected by the executive, in secret
session, to see that such rules as are
made are carried out. We understand
that all women students, other than
Freshettes, will be expected to wear
their hair up.
A MEMORIAL BOOK
A number of the students have suggested to the Publications Board that
this year's Annual should be a record
of the part the University has played in
the war. This plan had already been
discussed by the board, which was
forced, for many reasons, to dismiss it
as impossible. At the same time, the
idea seems much too good to be lost
altogether; and the suggestion is now
made that the Alma Mater Society consider the practicability of publishing a
memorial volume, at the beginning of
the next session, which should contain
the honor roll, with an account of each
student whose name is on it, and pictures of all who have been killed. The
work of the University Red Cross would
also require mention. We have made
plans for the founding of a memorial in
stone at Point Grey; but surely a completed record, of which every student
could own a copy, would be a genuine
reminder   of   our   new-found   traditions.
No International
Debate This Year
ANNUAL DEBATE WITH WASHINGTON AND OREGON CANCELLED
At the beginning of the fall term the
Men's Literary Society communicated
with the universities of Washington
and Oregon with reference to the international debate. The latter university
immediately replied that, owing to financial conditions, they would be unable to
enter a team this year. The University
of Washington, however, intimated that
they would continue as in former years,
but that they were hampered in making
arrangements because they lacked a
"coach" for their debators. After much
correspondence, the local society has
received the following letter, which is,
presumably,   final:
February 4th. 1919.
Men's  Literary  Society,
University of  B. C,
Vancouver, B. C.
Dear Sirs:
Mr. O. P. Cockerill has just been
appointed as coach of debate at
Washington. He has been asked to
limit his schedule as far as possible
because of the unusually short season. He has asked me to tell you
that Washington will be i-nable to
meet your Men's Literary Society
this year. I know that yo u have
found the slow return of men to
school as great a handicap as we
have in the organization of student
activities, so that you will understand that we are sorry that we are
forced to give up this competition
with Vancouver.
I hope that we may not be so unfortunate next year.
Sincerely yours, etc.,
Mrs. J. A. Younger.
Who wouldn't be proud to give such a
book a prominent place on their shelves?
As to the cost, an edition of a thousand
neat and substantial volumes could
probably be published for about a thousand dollars.
Class Will Study
St. John's Gospel
OPEN TO MEN AND WOMEN STUDENTS ON WEDNESDAYS AT
FOUR
A Bible Class has been formed, under
the leadership of one of the students.
The subject of study is the Gospel of
St. John, which Mr. Robert E. Speer has
rightly called "the greatest book in the
world." In order that the course may
be completed by the end of the session,
it will be necessary to study three chapters   of   the   Gospel    at    each    meeting.
Meetings will be held every Wednesday, at 4 p.m., in Room 31, Arts building, and will largely take the form of
discussions. Men and women are invited, and a special appeal is made to
them to come prepared  to take part.
SCIENCE '22 BANQUET
Owing to the scarcity of young ladies
in Applied Science, the First Year men
decided to depart from the usual order
of class parties.
On Friday night, any of the audience
of the Orpheum might have noticed the
handsome young gentlemen occupying
the front boxes.    Well, *this was us!
After the show, we made our way to
the London Cafe Grill. Toasts were
drunk to "Our Alma Mater," "Our
Guests." and "Science '22"; and, after a
good, hearty "Kitsilano," we hiked for
home.
*Ed. Note:—Should read "This were
we."
EXCHANGE TICKETS
FOR "THE  IMPORTANCE  OF
BEING EARNEST"
We are asked to announce that exchange tickets will be accepted at the
theatre two days before the regular
opening of the box-office, instead of ten
days, as was reported in last week's
"UBYSSEY." UBYSSEY
February 20, 1919
IRELAND     &    ALLAN
"TIbe Bool? ^Lovers' TRetreat
BOOKSELLERS   AND   STATIONERS
Phone, Seymour 602
649  GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
THE     YAMATO
Direct Importers of
Japanese Silk and Fancy Goods
460 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone,  Seymour 2288
ENLARGEMENTS
Photographs copied equal to the
original. Duplicates, enlargements
and   miniatures   made   from   same.
Uancouvtr Photo €o.
