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The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1962

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 Theplwrat
of
spouse
Vol. XUV
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2,  1962
No. 49
CAGED ARTSMEN  got free ride around campus Thursday courtesy of singing Engineers. The
two Artsmen,  one  dressed   in a skirt,  were said by Redshirts to be Buchanan lounge lovers.
Young lovers placed in cage,
continue art' in Brock hall
By MIKE GRENBY i
Quick-working redshirts abducted a pair of lovebirds from
the Buchanan Lounge Thursday
noon.
One-half hour later the two
were found publicly demonstrating their art in a cage inside
Brock Hall. ;
The engineers pounced on the
lovers as they were about to
commence their daily noon-hour
ritual. '
They were marched from
'Buchanan -to the engineering
building under heavy bodyguard.
The male made a valiant attempt to escape but was quickly
recaptured and placed in the
cage.
Deciding that the female
lacked certain qualities, the engineers made a <juick substitution. They seized an innocent
bystander, redressed the unfortunate artsman and dumped him
into the cage.
The cage was then escorted to
Brock.
"The way these people carry
on in public is disgusting,"
commented an unidentified engineer. "Perhaps if we make
an example of them it might
help."
An earlier plan to hang the
caged lovebirds from a tree on
the   Main   Mall   was scrapped
after it was feared rain might
dampen and decrease their activities.
The engineers climaxed their
contribution to Frosh Week by
forcibly taking a set of stocks
from members of the frosh class.
The action came after Ed
Grande, Eng. II,  had been im
prisoned in the stocks by the
frosh. Other first-year students
had earlier thrown three red-
shirts  into the   lily  pond.
The science-men were last
seen in a stationwagon containing the stocks and several frosh
heading toward the engineering
building.
Today - the end?
According to. news from
Kuala Lumpur, Malaya, carried
in the University of Saskatchewan's "Sheaf", Asian astrologers are saying that the end
of the world is coming on Feb.
2,  1962.
The star gazers, looking deep
into their heavenly charts, say
the night of Feb. 1962, seven
planets will be in conjunction
in the house of Capricorn. Also,
on that night the moon enters
the same house.
As any astrologer knows, that
spells disaster.
TOUGH BATTLE PREDKTED
FOR FIRST SLATE ELECTIONS
Alma Mater Society election returning officer Dar-
ryl Roberts predicted a tough battle for the presidential
and second vice presidential positions.
Presidential seat hopefuls include Nicholas Omelusik,
Arts III, Eric Ricker, Law I, and Doug Stewart, Law II.
Three candidates contesting the position of second vice
president are Michael Hanson, Edward Lavalle and Robert
MacKay, all in Coram. II.
The two candidates for secretary are Miriam Sapiro,
Arts II, and Barbara Bennett, Arts III.
First slate voting takes place Wednesday.
Men jealous?
UBC to save
UN centre?
New financial  plan
under official study
By ERIC WILSON
UBC appears on the brink of saving its two-year-old
United. Nations training centre.
Earlier the UN had announced that it was forced to cancel its annual $30,000 grant to the UBC centre because of increasing demands on its budget. Unless other financial arrangements could be porked out the centre was to close May
31.
, However, the director of the
training centre, Dr. Cyril Bel-
shaw, appeared haopeful that an
alternative financial plan, currently under official study,
would keep the centre alive.
NEW PLAN
Under the new plan the centre as it now exists would be
replaced by a UBC Administrative Office which would
carry on the work of the training centre. Funds would be obtained by charging the UN, the
Canadian government, and other
international agencies such as
UNESCO a fee for services rendered. UBC would underwrite
operating costs and would recoup some of these from the
service fees.
He declined further comment
on the new financial plans for
the centre.
A second University official
labelled discussions currently
underway between representatives of UBC, the UN and the
federal government as "confidential" and said there would
be no statement forthcoming
until negotiations have ended.
ONE OF  A   KIND
The training centre, the only
one of its kind in the world subsidized by the UN, has been in
operation since 1959. In addition to the UN grant, funds for
the centre's upkeep have come
from the Canadian government
($9,500) and UBC ($5,850). In
a recent Commons speech, External Affairs Minister Green
stated that it would be "useless"
for the federal government to
continue payments to the centre
if the  UN pulls out.
The centre helps select Canadian personnel for UN technical
assistance programs and, in conjunction with International
House, administers the Canadian
University Service Overseas
plan, which recently arranged
positions for several students in
Sarawak and Nigeria.
German club
not Nazis
-president
The UBC German Club is not
a Nazi organization, the club
president said Thursday.
Ben Horn said the German
Club is tired of being called.
right wingers by the communists, and being asked, to Join
the right wing party on campus.
"Our aims are cultural, and
we are attempting to further
understanding of the culture
and language of German-speaking people," he said.
Horn said it seems people
take offence to some of the films
the club shows, "particularly
the last one on the Berlin wall."
He said this type of film is
shown to give students an understanding of present-day Germany.
Debaters claim women detrimental
By BON RITER
Are men jealous of the presence of women on the campus?
Social Worker Gillian Strib-
ley says they are.
She adds that men fear competition from the fair sex,
whereas females come only to
learn and to make a cultural
contribution to society.
Miss Stribley and Zora
Lucyk, also in Social Work,
constituted the negative side
of a debate Thursday, "That
women should be prohibited
attendance at UBC."
Commerce students Dennis
Brow and Waldo Skillings defended the affirmative.
According to Brow, woman's
presence at UBC is economic-
NOT JEALOUS HE SAYS
just friendly
cally detrimental to the education of men.
Brow and Skillings said men
should have priority in obtaining scholarships. They also
protested against the presence
of women in campus residences.
These comments led to Miss
Stribley's jealousy charge.
She further pointed out that
campus would be a very dull
place if inhabited solely by
men.
Miss Lucyk said the women
would be frustrated if denied
attendance.
At this point Brow hedged
and decided women should be
only denied residence on campus. He told Miss Lucyk she
was lovely.
Judges gave the decision to
the ladies. Page 2
T H E       UBYSS E Y
Friday, February 2, T962
Monopomaniacs match
AAcGiU's marathonitis
—Photo  by   Barry  Joe
STOCKS WENT UP in Brock Cafeteria Thursday as artsmen and Frosh captured second year
Engineering  president  Ed   Grande,   in   retaliation for engineers'earlier capture pf two "Brock
lovers." (See story.  Page  1)
U of T college unfair-CUCND
TORONTO (CUP)—Charges
and countercharges of "unfairness" have resulted from
the refusal of St. Michael's
College to allow the Combined Universities Campaign
for Nuclear Disarmament use
of rooms at the college.
Father John Kelly, president of Saint Michael's, said
the college does not share the
attitudes of CUCND. "We
don't wish to make our facilities  open  to  them," he  said.
"It's amazing that they
would prevent SMC students
from hearing views simply be-
"Romance"
or "Sex Appeal"
. Is "romance" unstylish, even
unsporting in today's dating?
February Reader's Digest suggests that the Iet's-be-practical
approach to marriage is unfair
to both women and men. Our
• sense of values has changed,
says this Valentine article, and
. in scrapping "romance" for
"sex-appeal" we are missing a
lot. Get your February Reader's
Digest today—40 articles of
lasting interest.
cause they don't personally
agree with them," asserted
Ian Gentles, head of the
CUCND drive.
Gentles' view was also
shared by the SMC Students'
Administrative Council which
Tuesday night (January 23)
passed a resolution urging free
discussion, especially on the
St. Michael's campus. However, an amendment to this
resolution    stating   that   the
council regretted the action
of the administration, was defeated by a 7-6 vote.
President Father John Kelly
released a statement later in
the week which said in part:
"We have a perfect right to
express a concurrence with
government policy concerning
the attitudes of CUCND."
Father Kelly was referring to
Ottawa's intention to acquire
nuclear arms.
By  TED  STUART
Varsity staff reporter
TORONTO   (CUP) — The
mighty   University   of  Toronto
jeerr.s   well   launched   towards
, the   monopoly   marathon world
1 championship.
Accepting the defiant gage of
McGillia-n "monopomaniacs,"
Trinity College has elected to
bear the "Blue and White" to a
record^devastating six days of
continuous dicing. The 144 hours
play planned will more than
fell McGill's 100-hour stint.
Students dealt out the bills
after dinner Friday evening.
Trinity's Head of Divinity,
Keith Young, officially started
the tourney at 8 o'clock p.m.
Tonight at 8 p.m. the dedicated young band will have
passed the 72nd "plateau" and
lust 181 minutes later victory
will be a spine-tingling reality.
News* of the heroism trickled
out unofficially late Friday
night and into Saturday morning. Local radio stations CHUM,
CKEY, CKFH, and CFRB have
all broadcast news of Trinity's
cleverly persistent rolling.
Early Saturday morning 'Spiz-
zad protagonists" were considerably cheered with a couple of
dedications to their duress.
At 3 a.m. the tantalizing
lyricism    of   the    now-rampant
"My    Boomerang    Won't    Come
Back" delighted the devoted.
As yet the nation awaits the
triumph in incredulous expectancy. The Varsity notes, however, that while a bisexual contest for Canada it will not be
bilingual.
1951  Vauxhall Velox
New Plates.  $150.
A. Brown, Room 319.
Chemistry  Department.
Vaccination clinks
open all this month
Appointments for the annual vaccination clinics can
be made now at the Health
Service,  Wesbrook building.
Clinics will be held Tuesdays and Wednesday on the
following dates: Feb. 6, 7, 13,
14, 20 and 21, at ll-ll:45and
2-2:30 p.m.
Students requiring immunizations for international
travel certificates to foreign
countries this summer should
have their smallpox vaccination at one of the above
clinics.
Other immunizations are
given at the weekly clinic on
Thursdays, 2-4 p.m.
HELP WANTED
Research Assistants for Communications Research. Behavioural
science, research methods and
statistics helpful. Hours flexible.
Pay dependent upon ability. Call
Local   538   for   appointment.
FOR RENT
Sleeping room with private
bathroom. Breakfast if desired. 4307 W. 13th Ave.
Call CA 4-7471. Girl Student.
IN  PERSON I
Tues., Feb. 20 - 8:30 p.m.
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Tickets   now on   sale
Hudson's Bay Co.
10   a.m.-5   p.m.   MU   1-3351
$4.00 - 3.25 - 2.50 -  1.75
.inc. tax
Presented by CKWX and
FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD.
"If he makes it there by six o'clock,
■I'll eat my bustle!"
