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The Ubyssey Sep 21, 1954

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 SLP2 J 7954
THE LIBRARY
THE UBYSSEY
VOLUME 27
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER ?1, 1954
5 CENTS
NO. J
Faculty Squeeze Out Students
A CASE for Harry Hawthorn is the tribal customs of the
tJBC Pep Club. Here, two young freshettes, fresh from
their fertility rites, adorn the forehead of chief Don Jabour
with cabalistic symbols. Beneath that filigreed forehead are
hatching dreams and schemes for bigger crowds at football games. Photo by John Robertson
SMELLING SALTS
Club Gives
us New Life
Pep
Campi
who signed up for'the club at
registration, will constitute a
nucleus of the club.
"We've got a nice token membership   now,   but  we   hope  to
«et a lot more," chariman Don
Jabour said after the meeting.
THE   BRAINS
The club's ambitious masterminds-Jabour, ^Tom Anthony,
Bob McLean and Phil Green-
berg-have planned activities,
calculated to promote UBC's
Rah-Rah spirit, all requiring
manpower—and woman power
too.
Prospective musicians are asked to meet at the Band Hut on
Thursday noon.
RAH RAH
Cheerleaders are also needed. No previouse experience is
necessary, since an instructress
has been found. Again, the principles of the more the merrier
applies. Interested people should
The corpse of UBC's long-dead school spirit showed en-
courag_ng_s|gns of life Monday when over 200 students gathered
in Physics 200 for the first meeting of UBC's new Pep Club.
These 200 students, plus those
Join Clubs
Join Clubs,
Says LSE
There is more to UBC than
just lectures, Literary and Scientific Executive Clubs will
prove it on Club Day, September
23.
•Over fifty Clubs will set up
shop on the Arts Lawn Thursday
in the annual spree to lure students out of the Cat' and into
student activities.
Banners, music, dancing girls
and special exhibitions will be
used as the competing club
spokesmen talk themselves
hoarse and oihers into joining
the Best Club on the Campus.
LSE clubs offer varied outlets
for students with time on their
hands. Players Club, Musical
Society, Jazz Society and others
eponser productions throughout
the campus term.
Raidio and Television Society
produces "UBC Digest" each
week over CKWX. Varsity Out
door Club arranges escapades
for the athletically minded.
New club to appear is the
Skeptics Club whose members
are just that.
LSE president Dick Riopel ha-
announced that all club presidents must submit their budgets
for tiie coming year by Club
Day.
n case oi rain. Clubs will trans
fer activities to the Armouries.
Eacli club should make sure
that il. stick to the table marked
in its name. Electric lights ana
extension cords will also be pro
vided by the LSE,'but for further
enquiries, club representatives
should contact Alade Akesode
at CE. 2020.
Come out all and join the
clubs.
BUDGETS WANTED
AMS Treasurer Ron Bray announced that clubs which had
not submitted budgets to him by
Wednesday, Sep!. 22, would be
refused nn allotment from AMS
funds. IUs budget will be submitted to students for approval
at AMS general meeting Oct. 2a.
MIRACLE MU.ER THANKS
DR. NAM. MacKENllE
Roger Bannister, BEG miracle miler, thanked President
N. A. M. MacKenzie in a letter last Tuesday for his generosity to all who stayed at the University during the BEG
games.
Dr. Bannister apologized for his inability to accept
President MacKenzie's offer to entertain him, but added
that with the "additional complication of Mr. Peters it was
just not possible."
"We shall not forget your hospitality, and, if I am in
Vancouver again, as I very much hope I shall be, then I
shall be certain to visit you," Dr. Bannister wrote.
ANNUAL REPORT
President Points
To Financial Need
UBC must soon receive large funds for capital development'
if essential facilities are to be supplied to the growing student
body President N. A. M. MacKenzie said Monday.
Commenting on his annual re-*
port doctor MacKenzie said that
many essential projects were being held up for lack of financial
suport.
The President released his annual report to the University
September 1. In it he highlighted
the accomplishments and problems bf the academic year.
A new Arts building, a Medical Sciences building, new student residences, more stacks for
the library, additions to the
steam and electrical plants, lighting on the campus, and more
paved roads were some of the
projects listed by the President
as   "very  presing."
"The money for all this is
needed in addition to the annual
grant which maintains the University," he said.
The President also sated the
need for a medical building to
be erected adjacent to the Vancouver  General  Hospitl.
"We need this very badly,"
he said. "The Provincial Government has authorized a bond
issue fo finance construction but
no action has been taken yet."
Doctor MacKenzie pointed out
the increasing demand for University extension services such
as night classes, correspondence
and short courses, conferences
and workshops.
"Up till the present time," he
said, "we have been taking on
one job after another on the
assumption that each additfon
does not cost much and that
some member of the faculty can
be found to do additional work
in addition to his regular duties."
"The limit* of this situation
phone Charlotte Eyres at CEdar have in some cases been reach-
0885. ed," he said.
By-Election
To be Held
A new election of the position
of Undergrad Society Commit-
;ee president has been announced by Student Council for October 1.
Monte McKay, elected USC
president last year is unable to
continue in office due to academic ineligibility.
Candidates for the presidency
.ire required to have at least
bird year standing and a good
scholastic record.
Full details of nomination procedure will be announced later.
The thief exports of I lie is-
l.iud of Koeolra, in the Indian
t)cean are ghee, aloes, and dra-
iiJn'j  blood.
Charity
Setup
Unchanged
Student Council has voted in
favor of maintaining the pres*
ent drive system on the campus.
Last year a recommendation
war submitted to the Council for
a United Charity Drive to replace
the' existing three drives.
