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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1958

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 THE UB YSSEY
VOL. XL1
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1958
No. 20
Council Opposes Fee Hike
Alternatives
To Be Probed
Students' Council Monday passed a resolution opposing in
principle any increase in student fees at UBC.
Motion reads:  "WHEREAS it
"YAH-HOO"! screams Ubyssey Managing Editor, Barrie Cook, ecstatically waving a genuine
Indian scalp he and Assistant City Editor, Kerry Feltham, tore from the head of the president
of University of Alberta, whilst in Edmonton last week celebrating U. of A.'s golden jubilee.
The versatile Ubyssey staffers also found time to participate in Western CUP conference held
in the Alberta city last week end. — Photo by Colin Landie
Ubyssey Editors Fired With
CUP Conference Suggestions
The Western Canadian University Press Conference was termed "a remarkable success"
by The Ubyssey delegates, Barry Cook and Kerry Feltham. "A great deal of information was
passed around," stated Feltham, "but most of it  wa.s of an esoteric nature."
   j     Technical problems of produe
Committee To Probe
Student Government
First meeting of the committee on Representative Government
will be held Thursday.
The purpose of the committee
is to put forward final, concrete
and practical proposals with regard to establishing representative student government at
UBC.
The studenls' concil will sub-
mil the proposals to the Spring
general   meeting   for  approval.
TO   REPRESENT
STUDENT BODY
AMS vice-president and chairman of the committee Jairus
Mutambikwa, said "I would like
the committee to be representative of the entire body, as
much as possible, so that, the
final proposals that vve will
make will reflect the wishes
of the students on our campus,"
Members of the committee
have   been   drawn   from   every
(Continued  on  Page  3)
See COMMITTEE TO PROBE
Springhill
Blitz Nets
$1030 Total
"Absolutely delighted!" was
the reaction of Peter Haskins,
Chairman of the Undergraduate* Societies Committee, to the
blitz drive held Friday in aid
i of Springfield, Nova Scotia,
scone of last week's mine disaster.
Haskins,    who    chaired     thc
drive,   said   that   the   final   fig-
| uros for lhe drive could not yet
' be released as some private do-
j nations   were   still   coming   in,
(Continued on Page 4)
1       See SPRINGHILL BLITZ
tion and format were foremost in
j the conference.
!CONGRATULATIONS
The Ubyssey was congratulated by the other newspapers involved for the "remarkable"
interest which was shown by the
J delegates.
Some of the work sessions
lasted until three and four
o'clock.
"The conference was not with- J
1 oul  its lighter    moments,    how-j
■ ever,"   stated   Cook.     The   pair |
had  taken     Iho    Ubyssey  banjo j
j with Ihem, ;\ncl reported that
they   had   "regaled"    the   other ;
: delegates with songs.
Plans   lo   implement   some   of
: the information gathered al tlu*
conference* got under way a.s
soon as the pair returned.
SUGGESTIONS
!      "We   feel,   lhal:   lhe   paper  can j
be made lo run more efficiently
Ihrough   the   use  of   the   sugges-
i lions made." slated Ihe pair.
j j
s "New staff will be able to
take  advantage  of the   training ,
! methods vve picked up," staled
Feltham.    "We hope  fo expand
I {Continued  on  Page 4)
J       See UBYSSEY EDITORS
has been suggested that tuition
fees at UBC will be increased
for the 1959-60 session, so that
UBC students will contribute
a greater proportion of the University's operating costs.
AND WHEREAS the Students' Council feels that the
criteria for university education
should emphasize academic
rather than financial qualifications,
BE IT RESOLVED that the
Students' Council go on record
as opposing any increase in the
prestnt fee schedule.
After an hour's debate the
motion was passed by an 8 to 4
majority with one abstention.
Opposing the move were
Treasurer John Helliwell, Executive Member Brad Crawford, WAA President Theo
Carroll and UCC Chairman
Dave Edgar. USC Chairman
Peter Haskins abstained.
Councillors who oppose the
anti-fee hike motion felt that
such a motion would have little
srgnjlcance unless it included
the proposal of an alternative
method of meeting the university's  increasing expenses.
However, supporters of the
motion felt that such a qualification would weaken the original motion.
WILL INVESTIGATE
A second motion resolving
that Council "investigate immediately all possible alternatives to a suggested increase in
fees with a view to recommending a suitable alternative course
of action" was passed unanimously.
AMS President Charlie Connaghan said he would set up a
committee to conduct this investigation "within two clays."
It is not yet known whether
the new committee's recommendations will be submitted
to tht UBC administration or
to the B.C. government.
This will depend on whether
Ihe universily submits ils request to the B.C. government
for its 1f)59-t>0 operating grant
on the basis of the present fee
schedule or on lhat. of a fee
increase.
The anti-fee hike motion was
originally to be presented to
the fall AMS general meeting
by an independent group of
students but could not be discussed at that time because the
meeting  lacked  a quorum.
An editorial in Friday's Ubyssey urged students to go on record as soon as possible as opposing a fee increase.
GRADS POSTPONE
FRIDAY ELECTIONS
Grad elections will NOT
be held Wednesday, as previously announced.
A meeting to determine a
definite date will be held
Wednesday noon in the Music
Room.
Tween Classes
Engineers Training
Debated At Noon
DEBATING UNION — "Resolved that an Artsman is educated whereas an Engineer is
trained" is the topic of a debate today 12:30, Buchanan 106.
Everyone is welcome.
ff.        ff.        #
CAMERA CLUB MODELLING—Stan Rogers of Lee
Hodgson School of Modelling
& Charm will speak on modelling in Bu. 315 at 12:30 Tuesday. All girls interested, are invited to  attend.
ff*        ff* *f*
FILMSOC—will be showing
"Zero de Conduite" today at
12:30 in the Auditorium. Admission 15c or by series pass.
A few series passes are still
available for $1.00 each.
9ft 9ft 9ft
GYMNASTIC CLUB — Gym
club   workout  at   12:30   in  the
Apparatus room Main  Gym on
Tuesday and Thursday.
ff,        ff*        ff*
SOUTHERN BAPTIST STUDENT UNION—is having its
mid-week devotional period today in Bu. 117. YOU are always
welcome, so come along won't
you.
ff* ff, ff,
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP—is presenting the
Rev, Ian M. MacRury M.A, from
Glasgow, Scotland .speaking on
"Christianity—open and above
board" today at noon in. Arts
100,
ff* ff* ff*
ROD & GUN CLUB—General
Meeting Tuesday at noon in,
Bu. 204. Election of officers.
Everybody interested in the
club  please   attend.
CCF — Important general
meeting to be held Tuesday at
12:30 in Bu. 212. All members
please1 turn out. On Wednesday
5 November CCF presents Arthur Turner, MLA for Vancouver East, speaking on Metropolitan   Government- Needs   &
Obstacles, in Bu. 104 at 12:30.