But getting the re fast is no problem at all, by TCA. Economical, too.
VANCOUVER TO CALGARY $54
Economy Return  Fare
(Even   less   on   Excursion   Days)
TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES
AIR CANADA Friday, February 2, 1962
THE     UBYSSIY:
Page 3
Just recently we had a new
telephone   system   installed   in
•"our office.
And with the system came
a   12-point  list  of instructions
on "HOW TO   USE   A TELE-
.    PHONE."
1. Remove the receiver and
listen for dial tone. Well, that's
.not too much to ask, I guess.
4. It is necessary to commence dialing the number within eight (8) seconds. The only
trouble with this is that by the
time one gets to point four (after carefully reading points two
..and three), eight (8) seconds
have long since fled into eternity.
Most frustrating for the beginner, because by this time,
the background blip sound will
have stopped and it will be necessary to hang up and start
over.
Perhaps after a few lessons
in speed-reading, the aspirant
to 'phone fame will be able to
reach point four within the required eight (8) seconds, and a
third of the battle will be over.
5. Between calls, the receiver
should be replaced for at least
five seconds to release the previous call.
This is a step in the right direction, for if you hang up, then
remember something you forgot to say and if all this takes
less than five seconds—whip
up: the receiver, and all will be
well.
Unless, of course, the other
party has hung up, too.
6. When the telephone bell
rings, answer promptly and
announce yourself clearly to
the calling party.
What kind of a "clear -announcement" do they expect
after one has almost broken a
tleg, stumbling over a chair in
a valiant dash to answer
"promptly" the miserable instrument?
What this country needs in a
good, clear, prompt telephone-
answering announcement —
like "Yeah?"
7. How to transfer or hold a
central office call.
This ingenious system even
allows calls to be transferred
to different parties. However
if the desired party cannot be
reached, one can return to the
central office call by flashing
the cradle plunger once or, if
background blip sound has
stopped, by dialing the digit'T'.
At all times the repeated
background blip sound must
have stopped before the digit
"t" is dialed for any consultation services.
What with all this cradle-
plunger flashing and repeated
background blipping, I can see
that the consultation services
come in very handy.
As if the blips weren't enough
point nine introduces the
"Tick-Tone," a marvellous device to indicate that the attendant has entered the connection
for the purpose of announcing
an important call.
More likely the attendant is
just plain nosy and is taking a
break from playing cards to
.eavesdrop a little.
11. If your telephone is out-
of-order, report the trouble . . .
Ha! Fat chance of the 'phone
breaking down — but what
about me? Bleep-bleep, tick-
tick, bzzz-bzzz-b2zz . . .
RECEIVING TROPHY for best undergraduate society singing,
is Sharon Habkirk, Education 5, after Education won the
Frosh Song Fest in  Brock Lounge Thursday noon.
Frosh song fest honors
go to education singers
it's just  their
Frosh  aren't necessarily rotten singers,
choice of songs.
Anyway that's the way the
director of the music department
looked at Thursday's songfest
in  Brock lounge.
Dr. G. W. Marquis awarded
first place in the competition to
education students because of
their "better choice of songs."
Only frosh and education
types competed.
Future educators- chose "How
sad runs the Stream" and
"Black is the Colour". Frosh
sang "Whiffenpoof song" and
"Everybody loves a Lover".
Dr. Marquis said he was also
impressed with the Education
team's absence of accompaniment in order to let the "tone
of their songs be clear as possible."
The Song Fest was on<? of the
Frosh sponsored events this
week. Scheduled tomorrow are
a Pizza Feast and Shoe Shine in
Brock Lounge.
Frosh week will finish with a
dance in the Bayshore Inn. Tickets for the "Stardust Ball" have
been sold out since Tuesday
PRICE
SALE
Men's Topcoats
Reg. $59.50
Now
29.75
UNITED
TAILORS
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville St., Vancouver
CUSO gets
A MS grant
Student council has approved
a finance committee decision to
contribute $1,000 to the Canadian University Service Overseas fund.
The contribution will be made
through the Dag Hammarskjold
Memorial Fund, which was initiated last fall by the UBC United Nations Club.
U of T president
favors term break
TORONTO (CUP) — University of Toronto President, Dr.
Claude Bissell said that he is
personally in favor of a midterm week-off or an extended
Christmas vacation.
The Ideal Place To
Meet Your Friends
Look
Full
For Our  Daily  Special!
Course   Meals   Within
Your Income
DO-NUT DINER
4556 West 10th Ave.
Fish & Chips, Donuts to GO!
Propaganda given
priority in Cuba
The writer of this article,
David Hitchcock, spent two
| weeks in Cuba during the Christmas break. Mr. Hitchcock, editor
of the Silhouette, is in Arts at
McMaster University.)
By DAVID HITCHCOCK
Special to  The Ubyssey
It is difficult to evaluate the
effects of the Cuban revolution
without direct knowledge of the
conditions in Cuba before it took
place.
The conditions which we saw
would lead one to conclude that
there has been a violent reaction
to a previously severe situation.
And if Cuba reacted in that manner, surely other Latin American countries must be leaning
in the same direction.
The most evident facts about
Cuba to a Canadian is the intensive propaganda carried out on
behalf of the revolutionary programs and ideals and the breaking down of many areas of the
economy as a result of the American  economic  blockade.
PRESS CONTROLLED
Newspapers, radios and television are all controlled by the
government, and are used as
vehicles for the transmission of
government proclamations and
praises of the revolution. International news is relegated to the
inside pages and is generally
chosen to illustrate the themes
of imperialist domination and
Communist liberation of the
workers.
For example, Kennedy's visit
to Colombia and V e n e z uela,
which took place during the
weekend of our arrival, was covered only in so far as a mention
of the. arrest of a Venezuelan student for demonstrating against
Kennedy. We heard nothing
about the negotiations on Berlin
TOO MANY BABIES
Some big-city hospitals send babies home the day after they're
born. Why? Not enough doctors. Or nurses. Or beds. In this
week's Saturday Evening Post,
you'll learn how inadequate
medical care costs thousands of
infant lives. How our baby death
rate compares with other countries'. And why licensed mid-,
wtyes may be the answer,     i
The Saturday Eteninm
FOOT
FEBRUARY 3 ISSUE NOW ON SALE
or about the Kitona agreement
made by Tshombe (though some
news from the Congo was reported).
CONTRAST NOTED
Coming from a country where
all opinions can be expressed
(though some are more difficult
to publish than others), we were
struck by the contrast and disillusioned of any claims that
Castro's regime is democratic.
This is not to say that Castro
does not have the support of the
Cuban people. An estimate gathered from the people we spoke
to in Havana and other places
would indicate that 60 to 70 per
cent of the Cuban population
idolize Castro as their leader and
deliverer from the evils of American economic domination.
PERSONAL INTEREST
There is considerably more
uneasiness about the extent of
Russian and Chinese influence
in the country, but even there,
there is no concerted opposition
to existing policy.
Many of the people we talked
to seemed to feel a sense of personal identification with what
was going on. They spoke of
Canadian cattle "being used to
build up our herds and make
beef our principle export." Virtually everyone admitted that
Castro had done many good
things for the Cuban people,
even a refugee we met in Miami
who had been deprived of most
of his land.
A FEW
facts    you    should
know  about pizza.
First, there is pizza and there
is PIZZA. Remember that—no two
restaurants make it the same. We
make PIZZA, not pizza. No one
else in town knows how to make
PIZZA, they all make pizza.
What's  the   difference?
The difference is that while
pizza LOOKS very much like
PIZZA, it is only remotely similar. PIZZA is made fresh :>3VERY
DAY at the PIZZARAMA, while
pizza is not made even the WESK
vou eat it. It is not fresh, therefore cannot taste like PIZZA. The
FRESHNESS is the real secret—
nothiner. but NOTHING can compare  with  it!
While pizza can be kept in cold
storage for long periods without
altering the flavor t?), PIZZA
must, on the other hand, be served
AND EATEN the very day It's
made. In fact it MUST be eaten
while hot from the oven. RE-
H EATING cannot bring back
what a cold pizza has lost.
Pizza can be pre-prepared, but
PIZZA cannot, for it must be
made within minutes of going into the oven. The reason??? —
FRESHNESS.
THE NEXT TIME YOU EAT
PIZZA, MAKE SURE IT ISN'T
pizza. YOU CAN SEE, TASTE,
AND SMELL THE DIFFERENCE
—only PIZZARAMA makes PIZZA
at   its   two   great   locations
2676 W. Broadway   1208 Davie St.
RE 3-9916 MU 3-6015
•there IS a difference!
Ipmnij-wise ami ddW-wise,
Hue student uita mHl{bio t%e,
Will utse tliis saving sMa^m
CI Mt eack iiieek mtlie BqfHI!
Bank or Montreal
A big step on the road to success
is an early banking connection
m 3 MiLim CAJumss UBYSSEY
Winn&t of the Sbuthcrm trepiiy
Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
MEiVffiRa GANAOlAN UNltERSITY PRESS
Published   three   times   weekly    throughout    the   University    year   In
Vancouver  by  the Alma  Mater  Society,   University  of  B.C.    Editorial
opinions ejdpresse.l «re  tjftose *f tBe MSitor of The Ubyssey aatf iH'
•\ -«««s?rHv   '''rtsup  ?■>*   *he   Vlwa   M**t#>r  Pn^'^ty  nr  t'hp  T'tttr"'"^**'   a*   «''
Telephone   CA   4-3242.   Locals:   Edltor-^2S; ' NerrB—&3;   frhfttography—2*
Eaaor-in-Chi«l: Ro^r McJW»«
Managing  Editor    ......   .    .    DeniB Stanley
Associate * EaStta1 Ann Packard
• JJSy&JS**01        prerf ?«$&***•
city ISfBtor Keith Bradbury
; tp| ijlftor Maureen Covell
• I%««#r*pfey Baiter    .........   Dim Hume
;  Santer jlaitot      .......    i      Sharon Rodney
Smzfa Editor     ,   .    ...  .   .   ..   ....   Mike Hunter
,J»<u6er4»bY Manager      ....   .       Byron Sender
" JrarlSfcS Editor      .    .    .    ,    . David Brotnige
-WRtdWaT JteasareR    .    .    Bob ffendrickson, Ian Cameron
STAFF THtS ISSUE
;  Reporters: Ken Warren (desk), Ron Riter, Nickie Phillips,
. Ian Cameron, Mike Grenby, Heather Virtue.
. Sports:  Rill Willson, Glenn Schultz, Ron Kidd, George
Railton.