The Aggies, Commerce and
Engineers each hold annual
charity drives on the campus.
CHARGED
Ron Longstaffe, first member-
-at-large, was put in charge of
investigating the recomendation
this year. He moved that the existing charity setup be maintained.
In his report to council Longstaffe pointed out that students
give only the change in their
pockets.
"If we had one drive Instead of
three, we'd only make a third
of the money," he said.
SPLIT
Visions of a third of last year's
$1600 total split three ways have
made the Engineers, Aggies and
Commerce turn down the idea
of a united appeal.
They also felt that smaller
campus organizations would try
to take part of the big pot for
their own pet charity while the
money they collect now is their
own.
The original recommendation
for a united appeal was made
last year by the first-member-at-
lnrge Howie Beck who had received letters boosting the idea
from eastern universities.
On investigation Long^tajffe
found that these universities
still carry on a multiple appeal
because it brings in more cash.
E.U.S. Head
Supports
Frosh Plans
Bob Johnson, Engineering Undergraduate Society President,
went on record Monday as opposing any "rough stuff" during
the Frosh Orientation week.
Johnson was referring to the
annual Frosh-Engineer battles
and "dunking in the cement
pond.'
He said that last year the EUS
Executive was split as to the
stand it should take with regards to Orientation. "However,
this year, "he said, "The Ex-
The Canadians attend IUS j ccutive has definitely gone on
meetings as observers only, as rfcm'cl as supporting Jerome
Canadian universities have re- ^ngel and his Orientation plans."
fused to join the organization j "The fellows aro not out to
oi the grounds that it is "Com- hurt or embarass anyone" John-
inunist   dominajed." j.on said.
Toronto  Student  Scribes
To  Write   in   Red   Press
The Varsity, University of Toronto undergrad daily, has
arranged to swap news with an international communist publication.
Varsity editor Clyde Batten
has just returned from a trip
to Moscow where he arranged to
to "swap" stories with World
Student News, published by the
Communist-inspired International  Union of Students.
Faculty Marrieds Get
Camptown Priority
By JEAN WHITESIDE
Over 500 students seeking accommodation on the campua
have been turned away, while the housing committee has refused to evict 50 faculty members in the married quarters to
nake way for married students. r:
"The faculty have top priority," said Dr. Gordon Shrum,
chairman of the housing committee, in referring to accommodation in the married quarters.
After faculty members, graduate students and veterans with
families  are  given  preference,
senior students come next.
for FACULTY
According to Dr. Shrum, the
married quarters were designed
to accomodate student veterans
arid faculty members when university enrollment was at its
peak 9000 students Just after the
War.
One third of those now living
in these quarters are faculty
members, some of whom have
been there for more than four
years.
PROPOSAL
Student Council has proposed
that these faculty members be
given immediate notice to vacate, with senior members vacating within 6 months and others
leaving within a year.
The councils' proposed future
policy would refuse residence in
the camp to senior faculty members and give only temporary
accommodation to new faculty
members below the rank of assistant professor.
The Councils' recomendations
will be considered at a meeting
laer this month, but Dr. Shrum
does not feel that they will be
approved.
NOT CRITICAL
Although the waiting list for
campus accommodation is one of
the biggest the housing committee has had to deal with so far,
Dr. Shrum does not feel that the
(Continued en Page 3)
See HOUSING
"Until now, Canadian Communists have been writing articles for the magazine and claiming to represent student opinion
in this country," he said.
The Varsity editor was one of
seven students to attend a meeting of IUS last month in Moscow. They represented Canadian
University Press, a news exchange operating between 23
Canadian university newspapers.
All passionately interested
in tht gentle art of pubttering
should come today at noon in
The Ubyssey offices, north
basement in Brock Hall.
Pointers on working for the
Publications Board will be
given. Newcomers will be introduced. Pamphlets will be
issued. Speeches will be
made.
New pubsters will be admitted.
COUNCIL
Pool
Decision
Tabled
Student Council decided Monday night to wait until November -1 before moving that tha
present BEG swimming pool be
roofed.
At this date the comparative
costs of roofing the present pool
and building and roofing a smaller pool would be made knOjwn
to Council, AMS President Dick
Underhill stated.
Although Underhill felt fttt
roofing the larger pool would b»
in the students interest at Imi
time, the comparative coats
might make the smaller pod)
more feasible.
Disagreement with Underbill's
stand was expressed by AIM
Treasurer Ron Bray, who felt
that Council should make a decisive motion in favor of roofing
the pool now.
"Council knows wham Us#anda
in regard to the pod, Wt *tu4-
ents don't," argued Bray.   ■ -....
However, Underhill felt thet
it would weaken Council's punY
tion if it had to reverse it's decision when the comparative
figures were tabulated on November 1.
Replying to arguments that
valuable time was being wasted*
he admitted that it was too late
to roof the pool this year.
Council has asked university
architects for an estimate of the
costs of moving the pool bleachers from the south side of tht
pool to the stadium.
(Continued on Page •)
COUNCIL
Frosh  Queen  Finalists
Chosen   By  F.U.S.  Judges
Freshmen will pick  their own frosh queen when thay
splash and dance at the Frosh mixed Friday night.
The ten candidates have been *~
Judy de la Vergne, Barbara-Ann
Ladner and Gerry Mooney.   .
'tween classes
picked and will be shown off to
students at Friday's Brock tea
dance, the Friday night mixer,
and Saturday's football game.
Frosh will be allowed to vote
for Queen on presentation of
their Frosh passes to the Splash
and Dance Mixer.