(Established 1911)
649 GRANVILLE STREET
(Down the Marble Stairs)
3 a0ljt0n - (Eraft
The
Waist Seam
Models
will   be   very   popular   this   season
with  young men.
We are showing these models in
single   and   double-breasted   styles.
SHOP OF
FASHIONCRAFT
®l|n0. boater & <£n.
Htmtttf)
514 GRANVILLE STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CYNICA GAY
Correspondent.—Box seats for the
Players' Club performances this year are
$1.25 each—two for $2.50. White carnations now selling at approximately 15
cents  each.
Curious.—Almost any of the young
ladies attending the U.B.C. are C.B.M.
So it will not be necessary to pine your
heart away.
Anxious Senior.—Yes: 1 think it
would be more compatible with your
dignity to abstain from the Pantages for
a week, and take box seats on March 8.
It would be very infra dignitatem to be
seen seated among a crowd of babbling,
howling Freshmen. Seeing the play is
by Oscar Wilde, I would advise you to
take   Lucille  rather  than  Mary.
Puzzled.—Xo, Ernie C's fountain pen
does not need filling every time he goes
into the Administration Offices. Nevertheless, it's a good excuse.
Anxious.—Xo, dear; all the boys who,
at rather peculiar moments, snap their
fingers and cry, "Come on, Red," are
not suffering from shell-shock. They
were at the Orpheum last week.
Agnes.—I would not advise attempting to make Sid jealous. You might
fail.
Ima Gossip.—Yes, I have quite frequently noticed that group of four obstructing the halls. It has been said
that T. Pr-t-n, P-r-d-n and A. L-r-d arc
merely acting as camouflage for that
modest capitalist, D-n-h-m. But. as to
the fourth person, I am not saying a
word.
Heartsick.—Little girl, dry your tears.
Even though some other ardent admirer
attracted the attention of the president
of the A. M. by sending him a touching
little Valentine, your cause is not yet
lost. You may still ensnare the object
of your devotions by joining the
Economic Club and evincing a deep interest in that subject. Remember, he is
not as shy as his looks would indicate.
"Still waters run deep."
D' you know, there's always something crooked about the man that carries  a  corkscrew.
We Specialize in
GLOVES
DENTS       FOWNES
PERRINS
Ladies' and Men's
E. CHAPMAN
545 Granville  Street
Success Business College
Limited
E.   SCOTT   EATON,   B.A.,
Principal
Corner Main Street and Tenth Avenue
VANCOUVER,  B.C.
Phone,  Fairmont 2075
GIBSON STUDIO
Photographers
214-18   Blrkt   Building
Phone,  Sey. 3430 Vancouver,  B.C.
HARRISON   &  CO.
R. H.  SEABROOK,  Prop.
Drawing    Instruments    and    Materials
Architects', Engineers' and Surveyors'
Supplies—Nautical  Instruments
and Charts
Telephone, Seymour 5826
582 RICHARDS STREET
VANCOUVER, B.C.
MCDONALD'S
CHOCOLATES
For  Birthday  Gifts
Granville  Street
Near Robson
U.Morimoto&Co.
JAPANESE FANCY GOODS
Ladies' Wear Made Special to
Order
Hemstitching  by  Measure
MAIN  STORE:
673   Granville   Street.    Phone,   Sey.   6410.
BRANCH   STORES:
57   Hastings   S.,   W.     Phone,   Sey.   2313.
932   Granville  St.     Phone,   Sey.  8723.
VICTORIA BRANCH:
1235   Government  St.     Phone 4742. February 20, 1919
UBYSSEY
E. C. KILBY
The Hosiery Specialist
628 Granville Street
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Wellington and Comox
COAL
The Best for Kitchen and
Furnace  Use
Macdonald, Marpole Co. Ltd.
Sole Agents
1001 MAIN STREET
Phone, Seymour 210
DAVID   SPENCER
LIMITED
Snappy New Caps
FOR   MEN —JUST   IN
The fashion of the day in caps
is a flat top style, with or without
strap or buckle. The vizor has not
changed its ample proportions.
They are available in a number of
snappy tweeds and smooth-looking
dark-colored worsteds. Young men
will be quick to grasp their advantages, especially as they are
from 50c to $1.00 less in price than
similar caps are offered at in other
stores. The scale for tljese newer
caps is
$1.50 TO $2.00
— Men's Store, Main Floor.