.  technical: Fred Jones, Gail Kendall.
T#f    fllYiSlT
fri«loy* WbfM«y .2, 1962
Letters to the Editor
-m
. The Alma Mater Society may find itself without eligibility rules today. If student court rules that council cannot set
or rule on student eligibility, anyone is eligible for anything,
including a seat on the AMS council, regardless of his academic standing.
And it's quite likely the court will' so rule.
'Where does that leave us, regarding the present AMS
elections? The first slate will have been run under the new
ehgiblity rules passed by council 'Monday night. (See The
Ubyssey, Feb. 1). If court rules it has not, and never has been,
within the power of the council to rule on student eligibility,
the second slate of AMS council offices will be run with no
eligibility rules.
The Ubyssey suggests council consider putting the question of eligibility to referendum along with the ballots for the
first slate, such rules to be incorporated as an AMS bylaw.
If any set of rules pnesenfed receive two thirds of the votes
cast, they would fheii a£ply to ncoriihatibris for the second
slate, as tfcey did for the first.
Why have eligibility rules at all?
! Students are at this institution primarily to get an education. True, participation in extra-curricular activities is part
of that education, but the most' important part of education
is academic.
: Students who are haying a tough time passing are certainly going to have it even tougher if ttaey'a¥« htoldiftg a student office.
Eligibility rules which require a student office to have
passed his previpus year insure some degree of respect from
members of the university administration, with whom our elected officials often have to deal.
#
If the AMS does not adopt some form of eligibility rules,
it; could easily, lose the reputation of being a responsible
organization.
Our reputation for responsibility is what will assure; a
cojntihuation of the student autonomy we libW enjoy.
Commendation
Editor,
The Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
1 would like to commend the
members of this year's student
council for their sporadic
efforts to restrict speech and
assembly Oh this campus. Other
students will support me, I am
sure, in urging our honorable
governing body to protect us
from various and sundry evils.
The debate topic being dis^
cussed last term by Arts council was a good case in point.
Before a resolution could be
decided, our distinguished student councillors deemed the
rumoured subject unfit to meet
the stringent requirements Of
UBC's public relations policy.
They justly cancelled the room
booking for the debate.
I repeat justly, for the
worldly subject Was reported
to have been concerned With
homosexuality.
Furthermore I would like to
congratulate council for upholding the laudable principle
that authority is omnipotent.
Early this term a few illustrious executive members were
approached to see if one could
be found who was willing to
support council's censorship
views in a debate. When this
was unsuccessful, Arts council
formally challenged any members of the student council
executive to appear at a de-
Scribed place on Thursday,
January 26, to debate the censorship question. Our proud
governing student body found
it beneath its great dignity to
show up at the aforementioned
time.
Carry on council, noble and
unimpeachable always.
WARREN WILSON,
Arts IV
'Whtrt we stand for'
Editor,
the Ubyssey.
Dear Sir:
You have used a considerable amount of space in your
paper to attack our viewpoint
and even to smear our group
and we consider it only fair to
be given an opportunity to
present our side of the story.
On Friday, January 12, one
of our members visitefi UBC
to have a private talk with a
few students, among them Mr.
LaCroix. We did not expect
that this meeting would be
publicized, the fact that it did
come to your attention makes
us wonder what type of man is
this Mir. LaCroix.
In your issue of Ubyssey of
January 16 you had already
two articles dealing with this
visit and our group.
In the first article wild and
inaccurate statements were
made. Our group was called a
"John Birch^style party" although Mr. LaCroix was told
that there is absolutely no connection between us and that
society, then it was suggested
that a connection existed between our group and the Social Credit party which is also
untrue.
In the same number you had
an editorial dealing with our.
petition. You gavje this matter
great attention: And rightly so.
But, unfortunately, you turned
matters upside down. Instead
of seeing clearly who is threatening not only our freedom
but our very existence you
generously encourage these
same people to continue their
work.
We are not against freedom
of speech -for anybody. What
we are against is subversive
and criminal conspiracy and
lies. We are against organized
terrorism which is already
working in Vancouver'. And
how many other clubs would
be permitted to operate at
UBC if there were only 500
communists there? We can answer this for you—NONE.
We would expect young, educated men to rise "against the
communist terror and brutality
especially after the Hungarian
people were mercilessly
crushed, after the Berlin Wall
was erected and after the five-
megaton bomb of terror was
exploded.
We would expect you to
loathe and abhor those people
that keep, not a few individuals, but entire nations
jailed. Don't you know that the
borders of all communist countries are covered with barbed
wire, mines and towers with
machine gun emplacements?
You accuse us of being unjust to communists. But can the
word justice  and communism
ever come together?
If your father were killed
by these "freedom - seeking
people" (freedom for their own
ends); if your sister were raped
by the soldiers of the Red
Army; if your brother were
rotting in a forced labor camp;
if you have seen Katyn where
10,000 Poles were massacred
or Vinica where mass graves
were discovered under public
parks; if you escaped from the
river of death where Yugoslav
communists slaughtered 20,000
men; if you had gone through
a torture chamber where modern brainwashing is done and
strong men are reduced to
nothingness; then you would
not be so generous to communists who have neither courage
nor conscientiousness to fight
for survival of your society
and yourselves.
The Communist Party has
been outlawed twice in Canada
for crimes, in the words of
Hon. Mr. Justice Wright, of
"teaching the overthrow of
governmental or economic institutions by force and violence". But this is not the answer. The answer must be
found in you and me and in
free men everywhere. We must
stand up for human rights and
work, fight and even die to
stop the criminal assault on
every source of our happiness
and our human dignity.
There is not time to bicker
and argue. The communists are
working day and night all
around the world to bury you
and me. If we fight we might
live. If we wait they will
surely burv us.
Arise young men! Look
clearly and bravely at yOur
own future. Don't let communists and their followers cloud
your mind and weaken your
courage.
This is our answer to your
writing. Now you know better
what we stand for.
GEZA BENKO,
Graduate,
Sopron Division
of Forest Faculty.
Three sentences Were cut
from the above letter. They
were in reference to a campus
political club leader and the
leader of a, downtown union.
Both we're defamatory and
slanderous.—Ed.
Serendipity
&--■*%
On practically everything
reverses love makes the world go round'
'-1 think that it's time for Canada to get into the space race.
Think Of all the "uncommitted"
minds we could- win* by catapulting some lucky guy and
girl arbuhd the world a few
times. Sort of" reverse the adage ■
that it's love that makes the
world go round. But the scientists tell us that by going into
space one can age slower than
ea:rthlings. So think young,
grow older slower, get on the
Pepsi space ship and zoom.
I'd volunteer to be the first
mafvinto space but my philosophy rii-ofesTsor keeps an attendance ret'ord and unless I
shouteH "Here-eft" ifrorn 150
miles »up, h^-'d record me as
absent.
Of course we could send my
professor up but then the public would Criticize the Canada
Council for wasting money in
exporting an "unintelligible"
philosopher to other realms.
Or' W cotild send trie architect of the new medical boxes
beside Wesbrook into space.
Tm convinced We'd only be
sending him Home' anyways!
But that's being unfair — to
space I rh£ah.
If Canada is too poor to go
up why don't We try to get a
man down? What with our
divorce laws; I'm sure" we get
lots of people down. I mean
aur divorce laws should be
more stringent. Why should
death separate people in love?
I'm sure that our legislature
Wouldn't hesitate to enforce
suicide and make the victim
swear to spend eternity with
his spouse. The Conservatives
couldn't help winning the election if they acted now. Or maybe we could send them, into
outer space?
And the Doukhobors. If we
could trust them not to blow
the spaceship to smithereens
(a province in Russia) they'd
be ideal for space travel.
Of course whoever we send
up will have to take a loyalty
Oath! Subversion from above
has always been more likely
than subversion from below.
He'd have to promise to uphold
our divorce laws and our right
to buy trading stamps before
we could let him go.
It's really a toss-up as to
whether there's more empty
space up there or down here.
The question is — do you
plan to buy trading stamps or
to support the Canadian Peace
Research Institute? If you want
to live to read my column
every week (and you may have
other reasons, too), you should
actively support CAPRI: - the
Peace Institute needs us and
our money. It will do research
on the problems underlying
international tensions. It will
try to find intelligent ways to
avert a thermonuclear war. It
Will be a non-profit, non-political organization supported, it
is hoped, by public subscriptions and government grants.
Its purpose is to provide our
government with the facts and
methods necessary to solve the
world's worst social disease —
WAR. An International Peace
Research Fund is being established to assist in creating an
independent Peace Research
institute in as many countries
as possible — all working full
time on a positive program for
peace.
If you like the idea of peace,
as opposed to say, radiation
sickness, help CAPRI at 1062
W. Georgia or Box 2249,
Vancouver, and come to the
Armory next Tuesday at 8:30
p.m.
Poem for the Weak: If you
care, I'll see you there. Friday, February 2, 1962
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
StiidfenF MP*s go national
By Canadian University Press
With a federal election in
the offing, model parliaments
at campuses across the country
are getting more attention this
year.
There has been a. decided
turning away from the old days
of mock parliaments where
such issues as improved campus
parking facilities were debated.
Topics now deal, in the main,
with Canada s stand on nuclear
weapons,^ foreign trade, and
employment, but attention is
also given to provincial and
regional matters;
The emphasis on the actual
issues with which Federal •Paiv
liament is engaged has also increased the emphasis of forming model parliaments on the
same framework.
Liberal, Progressive-Conservative   and   New   Democratic
clubs on esich campus are campaigning ardently to win control of the government in che
elections.
Who the overall winner will
be ■ for the whole of Canada
could give the clue as to which
party will win the federal election. Party organizations keep
a close eye on the university
elections and there is great
gnashing of teeth when an
election is lost.
While most of the parliaments are yet to be held, Liberals have formed the government at seven universities: University of Toronto, University
of Saskatchewan, Loyola. College, Sir George Williams University, University of Manitoba, McGill University and
Queens University.
The Liberals have also been
asked to form the government
at the University of Montreal
parliament, which is being
formed oh provincial framework with no elections.
Last year, the Liberals swept
the countryi taking 16 of 22
model parliaments. Whether or
not they can accomplish this
again will depend greatly on
the support given tne New
Democratic Party. At present,
this is unpredictable.
The Tories have won three
parliaments, the University of
Western Ontario^ Acadia University; and McMaster University. The single NDP Victory to
dri- e was at St. Francis Xavier
Junior. College in Nova Scotia.