Frosh Queen and her two princesses will be announced and
crowned at the Frosh Reception
on Saturday night, and the lucky
freshette will probably be entered in the Home Coming Queen
contest in October.
One of these girls will be
crowned Frosh Queen Saturday hold a meeting of last year'*
night: Louise Van Allen, Ann- J members in good standing We«V
Louise Ritchies. Mnrgot Johnsot?, nesday *t 19:30 In tbe Club
Ruth Packhan, Ann Riesterer, I room, for the purpose of elect-
Virginia Sykes, Marilyn Lyons,  ing officers.
Frosh Slosh
At VOC Dance
VARSITY  OUTDOOR  CLUB
will hold a "splash and dance",
party 8 p.m. Sept. 24 at Empire
Pool, Memorial gym. Frosh 28c,
upper classmen 50c. Bring your
girl friend and slosh around.
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB Will
UBC SEX HABITS BARED
AS  SCIENCEMAN' GOES ON
UBC Frosh will have the chance this week to view the
seamy side of University life, when the Players Club once
again present their version of Eric Nicol's classic, "Her
Scienceman Lover."
A satirical expose of campus sex-life, the play is an
annual event, and an indispensable part of frosh orientation.
Tom Shorthouse and Eleanor Johnson play the leading
roles, Muported by other players' club members.
The show will go on Friday and Monday noon, in the
auditorium. Admision is 35 cents. Page Two
THE UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER, CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Authorized as second class mail, Post Office Dept., Ottawa.
Editor-in-CMef    PETER SYPNOWICH
Managing Editor—Raymond T. Logie   News Editor—Stanley Beck
Executive Editor—Geoff Conway Sports Editor—Ken Lamb
CUP Editor—Bert Gordon Feature   Editor—Pat   Carney
Senior Editor—Sandy Rose
Reporters and Desk:    Rod Smith, Pat and Norah Carney, Jean
Wihteside, Marybeth Kowluk, Mike Deildal.
Sports: Ken Lamb, Russ Langhout, Jim Powell.
So Great is the Need
Dr. Shrum states that married profesors have "top priority"
over students.    Wherein  lies their claim  beyond  that  oi
squatters'? They were allowed into Acadia Camp after the
war because of the severe housing shortage. This no longer
exists.
It is true that the University must be prepared to make
concessions to bring talented men and women to UBC as
teachers. It is also true that professors are notoriously underpaid.
But it is incredible that talented professors can be lured
or retained by promising them accommodation in  UBC
shacks. And professors, poorly paid as they are, are still richer
than students.
The Administration's reaction to the student request for
more space in the married quarters at Acadia Camp is a disappointing one.
It comes at a time when economy-ridden students—500
of them—are forced to leave the campus to find more costly
accommodation, involving costly transportation.
The Administration has indicated to Student Council that
students should not be married while attending university.
Alternatives should have been suggested to carry this joke to
its logical conclusion.
The only reason professors remain in the huts is that
of thriftiness, a thriftiness which is enjoyed at the expense of
the student, who can illl afford this compulsory generosity.
Wanted-A Roof
On March 19, 1954, the students on this campus were
asked to vote sufficient funds so that the new $280,000 Empire Pool could be roofed immediately after the British
Empire Games.
This the students did by an overwhelming majority.
In June the Board of Governors agreed to put up $100,-
000 towards the roofing of the pool. The stage was then set,
with University and student funds, to roof the pool.
It now becomes apparent that a roofed pool will not be
available to UBC students until the 1955-56 session.
What has caused this delay after the University and AMS
were prepared to go ahead with construction of the roof?
A proposal to build a smaller roofed pool adjacent to the
present pool was submitted to the Swimming Pool Committee.
It was felt that it would be cheaper to maintain a smaller
pool while the larger open pool would continue to bring in
considerable revenue during the summer,
j The matter of whether to roof the present pool or build a
new, smaller pool is now under consideration by the committee, which will meet again on November 1.
The Ubyssey takes a dim view of the new proposal and
the delay that considering it has caused.
While we appreciate the fact that the University must
consider the economic side of the issue we feel that the interests of the students would best be served by roofing Empire
Pool. And by roofing Empire Pool we mean roofing it immediately.
The Ubyssey, and we are quite sure, the students, feel
that the Swimming Pool Committee should press the University architects for a complete estimate of roofing the pool
before November 1.
Too much time has already been wasted. Empire Pool
should be roofed immediately.
ONE UNROOFED
Look Again
The wrath of Vancouver citizens over the Vancouver Island race incident is admirable but amusing. • lt is somewhat misplaced.
Not that the ousting of the Jamaican bride of English
teacher John Hewitt from Shawnigan Lake Boys' School "before the boys come and see a colored person here," isn't disgusting.
Racial prejudice is always ugly. It is at its ugliest when
practised at an "exclusive" boys' school.
But the people of Vancouver should take a glance at
their own back yard.
Racial prejudice exists in Vancouver, and in strength.
It is present in our better hotels. It is evident on streets and
buses. Laundries still display the gratifying assurance of "no
colored help," and our business and industry manages to hide
its colored workers from the delicate eye of the public.
Many of your fathers are members of golf clubs which
bar non-caucasions from membership. Residential developments promise prospective home buyers that negroes, chinese
and Indians will not move in next door.
Yet Vancouver men and women continue hypocritically
cluck their tongues at the intolerance of the "deep south" and
blithely ignore the glaring race crimes perpetrated daily in
their own city.
The occasional newspaper columnist devotes the occasional paragraph to the occasional incident. That's all. Civic
leaders say nothing. No service groups raise their voice—they
are choosy themselves.