THE SPRING PLAY
The time of the Spring play is approaching. We see groups of excited
people gathered in the halls, and hear
such remarks as: "Well, I don't wear
pink.    That's all there  is  to it.     It does
not " or "She can't have that; it will
make   me   look "   and   we   feel   deep
sympathy for the costume committee.
The business manager may be seen at
any time with a far-away yet calculating look on his usually intelligent countenance, and we pass him by on tip-toe
lest he hurl another bushel of tickets a_t
us, or request us to find some scenery
for that third act. We would warn the
members of the Freshies' class, who are
taking such a keen interest in the performance and have not lived through
another time like this, not to take any
notice of the epithets that the various
committee-heads will hurl at each other.
They will probably recover after the
play and relax into their usual amicable
relations. W« must just remember, in
times like these, that theatrical life is
productive of temperaments (that is the
nice way to put it), and avoid arguing
with anyone who is, even remotely, connected  with  the  play.
THE UNSEEN COMPANION
Night and  the woods are  silent,
The  stars are as  daisies sown
O'er the lonely meadows of heaven.
Swept   bare   where   the   winds   have   blown.
The  croon of the  deathless ocean,
Beyond where the cedars nod,
Nearer  than voice  or  breathing
The long-loved  thrill  of  God.
'MY GIRL"
My girl's  a  hulabaloo;
She goes to 'Varsity, too;
She wears the gold and blue,
As we all do.
And, in my later life,
She's going to be my wife.
How in the world did you find that out?
She told me so!
She goes to all the games,
Along with the other Janes;
I  furnish all the change;
I go there, too.
And in my later life, etc.
As I grow older,
Then I'll grow bolder,
And I will hold her
Close  to  my  shoulder.
And  in my later life,  etc.
Leckie Shoes
are   made   for   the   man   who   is
particular
Remember:    "The Quality goes in
before the Name goes on"
"That's a Leckie"
University Students
Who have time to spare
could make no better use of their
time than in the
Study of
SHORTHAND
It will be of untold advantage
to you in taking lecture notes.
Most great speakers and many
great writers are good shorthand
writers.
What about  YOU?
Don't you think it would be
valuable to you also?
Enter any time—Day and Evening Sessions.
R. J. SPROTT, B.A.,
Manager.
Phone, Seymour 1911
"MIKADO"
Our  Specialties:
Silks,  Kimonas,  Ladles'  Wear
Made to Order
Opposite the Orpheum Theatre
766 Granville St. Vancouver,  B.C.
Next Time
TRY THE BUNGALOW
For   Light   Refreshments,
Ice   Cream   and   Candies
at
774 Granville Street UBYSSEY
February 20, 1919
Clubb & Stewart
Limited
309 to 315  Hastings  Street,  West
SPRING MODELS
in  Young Men's  Suits
"20th  CENTURY  BRAND"
and other first-class makes
SPRING HATS
The     very    latest — the     smartest
types   we   have   ever   shown.     See
them   before   deciding   where   you >
will buy.
Phone, Sey. 8380
The
Northern Life Assurance
Company of Canada
U a  good   Company   to  Insure with
EDWIN J. GALLOWAY
New and Old Book Shop
Specialists   in  University   Books
The Canadian Bank of
Commerce
Capital   -
Reserve  -
- $15,000,000
- $13,500,000
THRIFT AND  SECURITY
Open a Savings Account with The
Canadian Bank of Commerce. If more
convenient, accounts may be opened
and deposits made by mail.
Ten Branches In Vancouver District,
including the  following,   which  are In
the vicinity of ther University:
Falrvlew—Corner   Sixth   Avenue   and
Granville
Kltallano—Corner Fourth  Avenue  and
Yew Street
Mount   Pleasant—Corner   Eighth   Ave.
and Main Street
UBYSSEY
Issued     every     Thursday    by     the     Publications
Board  of the  University  of  British   Columbia.
Extra mural  subscriptions,   $2.00  per   session.
For   advertising   rates,   apply   Advertising   Manager.
EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor-in-Chief Ian.   A.   Shaw
Senior   Editor Alfred   Rive
1 Margaret Browne
Editors J  Patricia Smith
I  Reginald  E.   Cribb
Chief   Reporter T.   Preston   Peardon
DEPARTMENTS
Musical   Editor Leopold J.   Mahrer
Military   Editor Claude   P.   Leckie
Exchange   Editor Agnes  M.   Ure
BUSINESS STAFF:
Business   Manager W.   John   Allardyce
Advertising Manager John N.  Weld
Circulation   Manager J.   Gordon   Fraser
Editor for the Week Patricia Smith
THE VEXED QUESTION
With this new year of peace, the people must turn their attention to matters
slighted and neglected in the stress of
war. One of the foremost of these is
the vexed question of new University
buildings. Events this winter have
proved that the present site is urgently
required by the hospital; even if that
reason were lacking, the erection of new
buildings is necessitated by the rapidly
increasing numbers of students enrolled.
Many returned men have taken up their
studies anew, and there is every promise
of still more entering the University
next term. It is impossible to overlook
the fact that the present accommodation
is quite inadequate to meet the needs of
this steadily growing institution.
A period of world-wide war is finishing, and one of equally widespread
economic interest is beginning. Reconstruction is one of the vital questions
of the time, and education is going to
be one of the great factors in bringing
about a peaceable settlement of the
problems arising from the war. The
various universities of Canada must
supply many of the leaders of the great
work, and exert a tremendous influence
on public opinion. Better accommodation for the students would be a stimulus
to education, and thus a direct benefit to
the community at large. Fuller attention
could be given to many departments,
such as those of agriculture, science and
mining; hence a great influence would
be exerted on the development of the
natural resources of the Province; thus
the results of better buildings and apparatus in the University would be far-
reaching,' and would not only affect the
social problems of the Province, but
would go far toward solving many of its
economic difficulties.
In the interests of better and more
thorough work, the completion of the
buildings at Point Grey is immediately
necessary. Space is lacking in the
present erection, and student life is
hampered by the absence of many things
which tend to produce such strong
'Varsity spirit in older institutions. The
development of the Province demands
better facilities for the study of science
and its kindred subjects, and these can
only be supplied by larger and more
fully equipped buildings. It is estimated
that four hundred thousand dollars will
equip and set up the University at Point
Grey. Are the people of British Columbia going to allow money considerations
to block the way to progress much
longer?
CORRESPONDENCE
(The editors accept no responsibility for statements  made   in  this  column.
Letters must be brief. They should be written
on one side of the paper only and, if typewritten,
must be double spaced. The name and year of
the writer must be enclosed, but the letter may
be published over the initials or a pen-name if
so desired. No attention will be paid to letters
that do not comply with these rules.
The editors consider themselves under no obligation to publish any one letter. In the case of
two letters on the same subject, if both cannot be
printed,   the   briefer  will  be  given  the  preference.)
THE  ARTS  MEN'S   DANCE
January   23rd,   1919.
The Editor,  "Ubyssey":
Dear Sir:—I was more than amazed to see in
your columns the letter from the Students* Council and that of the president of the Alma Mater,
dated January 14th, relating to the Arts' dance.
Their stand is very unreasonable, and their action
in  publishing  such a  letter  extre.nely  unfortunate.
Suppose, for the sake of argument, that the'
accusations of the Council were true. Then
where would the responsibility of giving the dance
lie? One would judge, from the two letters, that
the students and other guests as a whole were
responsible. Is this logical? Did not the Council, when it granted permission to the Arts Men's
Undergrad. to hold the dance, take on its own
shoulders the responsibility for the proper management of the dance? If the managing committee for the dance were not capable of handling
the affairs, then why did the Council allow them
to go ahead with the dance?
I consider that, to the patronesses, the students
and other guests, the Council are definitely responsible ; and to the Council, the Arts Men's
Executive.
But were these accusations of the Council well
founded ? Was there any discourtesy to the
patronesses by the students and other guests3
No! By the managing committee? Most decidedly! And that in not providing any evident
and proper means of introducing the guests to the
patronesses. The way in which some of the guests
were treated, on entering the ballroom, was both
surprising  and  disgraceful.