Glenda Casson, executive-
secretary of .the Progressive-
Conservative Student Federation,, declined to predict on future elections—"You just can't
m a k e predictions with politics," she said.
Laval elections will lack
Liberals and Nationales
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) —
Neither    the   Liberal    nor   the
Union Nationale parties are go-
f    ing  to take part in the Laval
•* Model Parliament.
The two groups have refused
to accept a general election for
seats, charging that seats should
be allocated on the same basis
and in the same proportion as
that of the provincial parliament. This would have given the
Liberals 50 seats, the Union National 40, and one for an independent.
The New Party has objected
to this formula which would bar
it completely from the model
parliament. The same applies for
the Party for National Independence recently ■ formed at
Laval.
The proportion of the Liberal
and Union Nationale parties has
been rejected by the student
council as anti-democratic, and
the holding of statutory elections
has been decided on.
Only the New Party will contest the election with the Party
for National Independence and
a so-called independent party.
It's generally predicted that
the Party for National Independence will score a crushing
win over its two adversaries.
Liberals score victory
in Queen's elections
KINGSTON (CUP) — The Liberals will form a minority
government in Queen's model parliament next week, following   a   close   election   victory.
The Liberals captured 402 votes compared to 336 for the
Tories  and 230  for the New Democrats.
Liberals will get  25  seats in
Holding seats
challenge
of Liberals
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian University Liberal Federation (CULF) has kicked off the
Model Parliament competitions
by asserting that it intends "to
hold the ground gained last year
and to eat into the remaining
strongholds of the other parties."
Noting that CULF took more
Model Parliaments than any
other party last year, Peter
C a d e a u, executive secretary,
said "the (University Liberals
now have the task of consolidating the gains made last year.
"This," he said, "will be challenging in the face of the tremendous effort" being made by
the other national parties."
CULF claims 16 model parliament victories out of 22 held
last year.
■■A-   I     ■.  >    ■;■ .     -:..
the   61   seat   house,   the   Tories
will get 22 and NDP 14.
The Liberals polled 40.3 per
cent of the popular vote, the
PC's 36.7 per cent and the NDP
23 per cent. Thirty-one per cent
of the students voted, compared
with 44.1 per cent last year and
3.5 per cent in 1960.
The New Democrats almost
doubled their share of the
Queen's popular vote. In last
year's election, the Liberals
took 49 per cent, the PC's 40
and the New Party, as it was
then called, 12 per  cent.
"The best party won," said
Liberal leader Douglas McCal-
lan. "I hope this is a reflection
of national feeling."
Tory leader Phil Elder congratulated" the Liberals on their
victory and said that since the
| result had been so close, he was
looking forward to an "exciting"
session.
Commented NDP leader
Arnold Amber: "We learned a
lot from this campaign. We consider the result as a base on
which to build." In an answer
to a CUP survey before Christmas, the editor of the Queen's
journal had predicted a 40-40-20
split in the model parliament
election.
Monarchist Party
scores at Car/eton
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Imperial Monarchist Party
scored a strong win over
three political parties in the
Carleton Model Parliament
this week.
The Imperial Monarchists
took 12 seats, the Liberals and
Progressive Conservatives received seven each, and the
New Democratic Party took
four.
There is a strong possibility
that the defeated parties may
form a coalition to overthrow
the Imperial Monarchists.
A PLANTOR
Books to be displayed
An exhibition of 350 French
periodicals written on arts and
science will be held in Bu. 112
Monday to Friday next week.
The exhibition is sponsored by
the university French Club.
VIVAl
If Russia attacked today, says
physicist Edward Teller, the
U. S. would not survive. Why?
Because we're not appropriately
armed. Our weapons are too
clumsy. Too big. Too easy to
stop. In this week's Saturday
Evening Post, he maps out a
bold plan for survival. And explains why our nuclear-test ban
was "idiotic and dangerous."
The Saturday Evening
rtBrnfAiii 3 issue now on s»t»
Bill Piket, executive secretary for the youth section of
the New Democrats, said that
his party should at least form
the Opposition in many of the
parliaments. "We have especially good chances of taking the
elections at the University of
British Columbia, St. Francis
Xavier University and Waterloo Lutheran College," he asserted.
Commenting on the Liberal
victories, Peter Cadeau, executive-secretary of the Canadian
University Liberal Federation,
asserted that they represented
"a strong vote of protest
against the waited: years policies of the Tory government."
Cadeau said the Liberals would
hold the ground gained last
year, and would "eat into the
strongholds of the other parties" this year.
Campus editors are split in
their opinion as to who will be
the victor.
The traditional left - wing,
liberal thinking of universities
is still in evidence and may be
increased this year by student
dissatisfaction with federal
government policies. At
Queen's University students
are reported to be "getting
more disillusioned with the
Progressive - Conservative government."
At the University of British
Columbia, there is a reported
growing trend to support the
New Democrats or Liber ads,
while the power of the Conservatives is in a definite decline. The Liberals are still
leading in a neek-and-neck race
at UBC, but the NDP may
come up and take the election.
McMaster new member
in model parliament race
HAMILTON (CUP)^—McMaster University has joined the
list of Canadian universities now holding model parliaments.
McMaster will be holding lis first model parliament at the
end of January. Elections will take place 10 days before parliament comes into -session*
A steering committee, composed of the executive of the
Politics Society, and representatives of party clubs, is currently completing plans for the session.
Liberals, Progressive^Conservaiives and New Democratic
Party-ites will be contesting the seats in the House. The Joe
Noon Society, an organization formed with the purpose of
'preserving freedom' may also field a slate of candidates.
In previous years, party rivalry has prevented the formation of a model parliament on the campus.
Without this label [ /Ztfjjjfa. Jg& j '*is not a 9enuine Kit,en Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, F<
*>   i     V
KINEO
By PETER MORRIS
*    TEN  BEST FILMS    *
The most recent issue of the British Film Institute's quarterly
''Sight and Sound" has revived the old sport of choosing the
Ten Best Films of All Time. I am not positive the directors and
critics who submitted their lists do not agree on their definition of
"Best." Or, at least, this is the kind way of looking at it. An unkind interpretation of their lists would imply that they haven't
a clue what the cinema is all Eibout, and have had to fall back
on the notion that what they like must necessarily be good. I fail
to see how otherwise films like LA FEMME DU BOULANGER
and GONE WITH THE WIND coul.d ever creep into a Ten Best
list. I would define a "Best" film as one which has a universal
sense of meaning, is interpreted in terms of a cinematic aesthetic
and is as valid today as when it was first created. With this definition in mind my own "Ten Best" list would include the following
films—given in no particular order:
BICYCLE THIEF. This film by de Sica is certainly the greatest film in a whole gamut of trivial Italian neo-realistic "melodramas. I respect it for its artistic control in portraying a profound human truth and for its ability to intensify an emotion by
compressing within a single frame visual elements that make their
own commentary upon the main action.
TEN DAYS THAT SHOOK THE WORLD (OCTOBER). I
choose this Sergei Eisenstein film over his more successful BATTLESHIP PATEMKIN simply because it attempts more. I admire
its iconographic epic structure, its attempt to convey intellectual
concepts (even though this sometimes fails) and in particular its
tonal and constructive rhythms around the pivot of the 'mass-hero'
and the Russian Revolution.
TRIUMPH OF THE WILL. Leni Reifenstahl's skilful manipulation of the actuality of si Nazi Party Rally for propagandists
purposes is surely one of the greatest works of film art in the
world. The dexterity of its photography and editing to create
hidden effects on the viewer, the sensitivity and profundity of its
conception in raising such a vile excrescence as Hitler to the
level of the gods is surely unequalled in any sirt form.
THE CHILDHOOD OF MAXIM GORKY. Totally different
in conception and approach to TRIUMPH this Mark Donskoi film
has a lyrical sense of beauty in its imagery that I can review
indefinitely.
LISTEN TO BRITAIN. Humphrey Jennings is one of the few
intellectual's who have been attracted to the cinema, and this short
film is surely a stylistic triumph. In portraying his impression of
Britain at war he created such subtle rhythms, such marvellously
evocatve imagery freely linked by contrasting and complementary
sounds that, despite its uninteresting -subject matter to contempor-
ery non-English viewers, it has a real lasting value.
ZERO DE CONDUITE. Jean Vigo died young before he could
create more than two feature films: ZERO DE CONDUITE and
L'ATALANTE. ZERO is totally undeveloped technically, but it
displays a poet's instinct for the expressive symbol, for the intensity of emotion captured in a single apt image. The cinema
lost one of its greatest artists when he died.
HIOSHIMA MON AMOUR. This recent film certainly marks
as great a turning point for the sound film as BATTLESHIP
POTEMKIN did for the silent. The sensitivity of its conception
and construction in portraying the fleeting nature of human memory, the beauty of its imagery, the penetrating sense of rhythm,
and" the poetry of its dialogue make it One of the great works of
film art.
Finally, three films by the Swede Ingmar Bergman: WILD
STRAWBERRIES, THE SEVENTH SEAL and THE NAKED
NIGHT. These rich and complex films expressing Bergman's
death-in-love end life-in-death theme are most sublimely and cine-
niatically conceived. Their emotions and significance are unvier-
sally valid, and he is a lost man who cannot appreciate them.
It should be-remembered that choosing the Ten Best anything
can f*Hlly be nothing more than a 'game', and perhaps it is only
important in projecting tHe ego of the critics. However, I should
be interested to hear from any readers with their own list. Who
knows, we may even agree on some films.
Earn, Learn and Travel in Europe
Students   desiring   summer   jobs   in   Europe   requiring
little  or  no  language  background, send  for our  brochure
giving general job description and application form.
Mail to:
STRASSER TRAVEL SERVICE
1320 6th AVENUE
SEATTLE 1, WASHINGTON.
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ADDRESS
NAME OF COLLEGE AFFILIATION
IN KINEO, PETER MORRIS picks his "Ten Best." The shot above,
showing the Knight at chess with Death on a typically bleak
Bergman   sea-shore,   is   from
Morris's selections.
anniversary ba
A Twenty-fifth Anniversary
program should call forth a
company's best and most imaginative efforts. But last Thursday evening (appropriately the
twenty-fifth), the Ballet Russe
de Monte Carlo demonstrated
neither. This company, which
not very long ago could boast
the dancing of Alexandra
Danilova and Frederic Franklin and claim the respect of the
ballet world, has in recent
years apparently lost much of
its youthfulness and precision
and certainly its imagination.