(Continued on Page 5)
See 'TWEEN CLASSES PAGE TWO
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 19S8
THE UBYSSEY
MEMBER CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Published three time a week throughout the University year
iii Vancouver by the Publications Board of the Alma Mater Society,
University of B.C. Editorial opinions expressed are those of the
Editorial Board of The Ubyssey and not necessarily those of the
Alma Mater Society or the University of B.C.
Telephones: Editorial offices, AL. 4404; Locals 12, 13 and 14;
Business offices, AL. 4404; Local 15.
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF,   DAVE ROBERTSON
Acting City Editor, Judy Frain
IsdJt&iA., wsl qsL ktt&hA,
Managing Editor, Barrie Cook
Chief Photographer, Mike Sone
Asst. City Editor, Kerry Feltham
Editor, Special Editions
City Editor, Barbara  Hansen
Features Editor, Mary Wilkins
C.U.P. Editor, Judy Frain
-Rosemary Kent-Barber
SENIOR EDITOR, JUDY HARKER
Reporters and, Desk: Robert Sterling,  Mike  Raynor, Chris
Maule, Irene Frazer.
GUEST  EDITORIAL
AMS "Undemocratic:
It Has No Powers
So the fall AMS meeting was cancelled because a quorum was not present.
I did not attend this meeting. It is unlikely that ever
in the future will I attend such a meeting. In spite of this,
I do not feel I am apathetic. I feel that a good case can be
made for missing such meetings as a matter of policy.
I would like to ask: What has this or any other student
council ever done of real significance? It represents the
students? Weil and good, Mas it ever demanded, or even
abjectly requested, that credit be withdrawn from a course
given by an incompetent lecturer?
Has it ever attempted, financially and or otherwise, to
persuade an especially gifted lecturer to come to this university, or, being here, to remain?
Does it ever effectively lift its voice against the policy
of extortion practiced by the book store?
H&s it ever enquired why it is necessary year after
year to dig vast and expensive holes on the campus, where
vast and expensive holes have been dug a few years previously?
Has it ever pointed out to the administration the economic madness of proposing residences costing $5,000 per
student housed?
Has it, in fact, ever done anything more significant than
debate whether three "rahs" or four should follow the old
college try — and whether the accen tshould be on the first
and third "rah" or the second and fourth?
Is it not true that the constitution of the AMS prevents
it from being anything but a veneer of democratic forms
stretched across a void?
For real democracy to exist, the representatives of the
people must have two things: responsibility and power.
The AMS executive has neither.
To expect the student body to fritter away whatever
democratic inclinations it may possess on such an empty
farce is to underestimate the student body.
The greatest strength and the greatest hope of our day
and age is that such an overwhelming majority of the students recognize the emptiness for what it is and act accordingly.
F. D. REDDYIIOFF,
Arts IV.
ReCl! Entertainment nM ilir''>'n" whore .rcft'eries' rec-
Eclitor, The  Ubyssey, nnt;!  [n"c  P'^yed rent inimusl.y.
Dear Sir: Let's face il        he s.'lunk!
Well,    the   big   Homecoming Why  Iho Four Winds al  this;
weekend   of   Nov.    Kith   is   not. year's   Frosh     reem.it ion     wore
far  off,  and  of  course,   with   tl bad enough     - belching puffs of
comes  the  Homecoming dance, imitated   song   slv ling's   ■-•   bul
I undorshind that  theorches- .lofferim-s'     performance     made
Ira  of  Mart   Kenny   is   pku i:;g. lhe   four  winds  sound   like  Ihe
That's   fine!      Bul      what     I'm four   kids!     and     that's     going
hoping and praying for is that some.
for the half-lime entertainment, This year, let's see some en-
there's  no repetition    of    last lertainmont   that   really  enter-
year's     "goop,"       if     anyone tains,
thought    that    Herb   Jot'feries Yours truly,
was     a     good     singer,     they RALPH HENDERSON,
ought    to    be    condemned   to Arts IH,
What's Communism?
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Allow me to write about
those unhappy youths, the so-
called "communists" of the
UBC. I am not the first man
in the last month in your paper
writing about this silly problem.
A question to start:
Does a person exist now in
1958 who really knows what is
meant by the term: Communism?   No such person exists.
Generally speaking, people
can be grouped into three categories by their opinion about
Communism:
1. There are those, who believe that Communism is what
Marx and Engels wrote about.
2. The second group calls
Communism that which exists
in the USSR today.
3. Finally, there is the last
group, those who are shall we
say, "anti capitalists", and who
imagine themselves to be communists.
I will not discuss, which is
the 'better' category between
the first two, because I do not
know. I prefer to deal with the
third one, the category of imagined communists. I do this
mainly because this entirely,
false idea mislead many unsuspecting thinking people.
Anti-capitalists are those people, who could at least feel or
partly find mistakes in the
North American style of life —
(economics, foreign affairs, etc.)
—and cast away the system of
capitalistic democracy.
I am not competent to judge
whether this behaviour will act
as instructive criticism, or
whether it will show the degree
of decadence, as far as future
development is concerned, but I
can declare something:
These people have not automatically become communists,
but they are only naive critics.
It is a very unfortunate characteristic of our days, that those
who wish to find a quiet path
leading out of tho everyday
problems, seem to search for
the one which leads to communism.
In this world's situation and
in these days it is perfectly inopportune.
Yet it is nothing else but a
half planned destroying of our
own existence, because against
the unmistakable behaviour of
Russia, the only strong and defensible opposite-pole is North
America, in spite of whether we
accept it or not.
Therefore to turn away towards the enemy, from the present domestic problems (unemployment,   price   rises,   etc.)   	
instead of to honestly endeavour lo find th.e solution for
them,   il   is   no   criticism,   Uni
faithlessness and treason   ~  in
our cases against Canada.
onmihiim; that should
1 considered  even  by
)   which   spreads   Ihe
naiv        tvmiphlel
Viewpoint" on the
This
have   lo   be
licit   croup
childishly
"Communis
i ampus.
I would like In ask Ihem
Ihree quest ions, if Iheir ideological knowledge is really up lo
it, answer this in Ihe near future1:
1. What is communism?
2. What does il mean to ho a
communist?
3. Who is a bad communist'.'
The answers are required —
because the title of the "? Viewpoint" is too abstract until its
meaning is made clear.
Yours sincerely,
EDWARD APT,
Forestry I.
Tighter Parking
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
How to get ? % more cars
parked here on campus —
TIGHTER PARKING (meant
literally).
Have the Grounds Committee
and the City (on Marine Drive)
paint marks on the curbs to
alot spaces. Cars should be
placed more economically in
relation to space, so that they
are not parked with room for
three-quarters of a car in between,
Yours truly,
J. BUTT,
Arts IV.
'Worried' an Idiot?
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
If "Worried" was attempting
to be funny regarding Eric
Nicol's article on SCM, he certainly did not succeed. I suspect, however, that the writer
was serious. If this is the case,
"Worried" is a damn idiot.