As for the improper dancing, one would suppose, from the letters, that there were quite a
number "contaminating" the social standing of
our College. The common question after the
letter appeared was, "Did you see any improper
dancing at the Arts' dance?" I did not, nor did
anyone else to whom I have addressed this question. If there was such a misdemeanor, it certainly   was   an   isolated   case.      And     rather    than February 20, 1919
UBYSSEY
The Art of Speaking
Debates, Speeches, Play-parts,
Recitations  Coached
Special   rate   on   single  lessons   to
U.B.C.  Students
HELEN BADGLEY
Suite 23, 709  Dunsmuir Street
Phone,  Sey.  6535Y
Mrs. A. L. Richardson,
L. R. A. M.
Pupil of Tobias Matthay
Formerly    Professor    of    Piano    and
Lecturer  at  McGill  University,   Montreal,  and  Midland Institute,   Birmingham, England.
Studio,   709   Georgia   Street,   West
Phone,  Seymour 8519L
VIOLONCELLO
MISS MAUDE SCRUBY
A.R.C.M.,  L.R.A.M.
Receives Pupils, Ensemble Classes,
Concerts, Recitals. Visits Vancouver weekly (Tuesdays).
Studio:  709 Georgia Street
Telephone, Bay. 189
CUSICK
SERVES   GOOD   EATS
692   BROADWAY,   WEST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
3.m.?o$tcr,Ctd.
TWO   STORES:
SOCIETY BRAND
CLOTHES SHOP
Rogers Bldg., 450 Granville Street
FIT-REFORM
WARDROBE
345  Hastings Street
We sell clothes for young men and
men who stay young
advertise the Arts' dance as a vulgar affair "contaminating the Alma Mater Society for the sake
of a few paltry dollars," and "that a public dance
in a down-town hall could not have been much
worse," why did not the managing connittee put
a stop to any such dancing there and then? The
same lack of supervision applies to ths one or two
cases of smoking in the isolated parts of the ballroom.
I have heard of a supper at a dance, but never
before of a "supper hour," or it might more appropriately have been called a "starvation hour."
The absolute lack of any practical method of
serving refreshments was plainly evident. Most
of the guests went without any supper, or, at
least, with a cup of luke-warm coffee. Is the
social standing of the University to be lowered
by advertising throughout the Province the momentary craving of a few children for something
to eat? Of course not. Yet that is what the
Council and the president of the Alma Mater have
done.
The idea back of the action taken by the Council was certainly in the best interests of the Alma
Mater Society, but have they not gone about it
in a very unfortunate way? I do not wish to
camouflage our faults, but, at the same time, I
do not see why they should be advertised. It
would have been more to the point for ths Council to have apologized to the patronesses, students and other guests for permitting such a
poorly-managed affair to be held under the Alma
Mater. Instead, they who are primarily responsible have side-stepped all blame and issued a proclamation declaring that "such misbehavior will
not be tolerated." Let us hope they mean what
they say. The president and Council have appealed to the other members of the Alma Mater
to act in no way unbecoming the Alma Mater
Society. I hope the Council will remember their
own appeal and never again publish such a letter,
which has done no good, but merely created a
bit of excitement and weakened our Alma Mater.
C. J.  C.
Editor,   "Ubyssey" :
Dear Sir:—The session 1919-1920 of this University will, in all probability, have more effect
on the future history of the institution than any
other session in its annals; new men and new
ideas will be entering, and the student life will be
in a state of flux. It is at such a time that an
added impetus should be given to any which
will assist in the creation of a virile College
spirit. In my estimation, such a spirit can be
wonderfully assisted through the agency of an
"All-College" Field Day. Therefore, I wish to
make   the   following  suggestions:
(1) That the annual meeting of the Athletic
Department's small committee be appointed, with full powers to arrange for a College Field Day, to take place within the
first month after College re-opens in the
fall;
(2) That this Field Day be run either as an
Inter-Class  or   Inter-Faculty  event;
(3) That the meet shall be well advertised, and
. that  everything possible  be  done  to  obtain
a  large  entry-list;
(4) That arrangements be made with the Students' Council to provide suitable prizes,
medals,  or letters  (preferably the latter) ;
(5) That all arrangements be left solely in the
hands  of the committee appointed.
Next year there will be, by conservative estimate, three hundred men in the University. From
this number it should not be difficult to arrange
for a Field Day of a high standard. At the present time there are several athletes in the University who have already won considerable renown
in different field events.