Although Thursday's performance showed evidence of, general technical improvement
over some recent seasons, the
choice of program seemed governed as usual by a desire to
play safe at the box office
rather than give the public
anything challenging.'
NEW SELECTION
The one new work on the
program, an anniversary commission, was Franklin's Tribute,
set to Caesar Franck's Symphonic Variations. Franklin
has   made   skilled  use   of   the
- the ballet russe
Queen Elizabeth Auditorium —
interplay between piano and
orchestra in his choreography
although he could probably
have exploited the music's
varying moods' more thoroughly. Basically six dancers perform in simple classic style
what could become, with closer
integration of music and choreography, a standard repertoire
Item. The leaden approach of
the conductor and of piano
soloist Rachel Chapman provided the only major drawback
in performance. Miss Chapman's recitatives and solos
lacked sparkle while Mr. Bout-
nikoff's direction, one is
tempted to say, lacked almost
everything except the beat.
MORE DISCIPLINE
A perennial offering, Les
Sylphides, received a more
disciplined performance than
when last presented here by
the Ballet Russe. The essential
evenness and gracefulness of
the corps de ballet as it glides
through C h o p i n' s romantic
melodies were especially better, if not yet ideally, realized.
While  the  more  vigorous sec-
I
• BAR OPENS AT 9 p.m.
• DANCING UNTIL 2 cm.
• COCKTAILS SERVED AT 7:30
• DINNER STARTS AT 8 p.m.
Everyone Welcome
On Friday, Feb. 2, the Newman Centre will host its annual
formal, the Crystal Ball. This year the dance will be held
in the beautifully appointed Copper and Crystal rooms of
the CopilanaGardem. Cocktails witt be served at 7:30, and
dinner (baked-solmon entree) commences at 8:00. The bar
wilt open and dancing begin at 9rOQ and continue to 1:60.
Tickets are $7.50 per couple and can be obtained at the
A.M.S. Office or from any executive of the Newman Centre
at St. Mark's College. Everyone Welcome.
TICKETS   AT  A.M.S.   OFFICE
and ST. MARKS COLLEGE
de monte carlo —
Thursday, January 25, 1962
tions - may have lacked th
same precision of executior
the overall performance b
both soloists and corps we
quite sympathetic.
LACKING FRAGILITY
The evening's guest artis
Nina Vyroubova, appeare
with a technically secure ii
terpretation of the Dying Swa
but compared with that recen
ly given here by Rimma JC;
relskaya it seemed lacking i
the fragile, ethereal quality s
much a part of the Sovi<
artist's conception. The la
ter's pliant arms and glidin
pas de bouree were only a]
proached by Vyroubova.
An abridged version of tfi
Nutcracker, featuring the con
pany's premiere danseuse Nin
Novak with Juan Giuliane. coi
eluded Thursday's perforn
ance. While the corps of snov
flakes and flowers did not a
ways glisten or bloom con
pletely in unison, the perforn
ance as a whole was agai
proficient. Nina Novak ma
not radiate much of what th
critic's jargon calls poetry, bu
her extensions, pirouettes, an
so forth were well executec
As elsewhere lighting, cos
tumes, and scenery comph
mented the production withou
dominating the dancing.
Without wishing to labor th
point, I do think that balle
companies  should  better  real
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
SEVENTH   SEAL,   one   of
(et)
then* art as a wedding of
?ic and*.dance, where the
hestra is a partner not
^ely a minor embellishment
-where the conductor
uld function as more than
letronome; The Ballet Russe
.testra is an adequate en-
ible but under Ivan Boutni-
f it plays with little sensi-
ty and an overstressed beat.
ether the difficulty is one
sersOnnel or rehearsal time
both, its resolution would
-k an important step tods reviving the forme vital-
of the Ballet Russe de
tie Carlo.
—william littler
I
• J •
TOR: DAVE BROMIGE
Layout: Jones
^s Joyce
no choice
o peddle us
hen Daedalus.
ENTAGOWN
Lovely 1   25%
lection   for ^"* nr
OFF
For
T ,,       UBC
ier Jackets **mr**
UHE BRUCKER SALON
igners and Dressmakers
Expert Alterations
nings   by Appointment
1 Kingsway   HE 1-1160
•infants,
mil Wear
Stoles,
Kox,
*
soon-
seen scene
CINEMA 16, on Monday, Feb. 5, shows Warner Bros. 1935
version of A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, produced by Max
Reinhardt, which, surprisingly, includes James Cagney, Joe E.
Brown, and Mickey Rooney in the cast. Rooney plays Puck;
Titania is presumably played by Olivia de Haviland; in the absence of further information, it's impossible to guess whether
Cagney plays Oberon, Joe Brown Bottom, or vice versa.
THE   FESTIVAL   OF   CONTEMPORARY  ARTS
A PARTIAL LIST:
1.. MUSIC
Feb.   5, noon,   Aud.:   Don   Clarke's  Jazz  Sextette,
Feb. 6, noon, Brock: Elliot Carter talks about, and a quartet
performs, his music.
2. POETRY
Feb. 9, 3:30, Arts 100: Lawrence Ferlingheiti reads.
Feb. 16, 3:30, Arts 100: Robert Creeley reads.
3. FILM
Feb.  8, noon, Aud.: Le Tesiamente d'Orphee, or Cocteau's
farewell. Admission two bits.
Feb.  12,  noon, Aud.:  Closed Vision, French  stream-of-con-
sciousness. Two bits.
4. ART  AND  ARCHITECTURE
Exhibitions, in the Fine Art Gallery, of Pier Nervi, Canadian Classicism. The School of Paris.
P.S.: THE WINTER'S TALE, definitive review thereof, will
appear NEXT week. Our critic has been preoccupied with (a)
the hangover he acquired at the production party, and (b) a
Moricand-like visitation by Mike Matthews and his duffle.
However. Critic is now ru slack and confident as ever: read him
next Friday.
'placebo
by george bowering
OFF THE ROAD -
FIRSTLY, WE  SHOULD
state that we are greatly
pleased to see that a Show like
the CBC's Quest can remain
alive on television, and further, that it can find a spot
on Sunday nights. It has its
limitations and weaknesses,
but these are nowhere near as
flagrant as those encountered
in a thing such as The Danny
Thomas show, otherwise
known as Father Knows Best.
AND   SECONDLY,    WE
should state that we know,this
fact of life: No matter how
good a show based on a literary
work, the champions of said
work will be disappointed.
Jack Kerouac wrote On The
Road to be read or listened to.
Screenplayed by someone else,
it naturally becomes an inadequate translation. On the other
hand, Kerouac's very good
screenplay. Pull My Daisy, suf-
delayed-action bomb
The
Kitsilano
The Queen and the Rebels,
by Ugo Betti starts as a tale of
revolution and upheaval. Several travellers are detained in
a small mountain village by
the revolutionaries who happen to be in power at the time.
They are looking for the
"Queen," a person whose courage and dignity have become
almost a myth in the minds of
the country folk. The revolution has been going on for
about five years, power passing from one set of insurrectionists to the next. Although
the people pay service to whatever party is in power, and almost invariably condemn the
Queen, she1 remains in their
minds, giving questions a place
to start: questions the rebels
Son't want to have to answer.
SLOW DEVELOPMENT
This is how the play starts,
and for three out of four scenes
it continues, studded with epithets and pontifications, but
for the most part developing
only into a muddle of intrigues
and mistaken identities. Wolfe
Mentze, as Biante, the rebel
leader of the moment, manages to raise his voice often
enough to keep attention centred on the stage until the end
of the third scene whereupon,
having served his purpose, he
dies. Ray Pinder attempts to
play a cowardly orderly but
comes out more a player with
first-night nerves. Hilda
Thomas,   as   the  true   Queen,
ueen and the Rebels
Theatre January 30-February 3,  1962
plays her part effectively
(though I fear for her safety if
she continues to play her death
scene quite so effectively . . .
she pulls a real slammer.)
Dennis Jones, as Raim, a young
and overbearing opportunist,
has the largest supporting role.
What he does is detract from
the play, both by hamming
throughout (or at least until
he gets shot up) arnd by distorting his character from a
bully into an effeminate snob,
still another contender for the
Queen's title.
LARGEST CRITICISM
The largest single criticism
must lie with the playwright.
Betti has put all the meat in
the last scene, with nothing but
filler coming before. There are
only two players in the last
scene, and though* they have
magnificent parts and play
them well, they find themselves on poorly laid ground.
It is to the credit of these two
actors, Margaret . Suttees and
Lloyd Berry, that they establish themselves so well.
Miss Surtees plays the sometime prostitute Argia, who has
been falsely accused of being
the Queen by Amos, played by
Mr. Berry, and condemned to
death. Amos, the cold rationalist, attacks Argia by threatening her life and offering pardon in return for a confession
to crimes which would destroy
her legend. He pleaded the necessity,  over  all else,  of  con-
ued existence, against the woman he thinks to be the Queen,
the embodiment of all that is
opposed to necessity.
What he does not know is
that Argia has known necessity since she was eleven, and
lived with immediacy more
sensuously than Amos ever
eould. Argia wavers and recrudesces under Amos' attack
find finally walks by herself
to the firing squad, stopping
in the harsh glare of truck-
lights, unreal and unbelievable,
to euphemise for a moment
upon the mountains and the
stars.
LEFT AT ENDS
The dialogue bristles between these two through most
of the final scene. All that
Betti is concerned with in the
play comes here; all the rest is
scene-setting, with confusion of
characters left at tag-ends. Perhaps Betti feels his audiences
should be, willing to wait for
him. Certainly he is worth
waiting; fort and the play well
worth seeing, but for myself
seeing the last scene four times
would have-been'much more
enjoyable than seeing all four
once.
—-allan graves
fers by its Grove translation
into book with still photos.
EX-UBC MAN, Norman
Klenman did the screenplay
for the Toronto production of
Sunday night, and he did put
up a valiant effort while suffering defeat in a noble cause.
His job was to write On The
Road to fit into 30 minutes of
video time. His task was made
simpler by the fact that
Kerouac had isolated this short
segment from the novel and
had it printed in a magazine
before the King Jack edition
emerged. The film was a defeat, for all that, however.
EX-UBC MAN Darryl Duke
was the director, and one could
not help but feel that he knew
little about the novel. He forgot the basic rule of warfare:
know your enemy. Sometimes
the viewer felt that Duke was
mixing Chayefsky with Inge.