This silence is ominous. Mere apathy does not explain its
presence. Racial discrimination is a hateful thing, and draws
an energetic hate i'rom those who detest it.
This silence can only mean that most citizens are content
with things as they are.
hoots
in hell      UBC May Have Two Pools
Didacticism is poor entertainment, but freshmen are
entitled to be made familiar
with at least a few of the realities on this campus.
I know it is dangerous to
be paternal to a freshman.
For all I know he may be a
governor-general's gold medal winner who spent his summer driving taxi and manipulating stocks.
Yet even the most worldly
and sophisticated of frosh
could use a few pointers. For
example, most of them will
give up looking for a good
cup of coffee on the campus
after a few months. They
should stop now.
THE FACTS
And freshmen are no
doubt under the impression
that those complacent dullards behind desks in the armoury during registration
were clerks hired for the
purpose. % They were professors.
More of these hard, grim
little facts can go a long way
toward adjusting freshmen to
campus life. For rapid orientation:
Watch your class-room behaviour. The chief danger
here is not in falling asleep-
lecturers are understanding,
and expect that. Their vanities, however, require that
you give them a look of intense interest between periods of dozing. They know you
are faking, but it is recognized by you both as a sort of
tribute.
One of the first things your
professor wil tell you is that
he detests students who parrot back his lectures jX examinations. This is worth
only a hearing, however.
Remember that the bookstore is a privilege, not a
right. Don't expect service
when the store is operated on
a non-profit basis. And if the
price of a text is higher than
it is downtown, remember
that privileges are expensive.
Don't make the mistake to
think that engineers are as
colorful as their sweaters.
An engineer's life at UBC
lies before him on his drafting board. It goes no further.
If a redshirt sees a table
without cutlery upon it, he
begins searching for the T-
square.
And don't let a survey of
the Totem lead you to overestimate the stature of fraternities and sororities on the
campus. The Greeks paid
through the nose to get all
those pictures of themselves
in the yearbook.
PRIZED POSSESSION
The University prohibits
drinking on the campus, so
don't leave your bottles lying
around. You may be led to
lieve that students go to the
Georgia to do their drinking,
but this isn't so. They go
there to be seen.
One of the most common
fallacies held by students
new to UBC is that university is a place where people
are better, where there is no
thievery and the like. They
leave their books in unlocked cars and lose their wallets
with a soon-to-be-shattered
faith in the moral superiority
of Those Who Go To University.
It takes more time to become acquainted with all of
the facts of life here. However, the safest rule of thumb
is one which should be the
prized possession of all who
call themselves students;
things are not what they
seem.
—Peter Sypnowich.
A proposal is now under consideration by the Swimming
Pool Committee to build and
roof a smaller pool adjacent
to Empire Pool which would
remain unroofed.
At a meeting of the Com-
mitee on August 23 to discuss
roofing the present pool Mr.
C. J. Thompson as University
architect brought forward the
plan for the additional pool formulated by Marwell Construction Co.
CHEAPER PLAN
Marwell proposed that a pool
37 by 75 feet be uilt. Estimated
cost of such a pool would be
approximately $130,000.
CLASSIFIED
1951 ANGLIA CAR. CLEAN
economical transportation. Owned by '53 Grad. A bargain at
$395. Phone Alec, Bay. 2330,
Kerr. 2361-Y after 6.
CABIN FOR SALE ON HOLLY-
burn Mountain. Sleeps six. Has
radio, chesterfield, carpets and
other extras. Phone Pat: AL.
2414-R or Bill: WI. 2878.
TYPING AND MIMEOGRAPH-
ing. Electric typewriter. Carbon
paper and ribbons* used generously. Accurate work, reasonable rates. Mrs. F. Gow, 4456
West 10th Ave., AL. 3682.
KELP • FEMALE
Friendly, neat appearing woman
for dignified and profitable
work. Act now to take advantage of fall and Christmas buy-
inp. Beautiful Avon cosmetics
are a delight to sell. We help you
succeed.    Phone TAtlow 2922.
STUDENT WANTED for SALES
promotion (science equipment)
in the university departments,
schools, laboratories, etc. Sidam
Ltd., Toronto 15. (3)
BINOCULARS, C A IS Eft AS,
precision instruments, stop and
alarm wrist watches, microscopes, etc. Special discount for
students. Write Box 5, Toronto
K. (3)
Sosamot Cabs
ALma 2400
Alma's Community Taxi
24-hr. Service 10th & Trimble
On The Campus
everyone gets his hair cut
at PETER DYKE'S
because it's done exactly
as it's wanted.
IN NORTH BASEMENT
OF BROCK HALL
Two Chain
This ad worth 5% discount
on university activities orders
at
WEST POINT PRINTERS
& STATIONERS
"Programs a Specialty"
ALma 1245 4514 W. 10th
1522 W. Broadway       CE. 1611
2263 W. 41st at Yew St.
KE. 1871
*'o0£i_
Empire Pool is 165 by 50
feet and would cost approximately $200,000 to roof.
Mr. Thompson pointed out,
however, that there would be
other costs such as shower facilities, seating, fencing, etc.,
that would bring the total cost
to a comparable figure to that
for roofing the existing pool.
He also noted that there was
no intention of considering the
Marwell proposal on the basis
of a package deal or similar arrangement.
Advantages Of the two-pool
proposal were listed as follows:
1) Architecturally the composition of the units was considered to be good and the
aesthetically desirable aspect
of leaving tbe unique Empire
Pool an open-air pool would be
realized.
2) Heating, lighting, and operational costs of smaller pool
would be less.