H.  L.   KEENLEYSIDE.
Having read Mr. Keenkyside's letter, we, the
undersigned, desire to endorse his proposals:
F. R. Thurston, W. G. Sutcliffe, G. E. MacKinnon, W. H. Coates, A. J. Swencisky, J. W. Shier.
FOR CLASSY SWEETS
AND   DAINTY   EATS
Give
THE ARBOR
the  "Once  Over"
779 GRANVILLE STREET
T^EEP   the   happy   memories   of
College days for all time.
Bridgman s Studio
will    help    you    with    pictures    of
established  reputation
At the same address:
413 GRANVILLE STREET
The
Clarke & Stuart Co.
Limited
Commercial  Stationers   and   Printers
Students'  Loose-Leaf  Binders
Educational Stationery
School   Equipment
Drawing   Instruments   and   Materials
320  SEYMOUR  STREET
(Opposite C.P.R.  Depot)
Vancouver, B.C.
Fresh  Cut  Flowers
Funeral  Work  a   Specialty
Brown Bros. & Co. Ltd.
Florists, Nurserymen
and Seedsmen
TWO STORES
Head   Office:
48   HASTINGS   STREET,   EAST
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Phone, Sey. 988 and 672
728   GRANVILLE   STREET
Phone,  Sey. 9513 UBYSSEY
February 20, 1919
UMlson fieiglm metnodist Church
Forty-third   Avenue,   East,   and
Victoria  Road
REV.   T.   H.   WRIGHT,   Minister
r37o—43rd   Avenue,   East
Services   at   11   a.m.   and   7130   p.m.,   and
River Avenue Church
Five   Blocks   East   of   Fraser   and
Riverway
Public   Worship   at   7 130   p.m.
University   Students   made   welcome   and
invited   to   participate   in   the   activities   of
the   Church—Social,   Intellectual,   Spiritual.
Cuthbertson's
619   Hastings   Street
648   Granville   Street
VANCOUVER,       B. C.
Furnishings    for    YOUNG    MEN
Just Received
TRESS' CAPS
A   popular   British   make—ask   to
see the "MASCOT."
Price, $2.00 up
ARROW SHIRTS
A  fine  selection  of  pattern  makes
choosing easy.
Price, $1.50 up
PERSONALITY BELTS
are    popular    with    Young    Men.
Your own initial on Sterling Silver
Buckle.
Price, $1.75 up
THE PERSUASIVE PRAIRIE
REMINISCENCES OF AN ALBERTA  SUMMER
Armed with an oath of allegiance,
and a burning desire to Canadianize the
foreigner, one of Mrs. McClung's raw
recruits left for the  Prairies last  spring.
"Do you object to a foreign school?"
inquired an official of the Department
of  Education  in   Edmonton.
"Certainly not," replied the Westerner; then a strange twinkle in the
young man's eyes forced the qualification, "Ignorance is bliss in this case."
On her arrival at her new school she
was greeted with, "Edmonton man said
we get Russian teacher this year." Her
heart sank. "I am sorry, but I am your
new teacher," was her truthful reply.
Accepting the inevitable with Slavonic
equanimity, the trustee escorted the unwelcome official to the school grounds,
unlocked the shack, built a fire, and
promised to repair the well another day.
That other day never came. Yesterday,
to-day and to-morrow are the same to
the Russian.
That evening the trustee's wife and
daughter brought blankets and prettily-
colored eggs—the former loaned, the
latter presented, so the girl explained in
very broken English. These were the
first of many kindnesses. At one time
or another all the school children
brought gifts to the teacher. Who would
not feel at home under such friendly
favors? One woman brought a live
chicken as a present, and then whispered: "Lena no come school, very much
work." The donor was heartily thanked
and told that Lena must come, and Lena
did come!
Russians do not call—they come to
visit for three or four hours. It was
pleasant to have two young men come
in one evening. The pleasure was prolonged, and became somewhat painful,
as only one could speak English. The
other evinced his feeling by offering the
teacher a stick of gum. It was almost
midnight before the purpose of their
visit was disclosed. They wanted to act
as escorts to the dance the following
Sunday. With a stifled sigh that
aesthetic dancing had not been included
in her education, the teacher politely
refused. But she was forced to stifle
many a yawn before her visitors left—
one of. them volunteering his first remark  at  the  door,  "Please  excuse  me."