The corny bare lightbulb and
armpits were there, but the big
tragic comic view of Kerouac
was not. Duke's biggest goof
was the music he allowed off
the road. Running through the
book is Charley Parker. Walking through the screenplay was
CBC muzak-man Ricky Hyslop.
Arrrg!
I SUPPOSE IT IS INCI-
dental that On The Road's
tragicomic hero, Dean Moriarty
was missing from the screen
version. But so was Sal Paradise, the teller of the tale. Instead we had ex-Vancouver
man Bruno Gerussi using Sal's
name. Gerussi tried. He had
studied Kerouac's voice, and in
the narration sequences he did
not a bad job of imitating it.
But he was not a Kerouac
figure. He was not cool enough,
not thin enough, not aware
enough. His hair was beautifully trimmed and lacquered,
as Paradise's never would be
or could be. Most important, he
was too concerned with himself — he did not have the
tragic, and comic irony of Sal.
He did not laugh at himself.
The clown was AWOL.
BUT Pilar Seurat AS THE
winsome and brave and stupid
Teresa, was a beautiful
example of the veritable Kerouac heroine. She was Maggie
Cassidy and Mardou Fox and
Tristessa stepping from saga
to cine with a naturalness that
saved what could be saved
from the murder of the' roadmen.
U
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THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1962
Russia is
liberalizing
says Rowan
A philosophy professor pre>
dieted the Soviet Union will develop in a "way which will be
welcomed by the democracies."
Dr. R. J. Rowan said there
has been a definite liberalizing
movement in the USSR since the
death of   Stalin.
Rowan told a noon-hour audience Stalin behaved foolishly
within the ruling class by violating the principles that are
necessary for any ruling society.
He termed Stalin's practices
stupid and fear-ridden.
Rowan said that unrealistic
policies were embarked upon
because of a basic lack of communication resulting from these
practices.
"The result was misfortune,
setback and dangerous nonsense," he said.
Rowan said "we" should not
make shrill condemnations of
the Soviet Union.
"When, in five or ten years
the Iron Curtain has been removed, we may be surprised
and a bit chagrined to find the
situation that exists between us
similar," he said. "Their weaknesses and failures are the same
as ours."
NewmanClubformal
The Crystal Ball, the Newman centre's annual formal,
will be held Friday in the
Canyon Gardens.
Cocktails will begin the evening at 7:30 p.m. Dinner is
served at 8 and dancing begins at 9.
Carleton to be host
for student seminar
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carle-
ton University will be host
for the Fifth Annual Seminar
of the National Federation of
Canadian University Students
The seminar will have as its
theme "The University in Canadian Life."
Walter McLean, NFCUS
president, said he hoped that
as many students as possible
would apply for the seminar,
a gathering which he described as "unique in Canadian student affairs."
Crossing patrol\
set up at Carteton
OTTAWA (CUP) — Carleton
students took matters into their
own hands this week by establishing a system of self-protection at a level crossing on the
campus.
Students, working in oneJiour
shifts, stand at the rail line
where it cuts across a' university
road and flag cars down to warn
them of the dangerous crossing.
The action called "Operation
WIG-WAG" was prompted by a
car-train collision at the crossing last week.
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Statistics
to
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OTTAWA (CUP) —The Dom-
inioo Bureau of Statistics' campaign to update the figures on
student income and expenditure
is about to begin.
One quarter of Canada's student population will receive a
brown envelope by mid-February from the government body.
The survey will check the
flow of money into and out of
students' hands. It will attempt
to learn how students' incomes
are divided between bursaries,
scholarships, i n d i v idual earnings, family support, loans, and
other revenue sources, and what
expenditures are made for fees,
living expenses, capital costs,
etc.
This year's survey is intended
to pay special attention to foreign and graduate students in
Canada. Approximately 14,000
questionaires will be s e n t to
these students, or, as the DBS
puts    it,    "every   non-Canadian
student and every full-time Can
adian post graduate student will
receive (one.)"
Undergraduates have been
broken into eight categories, of
which Arts, Science, Commerce
is the largest with 4,000 to be
queried.
Eleven thousand and five hundred forms will be sent to students working on their first degrees.
"Altogether,"   said   a   depart-
ment spokesman, "TWenty-fivf
thousand five hundred students
from 59 universities and colleges
—including 15 Quebec classical
colleges will participate in the
survey."
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I rv Yirl"V\ Barrie, Ontario Frfefcry, February 2, 1942
T HE     U BY5SEy
Pa»e9
Seconders give statements
PRESIDENT
Nick Omelusik
Any candidate for the AMS
Presidency must have initiative, be a leader and have a
wide range of experience in
studnt activities. Nick Omelusik has all the necessary requirements to make a strong
student council President.
The following are some of
the positions he has held:
Treasurer, Frosh Undergraduate Society; Vice - President,
Political Science Club; Assistant Co-ordinator and member,
Brock Management Committee;
Frosh Retreat Chairman. He is
currently Vice-Chairman of the
Discipline Committee and chief
basketball statistician for the
WCIAU.
*-Thus he has been active in
dofemittees, clubs and athletics,
all of which are areas of vital
concern in student affairs.
I urge you to elect Nick
Omelusik AMS President next
Wednesday.
JAMES WINCHELL
/*      Eric Ricker
In the coming year, the President of the Alma Mater Society will be confronted with
many new and difficult problems. Eric flicker's experience
with student activities, his
qualities of leadership and his
intense interest in student af-
f^jrs qualify him as an excellent choice for President.
For the past two years, Eric
has been a member of the student council — before this
he played an active role in the
Fort Camp Excutive and other
areas of student activities.
As First Vice-President, Eric
ifis gained a valuable insight
:o the President's duties and
•esponsibilities.
Eric has assumed responsibi-
ity willingly — achieving suc-
less in every position and task
le has undertaken.
DON  ROBERTSON
JIM MEEKISON
Doug Stewart
I am nominating Doug Stew-
irt for the chief executive posi-
ion on the student council be-
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cause his past record convinces
me that he has the ability and
experience for this job.
Like David Edgar, our outstanding president of 1&6<M$1,
Doug started his student political career as President of the
Oak Bay High School Student
Council.
Two years later again following Edgar's footsteps he became president of the Victoria
College Student Council.
Here at UBC he has been the
Activities Co-ordinator during
the past year, while previously
he was active in a number of
subordinate AMS organizations, for example NFCUS and
Open House.
In short, his wide experience
in this type of post shows Doug
to be our best choice for the
position of the 1962-63 student
council President.
DAVID ANBERSON
SECOND
VICE-PRESIDENT
Mike   Hanson
I have known Mike Hanson
for several years. I have always felt Mike to be quite capable and most willing to help
in the various committees in
which we have worked. Mike
has served on the Food Services Committee and was executive member of the Commerce
Undergraduate  Society.
This year Mike served on
the Public Relations Committee
under the incumbent 2nd Vice-
President; on this committee
Mike handled general publicity
and radio media. From this,
you can see Mike Hanson has
the necessary qualifications to
hold the position of 2nd Vice-
President.   We must  elect the
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man who best knows the position; I assure you Mike Hanson
is the man for 2nd Vice-President.
FRANK JACOBUCCI
Ed Lavalle
The past year has shown that
the office of Second Vice-President requires .not only an individual experienced in public
relations but also one who has
proven his capabilities in the
more important area of student
administration.
From personal experience I
am fully convinced that Ed
Lavalle's qualifications meet
both the above mentioned requirements. Administratively
he has served as treasurer of
Homecoming, Chairman of the
AMS Parking and Traffic Commission, Chairman of Frosh
Symposium and has held executive positions on High School
Conference, Frosh Retreat and
Orientation  Committees.
Furthermore, he has achieved
experience in Public Relations
as past Features and Associate
Editor of The Ubyssey and has
had occasion to work closely
with members of the downtown
radio and -press with regard to
other campus organizations.
PETER SHEPARD
Bob Mac Kay
The second Vice - President
must possess experience, ingenuity, and leadership ability.
In all of these, Bob MacKay
has revealed a high degree of
proficiency.
Professional newspaper training and public relations work
'HOW TO AVOID'
NUCLEAR
have provided Bob with maturity and experience which he
has applied to many student'
activities, including his positions as Advertising Sales Manager of the Radio Society and
Vancouver Advertising Manager of the Ubyssey. As well
as applying his keen interest
and knowledge of Public Relations, Bob will provide leadership and enthusiasm in all
areas of student endeavor.
JIM MEEKISON
SECRETARY
Barbara Bennett
It is a pleasure .to nominate
Barbara Bennett for the position of AMS Secretary. Barbara has proven her ability as
a student leader through her
past accomplishments as: Secretary of Open House, Secretary and Vice-chairman of the
Student Executive Conference,
a member of Homecoming and
many other committees.
In addition to the excellent
The surest way to avoid nuclear
war, says scientist Edward
Teller, is to get ready for It
And that means testing, testing
and more testing. In this
iweek's Post, he charges that
our nuclear test ban was "idiotic and dangerous." Tells how
lour stockpile compares with
| Russia's. And explains how
I misguided" peace lovers are
'taking us to the brink of war.;
The Saturday Evening
sriT
FEBRUARY 3 ISSUE  NOW ON SAL*.
ST. TIMOTHY LUTHERAN CHURCH
ON CAMPUS WORSHIP
HUT L4 - EAST MALL
11:00 a.m. every Sunday
Everyone^ Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
Services for Sunday, February 4th
8:00 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION
(followed by breakfast. All welcome)
11:00 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION and SERMON
(The Rector: Rev.  Desmond  Kimmitt)
7:30  p.m.-EVENSONG and ADDRESS: "NEW DELHI"
Speaker: Miss Mary Rendell, Anglican delegate to the
recent World Council of Churches meeting in New Delhi.
Coffee and discussion in which Miss Rendell will participate following  the service.
Wednesday, February 7th
7:00 a.m.-HOLY COMMUNION
work she has performed in
each of these activities, Barbara has provided originality
and constructive criticism
which enhanced their success.
Barbara's sense of responsibility and her past achievements qualify her as ah excellent secretary for the student
council. J
JIM MEEKISON
Miriam Sapiro
A secretary is more than a
mere stenographer. She is an
important and senior member
on an executive. As well as
a thorough knowledge of secretarial duties, she must have
the integrity and courage required of an elected representative of the students.
For these reasons, and having worked with her as a fellow executive for the past two
years, I second Miriam Sapiro
to the position of Secretary of
the Alma Mater Society.