3) With similar requirements
to those of UBC, other richer
universities have favored smaller pools and aparently have
found them adequate.
' Advantages tof the one large
pool proposal were listed as
follows:
1) Roofing the large pool provides the greatest accommodation for the students during the
academic year. The larger pool
Is more suitable for instructional purposes and there is some
training advantage due to the
Olympic standards of the pool.
2) Student needs and their
contribution to financing  the
project provide justification
for selecting the project molt
favorable to them. Because
either roofed pool must be shared with the public, the students would get more value for
their money by sharing the larger pool. Most students being
away in the summer, leaving
Empire Pool unroofed, it is oi
little value to them.
Regardless of which alternative is used, the roofed pool
would have to be open to tht
public at selected times and
separate public facilities would
have to be installed.
Essentially the problem boils
down to providing the best pool
posible for the students at tha
least cost to the university.
However, at the present time
this seems to be almost an insoluble problem.
Building and maintaining »
smaller pool would probably
be cheaper than roofing anil
maintaining Empire Pool. However, theer is no doubt that
Empire Pool would provide
better facilities for students.
LOOSE MONEY
The Universtiy Is also con*
cerned with the fact that If
the preesnt pool is roofed its
popularity in the summer would
fall off sharply. This summer
•the pool brought in as much m
$200 a day in revenue.
However,, the committee ls
awaiting final plans and estimates on both plans before tt
makes any recommendations
to the Board of Governors. Ttye
next meeting will take place on
November 1.
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ALma 2404
PHOTO FINISHING
* Film   and Accessories        • Projectors and Camera*
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PHONE: ALMA 2540 4550 W. 10TH AVENUE
1V_ Blocks from University Gates
Featuring the Best Shoes Made in Canada
SPECIAL   OPENING   OFFER
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Bring in this Ad and You Will Receive
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FOR WOMEN — Loafers • Oxfords • Strollers by Joyce
Pumps • Flats - Illusion Heels • High Heels
Price $5.95 to $12.95
»
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Oxfords (brown, black) - Blue Suedes
Price $8.95 to $16.95
FULL RANGE OF COLOURS AND SIZES
"There's no place like 'Holmes' for shoes."
• CO-ED
FASHIONS
IN THIS SHOP, just off the campus, coeds will find a
fulfillment of their every fashion need. Whether for campus wear, after five, or for formal occasions, we have the
perfect costume for you.
# DIXON  NAVY RAINCOTS - England's best, 100
per cent wool.
LANSEA CASHMERE AND BOTANY SWEATERS — A wonderful selection to choose from in a
wide variety of shades.
TWEEDS AND TARTANS—Skirts, suits and jumpers for the newest look in casuals.
NEW COSTUME ACCESSORIES — Scarves from
Italy, jewellery from New York, and imported
leather belts.
Wyl
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4409 W. 10th Ave.
(at Trimble) Tuesday, September 21
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3
PRESIDtNT SHAKS
11.30 WimSDAY
Setting a precedent on the
campus, the President of the
University, Dr. N. A. M. MacKenzie, will deliver a lecture*
to the entire student body on
"The Rights and Responsibilities of UBC Students."
The lecture will be delivered in the Armouries at 11:30
on   Wednesday.   All   lectures,,
and labs scheduled for that
time are cancelled.
»m
COUNCIL
(Continued from Page 1)
Council voted to accept an invitation from President N. A. M.
MacKenzie welcoming student
participation on the Housing and
Food Services Committees
Students would serve on the
committee in an advisory^capac-
ity only. Dr. MacKenzie felt that
students couldn't grasp the administrative details oi the com-
mitees in the short, period the
student members were on the
campus.
ANOTHER FROSH nonentity signed his name for the
363rd time, in this case, at the Pep Club Booth as registration en^ed Saturday. Enrollment climbed to over 5700 this
year, placing UBC ahead of McGill. The gal in front? She's
trying on her new Frosh beanie.
Photo by John Robertson
2nd BIGGEST
Enrollment
As 5700
Climbs
Register
UBC will probably become the second largest English-
speaking university in Canada when the last of an expected 5700
student register this week.       <?>
Assistant reregistrar John Parnell said today that final figures
have yet to be tabulated but
he expects an enrollment of at
least 200 over last year's 5500.
NO INCREASE
McGill University in Montreal
was second-largest English speaking university last year with an
enrollment of about 8600. Mc-
Gill's enrollment has remained
the same for several years and
is not expected to increase this
year.
Largest English-speaking university in Canada is the University of Toronto with 10,000 students.
Largest Canadian university is
the French-speaking University
of Montreal with an enrollment
of 10,5000.
LATE COMERS
Parnell said that 5200 students
had registered up until the last
day of registration Saturday,
but late registrations and graduate students have yet to be
added  to this figure.
If the expected enrollment of
5700 is reached it will give UBC
highest enrollment since the departure of the veterans, and a
start on the predicted enrollment of 7000 students by 1960.
You Sir,
Have Got
Mice Sir
. A grim warning was issued to
UBC students today by George,
the usually genial custodian of
Brock Hall.
"Unless students stop leaving
their lunches around the place,
we're going to close Brock Hall,"
he said.
"Old lunches are not only untidy, and create extra work for
the janitors," he continued, "but
they attract mice."
He disclosed that mice cause
no end of trouble. They scare
girls, causing them to leap
screaming upon the sofas; they
go sniffing around the ' Brock
kitchen, thus jeopardizing public health; and they wreak havoc
at Phrateres pyjama parties.
He also hinted darkly at Bubonic Plague.
"Mice are known carriers of
Newcastle disease, which ravaged Europe in the 14th century,
decimated the population, and
caused a major social upheaval,"
he said.