A Prairie shack in a Russian community is no place to go for privacy.
One is never sure of being uninterrupted
between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. The young
people   were  very  anxious  to  learn   Ca
nadian manners and customs, and lantern entertainments were a help to that
end. A Dominion Day school picnic
illustrated the Canadian method of celebrating. Numerous were the catalogue
orders filled out after school hours, and
there was always an interested audience.
"My father sick in the head; please
give something to make him better,"
was one style of request. "You can cut
Katy white waist, same as your waist?"
and similar inquiries opened the way
for home dressmaking. "Nastasia want
teacher to write nice letter to her boy,"
so one of the school girls translated for
an elder sister. The teacher protested
that she could not write Russian. "Tom
can not read nor write; his friend will
do it for him." So an affectionate correspondence was carried on by proxy.
In many such ways the social approach
was made, for one must enter into the
life of Little Russia before Little Russia
will become a part of Canada in more
than   name.
Now you see why these reminiscences
are entitled "The Persuasive Prairie."
Through Mrs. McClung it said, "Come,
we need you." Now it says, "Come,
come  again."
L.   LETT,
RADIO CLUB
About forty members were present at
a meeting of the Wireless Club held in
the Science building Tuesday noon. The
report of the temporary executive and
the submitted constitution weie accepted. The official name of the Club is to
be "The Radio Association of the Uni-
(Continued on Page 7)
HOCKEY
Victoria at Vancouver
MONDAY,  February 24,
8.30 P.M.
Prices:
Reserve    Seats,    80c;     Promenade,
$1.10;    Box    Seats,    $1.35.      Entire
Balcony    Unreserved.    55c;    Boys,
25c.    Prices include tax.
Reserve  Seats  now  on sale at  the
GROTTO  CIGAR STORE
622 Granville Street
Phone,  Seymour  23420 February 20, 1919
UBYSSEY
SHIRTS
FOR EVERY PURPOSE
FOR EVERY PERSONALITY
FOR EVERY PURSE
New weaves
And colors
$1.50 to $12
Potts $ Small
LIMITED
Cor. Granville and Pender
SEY.1643
R.€.Purdy,Dd.
Famous Chocolates
and
Home-Made Candies
Afternoon Teas and Light Lunches
Ice Cream and Drinks of all kinds
675   GRANVILLE   STREET
EXCLUSIVE
COSTUMIERES
For  Women,  Misses  and  Children
^^M^^
575 GRANVILLE STREET
MUSICAL NOTES
STANDARDIZATION OF MUSIC
TEACHING
In his address before the Women's
Canadian Club, Mr. Wright deplored the
custom of allowing young children to
be taught by inexperienced teachers
during the most vital period of their
lives; he could have prefaced the word
teachers with the adjective music, and
still have been  perfectly correct.
The musical profession is an unlicensed one; and any person, whether
competent or not, can declare himself a
teacher. The result is t'lat these absolutely incompetent people give musical
instruction at a very low rate, and the
general public liberally patronizes them
on the assumption that inexpensive lessons will do for a beginning; after a
while, the child can go to a good teacher. Surely the fallacy of this sort of
reasoning is obvious; the really conscientious teachers, who have acquired
their knowledge and skill only after
great labor and expense, find themselves
unable to make a living on account of
the unfair competition, while the luckless pupil finds, when he eventually goes
to a good teacher, that everything he
has been taught has been all wrong, and
he  must begin  all  over  again.
Some time ago, a suggestion was
made to the University Senate to establish examinations in practical and theoretical music; this suggestion should be
amended so as to declare that no person
can teach music in this Province unless
he has passed certain of these examinations, or their equivalent. Various grades
of teachers' certificates would, of course,
be issued, and the fee which they could
charge for lessons should be fixed by
Statute to conform to the grade of certificate which they hold. Then, and only
then, can we expect to have music
teaching established on an equitable and
intelligent basis, with justice and mutual
protection to all—the teacher, the pupil,
and the general public.
RADIO CLUB
(Continued  from  Page  6)
versify of British Columbia." Permanent officers were elected: Honorary
president, Dr. Hub'b; honorary vice-
president, Dr. Elliot: president, W. G.
Walker; vice-president, J. W. Rebbeck;
treasurer, C. H. Green; secretary, H. W.
Gwythers.