MARK UNDERHILL
RCAF
DON'T FORGET
THIS DATE
February 7th,
in the Armouries
AN RCAF PERSONNEL
OFFICER WILL VISIT
YOUR CAMPUS TO
INTERVIEW
ALL FINAL YEAR
UNDERGRADUATES
INTERESTED IN
PERMANENT
EMPLOYMENT Page 10
THE      U.B YS S E Y
Friday, February 2, 1962
Bird winning streak
cooled off by Bears
—Photo  by  Les   Pal
SCRAMBLING UNDER BASKET with three UBC Thunderbirds
is Alaska forward Bill. Stauffer (20). Bird players are Court
Brousson and John Cook (left) and Dave Black (foreground).
Birds lose McDowell
—meet Vic pucksters
By GEORGE
The Thunderbird hockey
from the University eligibility
Low marks at Christmas
have forced former Vernon
fcimaiian player Mickey Me-;
Dowell to leave the team.
Birds wiil Iplay without him
Saturday night in Victoria
against Victoria College Vikings. ,'
Peter Kelly, Bob Parker,
and Denny Selder will be the
first line of attack; their chief
support will come from the
defence team of John MacLeod and Dave Leishman.
The second forward ' line
is Bruce Kitsch, Trevor Owen
and Gerry Kirschke. The third
line is Clint Smith, Glenn Parker and Chern Singh.
Singh, now in his fifth year
with the Birds, played on the
first line last season.
Kirschke, a winger, is an-,
other .possible ineligible player.
Bird coach Father David
Bauer, had  earlier  expressed
RAILTON
squad has received a blow
rules.
concern over the team's academic standing.
Father Bauer cancelled
practices for a week on the
team's return from the prairies, and ne n&s held practices to a minimum since then.
Birds play another exhibition game against the Chilli-
wack Steelheads at the Chil-
liwack Arena Saturday, Feb.
10.
They open their home league
schedule against the Saskatchewan Huskies Feb. 16.
Thunderbirds have failed to
place a player among the top
nine individual point geters.
Alberta's Austin Smith
leads with 11 points. He is
followed by four teammates.
The Golden Bear netminder-
has the best goals-against record—2.5 per game.
Thunderbird goalies have
let 38 pucks past them in the
four-league games ttjis season.
By HERB WALKER
Alaska   76,   UBC   74
UBC Thunderbirds, playing
their first Thursday noon-hour
game of the year, dropped a 76-
74 squeaker to University of
Alaska Polar Bears before more
than 1,000 students in Memorial
Gym.
It was UBC's first loss in their
last six gaimes.
Thursday's game, however,
was only the first of five scheduled for the coming week for
the Birds. Today and Saturday
at 8:30, Birds will take on powerful St. Martins from Seattle.
LOST  TOP  SCORER
Although St. Martin's coach,
Art Acuff has lost high scorer
Jack Hein from last year's varsity, he still has little Joe Monroe, a sharpshooting guard who
will give the Birds lots of
trouble.
They also have a big threat
in Jim Sims, a 6-6 centre with
a year's experience.
Jayvees will play preliminaries both nights starting at :30.
Next week will see the Peru
Olympic team make an appearance in War Memorial Gym. But
even Peru must be anticlimatic
after yesterday's game.
TbAinderbirds, hreaiking fast,
piled up an early lead. Led by
little Laurie Predinchuk, they
surprised Alaska with some accurate first quarter shooting,
taking a lead of 19-12.
FANTASTIC LAYUPS
Predinchuk beat his man for
a padr of fantastic layups to
start the ball rolling, and the
Birds never looked back. At
halftime, they led 39-35, and at
three-quarter time 60-54.^.
In the last quarter, however,
Birds were unable to contain big
Franz .Sperner of the Polar
Bears, who hit for ten big points
in the final ten minutes alone.
Sperner was the big thorn in
UBC's side all day, winding up
with 28 points, largely from a
brilliant assortment of driving
layups.
WAY SHOOTS WELL
The final half, in fact, almost
became a personal scoring duel
between Sperner and UBC's
Dave Way, who put on an outstanding display of shooting
while also leading Birds on the
boards.
Way hit for 13 points in the
last half, and ended up with 18.
Way shared the scoring honors
with Dave Black, who deftly
potted 16 points with his deadly
outside jumpshot. Predinchuk,
who for some unknown reason
saw very little action in the second half, ended up with 12.
LATE LEAD
The Polar Bears didn't take
the lead until 34 seconds before
the end of the game. A defensive lapse by the Birds allowed
Bill Sperl to drive in for an
easy two points and the game.
Birds still had 34 seconds to
tie the game, but an attempted
shot by John Cook was deflected
by Sperner, and Alaska gamed
possession.
SUMMARIES
Polar Bears (76)—gErstagth 3,
Weston 6, Leask, Waterson 8,
Brown, Mix, Sperl 8, Stanton 4,
Stauffer 19,  Sperner 28.
Birds (74)—Black 16, Lusk 4,
Way 18, Cook 8, Predinchuk 12,
Wellings 2, King, Nelson, Spencer, Brousson 7, Osborne 7, Williamson, Latta.
HOOP   STATS
STANDINGS
I'BC     2     0
4     134
96
Alberta     2     0
4     133
107
Sask 0     4
0     203
267
INDIVIDUAL     SCORING
G FG
FT  Pts
Avg
Van Vliet  (Alta)   2    12
Bredincliug'  (Be)   2     12
7     31
15:5
7     31
15.5
Lawson  (Sask)   ..4     20
S     4S
12
Way    (B.C.)           3.    10
4     24
12
Little   (Sask)    ...4     IS
10     46
11.5
Cook    (B.C.)             2       5
12     22
11
Brousson   (B.C.)   2       5
12     22
11
Mirvvald    (Sa :k)    4     14
15     43
10.S
FIELD   GOAL   PERCENTAGE
PGA
FG
PCT.
Way    (B.C.)     IS
10
.555
Predinchuk (B.C.)   .23
12
.52 2
Hieken   (Alta.)    14
i
.500
Lawson   (Sask.)    ....46
20
.435
Hakeman  (Alta.)   ...17
i
.411
Smith   (Alta.)    22
8
.364
1
.355
Brousson    (B.C.)    . . .26
.346
Van   Vliet   (Alta)    ..35
12
.343
Mirwald   (Sask)   ..     45
14
.311
TOTAL  REBOUNDS
GP
KB
AVG.
Dave Way   (B.C.)   ... 2
31
15.5
Gary   Smith   (Alta)    . .2
17
John Cook   (B.C.)   . . .2
17
S.5
Court Brousson (BC) 2
15
7.-5
Pat Lawson (S*ask.) . .4
27
6.7
FREE THROW PERCENTAGE
FTA
PTS
PCT.
Hioken (Alta)    6
6
1.000
7
v .875
D
8.33
Tourigrny  (Sask.)  ...13
10
.769
12
.750
Mirwald   (Sask.)    ...22
15
.682
Predinchuk (B.C.)   ..11
7
.636
PERSONAL rOULS
GF
PF
AVG.
Way   (B.C.)     .2
9
4.5
Lusk    (B.C.)      2
8
4
Cook  (B.C.)    2
7
3.5
Lawson   (Sask.)       4
14
3.5
Mirwald   (Sask.)     4
14
3.5
Hastings defeated UBC's junior women's basketball team
29-25 Tuesday at Winston
Churchill gym. Sue Hamilton
scored 11 points for UBC.
UBC Jayvees play the Olympic College Rangers in two
preliminary basketball games
tonight and Saturday.
The games start at 6:30 both
nights at Memorial Gym. The
Thunderbirds-St. Martin's senior
games start at  8:15.
LOSING RECORD
The baby 'Birds now sport a
4-7  won-lost  record after  their"
two  losses to the Alberni Athletics  last weekend. •
One consolation for coach Al
Yarr was the fine performance
by guard Earl Farenholtz, who
scored 41 points in two games.
He now has a total of 101
points for the year, an average
of  14.4" per game.
The Jayvees will have their
hands full -with the Rangers.
Head Coach Phil Pesco, in 14
years with the Olympic team,
has won six championships.
- The Rangers play such fine"
opposition as Seattle University
Frosh, University of Washington
Frosh, and the Cheney Studs, a
senior team.
TALL TEAM
Olympic College lists no less
than 39 players oii their roster
and have three 6-6 men listed.
The College is located in Brem*
erton, Washington, and has an
enrolment of 1,500.
FORT CAMP!   I
STUDYING TOO HARD?!
KEEP ASPIRIN WITH YOU
AT ALL TIMES
ASPIRINS!
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Reg.  to  $8.98. SALE PRICE - $4.97 and $5.97
Black or Brown, Suede or Leather.
Flats,  Jets, Illusion  or  High   Heels.
Charge Accounts Invited.
CAMPUS SHOE STORE
4442 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-3833
(Open 9 ■a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday to 9:00) ■Friday, February 2,  1962
THE      U BYSSEY
Page 11
SKI
TIPS
Lament of a Beginning Skier
I think that I shall never ski
Without encountering some
tree
And plots to land me on my
end
That lie in wait behind each
bend
I'm sure, unless the trees all
.    fall,
I'll never learn to ski at all.
The VOC bed-slat bash this
weekend is going to take
place at Steven's Pass in
Washington. This expedition
is the usual "annual event."
A bus will leave the oampus
Friday night with all paid
Bashers and Slats aboard,
and the same bus will return (hopefully) late Sunday
night.
' Although this trip is restricted to VOC members, a
trip to Steven's Pass is well
worth the effort. There is a
variety of slopes in differing
degrees of difficulty, and
three clhair-lifts provide
three choices of runs. But the
3est part of all is that it's
comparatively unciowded,
;o you don't have to worry
ibputaoai^trophic collision
;v*ry time you make a turn.
Vli'C SKI JH^OBT
J>CAL: Rain falling on
jrouse, Hollyburn, and Sey-
ripur has made all their runs
; li p p e r y . The outlook is
squally discouraging for this
weekend — more rain js fore-
:ast. ' _
JAKER: Conditions at Baker
ire just as bad as they are1
Rugby Birds to defend
McKechnie cup title
With only five minutes gone in the McKechnie Cup final
the Birds jumped out in front and never looked back.
their   finest
Playing one of
games of the year, they jumped
into a 11-0 lead before the Reps
had a chance to catch their
breath.
The Birds won 14-3 and as a
Big Block forms
available at gym
Awards cards for Men's
Big Blocks must be picked
up now at the gym by managers and coaches.
Deadline for completed
forms is Feb. 21.
SHORTS
o|ally.