No more lunches in Brock
Hall, by George.
'Sadistic Hazing'
Scored by Angel
A warning that sadistic hazing would not be tolerated at
UBC during Frosh Orientation Week was issued today by Coordinator of Activities Jerome Angel, commenting on a report
of "sadistic" initiations at Ryerson Institute.
Angel, who is in charge of
the frosh orientation program
at UBC, emphasized that Orientation activities are entirely voluntary. "Freshmen will be encouraged but not coerced into
participating in all activities."
he stated.
ACCIDENT POLICY
"We don't expect any incidents, but Student Council will
co-operate with the Engineering
Undergraduate Society executive
in keeping a watchful eye on the
orientation  program."
Frosh regalia, consisting of
crew hats and placard-size report cards, were sold out during
registration. Over 90% of the
freshmen have bought regalia.
SPIRITS
"We expect that this year's
frosh class will be the most
spirited class yet at UBC," Angel  said.   "Frosh have turned
put in full force to all activities
so far. Their support for the
Pep Club is particularly gratifying."
Candidates fos frosh president
came out behind the Council
orientation program. D e b b y
Greenberg, nominated for Frosh
Undergraduate Society president
Friday, said that the orientation
program created spirit among
the frosh class.
NO ROUGH STUFF
"As long as there isn't any
unorganized rough-stuff, I'm all
for it," Debby said.
Wally Pierce, nominated for
FUS president, said that the frosh
looked forward to wearing the
regalia. "It's fun being different"
he said.
Phonecian sailors revered the
Weten Bird since it swallowed
it. young alive.
-T
U.B.C. SERVICE STATION
COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICING
Wo Cour To UBC Studonts
ROY HAND, Prop.
2180 Allison Rd. ALma 0524
(Just off University Blvd.)
An extensive psychological
survey of the Jukes family carried on over a period of 2QQ
years, revealed that 342 little
Jukes were born in that period,
At the conclusion of the Sacco
and Vanzetti case, Edgar Gyejt
wrote a poem about daffodils.
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pe*k
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#> FULL CLASSROOM SUPPLIES
# COMPLETE DORM SUPPLIES
• ABUNDANT MAGAZINE SELEC-
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from 9:00 a.m. till 10:00 p.m.
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With a Paper-Matt Pen,
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ON SALE EVERYWHERE
HOUSING
(Continued from Page 1)
situation   is   critical,   as   most
students have found accommodation off the campus.
Accommodation at Acadia has
been increased to include 14
more women, a new addition to
Fori Camp takes care of 27 more
men, and '0 more suites have
been added to the married quarters.
EVICTED
One hundred men have been
accommodated temporarily at
the Youth Training Centre, but
will be forced to vacate in January to make room for students
enrolling for the Extension Department's youth training courses. V\
There are over 1300 students
living on the campus, with 880
at Fort and Acadia Camps, 156
in the women's dormitories, 100
at the YTC and 200 in the married quarters.
B.C. Matriculotion ond Science School
— SINCE 1914 —
HIGH-GRADE TUITION AND REASONABLE FEES
Senior and Junior Matriculation
Tuition in University Subjects
Languages — Mathematics — Chemistry — Physics
4349 W. 10th AVE. AL. 3248
BEST WISHES TO THE NEW STUDENTS
Mrs.  Munro' s
A FULL LINE OF STUDENTS' SUPPLIES,
MAGAZINES, CIGARETTES, DELICATESSEN
4601 W. 10th Ave. ALma 0080
DE HAAS STUDIO
ALma 2174
4439 West 10th Ave.
(down from Sasamat)
—modern photography
—better photo-finishing
10th Avenue
B.A. Service
10th Ave. and Discovery
GORDIE   McCORQUODALE
JACK McCOLL
AL. 1136
Dressmaking and tailoring to
your own individual
suggestions.
PARISIAN
LADIES' DRESS SHOP
Opposite Safeway
Come in and see our separates.
Martin's Bakery
& Delicatessen
5784 University Blvd.
MRS. M. TAKEUCHI
DRESSMAKER
4337 West 10th Avenue
ALma 3710
•mmmmmms*
FOR THE BEST IN BOOKS
History - Philosophy • Economics - Literature
People's Co-op Book Store
Imported books from China, Eastern Europe.
U.S.S.R.. Britain, etc.
339 WEST PENDER
EXTRA HELP REQUIRED
The Hudson's Bay Company requires a number of people
to help out on sale days or at other busy periods during
the fall and winter season. Students with previous sales
experience who wish to earn some extra money in this
way should apply now to the Personnel Office, Sth Floor,
Hudson's Bay Company.
Enjoy the lightweight warmth
and luxury of cashmere . . .
the hard-wearing qualities
of lambswool in this
Cashmere - Lambswool
V-NECK
PULLOVER
by ALAN PAINE
$18 95
Thtt smart campus male knows the value of a 50% casihmere-50% lambswool
mix in his V-neok sweaters. Cloud soft cashmere gives you an irreplaceable
"well-dressed look" and snug warmth without weight — lambswool gives
strength and longer wear, so important to a student's budget.
Sweaters are styled with fully fashioned sleeves, rolled V-neck, and com*
in smart shades of powder blue, green mist, yellow, beige and grey.
Sizes are 38 to 48. «|_ ,| ]
HBC Men's Sweaters, Main Floor   \
INCORPORATED 2*»   MAY 1670.
I Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
Redmen Sneak By
Thunderbirds 8-5
Montreal-Hamilton TV
Game  Lessens Crowd
By STANLEY BECK
MONTREAL—As Colonel Logan, the President's personal
representative to the Paraplegic Bowl game put it, "We won
everything b\it the game."'