Perhaps he would like to
hold an investigation is S.C.M.
in the manner of the late
"dearly beloved" Joe. Maybe
he'd find someone has been pilfering the collection box for
the party. "Worried" should
worry more about himself than
Nicol's articles or S.C.M.
I am not a member of S.C.M.
but I feel that someone should
tell "Worried" that Eric Nicol
writes a humorous column not
a police report.
Yours truly,
CHRIS DAVIES,
Forestry II.
Down To Earth
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Hats off to Kerry White for
his on the spot report on China
Town. This is the kind of hard
hitting, down to earth reporting we need more of. It's the
kind ordinary guys like me can
understand straight from the
shoulder. White has the knack
of seeing the meat of things
with a minimum of fancy language and thought.
I  don't  care    whether    you
publish  the enclosed  letter or
not, but I would like you and
Mr. White to see it.
Sincerely,
R. M. J.
P.S. -In fact I see no point
at all in publishing it.
Notes Communism
Editor, The  Ubyssex,
Dear Sir:
With Ihe Uung.arian studenls
en campus, lei me hike this opportunity io express my own
hat red for commun Cm.
To Ihoso individuals who
would threaten to lynch local.
LLP's, T can only express my
disbelief, disbelief that any person living for even a short lime
in a democratic country such
as this could have remained so
unfamiliar with our basic laws.
It may be of interest to the
second year forestry student to
know that while communist
speakers are not obliged to answer questions from their audiences — neither are ours!
If a speaker is obviously reluctant or evasive in answering questions, he may well suffer public censure, while at the
same time his activity would
still be classified as acceptable
to civilized society.
My advice to this student
with such an obvious, and natural dislike for anything even
half-way pink is simply: Stay
away from any LPP sponsored
assembly. Your curiosity has
led you to one such meeting
whereat you formed the impression that the whole gathering
was merely what we would call
a farce.
Yours or anyone else's presence at any future LPP assembly can only serve to lend their
movement prestige. They
count noses, not cheers.
Yours sincerely,
JIM COKE,
Education II.
Islam Persecutes
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
Mr. Asadi claims that Islam
is a peaceful creed. Can he
explain why the three million
Christians in Egypt are subject
to political, economic and social
pressures as bad as those imposed on Christians in Communist Europe?
As a small example I offer—
Cairo Radio, 26 Nov, 1955: —
"Christianity is a poison for
which the Arabs have to find
an antidote."
At least Marx only described
religion as a drug.
Yours truly,
J. J. FULFORD,
Arts II.
Muffins
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
I should like to take advantage of your columns in order
to express appreciation to the
member of the LPP Club who
so unfailingly distributes the
"Communist Viewpoint" in the
dining hall at Acadia Camp on
the days we have muffins for
lunch.
We like our muffins. So
much so that we sometimes remove them to devour at a
more leisurely pace elsewhere.
He provides excellent wrapping. I dare say there are
other uses too.
Yours truly,
JOHN F. TOWNSEND
Arts III.
Need Translators
Editor, The Ubyssey,
Dear Sir:
May I have an appeal through
your column for volunteers to
translate letters from and into
Polish, Ukrainian or German
The B.C. Branch of the Adoption Committee for Aid to Displaced Persons in Europe helps
refugees, who, thirteen years
af'er Ihe end of Ihe war, are
slill left  in camps in Germain.
We urgenlly need more
P'anstalnr.s to enable Canadian
"ado'.ilor-s" ot ind:\ idual refugee lam.ilies to carry on. an exchange of  letters from idem.
To anyone volunteering to do
tran.-ilalmg, this would mean
perhaps one hour's work a
month and would provide much
needed help for a worthwhile
cause.
Yours sincerely,
ALISON   SCOTT Tuesday, November 4, 1998
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE THREE
*■*♦',[+• i "■ - *♦■.■.
DtNIMO    AND    SOCIAL    BLOCK
UNIVERSITY   OF  BRITISH   COLUMBIA    RESIDENCES
THOMPSON,   BERWICK    AND     PRATT ARCHITECTS
'      . - si
Pictured above is the proposed dormitory accommodation, dining and social block to service the residence development
now taking place on Marine Drive. The dormitories, each capable of housing 100 students will be grouped around the
dining and social block. Two dormitories are now under construction, funds for the residence are drawn from the UBC
development fund.
Campus Girls
Honored By
Delta Sigma Pi
Eight new members have been
elected to Delta Sigma Pi, UBC's
•Honorary Activity sorority for
girls.
Named for their active participation in campus affairs are:
Marlene James, Law 3, last
year's Executive member on
Student Council.
Wendy Amor, Ed 5, secretary
JDf Student Council.
COMMITTEE TO PROBE
(Continued from Page 1)
section of the student body, including presidents of clubs and
undergraduate societies.
IDEAS WELCOMED
Mutambikwa added that the
committee would be glad to accept the ideas of any student
on representative government.
Ideas are to be submitted in
writing to Box 150, Brock Hall.
Barbara Hay,   Arts 3,
Editor.
Totem
Barbara Scott, Ed 3, Leadership Conference.
Theo Carroll, Law 1, Women's
Athletic Directorate Chairman,
Margaret Mary Leeson, Arts
4, President of United Nations'
Club.
Sharon Wright, Com 4, Vice-
President of Women's Undergraduate Society.
Girls are nominated by their
organizations and clubs on the
basis of campus participation
and academic scholarship.
Drawing of Illustrations —
(Charts, Graphs, etc.) and all
Photographic assignments —
Contact JOHN WORST, licensed Photographer, 3250 Heather Street. Phone DI. 3331
or U.B.C.  Local 266.
NFCUS NOW TAKING PHOTO ENTRIES
FOR 1958 ALL ■ CANADA CONTEST
Annual N.F.C.U.S. Photo Contest has started on campus.
The contest, offering $800 in prizes, is divided onto two
sections: black and white enlargements, and eolored slides.
Students from all Canadian universities are eligible for
entry.
The prize-winning photos from last year's contest are now
on display in the Brock. Several prizes were won by UBC
students.
Application forms can be obtained from the N.F.C.U.S.
office in Brock Extension.   Contest closes November 30.
Engineers
vs Artsmen
Debating Union features the
first inter-faculty today at noon
in Buchanan 106.
Artsman versus Engineers
will debate the resolution "that
an Artsman is educated whereas an Engineer is trained."
The contest was an annual
event until a few years ago.
TO REGAIN LOST HONOUR
Engineers have indicated they
wall invade Buchanan Building
to regain the honour they lost
in the last debate.
Judges will be Ron Baker and
Jan deBruyn of the English department. Both have undertaken not to accept bribes from
the contestants unless the sum
is in excess of $100.
Food Costs
By Council
Students' Council expressed
disapproval of increased prices
for food services Monday night.
Student    organizations    have
complained   to   Council   about
the recent increase in prices for
catering services.
ISO BOND DEMANDED
Food Services has demanded
a $50 bond for use of the kitchen at dances, instead of the
former $30 bond.