A Wolkswagen was top car in
the Thunderbird sports car rally
last weekend. Winning drivers
Titmus and Nielson Second
place went to Jellet and Alexander in a Volvo.
In the small sedan class, Titmus and Nielson were winners.
Jellet and Alexander were first
in the big sedan class. In the
sports car class, Bay and Bell
took the small section and Grant
and Ashton the big car section.
IN SKIING—UBC's team is
off for Banff and the giant Intercollegiate ski meet sponsored by
the Government of Alberta.
Some of the teams competing
will be University of Washington, Montana State University,
University of Alberta, University of Nevada, and University
of Idaho.
IN GYMNASTICS — UBC
coach H. D. Whittle takes his
team to Seattle for a meet
against University of Washington Varsity. UBC has lost two
meets this year, to Eastern
Washington and Was hington
State. .
IN BASKETBALL Thun-
derettes play two weekend
games in Portland.
resuit of that game the Varsity
Reps were McKechnie Cup
champions.
MEET REPS AGAIN
That was last year's McKechnie Cup final and the defending
champion Birds will be out to
capture   the cup   once  again.
They play the Vancouver
Reps, at Brockton Oval at 2:30
Saturday.
The winner of Saturday's
;ame will play Victoria at Victoria's McDonald Park next Sat-.
urday for the B.C. title.
Birds are not in their best
-hape for this game. They will
;e missing their back row of the
scrum.
Some Birds like Peter Bugg
are out with injuries, while
others may be sidelined with the
flu.
But coach Albert Laithewaite
is optimistic and predicts a win
for the Birds.
TOP TALENT
"We are knee deep in talent,"
he said. He said he expects no
problem in replacements, and
will probably call up Gordie
Olafson and Ray Wickland from
the Braves.
BYRON   KEMP
. . . first loss
Grapplers
face Western
Paul Nemeth's UBC wrestlers
will accompany the swim team
to Bellingham for a return
match against Western Washington.
Last Saturday, Western came
through with an 18-16 win over
UBC in Vancouver. The Western meet also marked the first
time that Byron Kemp of UBC
has lost his match in the 191-lb.
class.
Bunny rejoins
UBC swimmers
«
Coach Dave Parsons has
added three new faces to his
swim team for a dual meet this
weekend.
Parsons, who lost top back- •
stroker Al Harvey last week,
came up with an able veteran,
"Bunny" Gilchrist as a replacement.
Other members who have
joined the team are veteran
diver Peter Pellatt and Tom
Spraggs, who specializes in freestyle sprints. Pellatt, last year's
WCIAU champion, won the diving last weekend in Edmonton.
Today, the Birds take on Western Washington College at Bellingham. Last year the Birds
won their • only meet against
Western.  Meet   time   is   2  p.m.
UNITED AIR LINES
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR
STEWARDESSES
For Spring and Summer Training  Classes
0-->;:i ■.•al oils', oinsie.—age 20 through 26; height 5'2" to
5'S", weigrht in proportion. Must be personable, attractive,
capa.ue or' dealing with the public, t'ome public contact
work  experience   beneficial.
IFTSRVIEWPB     ACCEPTING    APPLICATIONS     AT
CrEOESIA   HOTEL,   MEZZANINS.   FEBRUARY   14,
11:00  a.m. to 7:00 p.m.  -  FEBRUARY  15, 10:00 to  2 p.m.
feb.
For  further  information  ulease
write to United Air Lines Personnel   Department,   Seatle-Tacoma
Airport, Seattle 88, Washington.
ALL STUDENTS ARE URGED TO COME TO THE
Peace Research Institute Meeting
Tuesday, February 6, 8:00 p.m.
IN THE ARMOURIES.
Speakers include:
Dr. Norman Alcock - Founder of C.P.R.I.
Dr. Hugh Keenleyside - Chairman of B.C. Power
Commission
For Further Information Phone MU 2-4588 or
Write 1062 W. Georgia or Box 2249.
FLUNKING  ENGLISH?
Why not try newest method available as an educational aid.
Taped Tutorials
For English 100 and 200. This tried and proven method of learning is available
through personal and class instruction. Audio Visual Tutorage, pre-sleep and
sleep learning courses. Classes begin 6:30 p.m., Monday, February 5|h and
Wednesday, February 7th, 1962.
FREE — Public lecture on taped tutorials (English 100-200), February 2nd at
8:30 p.m., 2431 South Granville Street.
DON'T WAIT!  INVESTIGATE!
REgent 8-8012 TRinity 4-9532 EVENINGS
A-Z Institute of Personality Development.
Educational Division
2431   South Granville Street
Vancouver 9, B.C.
AIR LINES
Please send me complete information on Tape Tutorials (English 100-200);
NAME :—
ADDRESS	
TELEPHONE __ — _____— ,__	
A-Z  PERSONALITY INSTITUTE  OF  DEVELOPMENT
2431 South Granville Street Vancouver 9, B.C.
REgent 8-8012 - TRinity 4-9532 Evenings . Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, February 2, 1962\?
Iween chases
Skating party on Saturday
CHINESE VARSITY
Ice-Capers; rear rink of Forum, Hastings and Renfrew, Saturday, 9:30-11:30. Tickets at
door — everybody welcome.
* *       *
FINE ARTS DEPT.
Group of Seven — films on
Tom Thomson and F. H. Var-
ley: noon, today -in Bu. 102.
* *       *
CIRCLE K
Group Captain McNab on
Civil Defense. Noon today in Bu.
2218.
* *       *
SCM
The Mind and the Maker: English. 200 lecture on Pope by Dr.
Ian Ross. Monday, Bu. 100,
Noon.
* *       *
COMMUNIST CLUB
Hear Harold Pritchett speak
on '"Peaceful Co-existence" in
Bu. 100 noon today. All welcome.
. * . ...*:. .;■■'*. .
FROSH UNDERGRAD SOC
Pizza Feast and Shoe Shine
today in the Brock Lounge. For
a relief from that dry packed
lunch try Pizza — 25c. Shoe
shine—10c. Proceeds to the Red
Cross.
'RUSSIA'S NEXT}
'A For years, Finland has]
,f been under Russia's
■ thumb. But it may soon be
under Russia's boot, as well. In
this week's Saturday Evening.
Post, you'll ledfn how Mirth
shchev has putihe squeeze on
Finnish leaders. Mow he's even
hand-picked their next, president And what it will mean to I
Lus it K. takes over completely.
Th* Saturday Evening'
'lesst
ja«t a >«am..qo»t«»IMfj
UN CLUB
William Sheehan, president of
the Canadian World Federalists
will speak on "World Federalism — is it desireable, feasible,
possible? Bu. 205 Noon, Monday.
* *       *
GERMAN CLUB
"To Help Humanity": a film
an the Nobel prize winner,
Dr. Domagt, TB and cancer
scientist plus the "Recklinghaus
Miners'' and the latest newsreel.
Noon today Bu. 204.
"Enco unter with Germany"
Thurs. Feb. 8, at noon in Bu.
100.
* *       *
VCF
"Paul, the Rabi from Tarsus"
— a lecture today at noon in Bu.
106 by Mr. John Williams.
* *       *
NDC
Dr. B. Savery speaks on "A
Philosophy  for our  Time"   Bu.
217, noon, Friday.
*      *      *
JR. CHEM. CLUB
Dr. Frost speaks on "The Mass
S'p e c trometer", Friday, 12:30,
Chem. 250.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Two films in Bu. 202. The first
is on Van Gogh. Members free;
non-members 10c.
* *       *
COMMUNIST CLUB
Mr. Charles Caron speaks on
the topic "Canada for Canadians", Monday noon in Bu. 204.
All welcome.
* *       *
IH
Israeli Night at IH. Israeli
dances and songs. Non-members
25c.
* *       *
HAMSOC
John W: Oades of the Electrical Engineering Dept. will give
a series of lectures on parametric
amplifiers and low noise amplifiers of satellite signals Tuesday,
Feb. 6 in Bn. 203 at noon. All
interested are invited to attend.
* *      *'..;.•.'■
UBC LIBERALS
Dance in the Hance Club
Lounge (Brock Extension) Saturday, Feb. 3, 8:30 - 12:00. Admission 25c. Refreshments will
be served. Everyone is invited.
SPEOAL STUDENT RATES
COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE
Glasses Fitted
Contact Lenses
24-Hour Service OPTICAL Repairs
VANCOUVER BLOCK
MU 5-8928 — MU 3-2948
Main Floor
734 GRANVILLE ST.
Immediate Appointment
NEW WESTMINSTER - G75 COLUMBIA STREET
&
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE COMPANY, LIMITED
CELGAR LIMITED
Chemical - ENGINEERS - Mechanical
Columbia Cellulose operates a 400 ton/day sulphite dissolving pulp
mill near Prince Rupert and logging operations near Terrace. Celgar
operates a new 500 ton/day bleached kraft mill and integrated sawmill
near Castlegar, with logging headqaarters at Nakusp.
Both Companies are offering permanent employment to graduating
Chemical and Mechanical Engineers. Permanent openings may also
be offered in the Companies' Research & Development Division for
holders of a Bachelor's, Master's or Ph.D. degree in the pure sciences.
Both Companies are offering summer employment to undergraduates
about to enter 2nd, 3rd, or 4th year Chemical, Mechanical and
Electrical Engineering.
There may also be opportunities for summer employment in the
Research & Development Division for students in Honours Chemistry
about to enter 4th year or for students in Post-graduate study.
Company Representatives will be on the Campus for interviews.
FEBRUARY 5TH TO 9TH
—^■——^—^^^—■—^^—mmm 111—^—
If you are interested, please make an appointment through the
STUDENT  PLACEMENT SERVICE
OPEN DAILY 9-5:30; FRIDAYS 9-9; PHONE MU 1-6211
INCORPORATED  2*9   MAY   1670.
Georgia at Granville
y* x ■■' "■' **&&*
The NEW look you want for Spring.. in
comfortable, casual campus style cotton
SUM CHECKS
ONLY
9.95
PAIR
These neat and narrow trousers exemplify good
fashion, with natural fit, to take.you stylishly around
campus. Pleatless with self - supporting adjustable
waistband, no cuffs. 100% cotton in check patterns
in calpucs of brown, heather, green, black. Waist 28-38
USE YOUR PBA CARD at the Bay Career and Campus
Shop; second floor.
Also: HIPSTER CORDS by Days pair $7.95
available in  The Young  Men's Shop,  second  floor.
Shop Friday Night 'til 9 ... All Day Saturday

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