The Club is to meet on Thursday
evening of each week throughout the
session
Exclusive Styles
in
for
Young men and
Voting iUomen
npHE  NEW STYLES IN  FALL
AND WINTER FOOTWEAR
are  certainly  handsome.
For the young woman, the new
military heel boot, with cloth or
buck tops, in colors of brown,
grey, or black.
For the young man, the new
shades of tan, with leather or
Neolin soles; also smart styles in
black.
We have an Expert Fitting
Service.
Tngledew
Shoe go,
666 Granville Street
"Vancouver's   Smartest   Shoe
Store" UBYSSEY
February 20, 1919
Shoes for
Young Men
OMART and SNAPPY STYLES
**^ —the latest in Shoes as now
being worn in the large Eastern
centres.
In   all   leathers—in   Black,   Tan,
Brown—all  the  popular  shades.
The   largest   and   best   stock   of
Men's Shoes in Vancouver.
Your   Money's   Worth
or  Your  Money  Back
WILLIAM DICK
Limited
33-49 Hastings, East
Vancouver, B. C.
RENNIE'S  SEEDS
They  Always  Grow
Send for Catalogue To-day
WM. RENNIE CO., LTD.
1138 HOMER STREET
872 GRANVILLE STREET   .
Phone, Sey. 530
GAS COKE
TRY IT
and you will never go back to
coal.
No smoke, no soot; light to
handle, more heat per pound.
Costs less per ton and goes
farther.
Vancouver Gas  Co.
Sey.
5000
"Coke
Sales"
Proposed Song for U.B.C.
By   the   broad    Pacific   shall   our    noble
College  stand,
Holding  both   the   East   and   West   in
fee;
Home   of   strength   and   wisdom   in   this
golden  sunset-land
Art thou, Alma Mater U.B.C.
Chorus:
U.B.C, the daughter of the West!
Glorious forerunner of a nation yet to
be!
U.B.C, the loveliest and best!
We should thank the fate that brought
us to thee, U.B.C.
When we leave thy portals for the world
of work and strife,
Let's' remember we belong to thee;
Let thy  high  ideals  govern  all  our  acts
in  life,
Let's  be  proud  we're from  the   U.B.C.
Chorus:
U.B.C, the daughter, etc.
There   is   room   in   Canada   for   men   of
power and will—
Room for women brave and wise and
free;
Let   us   fill   those   places,   comrades,   do
our share, and still
Make thee proud to own us, U.B.C
Chorus:
U.B.C, the daughter, etc.
PENWIPER.
SCIENCE LAW COURT
It would not be fair to mention names,
so we must needs couch our report in
allegorical terms this  week.
The Court sat on Thursday, and the
first case to be tried was that of "Science vs. The Lily." Now lilies are supposed to toil not, neither spin; but our
Science Lily did not live up to her traditional reputation. Therefore, when
the Turnip accused her of outstripping
the others in drawing, the jury of six
Cabbages brought in a verdict of
"Guilty." Judge Carrot, however, waived
all right to pronounce sentence, and the
Lily has promised to be good in future.
The second case dealt with the legality of selling books not required in the
calendar, the Judge compromising the
case to the satisfaction of all.
Aint It Awful!
(At  Post  Office)—What is  that awful
odor?
Maybe it's the  dead letters!
The Great-West Life
Assurance Co.
HEAD    OFFICE:    WINNIPEG,    MAN.
Assets,  December 31st,  1917,
Over 24 Millions
As soon .as possible every young
man should create an estate by purchasing a life insurance policy.
Investigate the merits of The Great-
West Life, and it will not be necessary  to seek  information  elsewhere.
Inquire at
640 HASTINGS STREET, WEST
Branch  Office for  B.C.
Remodelling Skins Tanned
FURS
A   SEALSKIN   COAT   or   a   fur
piece made up by us is a thing
of beauty.
H.  E.  TAYLOR
Repairs
508   DUNSMUIR   STREET
Phone, Sey. 4891
WELL-PRINTED
STATIONERY
Means Everything
to Your
Business Success
Get   Your   Next   Supply
from the Pioneer
Printing House
EVANS & HASTINGS
578 SEYMOUR STREET
Phone, Sey. 189     Vancouver, B.C.
None  but  Union   Mechanic!   Employed

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