One group complained that
a price of 15c per cup was quoted for coffee at an evening
dance.
Campus groups have suggested buying coffee and donuts
from off-campus distributors as
a means of cutting rising costs.
Matz and Wozny
548 Howe St.       MU.3-4715
Custom  Tailored   Suits
for  Ladies  and  Gentlemen
Gowns and Hoods
Uniforms
Double breasted suits
modernized J» the new
single    breasted    styles.
Special  Student   Rates
THE PROCTER & GAMBLE CO. OF CANADA
Hamilton, Ontario
has management positions open in
• INDUSTRIAL   ENGINEERING      • PRODUCTION • DEVELOPMENT
•ENGINEERING        • PRODUCT   RESEARCH      • TECHNICAL PACKAGING
for graduates and postgraduates in
Engineering and  Honour Science Courses
PERSONAL   INTERVIEWS
may be arranged
through the
University Placement Office
COMPANY   REPRESENTATIVES
will be present for
campus interviews
November 6,7, 10
There are also summer employment opportunities for men from the
1960 Engineering and Science Classes. PAGE FOUR
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1958
Powell To
Play Bach
Wednesda
The Wednesday Noon Hour
Concert series will present the
Bach Piano Concerto in D Minor this week in Buchanan 106,
The work was written for a
single clavier with orchestra in
1720 and is considered to be the
finest of its kind written by
Bach.
Soloist will be Lloyd Powell
accompanied on the organ by
Hugh John Mclean.
Moscow Visit
To Be Topic
Professor Alec Wainman of
the department of Slavonic
studies will speak on his visit
to Russia Thursday at 8 p.m.
at the Vancouver Art Gallery.
Dr.   Wainman   attended   the
meeting   of   the    International;
Congress of Slavists in Moscow
last summer.
Proceeds from the one dollar
admission will be used to pur- \
chase furnishings for the new
International House. i
SPRINGHILL     BLITZ
(Continued from Pag* 1)
but that the total would exceed
$1,030.
EXCEEDED   EXPECTATIONS
This was two and a half times
more  than  the  $400  that  Haskins had expected,
!     The drive was conducted by
I the   individual   faculties,   each
faculty    canvassing     its     own
The    program    will    include  buildings,
folk music from all parts of the      In tne smaller faculties, Has-
worldand is sponsored by the  kins reported that physical Education and Forestry had done
Folk Singer
Here Thurs.
Folk singer Pete Seeger will
be at UBC Thursday.
His concert will be held in I
the Auditorium at 12:30.
Special   Events  and  Fine  Arts
Committee
VIVACIOUS 18-year-old Vicki Reichert has been chosen
Queen of the College of Education. Vicki is in first year
Education and will represent her faculty in the Homecoming
Queen Contest. — Photo courtesy of The Columbian
SHIRTS
Professionally Laundered
3 for 59 O
FOR
SALE
Woman
s
Oft-
white
Leathei
•  Coat, s
ize
14,
almost
new.
Pure  wool
lin-
ing, $3
5.00. Telephone
ALma
0970.
Excellent comfortable furnished room and good board
with University couple. Very
quiet; close to University
gates. Call at 4584 West 1st,
or phone ALma 2410-Y in the
evening.
Campus Barber Shop
2 locations
ff   Brock Extension
ff  3734 University Blvd.
Free Tickets
For Students
UBC students will get free
tickets again this year for the
Trio di Bolzano and for all
Friends of Chamber Music concerts.
Tickets for this evening's
performance are limited. Students will be admitted at the
west entrance of the Georgia
Auditorium at 8:30 p.m. on
presentation of their AMS cards
and the special ticket available at the AMS office.
Program, first in the Friends
of Chamber Music series, is a
representative one consisting of
the Mozart Trio in E Major
K542; Beethoven: Trio in B
Flat Major Opus 97 (The Archduke Trio); and the Trio Opus
67 of Shostakovich.
The Trio is widely known in
Europe and in North America
for their many recordings on
Vox Records.
Other concerts in this series
appearing at the Georgia Auditorium include the Janacek
Quartet, the Cassenti Players,
the Pasquier Trio and the Par-
renin String Quartet (also appearing on the UBC campus).
the best per capita. Frosh
topped the larger groups, collecting almost $150.
MONEY FOLLOWS
TELEGRAMS
The money will be forwarded
directly   to   Springhill,
Chuck Connaghan, President
of the Students' Council sent a
telegram of sympathy to the
town of Springhill, on behalf of
the AMS.
Function Of
Committees
Explained
Student Executive Program
will hold its second meeting
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in Arts
100.
The topic for discussion is
"committees, their purpose and
function."
Late delegates are asked to
leave their registration forms
in Box 11, AMS Office, or
bring them to the meeting.
Double-Breasted Suits
t O.S \ KHTKU  IM"   N''"
Singlc-Brcastcd Models
tlNITFD   TAIIORS
5'
19   Granville     MU.   1-46
49
UBYSSEY EDITORS
(Continued from Page 1)
the size of the reporting section
in order to get more efficient results."
Hoping that inexperienced
people wishing to report for The
Ubyssey would avail themselves
ot the opportunity to learn the
methods, the pair said that new
people could join the staff training programme during the next
week.
NO MORE RAIDS
on your Savings Account
Fight off raids on your savings this
businesslike way. Use a Royal Bank
Personal Chequing Account to pay
bills; keep your Savings Account
strictly for saving! Ask about this new
Royal Two-Account Plan.
THE ROYAL BANK OF CANADA
for students and faculty
the   new
«*
"W
Phone or call at
4rh  at  Burrard
MINIFON
the   world's   smallest
*>      Sound Recorder & Reproducer
The   MINIFON   is   no   bigger
^       than a box of 100 cigarettes and
can be easily fit into a loose leaf
binder or a small brief case.
STUDENTS FACULTY
v'Recording of lectures in place of note taking
v Checking pronouneiation in language courses
v Recording observations in labs
v Recording of  lectures for  future use
v Dictating  letters
R.C. GILCHRIST LTD.
B Ay view   8717
Branch Mgr., Mr. F.  Dey Tuesday, November 4, 1958
THE   UBYSSEY
PAGE FIVE
'TWEEN CLASSES
(Continued from Page 1)
#        *        *
COMMONWEALTH CLUB —
Films will be shown on the
Commonwealth, 8:00 p.m. Wednesday 5 Nov. in Bu. 202, admission 15c.
v ff* ff*
BADMINTON CLUB—There
will be a club tournament
Thursday 6 Nov. 8:30 p.m. in
the Memorial Gym. Tournament
rules: No two team members
may play  together.
' V '*T* ffi
UBC DANCE CLUB—Only a
few tickets left for Dance Club
Formal. Tickets at $3.50 per
couple on sale in club office
and from members. Get yours
now for a good time on Nov.
8th.
9p 9p 9ft
HAMSOC—Code   Classes   for
Beginners   12:30   Thursday   in j
HL-2. Everyone interested welcome.
ff* **V *r
MUSIC CIRCLE—Sibelius's!