A new chapter in sports at the University of British Columbia may have been written on the soggy sod of Molson Stadium
Saturday as the Birds dropped a narrow 8^5 call to the Redmen
ofMcGill.
For as the Colonel so succinctly expressed it, UBC, although they lost the game, earn
ed the respect Of the disappointing crowd of slightly over 4000,
of the McGill team and coacfling
staff, and perhaps what is more
important, of the Montreal sports-
writers who covered the game.
As of Saturday, UBC became
recognized as a power to deal
with in Canadian Intercollegiate
sports.
In all likelihood, an East-West
football final,   the Little Grey
ONE PASS DID IT
And it was only due to one
long pass and the speeding hands
of a delioate mechanism known
as a clock that stopped Birds
from stopping and stunning McGill.
Before the game a UBC rooter,
and there were many of them,
could have named his own odds
if he wished to bet on the Birds
from the West. After the game all
McGill rooters , felt much the
same as coach Larry Sullivan
when he said, "We were lucky
to win."
And he was so right because
they were lucky to win.
In the first 10 minutes both
teams played as. if touching the
ball meant Immediate deportation to a leper colony. Fumbles'
were the order of the day with
UBC having a slight advantage.
Then what before the game
Cup, as Eric Whitehead, president of the B.C. Athletic Round
Table chooses to call it, will be
played in Empire Stadium on
either the 20th or 27th of November. •
If UBC had been clobbered by
McGill the idea of such a final
would have been laughed at by
all concerned with football in
the East. But now, even if McGill does not win the Eastern
Intercollegiate c h a mpiohship,
UBC will be recognized as a good
foe for the team that does.
had been considered inevitable
happened. Ed Parente, McGill's
heralded quarterback, who Sullivan tabbed "the finest" natural
Canadian passer he's ever seen,"
faded back to the UBC 40 yard
stripe and tossed the ball into
the arms of end Roger Baikie,
who had gotten a good 10 yards
behind safety Gerry Nestman,
on the five yard line and Baikie
scooted over. The convert was
true and McGill appeared on
their way to the expected route.
The expectation grew minutes
later when Sam Yuska, hardhitting McGill end trapped Bird
halfback John Newton in his
own end zone for a safety touch.
The quarter ended with the Red-
men sporting an 8-0 lead.
But as it turned oyt McGill
did not even get a faint sniff of
paydirt for the remaining three-
quarters of the game.
SPECTACULAR TOUCHDOWN
Birds, sparked by the spectacular running of rookie Newton,
took charge in the second quarter and hit paydirt minutes before the half ended.
Birds lone score was a thing
of beauty to behold.
The break came when Redmen
centre Willie Lamb sent a bad
snap to kicker Ken Wright whose
hurried punt went out of bounds
on the McGill 40.
Quarterback Ted Duncan's
pass to Bruce Eagle was called
complete on the 20 because of
interference. The Gerry Stewart
who had arrived in Montreal
scant hours before game time,
entered the game at quarterback. A bullet completion from
Stewart to Newton put the ball
on the McGill 12 yard stripe.
Two plays later the ball was
still on the 12
Then Stewart, on third and
last down, sent two flankers
wide to the left and it looked
as if he planned to pass. The
whole Redmen backfield shifted
right as Stewart twice faked a
pass. Then left half Gary Williams came racing around, took
the handoff and with the assist
of a key block by Buz Hudson,
picked his way around right end
for the score.
Stu Mathew's convert attempt
hit the post and the gun went
off with McGill leading 8-5.
In the second half Birds did
everything but win the game.
Sparked by the brilliant offensive play of Newton and Dun-
c.tn and defensive play of Gerry
Stewart and Charlie James, Birds
fought the Redmen to a standstill
PLAYER DIES
IN SCRIMMAGE
SPOKANE, Wash. (CP).—
Caesar A. Hangan, Whitworth
Pirate halfback, died in hospital after receiving a brain concussion probably received
while scrimmaging with the
Pirates.
Hangan, a first year man at
Whitworth, is a native of Red-
lands, California.
Apparently Hangan received
his fatal blow when tackled
hard. He later fainted and
was taken from the field to
the hospital.
SHOWN ABOVE in a pose often used to wreak havoc
on UBC rugger teams is Dr. Max Howell, ex-Wallaby and
California star, who has been apopinted to the staff of the
physical education department.
Tuesday, September 21
SPORT
SCENE
UBC soccer squads will practice
all week at 3:30 in the field
near the research and biology
buildings.
Both UBC Chiefs and Braves
have lost many players from
last year and all interested are
asked to turn out. UBC enters
a team in the Coast League "B"
division and the Vancouver and
District   League.
A meeting for Representatives
of all intramural groups has
been called for 12:30 Wednesday.
It will be held In room 210
of the Gymnasium. All concerned are urged to attend this organization meeting.
Entries for the Volleyball are
being taken this week. Schedule
starts Monday Sept. 27.
BUT NOT AS A FOE
Howell Returns to Campus
Just to prove the vigour he
used against UBC rugger
squads wasn't all hate for the
blue and gold, Australian
Wallaby and California Golden Bear star Max Howell has
come back to UBC — as a
teacher.
Mighty Max, who incurred
a well-developed antagonism
from UBC fans for his great
efforts for the opposing teams,
was known as Methusalum to
the older fans and at one time
some circles were proposing
an houourary degree for his
frequent attendance.
Besides joining the instructing staff over at the gym as a
swimming and heaUh lecturer,
he has already shown his intentions to support the ever
increasing athletic buildup by
performing for the Varsity
cricket team.