Violin Concerto will be played
at noon today, An evening
meeting will be held on Wednesday 5th Nov. at 3492 West
33th Ave. at 8:00. Martin Bartlett will speak on Vaughan-
Williams, his life and works.
Refreshments provided.
9ft 9ft 9p
PRODUCTION CLUB—Trip
to Crown Zellerbach 6th Nov.
Meet in G.I. at 1:00 p.m. Thursday for organization of trip.
*r *V ffi
JAZZ SOC — Meeting on
Tuesday cancelled. We suggest
that you go see Pete Seeger on
Thursday.
T T T
HILLEL HOUSE—Men eham
Margolit, foreign exchange adviser Israeli Government speaks
at 12:30 on 'Israel's Foreign
Policy."
WEDNESDAY
PRE-MED SOCIETY—Dr. Alan Paterson will discuss how
experimental tumors are used
in cancer research. Wesbrook
100 Wednesday noon. Don't forget the Field Trip on Thursday.
*     *     *
REV. IAN A. MacRURY, M.A.
of Glasgow, will speak today
at noon in Arts 100 on —
"Christianity — Open and
Above Board". His visit is
sponsored by the Varsity
Christian Fellowship.
CKLG
RADIO 730   -    10,000 WATTS
Your Good Musk Station
CHUB
1570 ON YOUR DIAL
Soon 10,000  Watts
FILMSOC     PRESENTS
ZERO DE CONDUITE
(Zero for Conduct)
TUESDAY,   NOVEMBER   4
12.U0 noon
Admission by  Pass, or  15c
 ()	
THURSDAY,   NOVEMBER   13
12..50   p.m.
KENNETH MORE in
REACH FOR THE SKY
(T he Douglas Bacler Story)
Admission 35c
Shortage Of
Yak Tails
Worries Santa
It's more expensive to rent
Santa Claus costumes this year
than in past years, according to a
report in The Vancouver Province.
The reason for this is that yak
tails, the material used to make
the beards in Santa Claus suits,
has become scarce.
The main exporter of yak
tails in former years was Tibet,
but the Province's report says
that Tibet has stopped exporting
yak tails since it became Communist-infiltrated.
One Mrs. Cox, who runs a costume supply house in town,
states she has only one Santa
Claus suit in stock and that she
has had to raise the rental price
per day from $6.50 to $7.50.
It is the hope of many that
Dean Andrew will take this opportunity of putting his badly
mistreated yak out of its misery
and use the poor beast's tail as
part of another much needed
Santa suit for Vancouver's kiddies.
LITTLE MAN ON.CAMPUS
■y^tssssmJ
REV. MacRURY
9ft 9ft 9f*
V.O.C—Fred Becky of Se-:
attle will show a preview of the I
John Jay film and another on ,
climbing at the Wednesday:
meeting  in  Bio  100. ;
ff, ^r *v
THUNDERBIRD BOOSTER;
CLUB—Booster Club Boaters !
have arrived! Price is 50c each. !
All members please pick them !
up  at  Clubroom.
^uteoiftl^i (IflmjMttg
INCORPORATED   2^   MAY   1670.
Shop Daily 9 to 5.30,     Friday 9 'til 9.
Phone HBC MU. 1-6211
HBC's SKI CHALET
IS OPEN!
Come, gather up the smartest ski wardrobe ever!
Be ready for the first trek "up the mountain' with
trimly styled ski jacket and slacks from our new
collection of imported and domestic fashions !
REVERSIBLE SWISS SKI JACKET. Here are two jackets
in one . . . wear it with plain side out or change about
and appear in a smart printed jacket! Made of
water-repellant Swiss poplin ,with zip front, zip pockets,
knit collar and cuffs. Sizes 12-18.
$5 down, 5 month 	
2950
STRETCHEE SLACKS FROM SWITZERLAND. Once
you try these, you'll never want any others! Tailored from
a blend of nylon, wool and cotton, and finished with rubber waist band for extra grip, they offer the trim tapered fit
vou prefer for skiing. Navy, black. Sizes 10-18. OA Cft
S3 down, $7 month - 0«J#t,V
ACTION-FREE SKI PARKA. Well-made jacket with attached hood, in water-repellant poplin. Knit cuffs, zip
front and pockets, action sleeves. Sizes S,M,L <4 M Off
S5 clown, $5 month JLTI
WELL-TAILORED GABARDINE SKI SLACKS. Finished
vvith permanent crease, belt and zip pockets. You'll like
the fine fit . . . the good styling. Navy or black. Sizes
10-20 in Tall or Regular.' 4 A QCJ
$5 down, $5 month     JI.«/#*FW
Keep dry, warm and comfortable . . . AND
look your best in this sm>art ski wear.
Choose your new ski outfit at HBC's Ski Chalet fVAGESIX
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4* 19S8
NOTICES
TOUCH FOOTBALL
All   touch   football   games,
scheduled   for  Thursday,  have
been cancelled.
SQUASH CLUB
The Squash Club team will
practice at 1:30 on Thursday
at the Vancouver Rackets Club.
All members are encouraged to
come.
SPORTS EDITOR,   BOB BUSH
Women's Representatives: Audrey Ede, Flora MacLeod.
Deskmen:— Irene  Frazer, Elaine Spurrill, Flora MacLeod,
Audrey Ede, Mike Sone, Alan Dafoe, Tony Morrison, T. Smith
VARSITY WINS  FOURTH  STRAIGHT
GAME  IN  GRASSHOCKEY ACTION
The Varsity Women's hockey
team won their fourth straight
game Saturday to hold their
first-place position in the Greater Vancouver Grass Hockey
League.
YET TO LOSE
Tied with the Alums, Varsity
has yet to lose a game and will
meet the other first-place team
in their next match.
Varsity defeated Ex-Britannia
3-0 in Saturday's game, a surprising upset. Four members of
the Canadian team play for Ex-
Brits, last year's league winner.
PLAYED WELL
Both teams played well and
hard, but, on the whole, the
younger team outran the more
experienced Ex-Brits.
Libby Shekury, team captain,
scored one goal, while vice-captain, Marilyn Peterson came up
with the other two points.
UBC TIED
The UBC team, tied with Ex
King Ed for second place in the
league were also on the winning side Saturday afternoon,
defeating Burnaby Lions 6-0.
TWO GOALS
Cathy Greene, Marilyn Buker,
and Jacquie Wilson scored two
goals each.
Co-captains of this team are
Miss Buker and Vicky Husband.
Practice for both teams will
be held Thursday noon on the
Women's Field.
WOMEN'S  VOLLEYBALL   got  underway  last  week with
UBC winning its share of games.
Season Opener Played
In Volleyball  League
UBC won one of four sets played Thursday evening, October
30, in the Women's Gym. The Blues were defeated by the Women
Teachers' team, 15-7, 15-7 in two straight games.
—: . |     jn    competition    with    the
Womens Athletic Bud get
Approved By Directors
The revised 1958-59 budget of the Women's Athletic Association was approved at the bi-monthly meeting of the Women's Athletic Directorate on Friday afternoon.
The    applications    of    Betty
Richardson and Mary Fraser for
the positions of Fencing and
Archery Manager respectively
were accepted.
WAD approved a trip by the
Varsity Hockey team to the
University of Washington for
the Pacific Northwest Grass
Hockey Conference from November 7-9,
WOMEN'S   ATHLETIC ASS'N
BUDGET   1958-59
Administration    $ 480.00
Big Block Club  510.00
Expense Rebates     600.00
Intramurals     358.00
Public Relations   220.00
Gymnastics     106.00
Grass Hockey  734.00
Skiing      382.00
Speed Swimming   83.00
Synchronized Swimming 237.00
Itennis     .._ 110.00
Track  &  Field    242.00
Volleyball     200.00
$2,168.00
Archery    $ 20,00
Badminton  - 423.00
Bowling     - 20.00
Boys' Rules Basketball 637.00
Girls'  Bales Basketball 260.00
Curling      120.00
Fencing]     -- 33.00
*GoM     4&M
85,815.00
UBC Defeat
Eilers Five
The UBC Junior Girls Basketball team defeated Eilers' Junior
Girls, 42 to 31, on October 30 at
the Winston Churchill Gym.
Top scorer for UBC was Paddy
Studds with 13 points, while
Diana Hurst led the Eilers with
11 points.
The girls played a very fast
game. At the end of the first
quarter the score was tied 8-8,
but by half-time, UBC led 20-10.
Y.W.C.A. the Golds were defeated 16-14 in the first game,
won the second witli a score
of 15-7 but met defeat in the
final match, 16-14.
Only one game each was
played in the alternate tournament. The Golds were defeated
by the teachers 15-11 but UBC
Blues, in the last game of the
evening, defeated the Y.W.C.A.
15-11.
Team play was enthusiastic
and of a high standard for
games preceding only a short
period of organized  practice.
Close Game In
Imperial Cup Play
University soccer teams dropped two contests over the weekend, as the Sons of Norway
edged Varsity 1-0. New Westminster Legion swamped UBC
6-0 in the second game.
The Varsity game was an Imperial Cup fixture played at Kil-
larney Park.
The second contest was a
Third Division encounter,
Although Varsity had most of
the territorial play, the Norwegian boys broke through for a
goal ten minutes before the end
of the first half for their margin
of victory.
JoUbivinq JPm fivvch
By PAT MACGREGOR
Avid fans of the Thunderbirds, the UBC BIRDS' BOOSTER
CLUB turned up in small numbers, but in very high SPIRITS!!!
Trip down to Bellingham and back was a rollicking success, but
wha' hoppen at 12th and Main?
-CO-
Coach FRANK GNUP and Bird assistant coach, BOB HINDMARCH, in a pre-game confab with the officials praised them for
the fine job they did in the Whitworth game last week. And what
was that you were muttering after the game, Coach?
-CO-
Big ground gainers for the Birds: DON VASSOS and WAYNE
AIKEN had a small wager going. They were both out to see who
could average the most yards per carry. JACK BUSH'S statistice
show that Don carried 17 times for 108 yards, averaging 6.3 yards
per carry and Wayne ran for 68 yards on 14 carries, which is 4.9
yards per. Statistics don't lie fellows, but I wish you guys would
bet before every game.
-(::)-
The pass patterns that UBC used against the Vikings were so
complicated that even the Birds were confused, ditto Coach Gnup.
Twice QB HENWOOD ran miles behind the line of scrimmage and
finally flipped passes to ineligible receivers. Big ROY JOKANO-
VICH caught the one thrown to him, although with some surprise:
McNAMEE just looked when Henwood pitched one towards him.
-CO-
Washington radio and press men expressed great surprise at
the fine showing by the Birds. HAINES FAY, sports director for
KVOS, said the game had been predicted as a pushover for the
Vikings and added later that it was the finest game any Thunder-
bird team had ever played in Bellingham.
-CO-
Members of the Ubyssey staff almost had to produce birth cer.
tificates to obtain complimentary tickets for the game from WW
Sports Director, C. F. LAPPENBUSH. Finally had to autograph
his little black book for "security purposes" before getting into
the game.
-CO-
Western Washington fans really went for the UBC "SNARL
CARD." Booster Club members, in a goodwill gesture, handed
out a few to delighted Yanks. And where were those other ambassadors of goodwill — the cute UBC CHEERLEADERS???
-CO-
KELLY HOOD, winner of the Most Inspirational Player awaisd
at Vancouver College in 1956 now plays first string guard for the
Vikings. At College, Kelly used to run out of the fullback sldt.
Hood left Saturday's game in the third quarter with a painful log
injury.
-CO-
Birds came out of the game injury-free, which is something
new. Not quite so lucky were the Vikings. Besides Kelly Hoofl,
star Halfback FRED EMERSON seemed to be favouring the leg
which he had injured earlier this season. Coach KULBITSK1
was saving Emerson for their big game against Central, but pressed
him into action when UBC began pushing the Vikings all over the
field.
THREE WINS FOR UBC
Varsity tied North Shore 'A'
one-all in First Division Men's
Grasshockey action played over
the weekend.
UBC, missing on many scoring
possibilities, lone goal was scored by team captain, Gordon Forward.
Outstanding  in   his   perform-
-mce  was UBC's    centre    half,
Dave Hartley.
SECOND DIVISION
In Second Division play, UBC
Golds beat the "Juniors" three
goals to two, Golds scoring attack was led by Gerry Davidson
who scored all three goals from
his right wing position.
The University Hill squad
fought hard trying time and time
again to tie the game.
In the other second division
game, UBC Blues beat the Blackbirds 4-2. The Blues, a very
strong group, have won their last
three games and currently are in
first place of the division.
The weekend action was the
second week in a row that UBC
Men's teams have gone undefeated.
MEN'S ICE HOCKEY
The following teams will play
on Thursday at the Kerrisdale
Arena:
12.30 noon — Phi Kappa Pi
vs. Acadia Camp.
1.15 p.m. — Alpha Delt VS.
Commerce. Tuesday, November 4, 1958
Tilt   UBYSSEY
PACKET SEVEN
Birds Beaten By League Leaders
UBC's DON VASSOS, with ball, carries over the Viking's goal line for the Birds' first major.
Western Washington won 20-19 with a final quarter touchdown.     — Photo by Michael Sone
UBC Thunderbirds Third
\ln Inland Empire Meet
Placing two runners in the top three, the UBC Cross-country
team finished third in the Inland Empire Skyline Meet held in
Spokane over the weekend.
In a strong field of 53 athletes representing six universities and colleges, Jim Moore of
UBC placed second to winner
Frank   Wyatt of  Idaho  State.
UBC's Jack Burnett came in
third followed by a former Vancouver runner, Glen Ferguson.