Strangely enough, Howell
will not be holding regular
classes in English rugby but-
will be out coaching by the
side of mentor Albert Laithwaite. There is even a possibility he will be keeping in
shape by playing for the
Braves.
To date he has no plans for
playing for a city squad.
Or. Howell,   who   was   a
Coryell Plans
Study Table
swimming instructor at the
University of California while
he was gaining his degree joins
the UBC staff with a B.A.,
M.A., Ed.D., and an Australian Diploma of Education.
He taught two years in Australia and five years at the U.
of C.
Max will take over from
Doug Whittle as swim coach
and has already promised a
heavy schedule of workouts
for the aqua-stars. He says
our pool compares very favourably with. Cal's and the
diving tower is one of the most
modern he's ever seen.
Dr. Howell is 27, married
and lives in Fort Camp. He
started his sensational rugger
career at the age of 10 and at
16 he was playing for the
Wallabies on a New Zealand
tour.
He made the first of his
many appfbrances against
UBC in January, 1948, when
the down-under tourists were
finishing a European and
North American swing. He
was back to Vancouver nearly
every year from then.
Now he's finally finished his
pilgrimages and has come
here to stay. As far as Max
can see, It looks like UBC will
be his home for a long time.
In case you think athletes and
especially football players are
on the undernourished list where
brains are concerned, don't come
voicing your opinions around
Thunderbird coach Don Coryell.
Such a remark to Don, once
a football player himself . and
consequently easily chagrined by
the statement, is likely to lead
'o multiple injuries about the
head and ears. He sees red!
And   he  can   prove   that  the
Jame's defensive play at end  footba11 Players th« huave P^ed
had McGill coach Sullivan talking to himself at the end of the
game. Time and again Parente
would fade back to pass and,
end up eating the ball as James bruises-
would come barreling in to
smear him.
With five minutes left in the
bst half Birds, led by the accurate right arm of Duncan, began to march but time ran out
with McGill retaining the Sir
Winston Churchill Trophy.
UBC alum, Fisheries Minister
James Sinclair hit the nail on
the head in the dresing room
after the game when he told
coach   Coryell,   "This   was   the
for him are actually better than
the average student, if only because the practising keeps him
home at  night  with  aches and
Don says only two students on
last year's Thunderbirds were
knocked out by the exams, a
6% failure average which comes
out a lot better than the overall
student average.
And this year, to maintain or
even improve the state of affairs,
Coryell has introduced a plan
used in other universities-a study
table.
And because the team is doing
most of its practicing at night,
will be ruled out for ineligibility if he can help it.
Every practice night from 6
to 8 players will take their books
in hand and plant themselves
for two hours of studying under
watchful eyes. (So if you think
you'll have trouble passing your
course, why not turn out for
football?)
The reason for studying before
the battle of the bruises is obvious. Nobody feels like working
over a text with a sore head.
However, Coach Coryell says
the enforced program will not
apply to the old hands.
finest football game I have ever he feels he can enforce it. Don
seen UBC play." I has   declared   that   no   player
For a limited •ngagement only, with a star*
studded cast headed by Mr. Pogo Possum tho
Okefenokee Travelling Players present melodramas that will make you laugh and make
you cry.
Admission to this wonderful land of fantasy will
cost you only $1.35 at your booksellers.
By popular demand a return engagement oft
I Go Pogo, The Pogo Papers and Uncle Pogo't
So So Stories has been arranged — also $1.35
•ach at your booksellers.
The MUSSON BOOK COMPANY ltd.
POGO
STEPMOTHER
GOOSE
Produced and Directed bv
MR. WALT KELLY
J. V. FOOTBALLERS TO MEET
TODAY IN STADIUM AT NOON
Junior Varsity Football squad will hold its first meeting
at noon today in the Stadium. All interested please turn out.
Potential players of the new team, which will play Junior
Big Four, and Victoria crews, need not have any experience
or eligible'standing.
Practices are promised to belight, as the coaches intend
the games will be played mostly for enjoyment.
COOL DIP IN POOL
YOURS FOR GRATIS
First week of classes getting your goat already? Then
take it easy and go for a swim some afternoon. (This" advertisement is not sponsored by the UBC Student Control
Board).
Your prof will recommend you take a dip after hours
anyway, but if you do want to take a femme ducking in the
BEG pool it won't cost you a cent.
Price of admission for students Monday through Saturday is nothing. If you go Sunday, it will be slightly more,
around 25 cents. If you invite your lecturer (one of the
newer methods of getting on the good side), it will be 25
cents for him too.
Likewise for any high school or public school students.
Charge for adults   is 50 cents.
The pool will be open from noon to 7 p.m. Monday to
Friday and noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday frqm now
till October 31. Bring your own towel and beach unibrella.
Ask the students who hove eaten here
# COMPARE OUR PRICES . . .
• AND THEN TRY OUR FOOD
FULL-COURSE MEALS
SNACKS
Campus Inn
4423 SASAMAT (at Trimble) i
OPEN SUNDAYS
GREETINGS TO OUR GUESTS
NEW STUDENTS from
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Student Special Lunch >< !
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600 S.W. Marine Dr.
ALma 1962
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MAIN
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1234 Granville
MA. 3813
CAMPBELL
CLEANERS
Across from Varsity Theatre
AL. 2460
Discount for Students
TYPEWRITERS
Special Student Rental Rates
Portables or Office Machines
3 Months - $12.50
CONSOLIDATED  TYPEWRITERS
LIMITED
416 RICHARDS ST.
MA. 6371
»/
J

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