The   four    mile   course
covered in 21:20 minutes.
All of the top five participants were either Canadians !
running for UBC or American
Universities or else Englishmen
on  American   scholarships.
The feature event got under-1
"Way witih Wyatt taking the
lead, closely followed by a
group including Moore, Burnett,!
Bush, and Bernie Barton of
UBC. As the field began to
string out, Wyatt retained his
lead, followed by Moore and
Burnett. Bush dropped out of
the race with leg trouble and
Barton picked up thirteenth
spot. UBC's Doug Van Nes, Stan
Joughin and John Moncrief
placed in the first twenty competitors.
UBC THIRD
Using the reverse scoring
method, Idaho State took top
team honors followed by Washington State. UBC placed third,
WOMEN'S
NOTICES
Golf Practice—Women's Goll
Practice will he held on Wednesday, at; -mid in (ho Field
House, vl
on Frida
ahead of Whitworth College.
Coach Peter Mullins, hoping
for a second place finish, was
pleased with his first two runners but stated that for a better
team effort UBC needed more
depth.
Saturday, UBC will be hosts
was! to  various  teams  competing  in
, the   Annual   Pacific   Northwest
Championships to be held at the
UBC  Stadium.
JV Basketball
Team's First Game
Tins Thursday
UBC Jayvees play their firsl
game of the 1958-59 Senior "A"
Basketball season this week
when they meet the Hillside
Dairy at the King Edward Gym
Thursday night at 7:00 p.m.
J.V.'s, coached by Mr. Peter
Mullins, have a strong team
that will have plenty of heighl
and needed experience. Returning from the '57 squad are Jack
Lusk, Fred Kango, Trev Fields
and Doug Jennings.
SATURDAY'S YARDSTICK
BIRDS VIKINGS
21      first downs       18
221      yards rushing     206
51      yards passing       12
14      passes attempted        9
6      passes completed  --     3
0    ._ _. passes intercepted by       1
5      punts .       4
41.2    average punt      30.2
3     fumbles       1
0
40
.. fumbles lost by
_  yards penalized
1
25
Birds Drop Thriller To
W.W. Vikings, 20-19
By MICHAEL SONE
Western Washington Vikings narrowly defeated the fired-up
UBC Thunderbirds in an Evergreen Conference exhibition football
game on Saturday.
Playing on a muddy grid in Battersby Field in Bellingham,
the Birds came up with one of their best efforts in many years.
The margin of defeat was a
second quarter convert attempt
by end Dave Barker which
mailed over the top of the upright. The official looked twice,
lulled out his millimetre-calibrated ruler and signalled that
the kick was no good.
The Thunderbirds started off
well in the first quarter but a
long gain by Don Vassos on a
swing pass was nullified by a
penalty  for illegal  procedure.
On third down, QB Jackie
Henwood was pulled down for
a loss behind his own nine
yard line. Bianco booted on
fourth down but Viking Tom
Emerson, running beasutifully
returned the kick all the way
back to the UBC 19. Two plays
later, fullback Len Gargarello
of WW skirted nrrte yards
around left end f o r a major
score.
Tom Emerson converted and
he Vikings led 7-0 early in the
tirst quarter.
After the kick-off by WW,
UBC started moving the ball on
•ome fine running by Don Vassos and Wayne Aiken. Jackie
Henwood, with good faking
eluded a horde of Vikings for
in eleven yard gain and a first
down on the Western 12. Aiken
then ran for five, ending the
first quarter.
On the first play in the second period, Don Vassos again
drove for 3 yards. With a third
and two situation Vassos took
a hand-off from Henwood and
piled four yards of* left tackle
to score, capping a 63 yard
march for the Birds.
Dave Barker made the convert good to tie the game.
Western Washington got a
break later in the 2nd quarter.
On a third and 12 situation on
has own 40, Viking QB Dick
Muselton heaved a long pass
which went incomplete. Pass
interference was called on Roy
Bianco and it was Viking first
and ten  on the UBC  20.  With
feme; ice  will he  held
W'onu si
Tennis .'-)(
Tues,   ?"(;'.
mmmnuK r   i.
Int s'smuirsil
,ii'i -
Tabic
A.
Wed.
v s.
vs.
vs.
C.V.C.
G.P.B
A.D. P.
:.mv.  -I IM
 Pharrmm\
Xov. 5 -I'll. C
2
--Ph. C.  1   vs. P.E.
Fri. Nov. 7-—D.P.F.. vs. Ed. 1
—Ac. 3 vs. K.K.G.
FLEET-FOOTED VIKING Halfback, Tom Erneison runs behind good blocking
--Photo  by GEORGE FRASER
fullback Dennis Sheppard packing the mail, Washington got
its second teedee with nine minutes left to halftime and led
13-7 after the convert.
After Bianco and Vassos had
picked up a couple of first
downs from the kick-off, Henwood was thrown for a big loss
after zig-zagging all over behind the scrimmage. Bianco
punted and Dave Barker, coming in fast under the high kick,
fell on a WW fumble and it
was first down for UBC on the
Western 13.
Vassos then slid for two, Henwood was thrown back for a
loss but Aiken picked up five
yards to the WW ten. On a desperate 4th down attempt, Henwood completed a little look-in
pass to Dave Barker. Then
Aiken, with first and goal to
go, went over standing up for
the  Birds'  second  teedee.
Then came Barker's near-
miss of the convert attempt.
Thunderbirds began pushing
the Vikings all over the field
at the start of the second half.
After the kick-off the Viking3
were pushed all the way back
to their own one yard line.
Western's punt was short and
Wayne Aiken ran it all the way
back to the WW 28.
Aiken, Bianco and Vassos ran
the ball down to the one. Henwood was stopped on a Quarterback sneak but on the next
play, it was Wayne Aiken driving over for the six-pointer to
put the Birds in the lead for
the first time in the game. Barker's convert was 'way wide so
the score, with ten minutes to
go in the 3rd quarter was UBC
19_WW 14.
But the now desperate Vikings, with Fred Emerson back
in the line-up came right back.
Running out of a hard-to-stop
single wing with an unbalanced
line, Sheppard and Emerson,
drove to the Birds' one and
from there, Quarterback Husel-
tine went over on a quarterback
sneak, completing a long 59
yard march. Tom Emerson's
convert was wide, and the Vikings led 20-19.
In   the    fourth    quarter   the
Birds   put   up   a   solid   defence
and   twice   forced   the   Vikings
to kick and  took over the ball
| on downs.
|     With lime running out, UBC
! started    another    march    from
l their (j..n   [ive yard stripe, but
a   turn' le  by  Aiken  and a  key
intercepsien   by   Viking   Al   De-
Coi'ia   gave   WW   the   ball   with
•mconds   lel'l.   Western   then   ran
oul 1h..' clock  lo  preserve their
victory.
s     Said Coach Frank Gnup after
tho  game
'Wo played a good game and
lhe 'boys hustled to beat hell.
II. was a real good effort by the
loam. I think we surprised them
(Vikings) because the boys were
| really up for this game after
last   week's   showing.' PAGE EIGHT
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1958
CLUB NOTES
"The Boy Friend" Mussoc s
Thirtieth Musical
Show
Mussoc will produce its thirtieth production with its February showing of "The Boy
Friend." More than eighty people turned out to the auditions
which were held right after
Clubs day, but now the cast
has finally  been chosen.
The cast includes: Pam Jones,
Sheila Lees, Doreena Davidson,
Marie Andrews, Marie Carlson,
Gail Morrison, Marg Sampson,
Vicky Sampson, Judy Walters,
Deidre Woollett.
Male members are: Glen Atkinson, Sven Sundquist, Al
Sjuerdal, Bob Pearmain, Bob
Squires, John Wright, Danny
Minor, Don North, and George
Day.
The "Boy Friend" was first
produced in 1954 in London,
England, and had a very successful run on Broadway. It
toured the U.S. and was produced in Seattle in 1956.
The directors will be Harry
Price, who has been producing
Mussoc musicals for eight years,
and James Johnstone who has
been working with Mussoc for
four years. Both are well-known
lor their work in TUTS.
When Mussoc was founded
thirty years ago, its productions were along the Gilbert
and Sullivan type of musical.
But the directors soon found
that what the audience wanted
was a more modern, Broadway
type production.
And, starting with the Student Prince in 1952, Mussoc has
been doing that ever since. Last
year's production, "Call Me
Madam", was a tremendous
success, and it was the first
time that this musical had been
presented  in  Vancouver.
One important division of
Mussoc is the Choral Society
which will be sponsoring a
large concert in January. This
year they will present the concert version of Faust as well as
selections from My Fair Lady.
The Choral Society has received offers to tour, and will
give a concert in Nanaimo and
one in Victoria in March. It is
directed by the Director of Mu-
SHIRTS
Professionally Laundered
3 ^ 59
dPH
sic    from    John    Oliver    High
School,   Mr.   Theo   Repel.
The directors considered carefully before choosing a play
for their anniversary production. Everyone feels that "The
Boy Friend" is an excellent
choice.
The story concerns a young
girl who is sent to a finishing
school in England and her experiences while there, It takes
place in the 20's and the dress
is very similar to modern campus clothing.
As the Players Club Fall
Plays reach the final week of
rehearsal, word has reached the
Ubyssey that these plays are to
be Adult Entertainment Only.
No one under 18 is advised to
attend.
They are: The Lesson, Gam-
mergurton's Needle, and Blue
Duck's Feather and Eagle
Down, to be shown in the Auditorium November 13, 14, 15.
Tickets are 75c and are on sale
in the A.M.S. Office.
CCF CLUB
.1
A. TURNER
The C.C.F. Club is presenting
Mr. Arthur Turner, the MLA
for Vancouver East, speaking
on  Metropolitan  Government—
Needs and Obstacles. Mr, Turner will speak in Buchanan
104 on Wednesday, November
5 at 12:30.
Mr. Turner has represented
Vancouver East in the B.C.
Legislature ever since 1941.
During these seventeen years,
he has written various articles
on public insurance, municipal
affairs, hydro-electric power,
and industrial development.
His topic will include sewage disposal and the North-
Shdre-Vaneou ver traffic problem.
(Ed. Nolt: Thii article, appearing in The Ubyttay for the
past few week* under lhe headline "Club Note*", ii an experimental attempt, to .solve .the
problem often voiced of inadequate club publicity. It is written by Miss Patience Ryan, appointed by the UCC executive.
CommonRoon
Open In Brock
The Common Room in South
Brock will be open between 8.30
a.m. and 11 p.m. daily.
New furnishings are being
bought and there are television
and periodicals in the room.
Opening this room is designed
to supplement the main lounge,
especially when the latter is
closed for banquets and meetings.
ALMA     CABS
ALma 4422
Affiliated with
"YELLOW CAB CO. LTD.
MU. 1-3311
Tenders are invited from
Groups wishing to purchase
the furniture in the International House Hut. Please apply to the office in Hut 14 for
inventory of articles. Tenders
must be submitted by Friday,
November 7.
P H O T O G
R A P H E R S
10TH and BURRARD
Low-Cost USNSA Student Tours
of Europe — Summer 19 5 9
>•
2
•o
rt
54-81
jam-packed
days
from
$749
'A no-vp'n'.i   ro'no'ni-cirt   ie'v-".f|
Ij   S    v. ri«M! !■(,"- ■ oo'.' »u    oi,-,i
Excitement.-. Fun ... Adventure
to' roll^i'ir nirP and wnmr-n from   17  28
38 fabulous travel  values
CENTRAL  EUROPEAN   TOURS
ISRAEL  &  WESTERN   EUROPE
POLAND &   WESTERN  EUROPE
festivals  of   ART  ft   MUSIC
Informal  HOBO tours  by  bus
OrivB-it-yourself  VOLKSWAGEN tours
All  tours   include  round-trip  trans-Atlantic  passage,   accommodations,  meals,  sightseeing,  accident  and  health  insurance.
'or    <uH   rlficrirtivi:    I.li>rcilun<   v<<<!   it iil.T cir ir-s   »nl" nr  full
U. S. NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION
EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL, INC.*
701   Seventh  Avenue     •     New  York  36,  N.  Y.
JUdson  6-2247
i i
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u
WUS PRESIDENT, GAIL CARL-
SQN asks all you men to vote to
change Women's Undergraduate
Society to Associated Women's
Society on Friday ot the places
run by the girls all over the
campus.
CLASSIFIEDS
ESSAYS TYPED—Phone ALma I
0465-L  or  call  at   4680   West
4th Avenue.
WANTED—Trumpet man for
North Vancouver Dance Band.
Some experience necessary
with small groups. Should
have car. Phone Roland Pierrot WA2-4069.
BABY     SITTING—Offered    in
exchange  for   use  of  a   study
room     evenings,    vicinity     of
Point  Grey  &  Dunbar.
BA 6457.
Call
WANTED—Four people for car
chaih in vicinity of 49th Ave.
& West Boulevard. Call KE
2809-B or KE 8968.
WANTED—RidtTfrom 18th &
Cambie 8:30's Monday to Saturday. Phone Reg., EM 7458.
WANTED—2 riders 4th Avenue
Maple to Alma. Phone Ken
BA  1683.
This way to
oflmou^j
chemise
BAN-LON
cardigan
by Glemyr
^
Wherever you find Kitten you'll, find excitement!
And here's Kitten in a dramatic new convertible
heavy-knit turtle-neck cardigan . . . matching
pockets .. . accenting pearl buttons! In luxurious
Ban-Lou. soft, soft beauty without tiring-
upkeep. Full-fashioned, hand-finished sizes
,11. to ',()    at good shops everywhere, price $t 1.95.
Look for thr iiiinir   j^^U

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